AuthorTopic: The Environment Board  (Read 47639 times)

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #255 on: December 05, 2019, 04:34:43 PM »
Seems dry everywhere here AJ.
We have below average rainfall where I am even though still a bit of green around due to some recent rains. Rain in spring and summer just makes more fuel for later in the season.
January and February is usually when the SHTF fire wise in Vic.
Here is some quite accurate Wikipedia info on Black Saturday fires I often refer to.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Saturday_bushfires
This was a shit fight. Weather that day was horrendous. We were in the middle of it but got out unscathed due to a wind change when Kilmore East fire was about 10km from Wallan.

Fires so far:
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-06/properties-destroyed-total-fire-bans-in-place-as-nsw-burns/11772568
Real time updates:
https://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/fire-information/fires-near-me
https://www.ruralfire.qld.gov.au/map/Pages/default.aspx
West Oz getting in on the action:
https://www.emergency.wa.gov.au/
Still pretty calm down here in Victoria:
https://www.emergency.vic.gov.au/respond/


JOW

Offline RE

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #256 on: December 05, 2019, 04:47:44 PM »

Here is some quite accurate Wikipedia info on Black Saturday fires I often refer to.

You need to write that article about Black Saturday in Oz!

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #257 on: December 05, 2019, 05:06:38 PM »

Here is some quite accurate Wikipedia info on Black Saturday fires I often refer to.

You need to write that article about Black Saturday in Oz!

RE
Plan to this summer.
Expecting a replay any day soon...

Have just been reading the wikipedia page and am choking up remembering the day. Obviously still effects me and I was not directly impacted. I was preparing for the firefight when the wind changed and sent the freight train from hell to Kinglake. Place I regularly cut firewood burnt to the ground and friends narrowly escaped despite best efforts to do everything wrong... This will be in the essay..

Visited Marysville about 12 months later, which had less loss of life than Kinglake (Just), but was hit pretty bad. I was absolutely shocked. Place was literally no longer on the map. Main street was bare paddock where houses and shops had been. This really brought it into perspective.

Like I said, I will write a personal account of the day this Christmas break. 


JOW

Offline RE

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #258 on: December 05, 2019, 05:12:07 PM »
Like I said, I will write a personal account of the day this Christmas break. 

Personal, Boots on the Ground articles are the very BEST the Diner has to offer.  I look forward to reading that account.

RE
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Offline RE

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https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/environment/article239524263.html

‘Forever chemicals’ are in nearly all U.S. drinking water, activists say. Miami is #3 on the list.

By Adriana Brasileiro
January 23, 2020 06:00 AM

Miami-Dade last year closed three wells for high levels of chemicals engineers think are linked to contamination from Miami International Airport. Tests show drinking water from the plant served by those wells remains safe.

Drinking water contamination with “forever chemicals” — present in Teflon cookware and Scotchgard stain repellent — is far more widespread than previously estimated, with some of the highest levels found in Miami, according to a study by an environmental group.

The chemicals known as PFAS don’t break down easily and have been a problem for water quality managers in Florida and across the country as concerns grow about potential health risks. Miami-Dade last year closed three wells that were above federal health standards.

The Environmental Working Group, an advocacy nonprofit, said Wednesday that PFAS — short for Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances — are likely detectable in all major water supplies in the United States. A previous estimate that 110 million Americans could be exposed to the potentially toxic chemicals is “much too low” in light of the new findings, EWG said.
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Extensive exposure to the substances has been linked to higher risks for cancer and birth defects, though the chemicals are so common that most people have been exposed to them.
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Because PFAS are not regulated, the federal Environmental Protection Agency doesn’t have a firm rule on how much can be present in drinking water. The agency established a non-enforceable “health advisory level” of 70 parts per trillion for the most prevalent PFAS compounds, which are also widely used in firefighting foams. Advocacy groups like EWG and health advocates consider that threshold too high to be considered safe, and 10 states have implemented or are preparing to implement their own standards.

EWG didn’t provide its testing locations but tests conducted in Miami in July last year showed PFAS levels of 56.7 parts per trillion, below the federal advisory level but much higher than EWG’s recommended level of 1 ppt. Florida doesn’t have its own standard, and Miami-Dade said it uses the EPA guideline for its yardstick on PFAS contamination.

EWG sampled tap water in 31 states and the District of Columbia. Only Brunswick County in North Carolina and the Quad Cities area in Iowa had higher PFAS concentrations than Miami.

Miami-Dade said that all the drinking water its treatment plants provide is well within the EPA advisory level for PFAS, according to Water and Sewer Department spokeswoman Jennifer Messemer-Skold.

Still, six water supply wells out of 89 wells sampled have been found to exceed health advisory levels, leading to the closure last year of three of those wells, she said.

The closed wells, near Miami International Airport, supply the Hialeah and Preston water plants in the Hialeah area. Firefighting foam has been used for years in training and rescue operations at MIA, which could explain the high level of contaminants.
Adriana Brasileiro
(305) 376-2576
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Eddie

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https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/environment/article239524263.html

‘Forever chemicals’ are in nearly all U.S. drinking water, activists say. Miami is #3 on the list.

By Adriana Brasileiro
January 23, 2020 06:00 AM

Miami-Dade last year closed three wells for high levels of chemicals engineers think are linked to contamination from Miami International Airport. Tests show drinking water from the plant served by those wells remains safe.

Drinking water contamination with “forever chemicals” — present in Teflon cookware and Scotchgard stain repellent — is far more widespread than previously estimated, with some of the highest levels found in Miami, according to a study by an environmental group.

The chemicals known as PFAS don’t break down easily and have been a problem for water quality managers in Florida and across the country as concerns grow about potential health risks. Miami-Dade last year closed three wells that were above federal health standards.

The Environmental Working Group, an advocacy nonprofit, said Wednesday that PFAS — short for Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances — are likely detectable in all major water supplies in the United States. A previous estimate that 110 million Americans could be exposed to the potentially toxic chemicals is “much too low” in light of the new findings, EWG said.
TOP ARTICLES
They learned about Ukraine’s at-risk children and asked: How can we help kids in need here?
They learned about Ukraine’s at-risk children and
asked: How can we help kids in need here?
They learned about Ukraine’s at-risk children and asked: How can we help kids in need here?

Extensive exposure to the substances has been linked to higher risks for cancer and birth defects, though the chemicals are so common that most people have been exposed to them.
Local News at Your Fingertips

Get unlimited digital access for just $3.99 a month to #ReadLocal anytime, on any device.
GET OFFER

Because PFAS are not regulated, the federal Environmental Protection Agency doesn’t have a firm rule on how much can be present in drinking water. The agency established a non-enforceable “health advisory level” of 70 parts per trillion for the most prevalent PFAS compounds, which are also widely used in firefighting foams. Advocacy groups like EWG and health advocates consider that threshold too high to be considered safe, and 10 states have implemented or are preparing to implement their own standards.

EWG didn’t provide its testing locations but tests conducted in Miami in July last year showed PFAS levels of 56.7 parts per trillion, below the federal advisory level but much higher than EWG’s recommended level of 1 ppt. Florida doesn’t have its own standard, and Miami-Dade said it uses the EPA guideline for its yardstick on PFAS contamination.

EWG sampled tap water in 31 states and the District of Columbia. Only Brunswick County in North Carolina and the Quad Cities area in Iowa had higher PFAS concentrations than Miami.

Miami-Dade said that all the drinking water its treatment plants provide is well within the EPA advisory level for PFAS, according to Water and Sewer Department spokeswoman Jennifer Messemer-Skold.

Still, six water supply wells out of 89 wells sampled have been found to exceed health advisory levels, leading to the closure last year of three of those wells, she said.

The closed wells, near Miami International Airport, supply the Hialeah and Preston water plants in the Hialeah area. Firefighting foam has been used for years in training and rescue operations at MIA, which could explain the high level of contaminants.
Adriana Brasileiro
(305) 376-2576


The Berkey takes it out.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

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https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/environment/article239524263.html

‘Forever chemicals’ are in nearly all U.S. drinking water, activists say. Miami is #3 on the list.


The Berkey takes it out.

Now THAT is good to know.
"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline Surly1

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #262 on: February 07, 2020, 10:37:11 AM »
Another panic-inducing story from the mainstream media, posted by the hopelessly naive.
Don't worry, be happy.

Record-breaking temperature of nearly 65ºF logged in Antarctica as scientists sound alarm over rapid ice melt



"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline azozeo

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The Deer in Your Yard Are Here to Stay
« Reply #263 on: February 22, 2020, 02:19:37 PM »
The deer population of the eastern U.S. has exploded and cities are trying to keep it in check. But the options available to them are limited, and fraught.



A decade ago, deer were a rare sight on Staten Island. White-tailed deer are thought to have abandoned the island in the late 19th century, pushed by human development to open land in nearby New Jersey. In 2008, the estimated deer population of the 60-square-mile borough of New York City was only 24.

Then the deer came back, swimming across the Arthur Kill and Raritan Bay from New Jersey in search of new habitat. And they reproduced—boy, did they reproduce. An aerial survey of the deer population in 2014 put it at 793. By 2017, the new estimate was between 1,918 and 2,188, an increase of 9,000 percent in just nine years.

To various degrees, towns and cities across the Northeast have been seeing an ongoing resurgence of deer populations in recent decades, as suburbanization patterns deepened and hunting practices faded. If you live anywhere outside of an urban downtown, you’ve probably noticed this trend yourself.

Deer are cute. We’ve all cried watching Bambi. So what’s the problem?

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-deer-in-your-yard-are-here-to-stay?utm_source=pocket-newtab
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Cam

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Re: Methane Youtube Ad
« Reply #264 on: April 18, 2020, 10:32:42 AM »
So I'm watching a video on Youtube about lockdowns beginning to be eased around the world, and whether it is too early or not. In the corner of my eye I spot an ad and check it out. The imagery is quite dramatic I must say. I clicked it out of curiosity and was disappointed to get a dead link. The ad itself is funny, but I decided to have some fun with it.

Offline Eddie

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #265 on: April 18, 2020, 10:54:58 AM »
The "methane bomb" was supposed to kill us by now, but the evidence is that it isn't, at least not on the timeline suggested by the climate alarmists crowd. Most of the articles are guilty of cherry picking the data.

Please understand that I take climate change very seriously, but I also take lying bullshit seriously. Only by taking the time to delve deeply into the morass of conflicting info out there can one begin to get to the reality of the problem.

If I had to put climate change in a nutshell, I would just say that it is a terrible problem, but that the biggest problem is that our short term failings probably will cause irreversible changes, but  those changes will play out over the very long term. We need to eliminate fossil fuels....and it can be done. But if we don't, many of the worst predictions you might have read about are very unlikely to manifest over  the short term.

 I have a thread on climate change here somewhere , that some doomers I know consider heresy, because I refuse to go total alarmist. Educate yourself, and don't let the bullshitters snow you. There is  a whole lot of hype on both sides of the climate debate. I only say that because I found it to be true after a great deal of reading. I still do consider climate change to be perhaps the main existential threat facing mankind.....but those who  think methane is going to kill us all in ten or twenty years don't have adequate evidence to convince me.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2020, 11:33:19 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Cam

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #266 on: April 18, 2020, 11:09:16 AM »
The "methane bomb" was supposed to kill us by now, but the evidence is that it isn't, at least not on the timeline suggested by the climate alarmists crowd. Most of the articles are guilty of cherry picking the data.

Please understand that I take climate change very seriously, but I also take lying bullshit seriously. Only by taking the time to delve deeply into the morass of conflicting info out there can one begin to get to the reality of the problem.

If I had to put climate change in a nutshell, I would just say that it is a terrible problem, but that the biggest problem is that our short term failings probably will cause irreversible changes, but  those changes will play out over the very long term. We need to eliminate fossil fuels....and it can be done. But if we don't, many of the worst predictions you might have read about are very unlikely to manifest over  the short term.

 I have a thread on climate change here somewhere , that some doomers I know consider heresy, because I refuse to go total alarmist. Educate yourself, and don't let the bullshitters snow you. There is  a whole lot of hype on both sides of the climate debate. I only say that because I found it to be true after a great deal of reading. I still do consider climate change to be perhaps the main existential threats facing mankind.....but those who  think methane is going to kill us all in ten or twenty years don't have adequate evidence to convince me.

Eddie I don't mean to bring up methane's effects on climate change, just look at the 'ads' I put together on Microsoft Paint (pics below my initial post). I think they're kinda funny.

Offline monsta666

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #267 on: April 18, 2020, 11:22:45 AM »
I believe your views Eddie are closer to other people in this forum that you think. The idea that a methane bomb will kill us now, or in the very near future, is a fringe opinion even if you only include the community from the collapse crowd. To most people climate change is something that causes great damage/problems (but not extinction) in 20 to 30 years time. This opinion is also shared by people unaware of collapse and usually the underlying assumption made by the climate change advocates is that BAU will occur indefinitely. The bottleneck to perpertual growth will be the climate and not energy or resource constraints.

As this pandemic shows when we get a siginficant economic slowdown then worldwide emmissions will significantly reduce thus prolonging the time when climate change creates substantial problems. However despite these recent turn of events I suspect the prevailing wisdom will be that this pandemic is merely a temporary roadblock and when a vaccine is found BAU will march inexorably forwards and climate change will once more become the primary problem. Future growth is not guaranteed so the overall assumptions in regards to timelines is likely wrong. However a reduction in emmissions can lead to secondary outcomes that are favourable to all; namely a reduction in goods, greater awareness of where things are made/produced and perhaps priotise the need for less globalisation and more localisation. I do feel the thing that really gets on peoples' tits about climate change is how vocal the climate change people can get, the poster girl who seems to represent this Greta Thunberg. Climate change is a real issue and they do make good points but some of the strongest advocates can be as well received as that insistant vegan. Like the vegan they can have a holier than thou attitude that can rub people the wrong way.

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #268 on: May 09, 2020, 09:09:51 PM »
I take climate change very seriously.
I think we are screwed.
Still prefer to go down fighting than crying.

Planted 2 Calistimons and a Liquid Amber tree today, now we are going into cooler and wetter period.
Calistimons are native bird attractant. Now have about 12 on the property in 3 or 4 colours. These ones were Candy Pink.
Liquid amber is just going dormant now. Must be a North American tree?
Pretty big too. Grows to 20m tall! Have it on a fence line.

Plant a tree a week until I die. Have a few months catching up to do.

JOW

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #269 on: May 09, 2020, 09:12:31 PM »
Pictures are for reference. Both  are only 1 foot tall yet!
JOW

 

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