AuthorTopic: 🛬 Death of Aviation: Last Flight of the 747  (Read 3496 times)

Offline RE

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🛬 An American Airlines VP reveals why the Airbus A380 doesn't work
« Reply #75 on: April 25, 2019, 02:16:43 AM »
https://www.thisisinsider.com/american-airlines-exec-reveals-why-company-doesnt-use-airbus-a380-2019-4

An American Airlines VP reveals why the Airbus A380 doesn't work for the world's biggest airline
Benjamin Zhang


Airbus A380 Airbus

    The Airbus A380, which can carry more than 800 passengers, is the largest airliner in the world. At $445.6 million, the double-decker is also the world's most expensive passenger jet.
    Airbus announced in February that the A380 would cease production in 2021 because of insufficient demand.
    According to American Airlines' vice president of planning, Vasu Raja, the A380 is too big for the airline's route network.
    With a fleet of more than 950 aircraft, American Airlines is the world's largest airline, but it doesn't use massive central hubs as some other airlines do.
    Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories

With a capacity for more than 800 passengers, the Airbus A380 is the largest airliner in the world. At $445.6 million, the double-decker is also the world's most expensive passenger jet.

The gargantuan jet, dubbed the superjumbo, was designed to take on Boeing's iconic 747 and push the limits of modern engineering.

Unfortunately for Airbus, the superjumbo never developed into the game changer the company had hoped for when the massive jet was conceived more than two decades ago. This is especially the case on the financial front.

Airbus struggled for years to find airlines willing to buy the jet before finally throwing in the towel earlier this year when it announced that the A380 would cease production in 2021.

As it turns out, the A380's greatest asset, its gargantuan size, may have made it simply too large for most airlines.

Read more: The 20 biggest airlines in the world, ranked

According to American Airlines' vice president of planning, Vasu Raja, the Airbus A380 was even too large for the world's biggest airline. American Airlines operates a fleet of 956 aircraft.

"The Boeing 777-300 is the biggest-size airplane that fits into our network," Raja told Business Insider.

American's Boeing 777-300ERs are configured with 304 seats. To put that in perspective, British Airways A380s fly with 165 more seats than that, while some Emirates A380s fly with 300 more seats.
American Airlines Boeing 777 300ERAn American Airlines Boeing 777-300ER. American Airlines
Planes like the A380 are designed to feed large numbers of passengers into a central hub where they are connected to destinations around the world. Most of the plane's operators possess this trait. For example, Emirates has Dubai, Singapore Airlines has Changi, Qatar has Doha, and Korean Air has Incheon.

"Take British Airways for example: For them, they funnel the world into London Heathrow and send them forth," Raja said. "They are probably the only airline where the A380 legitimately makes economic sense. They are also the largest operator of the Boeing 747 for the same reason."

According to Raja, who is in charge of developing American's global network strategy, the airline's multihub strategy makes the A380 a tough sell.

Read more: The end is near for the Airbus A380 superjumbo jet. Here's how it went from airline status symbol to reject in just 10 years.

"The reality is that we don't just funnel all of our traffic into one hub," he said. "We operate out of nine different hubs in the US, and because of that there's no single hub where you can pool 500 people's worth of demand every single day and go make that work."

Raja added: "If you could do it, you'd do it on a few routes but not enough to go buy the 20 or 30 or 40 airplanes you would need in order to justify having the infrastructure of an airplane like that."
British Airways Airbus A380A British Airways Airbus A380. British Airways

And that drills down to the core of the issue.

When airlines buy planes, the investment reaches far beyond the aircraft itself.

"The first issue would be whenever we buy airplanes, especially a new airplane type, is the amount of infrastructure it takes to go and support it," Raja said. "You need to have a dedicated pool of pilots, a pilot-training regime, fixed maintenance, a maintenance program around it, a certain amount of spare parts."

"All of that is a huge degree of fixed cost, so want to have that scale over a number of units," Raja added.

Read more: An American Airlines executive reveals why its exposure to the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max has been limited.

At the end of the day, the A380's cost, infrastructure needs, and pressure to generate passenger demand make the plane too much of a risk for American.

"It's hard to see a place where you're worth it taking that kind of expense with that kind of demand, and even if the yields are all right, you can take a good market and make it negative pretty fast," Raja said.
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Offline RE

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Those computers better not quit when I fly down to the Lower 48 for my annual carbon burning frenzy!

RE

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/alaska-airlines-american-airlines-jetblue-computer-outages/

Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, JetBlue impacted by computer outages


By CARRIE MIHALCIK

Updated on: April 30, 2019 / 12:27 AM / CNET

A "technical issue" with a booking and reservation system used by several US airlines again caused delays and headaches at airports across the country Monday.

"Earlier today, Sabre had a brief technical issue that impacted multiple carriers, including American. This technical issue has been resolved," said American Airlines in an emailed statement. "We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience."

The outage hit the Sabre flight reservation and booking system used by several major airlines, including American Airlines, JetBlue and Alaska Airlines. Sabre said the systems are "back online and customers are reporting normal or close-to-normal operations," but didn't say what caused the problem.

"We understand how frustrating system outages are and we sincerely apologize for the disruption. No downtime is acceptable," the company said earlier in an emailed statement.

he same Sabre system experienced an outage in March.

"Due to a Sabre issue impacting multiple airlines, JetBlue customers may experience issues with booking or check-in on jetblue.com, airport kiosks, or our mobile app," JetBlue said in an emailed statement.

Travelers and would-be customers took to social media to vent about problems trying to book travel or check in for flights. Passengers reported outages at several major hubs, including San Francisco International, Los Angeles International and O'Hare International in Chicago.

"Spokesperson for ⁦@AlaskaAir just announced an all systems outage. Planes are ready, computers are down," tweeted Twitter user Alex Williams.

"@AmericanAir computers are down nationwide. Nobody can check in or board and all flights r grounded. Long lines at Chicago O'Hare #ORD #AA," tweeted user Chris.

"All JetBlue computers down at LAX —no Boarding passes can be written no luggage can be checked. LAX is bedlam nothing is moving. @JetBlue #jetblue," tweeted user Astrology Zone.

Alaska Airlines didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.
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🛬 Qantas Ultra Long Haul Flights – The A350 vs 787 vs 777X
« Reply #77 on: May 02, 2019, 12:14:08 AM »
https://simpleflying.com/qantas-ultra-long-haul-flights-the-a350-vs-787-vs-777x/

Qantas Ultra Long Haul Flights – The A350 vs 787 vs 777X

 

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🛬 Bizness Travel on Air France
« Reply #78 on: May 04, 2019, 01:51:24 AM »
It's BIZNESS!  Tax Deductable!

This is how average Rich Fucks who can't afford their own Private Jet fly.

RE

https://www.businessinsider.com/air-france-airbus-a380-800-business-class-review-2019-5

I flew in business class on Air France's Airbus A380, the world's biggest passenger jet, and the experience is what I imagine the golden age of air travel was like

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I flew in business class on Air France's Airbus A380, the world's biggest passenger jet, and the experience is what I imagine the golden age of air travel was like

 
 
I think it's so cool seeing how mammoth the plane is when you board on two jetbridges. Boarding an Air France Airbus A380. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

Review banner

  • Flying in business class on Air France's Airbus A380 round-trip between New York and Paris was a treat.
  • The airline has only five superjumbo jets in operation, and Airbus recently announced it would cease making any new ones.
  • Travel junkies have lauded the A380 for how quiet it is. I couldn't believe how soundproof the mammoth double-decker plane was.
  • Here's what the journey was like, from check-in to the lounge to the flights themselves.
  • Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories.

I'm rarely excited to get on a plane. These days, flying feels more like a chore. Airlines are packing more and more seats in planes to boost profits, and passengers are crammed in as tight as can be. If you didn't know your neighbor before you got on the plane, you sure do by the time you get off.

But for a recent trip to Europe, I flew in business class on Air France's Airbus A380-800, the legendary superjumbo jet. I'd never been on a double-decker plane, and I was so excited!

Read more: The $446 million Airbus A380 superjumbo is the largest and most expensive airliner in the world. Take a look inside.

From check-in to the airport lounge to the seamless boarding process to the plane ride itself, Air France's attentive service, delicious food, and thoughtful amenities made flying a luxury.

But the A380 is a dying breed. Airbus announced in February that it would discontinue production of the model, and Air France said last fall that it would get rid of five of its 10 superjumbos and retrofit the other five. As Business Insider's correspondent Benjamin Zhang has written, the plane is simply "too big, expensive, and inefficient for most operators."

I usually fly Delta, and we booked round-trip tickets between New York and Geneva through it, so I ended up getting almost 14,000 SkyMiles for my flights. Air France and Delta are partners in a transatlantic joint venture that allows them to jointly market their flights and share costs. The highlight of the journey was flying on the superjumbo from New York's John F. Kennedy Airport to Paris' Charles de Gaulle Airport.

Here's what it was like to fly in business class round-trip on Air France's A380-800.

 

After I whisked through priority check-in and TSA PreCheck, then waded through the hustle and bustle of JFK's Terminal 1, the Air France lounge beckoned with the promise of exclusivity.

After I whisked through priority check-in and TSA PreCheck, then waded through the hustle and bustle of JFK's Terminal 1, the Air France lounge beckoned with the promise of exclusivity. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

The Air France employee at check-in asked if I wanted my dinner in the lounge or on the plane. The airline now offers this "night service" option for its two latest overnight flights, AF009 and AF011, so you can go right to sleep once you board.

The Air France employee at check-in asked if I wanted my dinner in the lounge or on the plane. The airline now offers this Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

Source: Air France

 

I arrived as the sun was setting over the New York skyline, and the atmosphere felt truly magical. I was surprised by how few people were in the lounge when I arrived, but it filled up as we got closer to takeoff.

I arrived as the sun was setting over the New York skyline, and the atmosphere felt truly magical. I was surprised by how few people were in the lounge when I arrived, but it filled up as we got closer to takeoff. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

It seemed like upstairs was reserved for those in business or first class who were having dinner, while downstairs was open for other passengers with status, but I couldn't be sure. There was better food upstairs too.

It seemed like upstairs was reserved for those in business or first class who were having dinner, while downstairs was open for other passengers with status, but I couldn't be sure. There was better food upstairs too. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
 

A recurring theme of flying Air France was that everything started with Champagne.

A recurring theme of flying Air France was that everything started with Champagne. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

There was also a full bar available, with liquor, wine, water, soft drinks, and coffee from the Nespresso machine.

There was also a full bar available, with liquor, wine, water, soft drinks, and coffee from the Nespresso machine. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
 

The bread selection was divine. New York water plus French proclivity for making bread for the win.

The bread selection was divine. New York water plus French proclivity for making bread for the win. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
 

The salad bar was probably the best I've ever seen in an airport lounge, full of fresh ingredients.

The salad bar was probably the best I've ever seen in an airport lounge, full of fresh ingredients. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

The cheese and dessert bars were equally as impressive. The toffee tart was my favorite thing I ate in the lounge.

The cheese and dessert bars were equally as impressive. The toffee tart was my favorite thing I ate in the lounge. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
 

Time for the main course! We opted to have our dinner in the lounge since we were there so early and wanted to eat at a real table. The options were beef brisket, vegetables in tomato sauce, pollock, or chicken.

Time for the main course! We opted to have our dinner in the lounge since we were there so early and wanted to eat at a real table. The options were beef brisket, vegetables in tomato sauce, pollock, or chicken. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

I chose the pollock and immediately regretted it. It had an overwhelmingly fishy taste, and I abandoned it after two bites. At least the pesto was vibrant and the potatoes were tender. I was also surprised it was simply an airplane meal on a nice plate. I was expecting something more restaurant-quality.

I chose the pollock and immediately regretted it. It had an overwhelmingly fishy taste, and I abandoned it after two bites. At least the pesto was vibrant and the potatoes were tender. I was also surprised it was simply an airplane meal on a nice plate. I was expecting something more restaurant-quality. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
 

Luckily, there was enough to fill up on with the salad, cheese, and dessert bars. I also figured I could eat a proper main course on the plane.

Luckily, there was enough to fill up on with the salad, cheese, and dessert bars. I also figured I could eat a proper main course on the plane. As you can see, I ate nearly all the toffee tart before remembering to take this photo. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

When boarding, passengers on the upper deck went into one gateway, and those on the lower deck went into another. Being in business class, we waltzed right in with no line.

When boarding, passengers on the upper deck went into one gateway, and those on the lower deck went into another. Being in business class, we waltzed right in with no line. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
 

Here's what an Air France Airbus A380 looks like in daylight.

Here's what an Air France Airbus A380 looks like in daylight. DANIEL SLIM/AFP/Getty Images

Time for the flight! Here were our seats; I was by the window. Air France A380s boasts 80 business-class seats, all on the upper deck. In total, the plane has 516 seats, including nine first-class suites.

Time for the flight! Here were our seats; I was by the window. Air France A380s boasts 80 business-class seats, all on the upper deck. In total, the plane has 516 seats, including nine first-class suites. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

Source: SeatGuru

 

The business-class cabin had six seats per row, in a 2-2-2 configuration, so everyone had ample space. I would suggest choosing one of the two window bays if you're traveling with someone, and choosing the middle bay if you're alone. The middle bay has two aisle seats, so you don't have to climb over someone you don't know (or have them climb over you).

The business-class cabin had six seats per row, in a 2-2-2 configuration, so everyone had ample space. I would suggest choosing one of the two window bays if you're traveling with someone, and choosing the middle bay if you're alone. The middle bay has two aisle seats, so you don't have to climb over someone you don't know (or have them climb over you). Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

Source: SeatGuru

One of my favorite features was that a labeled hanger was left at every seat. It avoided the awkward moments when you're holding your coat wondering whether a flight attendant will take it.

One of my favorite features was that a labeled hanger was left at every seat. It avoided the awkward moments when you're holding your coat wondering whether a flight attendant will take it. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
 

I could not believe that the bin by the window fit my entire giant travel purse, which I originally got for an old 24-inch laptop.

I could not believe that the bin by the window fit my entire giant travel purse, which I originally got for an old 24-inch laptop. There were two bins under the window: one for the window seat, and one for the aisle seat. However, it would be awkward to use if you were in the aisle seat and didn't know your seatmate. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

In total, each seat had five bins: two between the seats, one under the footrest, one next to/behind the seat, and one by the windows.

In total, each seat had five bins: two between the seats, one under the footrest, one next to/behind the seat, and one by the windows. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
 

I was kind of bummed by how small the tray was and that it was the kind that came out of the armrest. But the flight attendants put a tablecloth over each one for meal service, which classed it up.

I was kind of bummed by how small the tray was and that it was the kind that came out of the armrest. But the flight attendants put a tablecloth over each one for meal service, which classed it up. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

While I remembered the seats being advertised as "lie flat," I found that it was only partially true. We decided that the seats do reach 180 degrees, but they're canted at an angle. Air France's website calls them "angle flat" seats.

While I remembered the seats being advertised as Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

Source: Air France

 

You can lie almost flat. During the night, I found myself slipping down toward the footrest a few times. That and the turbulence interrupted my sleep a few times.

You can lie almost flat. During the night, I found myself slipping down toward the footrest a few times. That and the turbulence interrupted my sleep a few times. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

But I loved the cocoon-style seats. Anything that makes it so the person reclining their seat in front of you doesn't impede your space is a win in my book.

But I loved the cocoon-style seats. Anything that makes it so the person reclining their seat in front of you doesn't impede your space is a win in my book. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
 

I always find airplane seat material scratchy. Since Air France doesn't offer sheets, I scored an extra blanket to line the bottom of the seat so I could lie on it for extra softness and cushion. I also got an extra pillow to make it feel more like a bed.

I always find airplane seat material scratchy. Since Air France doesn't offer sheets, I scored an extra blanket to line the bottom of the seat so I could lie on it for extra softness and cushion. I also got an extra pillow to make it feel more like a bed. This was the next morning, so the seat isn't reclined all the way. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

The amenities were of good quality. Each business-class passenger got a set of socks and slippers for the flight.

The amenities were of good quality. Each business-class passenger got a set of socks and slippers for the flight. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
 

The amenity kits had a sleep mask (thank God since I forgot mine!), a pen, earplugs, a floss pick, a mini hairbrush, a toothbrush, toothpaste, and Clarins lotions.

The amenity kits had a sleep mask (thank God since I forgot mine!), a pen, earplugs, a floss pick, a mini hairbrush, a toothbrush, toothpaste, and Clarins lotions. The amenity kits available this year are celebrating Air France's 85th anniversary. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider

The TV screen was a good size — here's a magazine for scale. While the entertainment options weren't nearly as varied as Delta's, there were still a handful of new releases in English that I wanted to watch.

The TV screen was a good size — here's a magazine for scale. While the entertainment options weren't nearly as varied as Delta's, there were still a handful of new releases in English that I wanted to watch. Rebecca Harrington/Business Insider
 

One cool feature was that you could add shows to your list of favorites before takeoff so your choices were all queued up by the time you were ready to watch them in the air.

jQuery(document).ready(function($){jQuery(function(){jQuery("#msg_173574").css("overflow-y", "hidden");});});
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🛬 ANA’s new-look A380 hints at sophisticated 777-9 design
« Reply #79 on: May 06, 2019, 12:17:59 AM »
Virgin Atlantic's "Upper Class" still looks like the best configuration.

If you look at what's happening here, airlines are downsizing their planes and reconfiguring them to fly more $RICH$ 🤑 people as the middle class tourista bizness dwindles.

RE

https://runwaygirlnetwork.com/2019/05/04/all-nippon-airways-new-look-a380-hints-at-sophisticated-777-9-design/

ANA’s new-look A380 hints at sophisticated 777-9 design

 

ANA’s new-look A380 hints at sophisticated 777-9 design

ANA’s Airbus A380 interior is designed for the leisure Hawaii market but the broader look shows ANA evolving to a more sophisticated brand. ANA is seeking innovation for its forthcoming Boeing 777-9s since its last major cabin design is a decade old and has been adopted by other airlines.

The A380 for ANA marks a bigger leap in the airline’s design evolution than upping the ante in the still-notable A380 product war. Yet comparisons to other A380s are unequal since ANA’s A380 will exclusively fly to Hawaii. That dictates a more practical cabin (including, in ANA’s case, a multi-functional room which can be used for breastfeeding moms).

First class gets a big upgrade on the A380, but ANA is conservative. “We could have designed a more gorgeous product,” ANA cabin products & LOPA manager Katsunori Maki tells Runway Girl Network. “This aircraft is not going to New York or Frankfurt. It’s flying 7-8 hours, Tokyo-Honolulu back and forth.”

Flight time and schedules mean passengers are looking to have a nap, “not deep sleep,” Maki says.

But other parts of the A380 underscore ANA’s design evolution: first class doors, more premium economy seats, and darker hues as airlines increasingly favor toned-down colors to connote premium (see Lufthansa’s new livery). To wit, ANA’s Boeing 787-10 entering service later this month has the same business class as the A380.

ANA has again selected Jamco to provide its first class seat, and, as mentioned, is debuting a door with the seat on the A380, albeit one not as high as the old Emirates first or even Qatar’s QSuite.

Aisle traffic is well visible.

Passengers can still see traffic over the new doors. Image: Will Horton

More practical is the wider seat and unobstructed windows – three in row one and two in row two. (Some faulted ANA’s 777 first product for being too narrow and difficult to look out of the windows.)

ANA A380 first class seat with wider seat and easy access to windows and door. Image: Will Horton

Ahead of first class in the A380’s dead space, ANA has a galley monument on top of which is a self-service bar featuring a dark blue background, wood slats on either side, and finishes of dark gray and an almost copper-looking metal.

At worst it is eye-pleasing, and at best it is stunning, the design passengers might expect of a Japanese airline, and a hint of the sophistication ANA is embracing.

First class bar. Image: Will Horton

It is tempting to visualize this design elsewhere so more passengers can enjoy it, such as at the entry door galleys. These are given a light wood finish with beige pull-down screens that make the space bright but also dull.

ANA A380 main deck entry galley is bright but simple. Image: Will Horton

ANA’s flat-bed business seat is normally staggered so center occupants have privacy. But on the A380, the center seats are together in alternate rows for couples traveling together.

The business class LOPA helps you to visualize the alternating rows of paired seats for couples. Image: ANA

There is also a very tall privacy divider for non-couple center seats. Yet ANA did not opt for doors in the A380 business class, with Maki saying, “We want to offer privacy but also offer openness, especially for center seats.”

Business class seat displaying its tall divider. Image: Will Horton

Blue in business class is a subdued approach. The hue is darker and used around the shell. The seat cover is gray and the side console has a wood laminate, metal rim and gray lower shell. This more thoughtful design replaces the previous blue-and-white.

 

Mood lighting is designed to match Hawaii-themed bulkheads like beaches and night stars. This can come across as kitsch, but in person is more abstract.

ANA notes the A380 design is “totally different” from the rest of its fleet. The bulkhead artwork and green lines on some economy seat covers are different, and Couchii is a family-oriented economy product that ANA does not expect to offer on other aircraft, where leisure and family travel is lower.

Even so, some key design features, and the overall tone could be adopted on other types. We do know that ANA’s future 777-9 will not have the center couple seats of the A380; ANA wants to maximize privacy.

Business class doors are in fact a discussion point. “It is a passenger request now,” Maki says. “Maybe we will have it on future aircraft.”

Meanwhile, ANA is looking to innovate its business class for the 777-9 since its last major business product, the introduction of direct aisle access, “is getting standard”, notes the ANA executive.

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🛬 Qantas To End Final Transpacific Boeing 747 Route
« Reply #80 on: May 09, 2019, 03:22:00 AM »
This story really hits home for me.  The San Francisco-Sydney route on Qantas is the one I took most of my 747 flights on, and the only ones I flew First Class when dad the Pigman was living down under.  The only other 747 I flew was NY-London on my Honeymoon with the ex-wife, that was coach class.  It's tempting to book one of these last flights for nostalgia purposes, but they don't have the upstairs lounge on them they used to have in the 70s.  So I'll take a pass on that one for the Bucket List.

An era is coming to a close here, it's happening in real time as we keyboard.  The end of the Age of Oil is upon us now.

RE

https://simpleflying.com/qantas-boeing-747-us/

Qantas To End Final Transpacific Boeing 747 Route

by Nicholas Cummins
    May 8, 2019


Qantas 747-400 at LAX. Photo: Qantas.

Qantas has set a date for its last transpacific Boeing 747 flight in December this year, as reported by Airlinegeeks.com

The route from Sydney to San Francisco, flown by a Boeing 747-400 for the better part of 50 years, will now see its service replaced by a Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner.

When is the last flight?

Qantas has locked in December 3rd as the last Boeing 747 flight. QF73 will fly from Sydney to San Francisco, and then onwards without passengers to the Californian desert for retirement.

This last trip follows the retirement of the craft from the Sydney – Los Angeles route back in 2018. Once a regular appearance at LAX, the Qantas 747 Longreach Jumbo last flew in from Brisbane ending a family of routes that also included Sydney and Melbourne.

Qantas has two 747-400s and six 747-400ERs still in service in their fleet. Each one carries 364 passengers.
What will replace the 747?

Qantas has placed a brand new 787-9 on the route. The Dreamliner, one of six new aircraft that is being delivered to fuel the international expansion of the airline, will afford far better fuel efficiency and, in some opinions, a better passenger experience.

This is the same aircraft that flies the direct Perth to London route.

The one major downside is a loss of capacity on the route. With 100 fewer seats now available, Qantas has taken a move that may mean increased prices for passengers as less demand can be filled. It remains to be seen if Qantas will increase the frequency of services to compensate. But for now, there are plenty of transpacific alternatives (Fiji Airways A350 anyone?).
Qantas 787 Dreamliner
The 787 Dreamliner has done very well for Qantas so far. Photo: Qantas

The new 787-9 new aircraft will also feature the new Qantas business class and premium economy.

The new Qantas business class is a big upgrade from what is currently available on the 747. With 42 true lie flat seats on board, each has a pitch of 46 / 80 inches (seating/bed mode) and is quite wide at 24 inches. Each seat also has direct aisle access and a privacy screen.

Also onboard are 28 of the new Qantas premium economy seats. These have a pitch of 38 inches, but the best part is better food and a larger entertainment screen. But there are only a few seats onboard and thus tend to sell out quite quickly.

With only 236 passengers onboard, the density of this aircraft is a far cry from the usual 290+ we see on other carriers (looking at you, KLM, with your 294 passengers).
Where is the remaining Qantas 747 still flying to the USA?

But fear not, there is one last Qantas 747 flying over the Pacific. The Sydney to Hawaii route saw an extension back in 2018 for the 2019 summer/winter season, as reported by Australian Business Traveller.

The route is normally flown by an Airbus A330, and it seems Qantas wanted to upgrade capacity to the island destination.

As we say goodbye to the 747 around the world, it reminds us of the golden days of aviation, of giant planes that were bigger than anything we had seen before, connecting cities across vast oceans and being a highlight for any first-time flyer.

This author personally flew on this route back in 1994 and remembers with delight his tour to the cockpit aboard the Qantas 747. You will be missed!

What do you think? Will you fly on the Qantas 747 one last time?
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Let the scavenging begin!

After they get all the still valuable parts off the behemoth, how do they get the rest of it to the Airplane Junkyard?  ???   :icon_scratch:

RE

https://www.businessinsider.com/airbus-a380-superjumbo-being-scrapped-for-parts-after-orders-dry-up-2019-5

A380 superjumbos are already being scrapped for parts just months after Airbus announced their discontinuation


Marcin Walków and Ruqayyah Moynihan, Business Insider Polska

Airbus A380 Airbus announced it would be terminating production of the A380 jet by 2021. Airbus

    According to Reuters, models of the A380— also known as the superjumbo and considered Airbus' flagship passenger carrier — are now being dismantled for parts.
    This move comes just months after Airbus announced they would be discontinuing the aircraft after orders dried up.
    Forbes columnist Michael Goldstein explained that the aircraft is not only costly itself but it's also expensive to run.
    Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The A380, also known as the superjumbo and considered Airbus' flagship passenger carrier, has been in production since 2007.

One of the most expensive and lavish jets ever made, the aircraft — originally designed to replace Boeing's 747 — is able to seat up to 800 passengers.

According to Reuters, however, two models of the world's largest passenger carriers are now being broken down for their valuable components, just months after Airbus announced it would be terminating production of the jet by 2021.

According to Reuters, the scrapping of the two of the planes started in December 2018, just halfway through their expected lifetime.

The dismantling of the two double-deckers — which Singapore Airlines returned after using for 10 years — is already underway at the Tarbes Lourdes airport in southern France.

235 of the passenger carriers have been manufactured and there are currently still 233 of them in use.

Read more: The $446 million Airbus A380 is the largest and most expensive airliner in the world. Take a look inside.

Air France also announced last November that it would be returning five of its A380s when their leases expire in 2021, according to Traveller.com.

Images from social media outlets show engines being dismantled as well as one plane missing its nose cone, where the radar would usually sit. As well as this, doors to the passenger cabin and the hold have also been removed.
The end of the superjumbo

Unfortunately, the jet hasn't generated the interest Airbus had hoped it would — the company found that airlines willing to put the A380 into service are in short supply.

According to Forbes columnist Michael Goldstein, the aircraft is not only pricey in itself but it's also costly to run: "In addition to demanding airport modifications for its huge passenger load and million-pound bulk, economics demand that it be flown full to pay its enormous hourly costs," he said in 2018.

As well as being inefficient, for a lot of airlines the models are just too large for many routes to make a profit from.
Emirates Airbus A380For a lot of airlines, the A380 models are just too large for many routes to make a profit from. Airbus

According to News.com.au, airlines have the option either to buy planes outright or to lease them.

While buying an A380 leaves airlines with the option of selling them to another airline farther down the line, it can cost anywhere between $300 million to $500 million.

Leasing them, on the other hand, allows the plane to be taken back once one airline is finished with the plane, to be leased back out to another airline.

Some airlines, however, are replacing A380 orders with other models from the Airbus range, predominantly the A350 and A33neo. Therein lies the problem — there are few airlines interested in taking on a discounted A380.

Read more: Ryanair's CEO says we'll see 'pilot-less planes' in the next 40 to 50 years

Until a few months ago, the number of orders for the aircraft had surpassed 310. As of April 30, 2019, the total number of orders for the A380 was just 290, including those that had already been delivered to airlines.

This means that just over 50 of the aircraft have been ordered for production.

However, since hundreds of A380s have already been manufactured and the planes have a lifespan of over 20 years, they won't be entirely disappearing from the skies for a while.
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