AuthorTopic: Official EV Carz Thread  (Read 32621 times)

Offline azozeo

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Re: EV Carz - From The Mouth of A Man That Doesn't Like Electric Carz
« Reply #255 on: April 29, 2019, 12:09:09 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/NZhV-V6nSWo&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/NZhV-V6nSWo&fs=1</a>

Elon fears the release of this 600hp German Beast  :coffee:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Not a good week for Elon to stop snorting Ajax. 

RE

https://nypost.com/2019/05/10/tesla-ceo-elon-musk-faces-trial-for-calling-thai-rescue-diver-a-pedo/

Tech
Tesla CEO Elon Musk faces trial for calling Thai rescue diver a ‘pedo’


By Associated Press

May 10, 2019 | 7:33pm
Enlarge Image
Elon Musk speaks before unveiling the Model Y at the company's design studio in Hawthorne, Calif.
Elon Musk AP
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LOS ANGELES — Tesla CEO Elon Musk will have to go to trial to defend himself for mocking a British diver as a pedophile in a verbal sparring match that unfolded last summer after the underwater rescue of youth soccer players trapped in a Thailand cave.

A federal court judge in Los Angeles set an Oct. 22 trial date in a Friday court filing that rejected Musk’s attempt to dismiss a defamation lawsuit filed by British diver Vernon Unsworth.

Musk called Unsworth a “pedo” in a July 15 post on this Twitter account after Unsworth, in an interview with CNN, dismissed Musk’s attempts to help rescue the soccer players as a “PR stunt.” Unsworth also derided the submarine that Musk had built for a rescue mission, prompting Musk to lash back on this Twitter account, which had 22.5 million followers at the time

Musk contended his insult was protected from legal action, but the judge overseeing the case disagreed.

Unsworth is seeking more than $75,000 in damages from Musk, a multibillionaire. The suit also seeks a court order prohibiting Musk from making any further disparaging comments.

This is the second time in less than a year that Musk’s free-wheeling comments on Twitter have saddled him with legal headaches.

Last year, Musk and Tesla reached a $40 million settlement of allegations that he misled investors with a tweet declaring he had secured financing for a buyout of the electric car maker. He then had to go to court earlier this year to defend himself against assertions that he had violated an agreement with the Securities and Exchange Commission about his tweeting.
Filed under elon musk ,  lawsuits ,  Thailand cave rescue
« Last Edit: May 11, 2019, 03:50:47 AM by RE »
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Offline azozeo

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Re: Official EV Carz Thread
« Reply #257 on: May 13, 2019, 12:59:59 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/qINrctNCowU&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/qINrctNCowU&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Re: Official EV Carz Thread
« Reply #258 on: May 13, 2019, 01:34:12 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/qINrctNCowU&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/qINrctNCowU&fs=1</a>

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/8O8_FMhW9dY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/8O8_FMhW9dY</a>

RE
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Offline azozeo

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Re: Official EV Carz Thread
« Reply #259 on: May 13, 2019, 01:36:43 PM »
LMAO  :emthup:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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EV Carz - Laps at Weissach in the Taycan
« Reply #260 on: May 14, 2019, 04:45:13 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/O2s68co4Xw8&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/O2s68co4Xw8&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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🔌 Tesla Stock Dives After NTSB Drops Model 3 Autopilot Bombshell
« Reply #261 on: May 18, 2019, 12:09:27 AM »
This would be a good week for Elon to start Snorting Cyanide.

RE

https://www.ccn.com/tesla-stock-nosedives-after-ntsb-drops-model-3-autopilot-bombshell

Tesla Stock Dives After NTSB Drops Model 3 Autopilot Bombshell


Tesla stock nosedived on Friday after a bombshell NTSB report revealed that a fatal Tesla Model 3 crash occurred while the vehicle's self-driving Autopilot system was engaged. | Source: REUTERS / Tyrone Siu

Tesla Stock Dives After NTSB Drops Model 3 Autopilot Bombshell
Harsh Chauhan 17/05/2019 News, Op-ed, U.S. Business News


By CCN: Elon Musk, the CEO of embattled electric vehicle giant Tesla, believes that self-driving cars will propel the company to obscene heights. But the National Transportation Safety Board’s (NTSB) latest investigation into a Tesla Model 3 crash suggests that Musk is far from realizing his dreams, and that report is taking a toll on Tesla stock.
NTSB Bombshell Raises Questions About Tesla Autopilot

The NTSB’s investigation found that Tesla’s Autopilot system was engaged for 10 seconds before a Model 3 fatally crashed into a semitrailer on March 1.

    “The driver engaged the Autopilot about 10 seconds before the collision. From less than 8 seconds before the crash to the time of impact, the vehicle did not detect the driver’s hands on the steering wheel. Preliminary vehicle data show that the Tesla was traveling about 68 mph when it struck the semitrailer. Neither the preliminary data nor the videos indicate that the driver or the ADAS executed evasive maneuvers.”

    $TESLA $TSLA so essentially all these crashes due to the #autopilot makes the humans the ultimate "crash test dummies" for Tesla to study from huh 🤔😖📉🚘… $XTN $SPY #Tragic
    Tesla on autopilot crashed when driver's hands were not on the wheel – CNN https://t.co/uUrr3jQkkh

    — Afurakan Emporium (@AfrakanEmporium) May 17, 2019

This is not the first instance where Tesla’s acclaimed self-driving system has been involved in a fatal crash. An Apple engineer passed away last year after his Model X drove into a traffic barrier while Autopilot was engaged.

Three years ago, a Tesla Model S driver was killed after crashing into a tractor-trailer while utilizing the famed Autopilot system that’s supposed to help Elon Musk’s company hit a $500 billion valuation.
Tesla: Keep Your Hands on the Wheel!
tesla autopilot steering wheel

Despite Elon Musk’s robotaxi ambitions, Tesla cautions that drivers need to keep their hands on the wheel when using Autopilot. | Source: Shutterstock

Critics placed the blame squarely at the feet of Autopilot.

    “This system can’t dependably navigate common road situations on its own and fails to keep the driver engaged exactly when needed most,” said David Friedman, a vice president for advocacy at Consumer Reports.

Nevertheless, Tesla doubled down on the safety of its Autopilot system, issuing the following retort:

    “Tesla drivers have logged more than one billion miles with Autopilot engaged, and our data shows that, when used properly by an attentive driver who is prepared to take control at all times, drivers supported by Autopilot are safer than those operating without assistance.”

The company added:

    “[The driver] immediately removed his hands from the wheel. Autopilot had not been used at any other time during that drive.”

If it’s the case that Autopilot cannot be used safely if drivers take their hands off the wheel, Elon Musk needs to tone down his rhetoric about deploying 1 million robotaxis by 2020 and focus on making Tesla’s self-driving system safer and more efficient.

The billionaire Tesla CEO claims that the company is “vastly ahead” of others in the self-driving space. But the latest incident gives us more proof that its autonomous driving system is “zillions of miles” away from achieving Musk’s lofty goals. This reputation could dent sales of Tesla’s cars and send the stock price lower.
NTSB Report Deals Tesla Stock (And Elon Musk) Another Setback

Speaking of Tesla stock, it fell 4.32% on Friday, likely in response to the NTSB’s worrisome report.
tesla stock price chart

TSLA shares took a nosedive on Friday after the NTSB raised questions about the safety of the Autopilot system. | Source: Yahoo Finance

Sales of Tesla cars are already slowing down, as Q1 delivery numbers demonstrated. This is likely why top investors are dumping the stock and analysts are reducing price targets.

But instead of offering investors a sober outlook and fixing the company’s problems, Elon Musk continues to try to win over the market’s confidence by touting a self-driving system that still requires drivers to keep their hands on the wheel.

That’s not the right way to go, and Musk’s quest for fame and love of rhetoric will come at a huge cost if Autopilot’s inability to keep drivers engaged isn’t sorted out — human lives and shareholder money.
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Offline RE

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Forget Shooting Up Cyanide.  This is a good week for Elon to go on an IV Drip.


RE

https://www.theverge.com/2019/5/17/18629214/tesla-autopilot-crash-death-josh-brown-jeremy-banner

Tesla didn’t fix an Autopilot problem for three years, and now another person is dead


Sizing up two fatal Tesla crashes and the questions they raise about Autopilot
By Andrew J. Hawkins@andyjayhawk May 17, 2019, 1:34pm EDT


Image: NTSB

On May 7th, 2016, a 40-year-old man named Joshua Brown was killed when his Tesla Model S sedan collided with a tractor-trailer that was crossing his path on US Highway 27A, near Williston, Florida. Nearly three years later, another Tesla owner, 50-year-old Jeremy Beren Banner, was also killed on a Florida highway under eerily similar circumstances: his Model 3 collided with a tractor-trailer that was crossing his path, shearing the roof off in the process.

There was another major similarity: both drivers were found by investigators to have been using Tesla’s advanced driver assist system Autopilot at the time of their respective crashes.

Autopilot is Level 2 semi-autonomous system, as described by the Society of Automotive Engineers, that combines adaptive cruise control, lane keep assist, self-parking, and, most recently, the ability to automatically change lanes. Tesla bills it as one of the safest systems on the road today, but the deaths of Brown and Banner raise questions about those claims and suggest that the Tesla has neglected to address a major weakness in its flagship technology.
"There are some big differences between the two crashes"

There are some big differences between the two crashes. For instance, Brown and Banner’s cars had completely different driver assistance technologies, although both are called Autopilot. The Autopilot in Brown’s Model S was based on technology supplied by Mobileye, an Israeli startup since acquired by Intel. Brown’s death was partly responsible for the two companies parting ways in 2016. Banner’s Model 3 was equipped with a second-generation version of Autopilot that Tesla developed in house.

That suggests that Tesla had a chance to address this so-called “edge case,” or unusual circumstance, when redesigning Autopilot, but it has, so far, failed to do so. After Brown’s death, Tesla said its camera failed to recognize the white truck against a bright sky; the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) essentially found that Brown was not paying attention to the road and exonerated Tesla. It determined he set his car’s cruise control at 74 mph about two minutes before the crash, and he should have had at least seven seconds to notice the truck before crashing into it.
"Tesla had a chance to address this so-called “edge case,” when redesigning Autopilot, but it has failed to do so"

Federal investigators have yet to make a determination in Banner’s death. In a preliminary report released May 15th, the National Traffic Safety Board (NTSB) said that Banner engaged Autopilot about 10 seconds before the collision. “From less than 8 seconds before the crash to the time of impact, the vehicle did not detect the driver’s hands on the steering wheel,” NTSB said. The vehicle was traveling at 68 mph when it crashed.

In a statement, a Tesla spokesperson phrased it differently, changing the passive “the vehicle did not detect the driver’s hands on the steering wheel” to the more active “the driver immediately removed his hands from the wheel.” The spokesperson did not respond to follow-up questions about what the company has done to address this problem.

In the past, Tesla CEO Elon Musk has blamed crashes involving Autopilot on driver overconfidence. “When there is a serious accident it is almost always, in fact maybe always, the case that it is an experienced user, and the issue is more one of complacency,” Musk said last year.

The latest crash comes at a time when Musk is touting Tesla’s plans to deploy a fleet of autonomous taxis in 2020. “A year from now, we’ll have over a million cars with full self-driving, software, everything,” he said at a recent “Autonomy Day” event for investors.

Those plans will be futile if federal regulators decide to crack down on Autopilot. Consumer advocates are calling on the government to open up an investigation into the advanced driver assist system. “Either Autopilot can’t see the broad side of an 18-wheeler, or it can’t react safely to it,” David Friedman, vice president of advocacy for Consumer Reports, said in a statement. “This system can’t dependably navigate common road situations on its own and fails to keep the driver engaged exactly when needed most.”
"“Either Autopilot can’t see the broad side of an 18-wheeler, or it can’t react safely to it”"

Car safety experts note that adaptive cruise control systems like Autopilot rely mostly on radar to avoid hitting other vehicles on the road. Radar is good at detecting moving objects but not stationary objects. It also has difficulty detecting objects like a vehicle crossing the road not moving in the car’s direction of travel.

Radar outputs of detected objects are sometimes ignored by the vehicle’s software to deal with the generation of “false positives,” said Raj Rajkumar, an electrical and computer engineering professor at Carnegie Mellon University. Without these, the radar would “see” an overpass and report that as an obstacle, causing the vehicle to slam on the brakes.

On the computer vision side of the equation, the algorithms using the camera output need to be trained to detect trucks that are perpendicular to the direction of the vehicle, he added. In most road situations, there are vehicles to the front, back, and to the side, but a perpendicular vehicle is much less common.

“Essentially, the same incident repeats after three years,” Rajkumar said. “This seems to indicate that these two problems have still not been addressed.” Machine learning and artificial intelligence have inherent limitations. If sensors “see” what they have never or seldom seen before, they do not know how to handle those situations. “Tesla is not handling the well-known limitations of AI,” he added.

Tesla has not yet explained in detail how it intends to fix this problem. The company releases a quarterly safety report about the safety of Autopilot, but that report is short on details. That means experts in the research community don’t have hard data that would allow them to compare the effectiveness of Autopilot to other systems. Only Tesla has 100 percent understanding of Autopilot’s logic and source code, and it guards those secrets closely.

“We need detailed exposure data related to when, where, and what conditions drivers are leveraging Autopilot,” said Bryan Reimer, a research scientist in the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics, in an email to The Verge, “so that we can begin to better quantify the risk with respect to other vehicles of a similar age and class.”

Other Tesla owners have spoken out about Autopilot’s problem of perceiving trucks in the vehicle’s path. An anonymous Twitter user who uses the handle @greentheonly “hacked” a Model X and posts observations on Twitter and YouTube. They did this to “observe Autopilot from the inside,” they said in an email to The Verge. In March, their Model X encountered a tractor-trailer perpendicular to their path, similar to both Brown and Banner. The vehicle would have tried to drive underneath the truck had the driver not intervened.

According to @greentheonly’s data, the semi was not marked as an obstacle. But they decided not to tempt fate: “I did not try to approach the trailer and see if any of the inputs would change (but I bet not).”
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Offline RE

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🔌 Tesla’s stock is getting beat up this year.
« Reply #263 on: May 23, 2019, 12:56:13 AM »
This would be a good week for Elon to cash out his Tesla stock, buy a sailboat and join the crazy Norseman sailing the North Sea.

RE


By CCN: Tesla’s stock is down another 6% today, the sixth consecutive session TSLA shares have fallen. It is now down 40% year-to-date.
Tesla stock chart

Tesla’s stock is getting beat up this year. | Source: Yahoo Finance
Tesla Car Price and Stock Price Are Both Falling


Tesla’s stock is getting hammered today because of the company’s announcement that it is cutting prices on older model S and X vehicles. Merrill Lynch put out a note expressing concern that sales on those models have peaked and are losing market share to its own Model 3.

Analysts are starting to get a clue that Tesla’s stock has always been a sucker’s bet, with Morgan Stanley lowering its worst-case scenario price target to $10:

    “Our revised bear case assumes Tesla misses our current Chinese volume forecast by roughly half to account for the highly volatile trade situation in the region, particularly around areas of technology, which we believe run a high and increasing risk of government/regulatory attention.”

Citi lowered its Tesla stock price target to $36:

    “The recent capital raise was a positive step but won’t necessarily get the balance sheet out of the woods if Tesla cannot achieve FCF targets. So the recent reported internal memo, which seemingly called into question prior guidance, didn’t help the risk/reward calculus. The implications can be serious, since an automaker’s balance sheet is always subject to the confidence “spiral” risk.”

The Tesla Honeymoon Is Over

Tesla’s stock had defied gravity for years even as problems with its cars mounted. From cars spontaneously bursting into flames to auto-driver crashes to production delays and shortages of parts, Tesla and Elon Musk managed to paper over all of these problems.

Yet things finally took a turn when Tesla’s cash burn caught up with it, forcing the company to draw down additional funding a few weeks ago after reporting a disastrous loss of $702 million in the first quarter. This loss came on the back of a 30% decline in quarterly deliveries of vehicles over the previous quarter.

Some of this decline is the result of the $7,500 tax credit being cut in half, once again proving that rent-seeking Elon Musk built his empire on the backs of government subsidies.
Consumer Reports Eviscerated Elon Musk

Then, a high-profile scolding from Consumer Reports, which slammed Elon Musk and Tesla for putting investors over safety, appeared to stick:

    “We’ve heard promises of self-driving vehicles being just around the corner from Tesla before. Claims about the company’s driving automation systems and safety are not backed up by the data, and it seems today’s presentations had more to do with investors than consumers’ safety.”

Elon Musk has been able to sweep all of Tesla’s problems under the rug with the help of bullish water carriers who insisted that TSLA should be valued as a tech stock and not as a manufacturer with endless problems.
Tesla Competition Is Also Heating Up

It’s not just internal problems that have been dogging Elon Musk. The rest of the auto world is the shark chasing his tail, as companies like BMW continue to pursue their own electric vehicles.

It appears that Wall Street is finally awakening to the scam that Tesla stock is and that Elon Musk is no longer the Teflon chief.

Lawrence Meyers

Lawrence Meyers has published over 2,500 articles on finance and policy at outlets including Breitbart.com, Investorplace, WyattResearch, LearnBonds, Lifezette.com, TownHall.com, U.S. News & World Report, and The New York Observer.

This article was edited by Gerelyn Terzo.
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Offline RE

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Wait till they put these techno-gimmicks in Big Rigs!  Then you'll really see a show!  :o


RE

https://www.forbes.com/sites/lanceeliot/2019/05/26/tesla-on-autopilot-rams-into-stalled-car-on-highway-expect-more-of-this/#5599965c4fe5

May 26, 2019, 11:28am
Tesla On Autopilot Slams Into Stalled Car On Highway, Expect More Of This

Lance Eliot
Contributor
Transportation


What it looks like to come upon a stalled car ahead of you, frightening and a driver's nightmare. Getty

Here’s a driving situation that I’m guessing most of us have all experienced at one time or another. You are driving along on a highway or freeway, moving at a relatively fast clip (say 60 miles per hour, the prevailing speed and as matched with other nearby cars), surrounded by a mild amount of traffic, but nothing so onerous as to bog down the overall flow of vehicles.

A car to your left unexpectedly decides to dart into your lane, cutting down on the distance you had from the car directly ahead of you. It’s one of those situations wherein the driver seems to want to swiftly go across multiple lanes of traffic, perhaps belatedly realizing that there is an off-ramp coming soon that they want to reach, and they had not been astute enough to gradually make their way over to the rightmost lane. The driver then makes another lane change, doing so into the lane to your right, now clearing the path ahead of you. Keep in mind that all of this is happening in a matter of a handful of seconds, everyone moving at 60+ mph during the course of this series of eye-blinkingly brief events.

Upon the driver having shifted into the lane to your right, you can now see more readily what’s ahead of you in your particular lane. Here’s the rub. Turns out that there is a car in your lane, up ahead of you, which has either come to a crawl or might even be entirely halted, possibly stalled on the highway or freeway. Because the other car had somewhat momentarily blocked your view, you had not been able to see that this stalled car was a menace-in-waiting to you and your car.

You don’t know whether the driver that had cut in front of you might have seen the stalled car and decided to make a quick escape, or whether they were merely completing their effort to get over into the rightmost lane for purposes of exiting at the next off-ramp. Either way, that driver has left you now holding the bag (a dangerous one, for sure!).

Essentially, you’ve been handed a hot potato. As recap, you were zooming along in your lane, and there is a car sitting in your lane, motionless, waiting to get smashed into by you, which you had not detected until the last moment, partially due to an interloper.
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This is the moment that many drivers hope will never arise, yet it likely happens to many drivers, possibly with some substantial frequency, particularly if you are a daily driver that puts ample mileage on your car while commuting to work (I encounter these kinds of situations about once or so every two weeks, during my hour and a half long commute each day, each way, for work).

Typically, you maneuver out of the situation, often barely, by the skin of your teeth, though with about 6,300,000 car accidents occurring annually in the United States, some proportion of car crashes are undoubtedly due to this kind of inadvertent setup.

In a reported recent incident, a Tesla on Autopilot (according to the driver) rammed into a stalled vehicle on a highway, doing so while the Tesla was moving along at a speed of around 60 mph, and the crash occurred in a manner akin to what I’ve just described as a driving scenario.

According to the driver of the Tesla, another car cut in front of him, staying there fleetingly, then moved rapidly over to the next lane, and within moments it became apparent that a car was stalled up ahead, and he and his Tesla were going to ram right into it, full force. He and his Tesla did so, and luckily he lived to tell the tale.

It might be instructive to consider how this kind of a crash occurred and what it portends for Tesla drivers using Autopilot, along with ramifications for autonomous self-driving driverless cars in general.

Diagnosing What Happens In Stalled Car Crashes

Let’s take out our Sherlock Holmes magnifying glass and try to ferret out salient characteristics of these kinds of automobile-based death-defying (though sometimes death resulting) incidents.

As I earlier suggested, sometimes you can maneuver out of the situation, while other times there is not any viable recourse and you get pinned into ramming into the stalled car.

Consider these two key elements:

• Specific context in the moment. The context of the specific driving predicament is a big factor in what will transpire since it determines what options might be viable and which ones are not.

• Driver mindset and actions. The thinking processes and actions of the driver are another crucial consideration for how the circumstance will play out.

If you try to hit your brakes, the question arises as to whether you can come to a stop in time, though even if you cannot come to a halt soon enough to prevent ramming of the stalled car, at least if you can ratchet down speed off your car you are going to reduce the likely amount of danger and resultant damage that can occur when you rear-end the other vehicle.

Beyond dealing with the speed of your car, you might perhaps swerve into another lane, either to your left or to your right, allowing you to either avoid entirely the stalled car, or maybe only sideswiping it, rather than plowing into it head-on.

Of course, the swerving action might be blocked by other cars that are to your left or right. Or, you might be able to do the swerve, yet other cars in the left or right lanes will then be disrupted by your movement into their lanes, possibly getting them directly involved in the pending crash. This often results in a domino-like cascade of cars hitting each other, doing so to avoid the sudden swerve that you made.

From the driver’s perspective, it is important to consider how much time did they have to take a potential avoidance kind of action and were they cognitively attune to have been able to use that time as best possible.

In other words, a human driver can be caught off-guard, and even if there was sufficient time to do something, the person might either become mentally confounded or be shocked into a state of being frozen, not sure of what to do, and potentially wasting those precious few seconds when an action might have made a significant difference to the outcome.

Now, let’s add into this scenario the use of automation, focusing on Advanced Driver-Assistance Systems (ADAS), and see how that changes the picture.

Semi-Autonomous Cars And The Co-Shared Driving Task

When reviewing an incident involving ADAS, and especially for those cars that are considered semi-autonomous, meaning they are not yet at a true autonomous level, not being at Level 5, and in the case of the Tesla Autopilot being at a considered Level 2, you need to imagine that there are essentially two drivers of the car, the human driver and the semi-autonomous automation.

What did your co-shared semi-autonomous driving “partner” do?

In theory, the Tesla Autopilot should not have been susceptible to a mind-freeze that a human being might have and would have unemotionally and computationally calmly calculated the matter. This would involve detecting the object ahead, and interpreting that the object was not moving, and ascertaining that the Tesla was moving toward the stalled object and would intersect (badly) with it, and then try to figure out what action to take.

According to the reported incident, the Autopilot did not engage the brakes. If so, we should be asking, why not? As a minimum, at least the Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB) should presumably have engaged.

Also, apparently the Autopilot did not try to swerve the car and avoid or reduce the head-on impact, which once again we are left to ask why it did not do so? Was it because it failed to consider utilizing any quick-maneuver options? As a side note, the Tesla manual warns that the Autopilot might not well handle these kinds of situations, though I have more to say about that aspect in a moment herein.

This incident further raises the question as to whether or not Tesla ought to be using LIDAR, a mash-up of light and radar that is a sensory device used by nearly all other autonomous car makers. Would a LIDAR device have potentially aided in detecting the stalled car? It is possible that a LIDAR unit, especially if positioned on the top of the vehicle, would have had an added chance of detecting the upcoming calamity, providing what I refer to as an essential omnipresence capability for the automation attempting to aid in driving the car.

On another notable facet of the incident, the human driver says that there was insufficient time for him to react.

Let’s make clear that this does not give the Autopilot a freebie in terms of suggesting that it too did not have time to react. The human driver might genuinely believe that he had insufficient time (he might be right, he might be mistaken), but the automation, working at the speed of onboard computers, could potentially have had time to do something. Plus, we’re removing the human mental coagulation time out of the equation when considering what the Autopilot automation system might have had time to do.

There is also a chance that the human driver might have assumed that the Autopilot was going to aid in the driving, doing so at this key or decisive moment, and thus the human driver might have instinctively delayed their own actions, spurred consciously or subconsciously under the assumption that their co-shared automation-based “driver” would come to their rescue.

Conclusion

Tesla typically points out in these kinds of incidents that it is the human driver that is responsible for the car, no matter what the Autopilot automation does or doesn’t do.

That’s a seemingly easy means to swipe away any possible limitations of the automation.

Plus, for human drivers, it is difficult to continually keep a mindset that you are presumably the captain of the ship, retaining ultimate responsibility, which is somewhat mentally undermined when you know that you have your second-in-command running things for you, the Autopilot, and then all of sudden, bam, turns out that you were supposed to be the one handling the controls (a Catch-22, as it were).

Furthermore, this kind of setup of Human-Machine Interaction (HMI) belies the aspect that the human driver might believe that the automation is going to do something, in spite of the human driver being informed possibly long-ago or as found in some owner’s manual that they cannot rely upon the automation. Human nature cannot be so readily overturned by merely telling someone to ignore their instincts or overcome what might have become an ingrained habit.

I have repeatedly forewarned that as we encounter the emergence of Level 2 with ADAS and Level 3 semi-autonomous cars coming into the marketplace, there will be a lot more of these kinds of incidents involving a co-shared human-machine driving effort that inevitably falters or fails to take what might have been suitable action to avoid or reduce a car crash.

Regrettably, get ready for more of this and brace yourself accordingly.

Lance Eliot
Contributor

I am Dr. Lance B. Eliot, a world-renowned expert on Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML). As a seasoned executive and high-tech entrepreneur, I combine...
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Offline RE

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🔌 Tesla's Catastrophic Miscalculation
« Reply #265 on: May 30, 2019, 02:00:50 PM »
This would be a good week for Elon to diversify into building solar powered Tornado Shelters and move into one of them.

RE

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4267030-teslas-catastrophic-miscalculation

Tesla's Catastrophic Miscalculation
May 29, 2019 12:10 PM ET|


About: Tesla, Inc. (TSLA)
Renegade Investment Research
Renegade Investment Research
Dividend growth investing, gold, long-term horizon, contrarian
(162 followers)
Summary

The recent Tesla capital raise can only be described as the actions of a panicked CEO, backed into a corner of his own making.

Autonomy Day was supposed to convince the investment world about the ‘future’, but was an utter patent failure.

Underscored by recent revisions and updates to investment cases and the introduction of bear cases that price Telsa as a common auto-manufacturer.

The obvious time to ‘set the table’ and then execute a capital raise was 2Q-2018 into 3Q-2018, where the world was Elon’s Model 3 toy store.

Could the departure of recent CFO Deepak Ahuja be, in part, a result of a failure of the CEO to listen to the common sense counsel and sound business acumen provided by a loyal ally regarding timing of a capital raise?

Parching a dry (cash in hand) throat

Tesla (TSLA) closed its most recent capital raise on May 15th collecting approximately $2.7 B of cash from a sale of ~3.55 MM shares coupled with a 2% convertible senior note raise of $1.84B. Per the 8-K filed in support of this capital raise, the conversion price on the senior note is the equivalent of $309.83 per TSLA share, with the shares issued being priced at approximately $243 each.

After the poor 1Q-2019 financials which saw a Net Income (loss) of $668 MM, despite delivering 63,000 vehicles, and a decrease in Net Cash & Equivalents of $1.594 B (after the repayment of the failed 0.25% Convertible Senior Notes 2019 offering), this cash injection was the proverbial gallon of water guzzled down into the belly of dehydrated bank accounts. Reported Cash and Cash Equivalents at the end of Q1 were $2.20 B, with Accounts Receivable at $1.05 B. This matched up almost one to one with the Accounts Payable balance of $3.25 B.

Halfway through 2Q-2019 and the jury is still out on whether there will be a significant demand recovery for TSLA vehicles. We should have the Insideevs.com view of May 2019 US deliveries within the next 7-10 days, followed by information on Europe and China deliveries tracked by a cadre of valued Seeking Alpha contributors not long thereafter. With the various and well documented price cuts to various TSLA models in Q1, at a high level, these would appear to have held relatively constant in Q2 (without news of a series of price increases). This however could change in the run-in of the last five weeks of the quarter. My view is that TSLA is likely heading for a Net Income (loss) of ~$500 MM, a similar result to Q1. A slightly reduced loss based on what I would hope is a better thought out and planned delivery effort on ships to overseas markets. Deliveries could come in around 67500 to 70000, with a large chunk of these being a reduction in the ‘in transit’ deliveries at the end of Q2 as compared to Q1.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2019, 02:07:18 PM by RE »
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Offline RE

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This would be a good week for Elon to strap himself into a solar PV powered electric Chair.  Probably safer than a Tesla driver's seat.


RE

https://gizmodo.com/there-is-absolutely-no-reason-to-trust-the-safety-recor-1835150623

There Is Absolutely No Reason to Trust the Safety Record of Tesla’s Autopilot System
Brian Merchant
Today 12:20pmFiled to: automaton


A Tesla Model S that crashed in South Jordan, Utah, while in Autopilot mode accelerated in the seconds before it smashed into the stopped firetruck, according to a police report obtained by The Associated Press. Two people were injured.
Photo: South Jordan Police Department (AP)

Tesla has long lurked in a category of its own in the self-driving car race; where Uber and Google’s Waymo are building fully autonomous vehicles essentially from the ground up, Elon Musk’s electric car company is slouching towards autonomy through a series of increasingly sophisticated updates to its semi-autonomous Autopilot system. Because Teslas are not totally self-driving, and because they are already on the roads, this puts the company in a sort of grey area—even greyer than the already grey area where standard autonomous vehicles dwell—when it comes to regulation and oversight.

This is a problem. Musk is a nonstop booster and font of optimism for Autopilot’s self-driving capabilities, Musk has millions of diehard devotees and customers, and Autopilot has so far been enabled during at least four fatal Tesla crashes. It’s a volatile and increasingly dangerous situation, especially as Musk continues to vouch for its safety, and make claims like the one about how there will be a million autonomous Teslas on the road *next year*.

Meanwhile, no one really has any good data about how and in what circumstances crashes that involve Autopilot happen; states don’t require that kind of data be collected because Teslas aren’t technically autonomous cars. So investigators have access to only small slivers of said data, and Tesla refuses to share any of its own trove.

All of which is why Matt Drange’s epic investigation into Autopilot’s safety record for the Information should absolutely be making a bigger splash than I’ve at least personally seen it making. Perhaps it’s because it’s hard to get anything to stand out these days that does not rise to the level of intrigue of our increasingly Caligula-esque president being deceived into believing he was not walking past an aircraft carrier with his late political rival’s name on it. Perhaps it’s because it literally costs hundreds of dollars to subscribe to the Information and to read stories that serve the public interest like this one. Who knows.

But while the entire piece is full of good reporting and interesting insights about the many, many challenges regulators and safety officers face in coming to grips with the Autopilot situation, one thing stuck out: Tesla’s refusal to even comment on the record in any official capacity about Autopilot’s safety record. Not only will Tesla apparently not make public the Autopilot data itself, or share it with regulators, it wouldn’t even discuss the numbers with Drange.

Musk has in the past been lauded for his transparency—see: his detailing very specific, elaborate plans to bring Tesla to the mainstream, or open-sourcing tossed-off Hyperloop specs—and has also been chastised for being too transparent. See: his Twitter feed, which is perpetually on the brink of a very public and very expensive train wreck.

So the fact that he will not cough up any of the data about Autopilot feels pretty telling. If it put Tesla in a positive light, there seems to be little question Musk would loose it upon the world. That’s what he does.

Instead, Tesla publishes its own quarterly vehicle safety reports that purport to demonstrate how driving with Autopilot is much safer than driving without it. As Drange notes, “the reports only show a rate of collisions on a per-miles-driven basis and don’t disclose what caused the crash and whether the Tesla driver was at fault.” The experts he cites aren’t buying it either. “It’s obviously a misrepresentation,” Hemant Bhargava, a UC Davis professor of technology management told Drange. “You’re only in autonomous mode in the best scenarios, so the number of crashes will be lower.”

(Tesla wouldn’t share any data with me, either—a spokesperson referred me to the same Vehicle Safety Report.)

As such, there is absolutely no conceivable reason to trust the safety record of Tesla’s Autopilot system—and the stakes are only getting higher. Musk continues to all but encourage users to switch on Autopilot and let the software take over in his public appearances. He remains so full-bore bullish on Autopilot, so deeply convinced of its safety, that it can seem at times that his own staff must have pulled a White House-staff-in-Japan and somehow hidden from his feeds news that four people have died while driving with the software enabled. Because at this point, it’s approaching levels of delusionality.

Until recently, Tesla even sold its cars with the promise that they all came equipped with “full self-driving hardware”—a phrase that was plastered on its website when I wrote about the nascent industry’s recklessness a few months ago. After I argued that promoting the feature might be creating a culture of belief in the system, Tesla’s PR team angrily contested the accusation at length; it was probably one of most contentious conversations I’ve fielded in my entire career. (Now, it looks like they’ve at least adjusted the language on the website.)
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Offline azozeo

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Re: Official EV Carz Thread
« Reply #267 on: June 08, 2019, 04:35:21 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/qEvNL6oEr0U&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/qEvNL6oEr0U&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Re: Official EV Carz Thread
« Reply #268 on: June 08, 2019, 04:42:33 PM »

These cats are gonna' crush "mushmouth"....

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Y8cukzcfElw&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Y8cukzcfElw&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Re: Official EV Carz Thread
« Reply #269 on: June 09, 2019, 07:10:35 PM »

Michelin's new Unique Puncture-Proof Tire System (Uptis) does away with one of the defining aspects of tires as we've known them for more than 100 years: the air inside. Unlike past attempts at airless tires, Uptis functions the way other modern tires do and, Michelin claims, will provide a similar driving experience. Unveiled at the company's sustainable-mobility-focused Movin'On Summit in Montreal today, Uptis is a tire without a traditional sidewall that carries its load by the top thanks to a new resin-embedded fiberglass material that Michelin was granted over 50 patents for. "The idea was to develop a technology that was strong enough to carry the load but light enough to replace the air," Cyrille Roget, technical and scientific communication director for the Michelin Group, told Car and Driver. "If you have a load on the tire and you cut all the spokes at the bottom, you will see that nothing will change, demonstrating that the load is carried by the top of it, not by the under parts." Other airless tires, he said, often carry the load at the bottom of the tire, which is very inefficient and causes extra heating due to compression. Uptis is not Michelin's first airless concept tire. It builds on the Vision concept that was introduced at the 2017 summit meeting. That concept had four main components: it was airless, connected, could be 3D printed (or have a rechargeable tread pattern), and was 100 percent sustainable. Uptis tackles the first of those problems as part of what Roget called a "step by step" process to the tire of the future. Michelin will test Uptis in the real world with General Motors. GM will outfit a fleet of its Chevrolet Bolt EV hatchbacks with the concept tires for road tests in Michigan later this year. Both companies said Uptis-style tires could be found on production passenger vehicles as early as 2024. "We're focusing initially on electric vehicles because we think it fits very well with the zero-zero-zero vision," said Steven Kiefer, senior vice president of global purchasing and supply chain at General Motors, referring to the company's "zero crashes, zero emissions, zero congestion" mission. "The Bolt EV and our next-generation BEV are really the platform for that, so it's the logical first place." The Uptis concept tires have a maximum speed of 130 miles per hour and a max load of 1102 pounds. Different versions with different specs and driving characteristics will be possible, Roget said. That's the kind of work Michelin will do with GM to figure out the right structure and number of spokes, which type of rubber to put on the outside, and how to embed the fiberglass in the tire depending on the vehicle application. No matter how the Uptis ends up, it will be more stable than other tires, he said. "Whatever the temperature, the profile of the tire will be exactly the same," Kiefer said. "So it's a very stable solution. No pressure check, no pressure adjustment." Theoretically, the tread life for the Uptis is the same as a standard tire, Roget said, but in the real world it will be longer because drivers who use it will not be driving around on improperly inflated tires. "You always have the right pressure, so the tire will have a longer life," he said.



<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/GIYFf6Bmpis&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/GIYFf6Bmpis&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

 

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