AuthorTopic: Spain Erupts in Riots  (Read 8252 times)

Offline Surly1

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Re: Spain Erupts in Riots
« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2012, 10:03:38 AM »
The riots should be occuring in Brussels.
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Offline agelbert

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Re: Spain Erupts in Riots
« Reply #16 on: July 12, 2012, 02:00:48 PM »
I'm with the people wrongly targeted by this "austerity" unjust attempt at fleecing the populace to feed the leaches and parasites that caused this problem in the first place.


THIS is the FIRST avenue of action a responsible government should persue BEFORE attacking main street. Of course, HERE in the USA our propaganda whores repeat over and over the LIE that making the rich (the real welfare queens) pay their fair share won't work because they already pay over 90% of the tax revenues. This monstrous lie is so convoluted and Orwellian with deliberately gamed definitions of what "income" is and what "tax revenue" is (they conveniently exclude sales tax from their calculations so the rich appear to pay the lion's share - a TOTAL fabrication) that it makes me want to puke every time I hear this fecal effluent once again be spewed out by our "propaganda on behalf of the 1%" machine. 

If the following was done with zeal all over this fucking planet, there wouldn't be any financial problems:
Quote
The homes of several high-ranking UBS employees in Strasbourg were also searched Tuesday, according to a French police source. The French prosecutor's office refused comment, saying the investigation was ongoing. The bank said it would cooperate.

Authorities here have cast a spotlight on UBS since 2009, when the U.S. and Swiss governments reached a settlement in the United States' efforts to get the names of thousands of wealthy Americans suspected of evading taxes by banking with the Swiss giant.

In Germany, tax officials are investigating about 5,000 clients of Credit Suisse over Bermuda-based life insurance products used by some wealthy clients to avoid taxes. The bank insisted it stopped selling the products in 2009.


http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-europe-banker-raids-20120712,0,6147753.story
« Last Edit: July 12, 2012, 05:40:36 PM by agelbert »
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Offline RE

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More Rain in Spain
« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2015, 11:20:17 PM »
http://www.internationalman.com/articles/catalonia-and-the-move-against-empires

Catalonia and the Move Against Empires

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Offline edpell

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Re: Spain Erupts in Riots
« Reply #18 on: November 03, 2015, 08:55:26 AM »
Anybody know the energy and food situation in Catalonia? Hydro? Solar? Wood? 50% food import?

Offline Eddie

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Re: Spain Erupts in Riots
« Reply #19 on: November 03, 2015, 10:44:34 AM »
What Catalans have...is money, industry, and a long tradition of independence, as well as a feeling of being superior to the rest of Spain. Spain, without Catalonia, would be a third world country.

The Catalan region has long been the industrial heartland of Spain – first for its maritime power and trade in goods such as textiles, but recently for finance, services and hi-tech companies.
It is one of the wealthiest regions of Spain - it accounts for 18.8pc of Spanish GDP, compared to 17.6pc from Madrid. Madrid, however, has a higher per capita GDP.
Secession would therefore cost Spain almost 20 per cent of its economic output, and trigger a row about how to carve up the sovereign’s 836 billion euros of debt.
It would have a gross domestic product of $314 billion (£195bn), according to calculations by the OECD, which would make it the 34th largest economy in the world. That would make it bigger than Portugal or Hong Kong.
Its GDP per capita would be $35,000, which would make it wealthier than South Korea, Israel or Italy.
And Catalonia's contribution to the Spanish economy is twice that of Scotland’s to the UK.
Food and football
It's not just in politics, economics and language that Catalans see themselves as different.
They are deeply proud of their food and their chefs, such as Ferran Adria, from El Bulli, and Jordi Cruz, who won his first Michelin star at the age of 25 – the youngest Spaniard to ever do so. El Celler de Can Roca was named the world's best restaurant for 2013, and is second this year.
And the footballing rivalry between Barcelona and Madrid is the stuff of legend – with "El Clasico", played biannually between the two teams, a huge event for both cities.

 


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/spain/11179914/Why-does-Catalonia-want-independence-from-Spain.html
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Offline Fenixor

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Re: Spain Erupts in Riots
« Reply #20 on: November 03, 2015, 11:06:36 AM »
They better get to work fast on their water situation, no water = no life

Offline Eddie

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Re: Spain Erupts in Riots
« Reply #21 on: November 03, 2015, 11:17:56 AM »
Is that graphic from a world map? Got a link? I think I want to check my local outlook.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Fenixor

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Re: Spain Erupts in Riots
« Reply #22 on: November 03, 2015, 11:22:12 AM »
No, its from Eurostat- Environmental department, so only covers Europe.

Offline Eddie

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Re: Spain Erupts in Riots
« Reply #23 on: November 03, 2015, 11:23:53 AM »
 I'm a full ten degrees of latitude south of Barcelona. I don't think I want to know anyway. :)
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Offline Fenixor

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Re: Spain Erupts in Riots
« Reply #24 on: November 03, 2015, 11:27:11 AM »
aha, sorry, haha
http://www.eea.europa.eu/data-and-maps/figures/annual-water-stress-for-present

Offline RE

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The Rain in Spain is a Hurricane
« Reply #25 on: September 16, 2017, 04:59:41 PM »
We don't NEED no Stinkin' Democracy!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/VqomZQMZQCQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/VqomZQMZQCQ</a>

RE

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-09-16/theyve-lost-plot-700-catalan-mayors-defy-spanish-government-amid-police-raids

"They've Lost The Plot" - 700 Catalan Mayors Defy Spanish Government Amid Police Raids

by Tyler Durden
Sep 16, 2017 2:45 PM


"The only thing I ask of (Catalan) mayors is that they comply with the law, and as such don’t participate in an illegal referendum," Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy urged this week, calling for a return to "rationality and legality" and promised to block the vote.

However, as Reuters reports, the mayors are not complying...

    More than 700 mayors from across Catalonia gathered in Barcelona on Saturday to confirm their support for a planned independence referendum that Madrid has declared illegal.

     

    The mayors met with Catalonia’s regional head Carles Puigdemont in a show of defiance, following Spanish prosecutors warning earlier this week that officials engaging in any preparations for the vote could be charged with civil disobedience, abuse of office and misuse of public funds.

     

    Barcelona mayor Ada Colau, who has reached an agreement with the Catalan regional government to allow voting in the city, criticized Madrid’s response to the crisis in a short speech in the city hall.

     

    “It’s a disgrace that we have a government that is incapable of dialogue and instead dedicates itself to pursuing and intimidating mayors and the media,” Colau said.

     

    So far, 740 of 948 municipal leaders have said they would allow municipal spaces to be used for the referendum, according to the Association for Municipalities for Independence (AMI).

As this was taking place, Reuters reports that Spanish police have raided several print shops and newspaper offices in recent days in a hunt for voting papers, ballot boxes and leaflets to be used for the referendum.

    The searches are part of a concerted effort by the government to prevent the ballot from going ahead, amid fears that a vote to break away could trigger a political crisis even if Spain does not recognize the outcome.

     

    “They’ve lost the plot,” said Albert Batet, mayor of the town of Valls and one of those summoned for questioning. “They are persecuting mayors, the press, printers. They are stretching the limits of democracy.”

     

    Catalonia’s president Carles Puigdemont, who faces criminal charges for organizing the referendum, says he has over 6,000 ballot boxes ready to deploy next month, but their whereabouts are a secret.

     

    “Right now, we have no idea where they are,” said Toni Castejon, spokesman for the Catalan police force union.

     

    On Friday, police confiscated 100,000 campaign leaflets in a raid in Catalonia, the Interior Ministry said, without saying where. Catalonia’s top court issued a warning on Friday to seven newspapers, many of them online, not to publish campaign notices for the referendum, a court spokesman said on Saturday.

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And furthermore, in its latest desperate move to stop the October 1 independence referendum, MishTalk.com's Mike Shedlock notes the Spanish Government is Poised to Seize Catalan Finances.

    Finance Minister Cristóbal Montoro said a mechanism had been approved for the state to take control of the autonomous region’s finances. Madrid is seeking to stop the Catalan government spending public money on its planned independence referendum.

     

    If the deadline is not met, the central government will take over the funding of most essential public services in the region, Mr. Montoro said.

     

    Catalan President Carles Puigdemont launched his campaign for a “Yes” vote on Thursday night in the town of Tarragona, telling a rally at a former bullring: “Vote, and in so doing bring light to darkness that has lasted for too many years.” The crowd shouted back, “Independence”, “We will vote” and “We’re not afraid”, AFP news agency reports.

     

    Public finances are a particularly sore point for Catalans who for years have contributed more to the state budget than they get back in spending on public services.

     

    More than 700 Catalan mayors who have agreed to help stage the referendum now face criminal investigation and police have been ordered by Spanish prosecutors to seize ballot boxes, election flyers and any other item that could be used in the referendum.

     

    The separatists have promised to declare independence within days if, as expected, the Yes vote prevails at the referendum.

Spanish Government Rejects Dialog Request

The Telegraph reports Spain threatens to cut funding for Catalonia over the independence referendum.

    The Spanish government on Friday dismissed a letter from Catalan leaders offering talks over their looming independence referendum as “a trap”, and announced it would intervene in Catalonia’s finances to ensure that “not one euro” of public money was used to fund the “illegal” vote.

     

    In the letter, addressed to Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy and King Felipe VI and carried by a number of media, the leaders said they were seeking talks “to make possible what in a democracy is never a problem nor still less a crime: to listen to the voice of the citizens”.

     

    At a press conference following a cabinet meeting, Mr Méndez de Vigo said the government considered it “a sarcasm” that “at this stage of the game” Catalan leaders were speaking of dialogue when “they have only put on the table a referendum yes or yes.”

     

    The spokesman also took aim at Ada Colau, the Barcelona mayor, over her support of the vote, warning she would be “responsible for her actions” and that she was “either with the law or against it”.

     

    The ministers also delivered an ultimatum for Mr. Puigdemont – sign an agreement that public funds would not be diverted for the referendum within 48 hours or the government would seize control of the part of the Catalan budget destined for services and salaries.

     

    A Metroscopia/El Pais poll published on Sunday found that 56 percent of Catalans think the referendum in its current form is illegal, and 82 percent – including 40 percent of voters for Mr. Rajoy’s PP – blame his government for “strengthening rather than weakening” independence forces.

Juncker in Hot water

EC president Jean-Claude Junker created quite a stir when he said the EU would respect a yes vote. His office now says he was misinterpreted.

It took several clarifications from Juncker to deny he said what he said.

Recall that Baseball great Yogi Berra said: “I never said most of the things I said.”

Also recall Jean-Claude Juncker is famous for his statement “When it becomes serious, you have to lie“.
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Offline RE

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Catalonia referendum: Spanish police target Catalan government
« Reply #26 on: September 20, 2017, 02:36:52 AM »
"Voting" to be "Free" is about as effective as taking a Sharpie to a piece of cardboard and writing a slogan on it.

It's the Hotel California.  You can Check Out, but you can NEVER LEAVE.

RE

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-41331152

Catalonia referendum: Spanish police target Catalan government

    1 hour ago
    From the section Europe


Image copyright AFP
Image caption A protest took place as police raided the Catalan economy ministry in the heart of Barcelona

Spain's Guardia Civil police have detained a senior Catalan official and raided regional government ministries involved in organising a banned independence vote.

Tensions were already high before the arrest of Josep Maria Jové, secretary-general of the Catalan vice presidency.

Catalan leaders are defying a court order to halt the vote, condemned by the Madrid government as illegal.

One official called for peaceful resistance to protect the buildings.

"The time has come - let's resist peacefully; let's come out and defend our institutions," the president of the Catalan National Assembly, Jordi Sánchez, tweeted.
'We will not allow it'

The economy, foreign affairs and presidency buildings were all targeted early on Wednesday, 11 days before the referendum.

The detained official's boss, Catalan Vice-President Oriol Junqueras, accused Spanish police of attacking the region's institutions and therefore its citizens too. "We will not allow it," he said.

The night before, Spanish police discovered a mass of documents directly related to the banned vote.

Catalan police officers, on patrol outside the building in Terrassa, scuffled with pro-secession protesters trying to block the street outside.

The Catalan government is trying to organise the 1 October referendum, in the face of determined resistance by the national government to prevent it going ahead.

The Madrid government has been backed up by Spain's Constitutional Court, which suspended the referendum law passed by the Catalan parliament.

    Spain plays cat and mouse as Catalan vote looms
    Catalonia's collision course with Madrid
    Spain poised to seize Catalan finances

Some 7.5 million people live in Spain's well-off north-eastern region. Although opinion polls have been rare, one survey commissioned by the Catalan government in July suggested that 41% of voters backed independence while 49% were opposed.
Stacks of boxes of envelopes found

One of the most important aims for the national authorities is to stop voting cards being sent out in the first place.
Image copyright AFP
Image caption Some 200 people prevented a judicial secretary from getting through

Among the documents seized in Terrassa were stacks of boxes containing some 45,000 envelopes with the Catalan government's logo. The envelopes were suspected of containing voting cards.

In earlier raids, only posters and other promotional election literature had been found.
Image copyright AFP
Image caption Police had tried to negotiate with the protesters
Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Scuffles broke out
Image copyright Reuters
Image caption The protesters were finally removed

A local judge in Terrassa authorised police to seize the envelopes and open one to assess whether a company official may have been involved in "misappropriating public money" for the 1 October vote.

Up to 200 local people gathered outside the Unipost offices, placing flowers on police vehicles. For more than two hours they stopped a local judiciary official from entering the building. Catalan police eventually intervened to let the official through.

The mayors of three small Catalan towns appeared in court on Tuesday on suspicion of helping the vote take place.

Spanish prosecutors have opened an investigation into more than 700 local mayors who have backed the referendum. If voting does go ahead, it will take place in Catalonia's schools and municipal buildings.

The Spanish government has also moved to take control of the region's finances, in an attempt to stop public money being spent on the vote.

A deadline for the Catalan leadership to abandon the vote has run out, with Spain preparing to take over funding of most public services, including the payment of workers' salaries.

However, the vice-president of the Catalan government, Oriol Junqueras, went to the Supreme Court on Tuesday to appeal against the decision. Accusing the national government of irresponsible behaviour, he said he was confident the appeal would in effect suspend Madrid's move.

The Catalan administration had all the resources it needed to meet its obligations, he said.
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Offline Surly1

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Re: Catalonia referendum: Spanish police target Catalan government
« Reply #27 on: September 20, 2017, 02:53:55 AM »
"Voting" to be "Free" is about as effective as taking a Sharpie to a piece of cardboard and writing a slogan on it.

It's the Hotel California.  You can Check Out, but you can NEVER LEAVE.

RE

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-41331152

Catalonia referendum: Spanish police target Catalan government

So your solution for the Catalonians is what? Go direct to armed insurrection? This from you, who never broke an egg.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: Catalonia referendum: Spanish police target Catalan government
« Reply #28 on: September 20, 2017, 03:08:05 AM »
"Voting" to be "Free" is about as effective as taking a Sharpie to a piece of cardboard and writing a slogan on it.

It's the Hotel California.  You can Check Out, but you can NEVER LEAVE.

RE

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-41331152

Catalonia referendum: Spanish police target Catalan government

So your solution for the Catalonians is what? Go direct to armed insurrection? This from you, who never broke an egg.

I suggest they all quit their jobs, stop paying taxes and start farming.

RE
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Offline RE

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Spain In Crisis: Catalan Police Reject Madrid Takeover, Vow To "Resist"
« Reply #29 on: September 24, 2017, 07:33:37 AM »
I wonder if the Catalan Gestapo will go mano-a-mano with the Madrid Gestapo?  ???  :icon_scratch:

RE

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-09-23/spain-crisis-catalan-police-rejects-madrid-takover-blasts-move-unacceptable

Spain In Crisis: Catalan Police Reject Madrid Takeover, Vow To "Resist"

by Tyler Durden
Sep 23, 2017 10:16 PM


Catalan minister Joaquim Forn (L) with Mossos chief Josep Lluís Trapero

Spain found itself on the verge of a full-blown sovereign crisis on Saturday, after the "rebel region" of Catalonia rejected giving more control to the central government in defiance of authorities in Madrid who are trying to suppress an independence referendum on Oct. 1.

As tensions rise ahead of the planned Catalan referendum on October 1, and as Madrid's crackdown on separatist passions took a turn for the bizarre overnight when as we reported Spain’s plan to send boatloads of military police to Catalonia to halt the referendum backfired with dockers in two ports staging a boycott and refused access, on Saturday Spain's Public Prosecutor's Office told Catalan Police chief Josep Lluis Trapero that his officers must now obey orders from a senior state-appointed police coordinator, Spanish news agency EFE reported on Saturday.

The Catalan Police, however, disagreed and as Bloomberg reports, the SAP union - the largest trade group for the 17,000-member Catalan Police, known as Mossos d'Esquadra - said it would resist hours after prosecutors Saturday ordered that it accept central-government coordination. The rejection echoed comments by Catalan separatist authorities.

“We don’t accept this interference of the state, jumping over all existing coordination mechanisms,” the region’s Interior Department chief Joaquim Forn said in brief televised comments. “The Mossos won’t renounce exercising their functions in loyalty to the Catalan people.”

The Mossos are one of the symbols of Catalonia’s autonomy and for many Catalans the prosecutor’s decision may be reminiscent of the 1936-39 Spanish Civil War and subsequent dictatorship of Francisco Franco, when the Mossos were abolished.

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In a joint press conference today with the Catalan home affairs minister Joaquim Forn and the Mossos chief Josep Lluís Trapero, Forn said that the move by Spain was "unacceptable".

“We denounce the Spanish government’s will of seizing the Mossos, as they did with Catalonia's finances" Forn said adding that that "the Catalan government does not accept this interference, it bypasses all the institutions that the current legal framework already has in place to guarantee the security of Catalonia." Additionally, Trapero expressed his intention to not accept the measure, which he described as "interference by the state", and also warned that "it skips over all the bodies of the legal framework to coordinate the security of Catalonia".


Earlier on Saturday, El Pais reported that Civil Guard Colonel Diego Perez de los Cobos, chief of staff of the Interior Ministry’s security department, was named by a prosecutor to coordinate the efforts of the Civil Guard, the National Police and the local Mossos.  Spanish media reported unnamed Home Office sources as saying the measure did not mean withdrawing any powers from the Mossos formally, but rather requiring them to submit to a joint coordination operation to stop the Catalan referendum taking place on October 1.

However, shortly after the reshuffling, Catalan police chief Josep Lluis Trapero rejected giving up control to the central government during a meeting with the heads of the other police forces on Saturday, adding that all possible legal challenges would be studied. According to La Vanguardia Trapero "protested at that meeting about the decision to impose central government control" on the regional police force.

Also on Saturday morning, as the police meeting in Barcelona took place, the regional interior minister, Forn, published a defiant message on Twitter: "We will encounter many difficulties. The state wants to take control of our self-government, but they will not stop us! #HelloRepublic".

    Ens trobarem amb moltes adversitats. L'Estat vol intervenir la nostra autonomia, però no ens aturaran! #HolaRepúbica pic.twitter.com/7Wdodq3AA0

    — Joaquim Forn (@quimforn) September 23, 2017

Ironically, as Bloomberg writes, while Mossos chief Trapero reports to the regional government, his force’s funding is mostly provided by Madrid and it’s supposed to take orders from judges and prosecutors from across the country. Article 155 of the Spanish Constitution lets the central government take control of a regional administration if it poses a threat to the national interest. Rajoy has already made moves in that direction.

Earlier this week, the budget ministry took over management of Catalan’s finances and will issue paychecks to more than 200,000 public workers in the region, including the police.

That said, any more direct challenge to the Mossos would be fraught with risk because Trapero, its leader, has become something of a local hero since leading the response to the terrorist attacks in August. Separatists are selling T-shirts with his face printed on them.

According to Reuters, the Catalan government also believes that the Mossos takeover bypasses the Catalan statute  - article 164 - and constitutional law and the Spanish prosecutor that ruled in favour of Madrid taking control had overstepped his legal boundaries, saying that it had no power to rule on who had the authority to issue orders to Mossos.

    The prosecutor had ordered that the Catalan police, the Spanish National Police and Spain's Guardia Civil be managed from the Ministry of Home Affairs in Madrid. The decision, according to the prosecution, aims at "reinforcing the operation to prevent crime and to keep public order" a week before the October 1 independence referendum.

     

    The decision was announced during a meeting between the prosecutor and the chiefs of the three police forces.

The disobedience will fuel further speculation the Mossos will not work with the national Civil Guard in Spain’s largest regional economy. The standoff came a day after Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy’s government acknowledged it’s sending more reinforcements to help control street demonstrations and carry out a separate court order to halt the vote.

Additionally, the latest move by Madrid will also increase the tension between the two sides which increasingly looks like it could descend into a direct confrontation as neither side appears to be willing to back down.


Catalan President Carles Puigdemont speaking a pro-independence rally

Carles Puigdemont, Catalonia’s president, called the independence vote in an attempt to push the secession movement forward after decades of political and legal fights over the region’s traditions and language. Since Rajoy took office in 2011, he’s had persistent clashes with separatists seeking to foment a backlash against Madrid. Catalonia is home to about 7.5 million people, or 16 percent of the population, but accounts for a fifth of the economy, on a par with Portugal and Finland.

Several pro-independence groups have called for widespread protests on Sunday in central Barcelona. “Let’s respond to the state with an unstoppable wave of democracy,” a Whatsapp message which was used to organize the demonstration read.

The Catalonian government opened a new website on Saturday with details of how and where to vote on Oct. 1, challenging several court rulings that had blocked previous sites and declared the referendum unconstitutional.

“You can’t stem the tide,” Catalonia’s president Carles Puigdemont said on Twitter in giving the link to the new website.

But Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy insisted again that the vote should not go ahead. “It will not happen because this would mean liquidating the law,” he said at the PP event in Palma de Mallorca. Acting on court orders, the Spanish state police has already raided the regional government offices, arrested temporarily several senior Catalan officials accused of organizing the referendum and seized ballot papers, ballot boxes, voting lists and electoral material and literature. The finance ministry in Madrid has also taken control of regional finances to make sure public money is not being spent to pay for the logistics the vote or to campaign.

How this escalating clash between Madrid and Catalonia is resolved over the coming week will define the fate of Spain for years to come.
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