AuthorTopic: The Environment Board  (Read 8872 times)

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 28390
    • View Profile
Macondo Oil Well Blowout Explained (Clarke & Dawe Classic)
« Reply #45 on: April 01, 2017, 12:21:08 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ClvLp4vXJ5I" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ClvLp4vXJ5I</a>
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 28390
    • View Profile
Trading Death
« Reply #46 on: April 02, 2017, 12:35:55 AM »
http://grist.org/briefly/global-trade-causes-more-than-20-percent-of-air-pollution-deaths/

Briefly
Stuff that matters

Trading Death


Global trade causes more than 20 percent of air-pollution deaths.

A new study in the journal Nature investigated what triggers the nearly 3.5 million annual deaths worldwide stemming from airborne particulate matter. It attributed more than 750,000 of them to goods being made in one part of the world and consumed in another.

The grim statistics center on Asia, home of cheap exports and lax environmental protections. Nearly 500,000 people succumb to smog-related illness each year on the continent, including more than 200,000 in China and more than 100,000 in India. The incidence of heart disease, lung cancer, and stroke are ratcheted up by breathing filthy air.

The main culprits behind this tragic phenomenon are buyers in the West. The study links consumption in Western Europe to almost 175,000 yearly deaths abroad and consumption in the U.S. to more than 100,000.

“It’s not a local issue anymore,” says study coauthor Dabo Guan, a professor of climate change economics at the University of East Anglia.

Asian health could benefit if the Trump administration is successful in reviving American manufacturing. Some of that health burden could shift to the U.S., which has higher air-quality standards that should result in fewer smog-related fatalities. Then again, if Trump has his way with environmental rules, all bets are off.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 28390
    • View Profile
Trump’s latest environmental evildoing: More pollution, less protection
« Reply #47 on: April 07, 2017, 01:53:39 AM »
http://grist.org/politics/heres-what-you-need-to-know-about-trumps-latest-environmental-evildoing/

Trump Tracker
Trump’s latest environmental evildoing: More pollution, less protection
By Lisa Hymas on Mar 31, 2017


In a single day, President Trump did more environmental damage than during his previous 67 days in office. That’s no small achievement.

With an executive order signed on March 28, he supercharged the process of demolishing President Obama’s climate initiatives, including his signature one, the Clean Power Plan. It’s not just climate hawks, treehuggers, and grandstanding Democratic politicians who are aghast. Mainstream media outlets are, too.

“President Trump’s move to rip up Mr. Obama’s climate policies [is] beyond reckless. Children studying his presidency will ask, ‘How could anyone have done this?’” the Washington Post editorial board wrote. The New York Times ran its own anxious editorial under the headline “President Trump Risks the Planet.”

Trump’s move means the U.S. will pump out a lot more greenhouse gases than it would have if Obama’s policies had been continued.

And it will make climate change still worse by weakening the resolve of other countries to curb their emissions.

Here’s a rundown of what Trump is aiming to do with his executive order as well as other recent moves:
Motley spew
Let power plants emit more pollution

What happened? Old coal-fired power plants may get to keep polluting the air we breathe and the atmosphere that sustains life on earth, thanks to Trump’s call to toss out the Clean Power Plan. And future power plants may not be held to tougher standards that would have largely prevented new coal plants from coming online.

What does it really mean? This is A Big F’ing Deal. These power plant rules were the most significant part of the Obama administration’s effort to meet its emission-cutting pledge under the Paris climate agreement. If the U.S. is wimping out on Paris, other countries will be more inclined to wimp out, too.

But undoing the Clean Power Plan will likely take years and will definitely be challenged in court, so it’s far from a done deal. Plus, cheap natural gas means utilities aren’t likely to build new coal-fired power plants anyway, because gas plants are less expensive to run.
Frack addicts
Make it easier for companies to frack and emit methane

What happened? The Obama administration tried to tighten regulations on fracking on federal and tribal lands to prevent water pollution. It also tried to rein in methane pollution from oil and gas operations on public lands. Trump’s executive order calls for those rules to be reviewed and rewritten.

What does it really mean? The Trump administration is working to remove all obstacles that stand in the way of the oil and gas industry, pure and simple.
Full speed ahead!
Trash other rules that restrain the oil, gas, and coal industries

What happened? Trump’s executive order tells federal agencies to review regulations and actions that potentially “burden” domestic energy development, and gives them 180 days to come up with plans to scale the regulations back.

What does it really mean? We don’t know how many rules will get dragged into this process and ultimately be weakened or tossed out, but the message is clear: Drill, baby, drill. Mine, baby, mine.
The coal ball and chain
Sell off coal from public lands again

What happened? The federal program that leases land to coal companies for mining is a big money loser as well as a climate killer. In January 2016, the Obama administration put a moratorium on the program so it could consider how to improve it, potentially by charging more for coal leases and taking into account the climate impacts of mining. With his executive order, Trump called for the moratorium to be reversed, and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke promptly did just that. Zinke also cancelled the big review of the program, so major reforms won’t be coming anytime soon.

What does it really mean? This won’t lead to much new coal mining immediately, as there’s currently a glut of coal on the market and companies already have plenty of reserves. But it means that the coal-leasing program will continue to waste taxpayer money, subsidize coal companies, and worsen climate change.
Global what?
Stop thinking about climate change

What happened? Under Obama, federal agencies were required to consider the full economic cost of climate change when making decisions about projects. The administration determined that a metric ton of CO2 pollution currently costs society about $36 — that’s called the social cost of carbon — and this number has been factored into cost-benefit analyses for regulations and other government actions, often supporting regulations that require emissions cuts.

The Obama administration also asked federal agencies to account for climate change when writing environmental impact statements for federal projects.

With his executive order, Trump is calling for a new review of the social cost of carbon, and he’s tossing out the requirement to consider climate in impact statements.

What does it really mean? Expect the social cost of carbon to drop, even though experts say it’s already way too low. Essentially, these are yet more ways for the administration to say it doesn’t give a damn about climate change.

Phew, that was quite the executive order. But wait, there’s more: Trump found time to pull some other scary moves between trips to Mar-a-Lago.
Having their spray
Allow use of a dangerous pesticide

What happened? Under Obama, the EPA proposed banning agricultural use of the toxic pesticide chlorpyrifos, but didn’t finalize the rule. Under Trump, the EPA did an about-face: On March 29, the agency officially declined to impose a ban.

What does it really mean? Scientific studies have linked even low doses of chlorpyrifos to developmental problems in kids. So children will continue to be exposed — especially the children of farm workers — while Dow AgroSciences, manufacturer of the pesticide, will continue to make lots of money selling it.
Dude, where’s my cleaner car?
Roll back auto fuel economy rules

What happened? Just before Obama moved out of the White House, his administration finalized a review of its ambitious gas-mileage standards for future cars and trucks. On March 15, the Trump administration sent those standards back to the drawing board, calling for more review after automakers complained that they were too strict.

What does it really mean? Cars will likely guzzle more gas than they need to, and the shift to electric cars may slow down.
Romancing the Keystone
Clear the way for the Keystone XL pipeline

What happened? Just as promised during his first week in office, Trump revived the Keystone XL pipeline, which would carry some of the filthiest oil on the planet down from the tar sands of Alberta, across the American farm belt, and toward refineries on the Gulf Coast. Obama denied the pipeline builder a permit to cross the U.S.-Canada border. On March 27, Trump reversed course and granted the permit.

What does it really mean? Within days of Trump’s move, environmentalists filed two lawsuits attempting to stop the pipeline’s construction. Pipeline builder TransCanada still needs approval from Nebraska and may face financial hurdles. Even so, chances are better than ever that the world’s most controversial pipeline will get built.

Meanwhile, that other highly controversial pipeline, Dakota Access, is now finished and being filled up with oil, thanks to the OK it got from the Trump administration on Feb. 6.

Let’s end on two slivers of good news:

Trump did not pull the U.S. out of the Paris Agreement, as some right-wingers have been calling for. The White House says a decision on that will be made by May 26, and maybe Ivanka Trump and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson can convince the president to stay in.

Trump did not ask the EPA to reverse its finding that greenhouse gas emissions endanger human health, which is the basis for the agency’s climate actions. The conservative Competitive Enterprise Institute has petitioned the agency to review that finding, hoping to overturn it. We don’t know how that will turn out, but in the meantime, the situation is making EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt very uncomfortable.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 28390
    • View Profile
Depressed about climate change? There’s a 9-step program for that.
« Reply #48 on: April 09, 2017, 04:38:32 AM »
I'm surprised I haven't heard from Carolyn Baker and Dr. McStinksion on this one yet.

Only 9 Steps?  That's 3 less than getting over a Booze Addiction!

RE

http://grist.org/article/depressed-about-climate-change-theres-a-9-step-program-for-that/


Shutterstock

climate desk
Depressed about climate change? There’s a 9-step program for that.
By Caroline Preston on Apr 8, 2017

This story was originally published by Fusion and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

One recent weeknight, ten people gathered around a knotty walnut table in a living room in suburban Salt Lake City. Laura Schmidt, a 31-year-old environmental advocate, spoke first. This being the group’s eighth gathering, their discussion centered on seeking beauty and meaning. Schmidt, an athletic woman with a dry sense of humor and shoulder-length brown hair, talked about the importance of exercising the neocortex, the part of the brain that mediates advanced mental functions, in order to access deeper meaning. With the Earth tilting toward climate catastrophe, the capacity to build resiliency through beauty and meaning is critical for preserving the self and planet, Schmidt said. Each member of the group took a few minutes to share. One read a poem by Rilke; another, words by Terry Tempest Williams, the American writer and conservationist. They spoke about their feelings of anxiety and grief, and of finding strength in the natural world. One man told the story of wheeling his terminally ill wife to a hospital room window to watch a final sunset.

Imagine Alcoholics Anonymous mixed with an environmental humanities course, and you’ll begin to get a sense of the “good grief” group started by Schmidt. Its goal is to help people cope with what’s been called “climate grief” — anxiety, sadness, depression, and other emotions provoked by awareness of the planet’s march toward a hotter, less biologically diverse, and potentially unsustainable future. The psychological consequences of climate change have been the subject of greater study in recent years, with the Obama White House releasing a report in 2016 that predicted growing numbers of people would experience direct mental-health effects from exposure to weather-related natural disasters as well as indirect stress and anxiety. In March, the American Psychiatric Association approved a policy committing to mitigate the adverse mental health effects of climate change.

In the United States alone, “we’ve seen a reflooding of Louisiana, we’ve seen terrible fires in the Southwest, we know there are water wars,” says Lise Van Susteren, a psychiatrist in private practice and a founding member of the Climate Psychiatry Alliance. “Even if you’re lucky enough to be at a distance … boy, is that going to weigh on you heavily. Among the activists, those of us watching, listening, hearing, and sensitive to what’s going on, we’re going to be the tip of the spear.”

Schmidt grew up in rural Michigan, off a dirt road surrounded by corn and soy fields and near the woods. Her home life was tumultuous — her father was an alcoholic and her mother eventually left Schmidt and her sisters to raise themselves. As a child, Schmidt sought sanctuary in the nature around her and, in her mid-20s, she began attending Adult Children of Alcoholics, a spin off of Alcoholics Anonymous. She found its 12-step approach, which focuses on understanding one’s past and how it influences the present, to be a bulwark against feelings of self-pity and helplessness. It was in graduate school at the University of Utah, where she took interdisciplinary courses on the environment, that she began to consider how climate change, habitat destruction, pollution, and other threats were now causing her similarly intense emotions. For Schmidt, species loss was of particular concern — the idea that dozens of species are blinking out of existence each day, at a pace 1,000 to 10,000 times faster than the natural rate of extinction. “We’re eliminating species before we even identify them, hear what noises they make, see what colors they are,” she says.


Good Grief Gathering at the International Peace Gardens in Salt Lake City.Leah Hogsten

Schmidt reached out to dozens of social-justice activists and environmentalists, people like Derrick Jensen and Bill McKibben, to learn how they were personally affected. What she found was that feelings of sadness and anxiety, and even literal nightmares, were common. Last year, with the help of her partner, Aimee Reau, Schmidt developed a nine-step program for building resiliency loosely modeled on AA (The steps begin with “admitting there’s a problem,” and include “acknowledging the ways in which we’re complicit,” “taking breaks and respecting your limits,” and “letting go.”) While she initially intended it for environmental professionals, most of those who signed up are employed in other fields but are personally committed to a greener planet. About a dozen people attend each session and 50 subscribe to its mailings. Schmidt, who now works as an outreach coordinator at the environmental group HEAL Utah, hopes to soon evaluate the pilot, incorporate the program as a nonprofit, and potentially expand it to other cities.

Kiera Bitter first learned of the group through a web listing in a local newspaper. A case manager in the court system whose family all supported Donald Trump, Bitter says she felt isolated in her views on climate change and eager for a way to add more meaning to her life. The first time she attended a grief group session, she cried. An introvert, this surprised her. “I told them that I could tell they were like me and it was just such a relief to be there and have hope and be surrounded by people who think like myself,” she says. Bitter is newer to environmentalism than some other participants. She began experiencing deep concern about the Earth after visiting a landfill not long ago and since then has thought often about her carbon footprint — when she drives, eats off a paper plate, makes a purchase. The group has been educating her about the consequences of climate change, which has caused her more short-term anxiety, but also about ways to take action, which she says is easing some of her frustrations. “Hopefully this group keeps growing and growing,” says Bitter.


Good Grief Gathering in Salt Lake City.Leah Hogsten

The meetings have been held at the home of Alli Harbertson, who met Schmidt three years ago through a wilderness “vision fast” program. Harbertson works as a caterer, and she recalls once standing in a Costco aisle, surrounded by carts with packaged foods up to people’s shoulders. She retreated to her car for a while before she could face the store again. “We live in a destructive culture environmentally and I have a lot of pain and sadness and helplessness being part of systems I feel are not working,” she says. Like Bitter, she has sometimes felt isolated in her beliefs, or at least the strength they have over her. “It’s not exactly cocktail party chatter,” she says. Harbertson says she appreciates the structure of the grief group and its nine steps, which underpin but don’t limit the discussions. She led the fifth session, on “feeling your feelings,” in which she and others spoke about the tendency to minimize or repress more fatalistic views on consumerism and the environment.

Thomas Doherty, a psychologist who specializes in applying an environmental perspective to mental health, believes the AA approach could provide valuable inspiration for coping with the planet’s warming. “The philosophical realization that there are certain things beyond your control is a big part of AA,” he says. “We are also on some level powerless against climate change.” But the “key question,” according to Doherty, is “where we can claim some power on these issues.” If done correctly, these sorts of groups could help people overcome the numbness they may feel regarding the existential threat of climate change and determine strategic ways to take action, he says.

Schmidt’s nine steps launched in January, after Trump’s election, an event that inflamed frustration, rage, and despondency among those who want the United States to acknowledge decades of science and curb planet-warming pollution. Without reductions in carbon emissions called for by the Paris climate agreement, experts warn, the world will be locked into a future of devastating droughts, frequent flooding, and food shortages. Even if countries do meet their commitments, it may already be too late to mitigate many of climate change’s destructive effects. For members of the grief group, anger at Trump, and at the Utah legislature, which recently shrugged off a handful of pro-environment bills, is a given. Schmidt wants to help others acknowledge this anger without suffocating from it, to encourage people to move from instinctive responses (the flight-fight-freeze impulses of the “reptilian brain”) to empathy and analysis (the neocortex).

Dick Meyer, a 67-year-old landscaper who joined the grief group after learning about it from public radio, says he’s seen conservationists become paralyzed by frustration and anger. Meyer passed through a grieving process after his work on a horticultural project in Santa Fe prompted him to research sustainable ecology. “I came to the conclusion that mankind is pretty much screwed,” he says. The grief he experienced was similar to the intense sadness that accompanies the death of a loved one, but it felt more solitary, and less socially accepted. He credits Schmidt’s group for moving beyond grousing to processing and healing. The refusal of policymakers to act on climate change’s extensively documented, urgent threats is maddening, and yet Meyer doesn’t think the problem can be solved by politicians alone. The grief group, he says, is “a seed of a community we need to build around living sustainably.” It’s teaching people to acknowledge fallacies we’ve come to accept, that the Earth is immutable and economic growth is infinite. Meyer thinks that local efforts like this one need to bloom before legislation can follow. “We all live, don’t we, with the notion that if we need it, someone will come save us?” he says. “Well, no one is coming to save you. Certainly not someone from Washington.”
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline JRM

  • Sous Chef
  • ****
  • Posts: 3190
    • View Profile
Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #49 on: April 09, 2017, 12:22:47 PM »
Anyone not grieving over what humans are doing to our only home is probably either oblivious or incapable of much feeling at all.

This short video is hugely worth the time investment!  Weller is extraordinary.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/EaI-4c92Mqo" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/EaI-4c92Mqo</a>
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline JRM

  • Sous Chef
  • ****
  • Posts: 3190
    • View Profile
Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #50 on: April 09, 2017, 12:32:43 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/NveB-kOXcZE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/NveB-kOXcZE</a>
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 28390
    • View Profile
NASA puts the Earth up for adoption
« Reply #51 on: April 10, 2017, 01:55:52 PM »
Maybe the Vulcans will adopt us!  They'll fix all the problems with Logic!  :icon_sunny:


Fucking stupid Greenie publicity stunts are depressing.

RE

http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/10/us/nasa-earth-adoption-trnd/

NASA puts the Earth up for adoption


By Madeline Holcombe, CNN

Updated 9:57 AM ET, Mon April 10, 2017

(CNN)Wondering how to show that special planet some affection this Earth Day?Adopt it.
NASA has sectioned off 64,000 individual pieces of Earth to be "adopted" by supporters on their website.
The pieces are about 55 miles wide and assigned randomly. Similar to adopting a highway or naming a star, participants do not get legal or property rights to their section. So whether you get the 55-mile section that contains the Taj Mahal or the one that is square in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, you benefit the same.


What NASA can give is individualized scientific data about the adopted sections. Or users can explore and interact with a world map to print certificates from anywhere in the world—from a childhood street to the streets of Paris.

Both come with a certificate to share (or brag about) on social media.
NASA hopes to have every piece adopted by Earth Day, April 22. Once the adoptions fill up, they will be reassigned to allow everyone the opportunity to celebrate their own little corner of the Earth.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline azozeo

  • Sous Chef
  • ****
  • Posts: 5245
    • View Profile
Re: NASA puts the Earth up for adoption
« Reply #52 on: April 10, 2017, 05:54:19 PM »
Maybe the Vulcans will adopt us!  They'll fix all the problems with Logic!  :icon_sunny:


Fucking stupid Greenie publicity stunts are depressing.

RE

http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/10/us/nasa-earth-adoption-trnd/

NASA puts the Earth up for adoption


By Madeline Holcombe, CNN

Updated 9:57 AM ET, Mon April 10, 2017

(CNN)Wondering how to show that special planet some affection this Earth Day?Adopt it.
NASA has sectioned off 64,000 individual pieces of Earth to be "adopted" by supporters on their website.
The pieces are about 55 miles wide and assigned randomly. Similar to adopting a highway or naming a star, participants do not get legal or property rights to their section. So whether you get the 55-mile section that contains the Taj Mahal or the one that is square in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, you benefit the same.


What NASA can give is individualized scientific data about the adopted sections. Or users can explore and interact with a world map to print certificates from anywhere in the world—from a childhood street to the streets of Paris.

Both come with a certificate to share (or brag about) on social media.
NASA hopes to have every piece adopted by Earth Day, April 22. Once the adoptions fill up, they will be reassigned to allow everyone the opportunity to celebrate their own little corner of the Earth.


Another fine example of taxpayer sponsored funny-money lunacy.
These psychopath's just can't stop diveying  up the planet.
Oh, let the sun beat down upon my face
And stars fill my dream
I’m a traveler of both time and space
To be where I have been
To sit with elders of the gentle race
This world has seldom seen
They talk of days for which they sit and wait
All will be revealed

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 28390
    • View Profile
Re: NASA puts the Earth up for adoption
« Reply #53 on: April 10, 2017, 06:06:55 PM »

Another fine example of taxpayer sponsored funny-money lunacy.
These psychopath's just can't stop diveying  up the planet.

I'm thinking of adopting a Hexagon for the Diner.  :icon_sunny:

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 28390
    • View Profile
Re: NASA puts the Earth up for adoption
« Reply #54 on: April 10, 2017, 06:14:24 PM »

Another fine example of taxpayer sponsored funny-money lunacy.
These psychopath's just can't stop diveying  up the planet.

I'm thinking of adopting a Hexagon for the Diner.  :icon_sunny:

RE

We are now the Proud Parents of a Hexagon on the Earth!

https://climate.nasa.gov/adopt-the-planet/#/explore/43263

We got a pretty good location off the coast of Newfoundland south of Greenland.  Where all the Icebergs are floating now.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 28390
    • View Profile
Re: NASA puts the Earth up for adoption
« Reply #55 on: April 10, 2017, 06:23:56 PM »

Another fine example of taxpayer sponsored funny-money lunacy.
These psychopath's just can't stop diveying  up the planet.

I'm thinking of adopting a Hexagon for the Diner.  :icon_sunny:

RE



We are now the Proud Parents of a Hexagon on the Earth!

https://climate.nasa.gov/adopt-the-planet/#/explore/43263

We got a pretty good location off the coast of Newfoundland south of Greenland.  Where all the Icebergs are floating now.

RE

Collapse Cafe adopted a Hexagon in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.  :icon_sunny:

https://climate.nasa.gov/adopt-the-planet/#/explore/22520

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 28390
    • View Profile
It's the Planet, Stupid- Clarke & Dawe
« Reply #56 on: April 15, 2017, 12:52:30 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/-LgswD4QveU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/-LgswD4QveU</a>
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline azozeo

  • Sous Chef
  • ****
  • Posts: 5245
    • View Profile
Re: NASA puts the Earth up for adoption
« Reply #57 on: April 15, 2017, 03:25:28 AM »

Another fine example of taxpayer sponsored funny-money lunacy.
These psychopath's just can't stop diveying  up the planet.

I'm thinking of adopting a Hexagon for the Diner.  :icon_sunny:

RE

We are now the Proud Parents of a Hexagon on the Earth!

https://climate.nasa.gov/adopt-the-planet/#/explore/43263

We got a pretty good location off the coast of Newfoundland south of Greenland.  Where all the Icebergs are floating now.

RE

Can we get a google earth pic of "junior"
Oh, let the sun beat down upon my face
And stars fill my dream
I’m a traveler of both time and space
To be where I have been
To sit with elders of the gentle race
This world has seldom seen
They talk of days for which they sit and wait
All will be revealed

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 28390
    • View Profile
Climate Change Maps Reveal Our Changing Planet
« Reply #58 on: April 21, 2017, 08:11:56 AM »
http://gisgeography.com/climate-change-effects-maps/

Climate Change Maps Reveal Our Changing Planet

See the Effects of Climate Change

We hear it so much that we don’t really hear it. Climate change.

…But climate change is a real and serious issue.

The climate has changed throughout history. Most of these changes were caused because of variations in the Earth’s orbit.

97% of scientists agree that climate change is not caused by Earth’s orbit but human activity.

Today, climate change is characterized with an abrupt increase in average temperature. rising sea levels, warming oceans and shrinking ice sheets adds to the evidence.

But how much evidence can be seen on Earth?

Today, we highlight some of the key evidence and potential outcomes of climate change:

Google Planetary Earth Engine Reveals Environment Impacts from Human Activity

Timelapse Landsat Satellite

With a few clicks of the mouse, Google Earth Engine reveals startling transitions of our planet.

Using Landsat data, these climate change maps show how the desert-city of Dubai has grew into the megacity today… in just 40 years.

Observe the rate at which glaciers like Alaska’s Columbia Glacier has melted… and is actually speeding up.

If an old tree falls in the forest and nobody’s around to hear it, does it make a sound? Rainforests in Brazil are vanishing at an accelerating rate. With timely satellite data from Landsat, everybody can hear it.



From the lakes of Las Vegas lakes drying up as Sin City sprawls… to the disappearance of farming villages across the Yangtze River Delta in China… to the oil boom in Alberta and its environmental impact…

These climate change maps are breathtaking…

But are living-proof of just how much humans impact their environment.

READ MORE: Human activities are reshaping Earth’s surface

NASA’s Earth Climate Change Maps

Nasa Earth Climate Change

Remote sensing satellites reveal a unique perspective of our planet. Sensors in orbit gain new perspectives taking advantage of the electromagnetic spectrum at its fullest.

Like clockwork, Nasa’s Earth Climate Change Global Map carves out a view of what’s happening on our planet with a full set of climate change maps.

The atmosphere, the land, the water, the ice and all living things – NASA keeps score of them all.

NASA tracks aerosols, snow cover and sea surface temperature monthly so we can understand how our planet works relative to climate change.

Through the lens of satellite sensors like MODIS, AMSR-E, TRMM and MOPITT – never in our history have we understood Earth’s climate as we do today.

Surging Sea Level Analysis

Surging Seas

How much will the sea level rise at our current pace?

The Surging Sea Map charts out two possible futures:

1. Sea levels at the course we are on now; and

2. Sea levels with extreme carbon cuts.

…And this depends entirely on the total amount of carbon we put into the atmosphere.

When glaciers and ice caps melt, sea levels rise. These sea level projects are based on that expansion

Sea level projections are based on the expansion of ocean water as it warms; melting glaciers and ice caps; and the decay of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets.

Carbon choices. Sea level choices. The future is yours to decide.

The Impact of a Four Degree Temperature Rise

Impact 4 Degrees

The Met Office Four Degree interactive map map out all the effects of global warming.

Climate change maps like this exemplifies the impacts of a four degree temperature rise on our planet.

How are aquatic environments affected by global warming? Ocean acidification will be the destructor of fish habitat.

How do rising temperatures affect crop production?



Yields of cereals crops such as rice and maize could decrease up to 5% across Southeast Asia.

These handy climate change maps takes you on a geographic journey. It hits the bull’s eye because it paints a complete picture.

It provides concrete examples of how and where forest fires, agriculture, water availability, sea level rise, marine life, drought and weather patterns will be transformed as a consequence of climate change.

If All the Ice Melted

National Geographic  -If All Ice Melted

These National Geographic Sea Level maps show the world as it is now, with only one difference:

All the ice on land has melted and drained into the sea.

The world would look very different if five million cubic miles of ice melted on Earth.

Waters would consume most of Florida and California. Ocean-front properties would cease to exist. Inland cities like Denver and Minneapolis would be affected the least.

The picture isn’t so bright anywhere in the world if sea levels rose 216 feet.

The island of Japan would suffer substantially. A highly dense population with a relatively small landmass. The ramifications for Japan, a country with a coastline that is almost 30,000 km long would be huge – as many citizens would be forced to relocate.

Disappearing Glaciers

Disappearing Glaciers

A grim consequence of climate change is retreating glaciers and the overall increase in sea levels.

The Disappearing Glaciers story map takes you on a journey highlighting the realities of climate change on glaciers on Earth.

From the Canadian Athabasca Glacier to the Upsala Glacier in Argentina – at one point these glaciers extended well beyond their current extent.

This map digitizes the global retreat of glaciers showing just how much glaciers have disappeared. Like the Storbreen Glacier in Norway, the glacier extent dates back to 1750.

These climate change maps catalog six retreating glaciers around the world and the irrefutable evidence of a warming world.

Esri’s Global Footprint Story Map

Esri Global Footprint

The Esri Global Footprint is a genius, timeline series map story designed by Global Footprint Network.

Which countries are ecological debtors?

The countries in red are ecological – which means that they rely on resource reserves from ecological creditors (in green).

What makes it so special is the charting interface.

In 1961, you can see how the vast majority of countries around the globe had ecological reserves.

…As you slide the cursor down the timeline, these resources have slowly dwindled as human activities consume more than 150 percent of Earth’s yearly biocapacity.

Carbon Emissions

Carbon Emissions

The Carbon Emissions map uses a cartogram-style technique to display data..

Each map is distorted to reflect a particular dataset – so high values bulge out, and low values contract.

For example:

Who are the people at risk due to climate change?

It’s scary to think of the number of people injured, left homeless, displaced or requiring emergency assistance due to floods, droughts or extreme temperatures in a typical year.

Climate change is expected to exacerbate many of these threats.

Climate Commons

Climate Commons

Despite the lack of updates, the Climate Commons is basically climate change news mapped.

Each climate news story is aggregated and relates to a geographic area. It’s all put together and represented in a hexagonal thematic map.

Users can explore the correlation between climate change data and its coverage in the media. You can filter by type of news story.

Climate change maps like this were interesting when it was alive and kicking.

ElkanoData Pollution Map

Elkano Data

Just how much have we polluted?

Siphoning data from the World Bank master database, ElkanoData puts together a cartographic masterpiece.

The ElkanoData pollution map sheds new light on carbon monoxide emissions over time.

The elephant in the room is the United Arab Emirates. At a whopping 24.98 metric tons per capita – this is more than double than any European country CO2 rate.

While Africa and South America are the pollution angels of the bunch. These continents in general pollute the least per capita.

Pro Tip: Use the time slider to see how much countries pollute over time.

Climate Change Maps Add Perspective

Atmosphere CompositionAtmosphere Composition

At a turtle’s pace, we shift over to environment-friendly green technologies.

Weather, sea level rise, warming oceans, declining Arctic sea ice, extreme events – these are all tell-tale signs of global warming.

Today, you’ve seen how climate change maps like these give us new perspective.

…and some of the effects are already taking place.

Our climate has immeasurable importance.

From crop production to changing weather patterns, grasping a clear understanding of our changing climate is the best investment we could ever make.

What are your thoughts on climate change?

Do you have any more visuals to add to our list of climate change maps?

SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 28390
    • View Profile
Happy Earth Day. Enjoy It While You Last.
« Reply #59 on: April 23, 2017, 12:35:32 AM »
https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2017-04-21/happy-earth-day-enjoy-it-while-you-last

Science
Happy Earth Day. Enjoy It While You Last.


April 21, 2017 1:29 PM EDT
By
Faye Flam

The people who know the most about life on Earth tend to be the most impressed by its staying power.

Harvard professor Andrew Knoll marvels that our planet has sustained life continuously for four billion years -- most of its 4.5 billion years in existence. This is not just a matter of location, said Knoll, who is an earth and planetary scientist. Mars and Venus are both in what astronomers would consider a “habitable” zone, getting sunlight in a range suitable for living organisms. Now both are barren (or close to it).

Earth has special features that may or may not be present on many of the other planets detected around the galaxy. Earth’s geology helps regulate the climate through the cycling of carbon dioxide. When exposed rocks weather, carbon dioxide gets pulled out of the atmosphere, allowing the globe to cool. When those rocks get covered in ice, the weathering stops, and carbon can build up as it’s replenished by volcanoes.

We can thank Earth’s system of plate tectonics for this, said Peter Ward, a paleontologist from the University of Washington and co-author of the book “Rare Earth: Why Complex Life Is Uncommon in the Universe.” As new crust continues to be exposed in some places and old crust is buried, carbon can cycle in and of the atmosphere. We’re also very lucky, said Ward, that the Earth got just the right amount of water. It’s thought that most came from impacts with comets early in the history of the solar system. If we’d gotten a bit more, and ended up like that third-rate Kevin Costner movie, he said, Earth would be a lot hotter -- maybe too hot for complex life.

Complex life, including plants and animals, are particular. They didn’t get going until the most recent 600 million years. Bacteria are another story. It’s hard to put a date on the origin of simple life because it happened so early. What we know, said Harvard’s Knoll, is that the very oldest rocks on Earth were formed 3.8 billion years ago, and they hold preserved signatures of life.

That’s fast given the widely held view that a few million years after its formation, the infant Earth collided with another early planet, creating debris that became the moon. After the crash, some scientists have calculated that the Earth’s surface temperature reached 3,600 degrees Fahrenheit and our planet shone like a star.

After it cooled off, there were further radical changes: periods when tropical plants grew at the poles, and periods when ice flowed down to the equator. But the extremes always eventually gave way to more moderate periods, and life was never extinguished.

All this recovery and cycling may sound reassuring, backing a longstanding popular belief in an inherent balance of nature. As historian Spencer Weart describes it in his book “The Discovery of Global Warming”: “Hardly anyone could imagine that human actions, so puny among the vast natural powers, could offset the balance that governed the planet as a whole. This view of Nature -- suprahuman, benevolent and inherently stable -- lay deep in most human cultures.”

But in the last few decades, scientists have learned that there’s no real barrier between the physical processes of the planet and the biological ones. Earth was not born a blue planet rich with oxygen. Single-celled organisms called cyanobacteria started releasing oxygen into the atmosphere. The emergence of plants changed the climate. Animals changed the climate. Even the evolution of poop changed the physical world, said Ward, by creating a new mechanism by which carbon and other materials would get packaged up and sink to the bottom of the ocean.

That still leaves the argument that human-generated greenhouse gases -- like early fish poop -- represent nothing the Earth can’t handle. Knoll said he recalled a newspaper column by George Will, still available online, arguing that current climate change is nothing to worry about because the past periods of climate change were not the end of the world. But the column focused on recent, small blips in the climate, not on the bigger, longer-term upheavals.

Some periods of climate change were terrible. Take one 252 million years ago called the End Permian extinction. Large volcanic eruptions, possibly combined with ignition of coal beds, led to a rapid enough global warming to kill off about 90 percent of the planet’s species. This was good for some -- especially sulfur-excreting bacteria -- whose flourishing is preserved in the fossil record. But it was bad for plants and animals. In another of his popular books, “Under a Green Sky,” Ward describes the End Permian seashore this way: “No fish break its surface, no birds of any kind. We are under a pale green sky and it has the smell of death and poison.”

So life went on, in an altered form, and plants and animals again flourished after a few million years. Knoll doesn’t find this particularly reassuring. “We are changing the climate at a geologically unusual rate,” he said -- changes comparable to an era of volcanism a million times more powerful than anything in human history. Earth’s climate will probably recover from this human-fueled round of global warming, but “on time scales that are unimaginable to humans.” And perhaps without humans.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
5 Replies
1045 Views
Last post May 08, 2015, 02:48:28 PM
by RE
0 Replies
255 Views
Last post April 21, 2016, 02:16:25 AM
by Guest
0 Replies
301 Views
Last post May 07, 2016, 05:43:56 AM
by RE