AuthorTopic: The Environment Board  (Read 23893 times)

Offline Surly1

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Scientists amazed as Canadian permafrost thaws 70 years early
« Reply #150 on: June 19, 2019, 05:12:47 AM »
Scientists amazed as Canadian permafrost thaws 70 years early


General view of a landscape of partially thawed Arctic permafrost near Mould Bay, Canada, in this handout photo released June 18, 2019. The image was captured in 2016 by researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks who were amazed to find the permafrost thawing 70 years faster than models predicted. Louise Farquharson/Handout via REUTERS

LONDON (Reuters) - Permafrost at outposts in the Canadian Arctic is thawing 70 years earlier than predicted, an expedition has discovered, in the latest sign that the global climate crisis is accelerating even faster than scientists had feared.

General view of a landscape of partially thawed Arctic permafrost near Mould Bay, Canada, in this handout photo released June 18, 2019. The image was captured in 2016 by researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks who were amazed to find the permafrost thawing 70 years faster than models predicted. Louise Farquharson/Handout via REUTERS

A team from the University of Alaska Fairbanks said they were astounded by how quickly a succession of unusually hot summers had destabilized the upper layers of giant subterranean ice blocks that had been frozen solid for millennia.

“What we saw was amazing,” Vladimir E. Romanovsky, a professor of geophysics at the university, told Reuters by telephone. “It’s an indication that the climate is now warmer than at any time in the last 5,000 or more years.”

With governments meeting in Bonn this week to try to ratchet up ambitions in United Nations climate negotiations, the team’s findings, published on June 10 in Geophysical Research Letters, offered a further sign of a growing climate emergency.

The paper was based on data Romanovsky and his colleagues had been analyzing since their last expedition to the area in 2016. The team used a modified propeller plane to visit exceptionally remote sites, including an abandoned Cold War-era radar base more than 300 km from the nearest human settlement.

Diving through a lucky break in the clouds, Romanovsky and his colleagues said they were confronted with a landscape that was unrecognizable from the pristine Arctic terrain they had encountered during initial visits a decade or so earlier.

The vista had dissolved into an undulating sea of hummocks - waist-high depressions and ponds known as thermokarst. Vegetation, once sparse, had begun to flourish in the shelter provided from the constant wind.

Torn between professional excitement and foreboding, Romanovsky said the scene had reminded him of the aftermath of a bombardment.

“It’s a canary in the coalmine,” said Louise Farquharson, a post-doctoral researcher and co-author of the study. “It’s very likely that this phenomenon is affecting a much more extensive region and that’s what we’re going to look at next.”

Scientists are concerned about the stability of permafrost because of the risk that rapid thawing could release vast quantities of heat-trapping gases, unleashing a feedback loop that would in turn fuel even faster temperature rises.

Even if current commitments to cut emissions under the 2015 Paris Agreement are implemented, the world is still far from averting the risk that these kinds of feedback loops will trigger runaway warming, according to models used by the U.N.-backed Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

With scientists warning that sharply higher temperatures would devastate the global south and threaten the viability of industrial civilization in the northern hemisphere, campaigners said the new paper reinforced the imperative to cut emissions.

“Thawing permafrost is one of the tipping points for climate breakdown and it’s happening before our very eyes,” said Jennifer Morgan, Executive Director of Greenpeace International. “This premature thawing is another clear signal that we must decarbonize our economies, and immediately.”

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #151 on: June 24, 2019, 02:33:18 AM »
This weeks tree:
Eucalyptus Pauciflora "Little Snowman"
Hopefully will not need much water once established, and will be good for birds and insects.

https://www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2003/eucalyptus-pauciflora.html

Next week might be a native Bottle Brush or another citrus.
I am with you Re: "Save As Many As You Can".

JOW

Offline Surly1

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We Have Less Than a Millisecond Left
« Reply #152 on: June 28, 2019, 10:08:13 AM »
We Have Less Than a Millisecond Left-
 None of us should be thinking or talking about anything other than climate change.


We Have Less Than a Millisecond Left

LEE CAMP
We Have Less Than a Millisecond Left
Shutterstock

We have less than a millisecond left.

You see, the planet we call home has existed for roughly 4.55 billion years. But numbers that large mean almost nothing to me, nor to most people, so I choose to break it down. If we lay the age of the Earth out over a calendar year, that would amount to 518,264 years per hour or 144 years per second. So if we have 10 or 11 years until the point of no return, as climate scientists have repeatedly told us, that means we have a millisecond left before midnight in which to change our society completely to avoid turning the Earth into a piping hot fajita. (If you want to be more generous and instead look at how long modern homosapiens have been walking around, it’s 315,000 years. So if you lay that over a calendar year, we have roughly 15 minutes before the stroke of midnight to combat climate change. Not sure that makes me feel much better.)

None of us should be thinking about anything other than climate change. We all kind of know it even if we think we don’t know it. Even people who deny climate change exists probably secretly know it. They’re just confusing what they want to be true with what they subconsciously know to be true. I did the same thing when I was a child and tennis legend Jimmy Connors lost in the semifinals of the 1991 U.S. Open after his monumental run at the ancient age of 39. (For an 11-year-old, 39 sounds pretty close to mummified.) I was certain Jimmy would be playing in the finals. I knew deep within my bones that Jimbo would dazzle us with diving volleys and mid-court passing shots in the championship match because how could the powers that be allow the only character America genuinely cared about to bow out before the finals? In my mind it was akin to killing off Iron Man halfway through the movie “Iron Man.”

Jimmy Connors did not show up to the finals. Climate change is the only thing we should be thinking about.

I don’t just mean there should be a report every couple hours about climate change by our bloviating bullhorns of mainstream news. I don’t mean once a day you should mention to a friend that Al Gore seems vaguely douchey but probably has a point. I mean climate change should be ALL we’re thinking about. It should be a major factor in every conversation, every job, every TV show, every humor column, every tweet, every clever T-shirt slogan and every fortune cookie message. Climate change should be everything.

Plastic action figures for kids should have one arm melted off to symbolize the effects of climate change. Your server at a nice restaurant should sprinkle sand in your soup du jour to remind you of the disappearance of fresh water. Ice cream should be exclusively served melted to symbolize rising temperatures. Hamburgers should cost $200 to compensate for the global emissions of factory farming. And every time you go ice skating someone should punch you in the face and yell, “Enjoy it while it lasts!”

We have less than a millisecond left.

Simply put, humans have no business going about our day-to-day actions as if we aren’t on the event horizon. It’s equivalent to working on your model train set while your kitchen is burning down, your spouse is in the bathroom battling an alligator that took up residence in the bathtub, and your 12-year-old daughter is in the living room having just been offered heroin for the first time. … Right now, humanity is still focused on the model train.

The International Governmental Panel on Climate Change says the point of no return is the year 2030. This obviously doesn’t mean everything spontaneously combusts at the stroke of midnight 2030 (although that would be fascinating to watch). It means that after that point—if we aren’t living vastly different lives—no effort will change the fact that the planet inevitably will become uninhabitable and we humans inevitably will go extinct and there inevitably will be no more skiing (both due to a lack of snow and due to a lack of fleshy beings to ride on skis). The year 2030 is the point of no return. It is the date of our impending, prolonged suicide.

Let’s assume the world’s greatest climate scientists are way off. Let’s assume these people who do nothing other than study climatic models using computer programs so sophisticated I wouldn’t be qualified to turn them on—let’s assume they have their swollen heads up their highly-educated asses. Let’s assume that they were so wrong that it’s not 10 years but instead 20 years until the point of no return, so the amount of time we have left is double what they thought. That still means we should be thinking about nothing other than climate change. It still means our very survival as a species, or lack thereof, will be decided in the next couple decades. It still means we have only a millisecond.

Maybe we’re right to die off. Maybe our hubris and egos the size and shape of SUVs have doomed us, and we should just give up and enjoy our final few years. But if that’s the case, I would like an announcement. I would honestly prefer a national address by some of our so-called leaders stating clearly, “Look folks, in order to continue civilized society of the human species, we would need to change everything. Every single one of us would have to labor toward a massive shift to a sustainable culture that works in harmony with nature, rather than abusing nature like it’s a servant who gave us an ugly look. We would have to focus on achieving this new society rather than spending a third of all our free time watching superhero movies. But we have no intention of doing that because it sounds kinda hard, not to mention corporate profits would suffer in the short term. So instead, we’re declaring here and now that we’ll all just keep functioning as is until such time as the oceans turn to acid, the ever-growing storms consume us, and California feels like the inside of a kiln. According to our best minds, that will be 10 to 20 years from now, so don’t worry about starting that retirement fund. Don’t buy the extended warranty on that vacuum. And whatever you do, at no point, and under no circumstances, quit smoking and drinking. …”Thank you, and good night.”

If that’s the choice we’ve decided to make, then I want an announcement along these lines. On the other hand, if we decide to do the opposite and save ourselves, someone should probably let everyone know it’s an all-hands-on-deck scenario.

Let’s make the call. We have less than a millisecond left.

Lee Camp is an American stand-up comedian, writer, actor and activist. Camp is the host of the weekly comedy news TV show “Redacted Tonight With Lee Camp” on RT America. He is a former comedy writer for the Onion and the Huffington Post and has been a touring stand-up comic for 20 years.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: We Have Less Than a Millisecond Left
« Reply #153 on: June 28, 2019, 10:21:08 AM »
If that were true, we would have all been dead by the time I replied to your post.

Hyperbole in titling is not real helpful on this issue.  It amounts to another prediction not come true.

I do realize of course you did not write this headline.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #154 on: July 01, 2019, 02:19:27 AM »
This week's tree: Callistemon Citrinus.
"White Anzac" bottle brush. Australian native. Bird and insect attracting. Grows well in this area.
Have 2 red bottle brushes already on property which are always teeming with bees and yellow honey eaters when in flower. looking forward to see the white variety.

Next week will be another fruit tree I think. Maybe a blood orange or perhaps an apple... Have plenty of nuts and stone fruits already.

Plant a tree a week until I die. Save all you can.

JOW

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #155 on: July 01, 2019, 02:20:56 AM »
Here is a picture of a Callistemon citrinus..

Offline AJ

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #156 on: July 01, 2019, 03:06:35 AM »
I wish I could plant a tree a week :o.
1. I would have to put in T posts and wire fencing around every tree to keep the deer/elk from eating them to twigs.
2. The forest fire that is sure to come through here in time will burn Oregon to the ground and the area will become desert like Southern California (climate change is a bitch!).
Not sure a tree a week would help - at least here.
Good luck with the planting.
AJ
Nullis in Verba

Offline K-Dog

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Re: We Have Less Than a Millisecond Left
« Reply #157 on: July 01, 2019, 08:09:06 AM »
If that were true, we would have all been dead by the time I replied to your post.

Hyperbole in titling is not real helpful on this issue.  It amounts to another prediction not come true.

I do realize of course you did not write this headline.

RE

It is just the beginning.  Titles like that will be invented by pro-status quo players to emphasize foolish doom.  Forever doomers were ignored as being crazy.  Some of us are crazy but not all as we know.

Guy McPhee preaches a scary fact exaggerated story to audiences with nothing better to do than pay attention to him.  Similar messages will pushed by OPPONENTS of DOOM to make rational concern over our ecological/resource predicament seem foolish.

OH NO WE ARE ALL GOING TO DIE

You get that pushed at you three times a day and mission accomplished, you will hold doom in contempt and Trumptopia goes on.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2019, 08:11:33 AM by K-Dog »
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline azozeo

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #158 on: July 01, 2019, 11:54:40 AM »
Here is a picture of a Callistemon citrinus..

Growing up in So. Cal. back in the day, folks had these & the red ones in their yards. Nice touch to your surroundings.  :icon_sunny:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #159 on: July 01, 2019, 12:37:37 PM »
I wish I could plant a tree a week :o.
1. I would have to put in T posts and wire fencing around every tree to keep the deer/elk from eating them to twigs.
2. The forest fire that is sure to come through here in time will burn Oregon to the ground and the area will become desert like Southern California (climate change is a bitch!).
Not sure a tree a week would help - at least here.
Good luck with the planting.
AJ

I will plant a tree for you mate. Give me a suggestion.
I have trouble with rabbits and kangaroos, so I put a tree guard on every tree until established.
Very bad fire area here. (Just North of Melbourne Australia in what we call mountains...). Have strategies and equipment to try and defend the property. 

Here is a picture of a Callistemon citrinus..

Growing up in So. Cal. back in the day, folks had these & the red ones in their yards. Nice touch to your surroundings.  :icon_sunny:

Yes they are very nice trees. I have 2 red already and like I said birds and insects love them. Added bonus is they dont need watering once established as they are natives here and can handle the hot dry summers.

When all my trees are established and flowering I will post a few pictures. I think I have one of my flowering gums out front from last spring. I will see if I can find it.

JOW.
Below is a picture from summer of the 6 WA flowering gums I planted out front when we moved here nearly 20 years ago. Doing well.

Offline Eddie

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #160 on: July 01, 2019, 02:02:03 PM »
I wish I could plant a tree a week :o.
1. I would have to put in T posts and wire fencing around every tree to keep the deer/elk from eating them to twigs.
2. The forest fire that is sure to come through here in time will burn Oregon to the ground and the area will become desert like Southern California (climate change is a bitch!).
Not sure a tree a week would help - at least here.
Good luck with the planting.
AJ

I will plant a tree for you mate. Give me a suggestion.
I have trouble with rabbits and kangaroos, so I put a tree guard on every tree until established.
Very bad fire area here. (Just North of Melbourne Australia in what we call mountains...). Have strategies and equipment to try and defend the property. 

Here is a picture of a Callistemon citrinus..

Growing up in So. Cal. back in the day, folks had these & the red ones in their yards. Nice touch to your surroundings.  :icon_sunny:

Yes they are very nice trees. I have 2 red already and like I said birds and insects love them. Added bonus is they dont need watering once established as they are natives here and can handle the hot dry summers.

When all my trees are established and flowering I will post a few pictures. I think I have one of my flowering gums out front from last spring. I will see if I can find it.

JOW.
Below is a picture from summer of the 6 WA flowering gums I planted out front when we moved here nearly 20 years ago. Doing well.
Very nice avocation you've selected JOW. I am reading the thread with interest.

I think I'm going to put out the fig tree I propagated  a few years back ( the one from cuttings planted by the dead pioneers who settled my place) out at the lake house.It'll  be touch and go, but I already have two fig trees at the other house, and I want one out there. Plenty of water with the lake, but I'll still have to water it for years probably, to get it past the tough part.

My mango tree I started before Palloy drank the hemlock, is doing well, too, My grown daughter who is currently living with us re-potted it for me. I'm afraid to put it in the ground. Too likely to freeze, until things warm up a bit more. Maybe in the fullness of time.

This year climate change here means it's been the wettest year on record pretty much, which is more like a blessing than a curse. Not sure it keeps on doing that. We had an eight year miserable drought that only ended a few years back.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline AJ

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #161 on: July 01, 2019, 04:26:54 PM »


I will plant a tree for you mate. Give me a suggestion.
I have trouble with rabbits and kangaroos, so I put a tree guard on every tree until established.
Very bad fire area here. (Just North of Melbourne Australia in what we call mountains...). Have strategies and equipment to try and defend the property. 


Here is a picture of a Callistemon citrinus..

Yes they are very nice trees. I have 2 red already and like I said birds and insects love them. Added bonus is they dont need watering once established as they are natives here and can handle the hot dry summers.

When all my trees are established and flowering I will post a few pictures. I think I have one of my flowering gums out front from last spring. I will see if I can find it.

JOW.
Below is a picture from summer of the 6 WA flowering gums I planted out front when we moved here nearly 20 years ago. Doing well.
Any kind of fruit tree is nice.
I just bought a trash pump (can pump pond water) and then found out that the fire hose and fittings cost more than the pump. They are being shipped right now. Once I have it all here I can fight a small fire in the brush. However, if the BIG "burn the forest down fire" - PARADISE CA kinda fire - comes through I will be running at top speed to the pasture across the road.
You can see from my picture, we are in the forest.
Love your gum trees flowers :emthup:
AJ
Nullis in Verba

Offline azozeo

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Corporations and Bolsonaro Teaming Up to Destroy the Amazon
« Reply #162 on: July 02, 2019, 12:36:46 PM »



July 01st, 2019

By Joe Catron @jncatron
 2 Comments

As deforestation in Brazil’s Amazon rainforest reaches the highest level in a decade, the rainforest’s indigenous peoples and their supporters have called for action against the political and business interests they blame for a spike in illegal logging and other resource extraction.

A report released by Amazon Watch as part of its ongoing “Complicity in Destruction” campaign aims not only to spotlight the role of North American and Western European financiers, importers, and traders in the ongoing destruction of the Amazon, but also to mobilize support for a boycott launched by the National Indigenous Mobilization (MNI) against the Brazilian agribusiness and mining interests encroaching on the threatened region. The report says:

    The MNI requests solidarity from the international community to support these efforts, which aim to leverage global markets in order to moderate the behavior of the agroindustrial sector, as a means to halt [Brazil President Jair] Bolsonaro’s assault, ultimately protecting and restoring environmental safeguards and human rights.”

Christian Poirier, Amazon Watch’s Program Director, told MintPress News that the inauguration of right-wing strongman Jair Bolsonaro as Brazil’s president on January 1 lent fresh urgency to the campaign.


https://www.mintpressnews.com/report-corporations-brazil-bolsonaro-destroy-amazon/260112/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #163 on: July 02, 2019, 04:54:48 PM »
I wish I could plant a tree a week :o.
1. I would have to put in T posts and wire fencing around every tree to keep the deer/elk from eating them to twigs.
2. The forest fire that is sure to come through here in time will burn Oregon to the ground and the area will become desert like Southern California (climate change is a bitch!).
Not sure a tree a week would help - at least here.
Good luck with the planting.
AJ

I will plant a tree for you mate. Give me a suggestion.
I have trouble with rabbits and kangaroos, so I put a tree guard on every tree until established.
Very bad fire area here. (Just North of Melbourne Australia in what we call mountains...). Have strategies and equipment to try and defend the property. 

Here is a picture of a Callistemon citrinus..

Growing up in So. Cal. back in the day, folks had these & the red ones in their yards. Nice touch to your surroundings.  :icon_sunny:

Yes they are very nice trees. I have 2 red already and like I said birds and insects love them. Added bonus is they dont need watering once established as they are natives here and can handle the hot dry summers.

When all my trees are established and flowering I will post a few pictures. I think I have one of my flowering gums out front from last spring. I will see if I can find it.

JOW.
Below is a picture from summer of the 6 WA flowering gums I planted out front when we moved here nearly 20 years ago. Doing well.
Very nice avocation you've selected JOW. I am reading the thread with interest.

I think I'm going to put out the fig tree I propagated  a few years back ( the one from cuttings planted by the dead pioneers who settled my place) out at the lake house.It'll  be touch and go, but I already have two fig trees at the other house, and I want one out there. Plenty of water with the lake, but I'll still have to water it for years probably, to get it past the tough part.

My mango tree I started before Palloy drank the hemlock, is doing well, too, My grown daughter who is currently living with us re-potted it for me. I'm afraid to put it in the ground. Too likely to freeze, until things warm up a bit more. Maybe in the fullness of time.

This year climate change here means it's been the wettest year on record pretty much, which is more like a blessing than a curse. Not sure it keeps on doing that. We had an eight year miserable drought that only ended a few years back.

Cool mate.
Figs are indestructable! I have 2 on the property, one in the chicken pen which is thriving, and I cut back pretty savagely every year, and one I have neglected for 4 years as I planted it in the wrong spot out in my paddock. Every Summer it dies off and drops all its leaves. Every Spring it comes back.... I get a few figs every year, but birds get most. I will net them when I need more.
Too cold for mangoes in my area too. Big trees when they grow. I have 3 Avocado's which I have plastic around in winter, which are doing well, but frost knocks them really badly. No fruit yet.
I only have 2 acres, but I am surprised what you can fit on it! All up I have over 200 trees already. Nuts, fruit, ornamental and natives. 
Truth is I am cynical and angry. World is going to hell in a hand basket. Politicians are useless and Joe public is majority brainwashed denialist morons. I have decided all I can do is try and improve my little bit in of our world. Better to channel my anger into direct action of planting trees. Still not allowed to eat the stupid people in Australia.... I would start with the clergy and the politicians first. ;D


JOW


Offline RE

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #164 on: July 02, 2019, 08:01:12 PM »
Still not allowed to eat the stupid people in Australia.... I would start with the clergy and the politicians first. ;D

Banksters are my first choice of post-SHTF Day meats.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

 

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