AuthorTopic: The Environment Board  (Read 36706 times)

Offline azozeo

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Here’s how the hottest month in recorded history unfolded around the world
« Reply #195 on: August 11, 2019, 05:58:28 PM »


During the hottest month that humans have recorded, a local television station in the Netherlands aired nonstop images of wintry landscapes to help viewers momentarily forget the heat wave outside.

Officials in Switzerland and elsewhere painted stretches of rail tracks white, hoping to keep them from buckling in the extreme heat.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-environment/2019/08/05/heres-how-hottest-month-recorded-history-unfolded-around-globe/?noredirect=on&utm_source=pocket-newtab
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Surly1

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NASA Study Concludes When Civilization Will End, And It's Not Looking Good
« Reply #196 on: August 16, 2019, 06:21:54 AM »

NASA Study Concludes When Civilization Will End, And It's Not Looking Good for Us

Update: NASA is now clarifying its role in this study. NASA officials released this statement on the study on March 20, which seeks to distance the agency from the paper: "A soon-to-be published research paper, 'Human and Nature Dynamics (HANDY): Modeling Inequality and Use of Resources in the Collapse or Sustainability of Societies' by University of Maryland researchers Safa Motesharrei and Eugenia Kalnay, and University of Minnesota's Jorge Rivas, was not solicited, directed or reviewed by NASA. It is an independent study by the university researchers utilizing research tools developed for a separate NASA activity. As is the case with all independent research, the views and conclusions in the paper are those of the authors alone. NASA does not endorse the paper or its conclusions." Read the original story below.

Civilization was pretty great while it lasted, wasn't it? Too bad it's not going to for much longer. According to a new study sponsored by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, we only have a few decades left before everything we know and hold dear collapses.

The report, written by applied mathematician Safa Motesharrei of the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center along with a team of natural and social scientists, explains that modern civilization is doomed. And there's not just one particular group to blame, but the entire fundamental structure and nature of our society.

Analyzing five risk factors for societal collapse (population, climate, water, agriculture and energy), the report says that the sudden downfall of complicated societal structures can follow when these factors converge to form two important criteria. Motesharrei's report says that all societal collapses over the past 5,000 years have involved both "the stretching of resources due to the strain placed on the ecological carrying capacity" and "the economic stratification of society into Elites [rich] and Masses (or "Commoners") [poor]." This "Elite" population restricts the flow of resources accessible to the "Masses", accumulating a surplus for themselves that is high enough to strain natural resources. Eventually this situation will inevitably result in the destruction of society.

Elite power, the report suggests, will buffer "detrimental effects of the environmental collapse until much later than the Commoners," allowing the privileged to "continue 'business as usual' despite the impending catastrophe."

Science will surely save us, the nay-sayers may yell. But technology, argues Motesharrei, has only damned us further:

In other words, the benefits of technology are outweighed by how much the gains reinforce the existing, over-burdened system — making collapse even more likely.

The worst-case scenarios predicted by Motesharrei are pretty dire, involving sudden collapse due to famine or a drawn-out breakdown of society due to the over-consumption of natural resources. The best-case scenario involves recognition of the looming catastrophe by Elites and a more equitable restructuring of society, but who really believes that is going to happen? Here's what the study recommends in a nutshell:

These are great suggestions that will, unfortunately, almost certainly never be put into action, considering just how far down the wrong path our civilization has gone. As of last year, humans are using more resources than the Earth can replenish and the planet's distribution of resources among its terrestrial inhabitants is massively unequal. This is what happened to Rome and the Mayans, according to the report.

... historical collapses were allowed to occur by elites who appear to be oblivious to the catastrophic trajectory (most clearly apparent in the Roman and Mayan cases).

And that's not even counting the spectre of global climate change, which could be a looming "instant planetary emergency." According to Canadian Wildlife Service biologist Neil Dawe:

Economic growth is the biggest destroyer of the ecology. Those people who think you can have a growing economy and a healthy environment are wrong. If we don't reduce our numbers, nature will do it for us ... Everything is worse and we’re still doing the same things. Because ecosystems are so resilient, they don’t exact immediate punishment on the stupid.

In maybe the nicest way to say the end is nigh possible, Motesharrei's report concludes that "closely reflecting the reality of the world today ... we find that collapse is difficult to avoid."

Writes Nafeez Ahmed at The Guardian:

"Although the study is largely theoretical, a number of other more empirically-focused studies — by KPMG and the UK Government Office of Science for instance — have warned that the convergence of food, water and energy crises could create a 'perfect storm' within about fifteen years. But these 'business as usual' forecasts could be very conservative."

Well, at least zombies aren't real.

Update: NASA has issued a clarification about its role in the study, saying that while the study relies on NASA research tools developed for another project, it did not directly solicit, direct, or review Motesharrei's paper. "As is the case with all independent research, the views and conclusions in the paper are those of the authors alone. NASA does not endorse the paper or its conclusions."


https://www.mic.com/articles/85541/nasa-study-concludes-when-civilization-will-end-and-it-s-not-looking-good-for-us
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline azozeo

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Re: NASA Study Concludes When Civilization Will End, And It's Not Looking Good
« Reply #197 on: August 16, 2019, 06:53:16 AM »
<div><img alt="" sizes="(min-width:768px) 1020px, 414px" src="https://imgix.bustle.com/mic/758650cdac2974653775e1a3ba00e59f6d7f688448dfd420dc40cac35b4a0858.jpg?w=1020&h=576&fit=crop&crop=faces&auto=format&q=70" srcset="https://imgix.bustle.com/mic/758650cdac2974653775e1a3ba00e59f6d7f688448dfd420dc40cac35b4a0858.jpg?w=414&h=233&fit=crop&crop=faces&auto=format&q=70 414w, https://imgix.bustle.com/mic/758650cdac2974653775e1a3ba00e59f6d7f688448dfd420dc40cac35b4a0858.jpg?w=414&h=233&fit=crop&crop=faces&auto=format&q=70&dpr=2 828w, https://imgix.bustle.com/mic/758650cdac2974653775e1a3ba00e59f6d7f688448dfd420dc40cac35b4a0858.jpg?w=1020&h=576&fit=crop&crop=faces&auto=format&q=70 1020w, https://imgix.bustle.com/mic/758650cdac2974653775e1a3ba00e59f6d7f688448dfd420dc40cac35b4a0858.jpg?w=1020&h=576&fit=crop&crop=faces&auto=format&q=70&dpr=2 2040w" /></div>
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<h1>NASA Study Concludes When Civilization Will End, And It's Not Looking Good for Us</h1>
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<div><span>By </span>Tom McKay</div>
<time>Mar 18 2014</time></div>
<a href="https://www.facebook.com/sharer/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.mic.com%2Farticles%2F85541%2Fnasa-study-concludes-when-civilization-will-end-and-it-s-not-looking-good-for-us%3Futm_term%3Dshare" title="Share" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><button></button>[/url]</div>
<div>Update: NASA is now clarifying its role in this study. NASA officials released this statement on the study on March 20, which seeks to distance the agency from the paper: "A soon-to-be published research paper, 'Human and Nature Dynamics (HANDY): Modeling Inequality and Use of Resources in the Collapse or Sustainability of Societies' by University of Maryland researchers Safa Motesharrei and Eugenia Kalnay, and University of Minnesota's Jorge Rivas, was not solicited, directed or reviewed by NASA. It is an independent study by the university researchers utilizing research tools developed for a separate NASA activity. As is the case with all independent research, the views and conclusions in the paper are those of the authors alone. NASA does not endorse the paper or its conclusions." Read the original story below.</div>
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<p>Civilization was pretty great while it lasted, wasn't it? Too bad it's not going to for much longer. According to a new study sponsored by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, we only have a few decades left before everything we know and hold dear collapses.</p>
<p>The report, written by applied mathematician Safa Motesharrei of the <a href="http://www.sesync.org/" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center[/url] along with a team of natural and social scientists, explains that <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/environment/earth-insight/2014/mar/14/nasa-civilisation-irreversible-collapse-study-scientists" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">modern civilization is doomed[/url]. And there's not just one particular group to blame, but the entire fundamental structure and nature of our society.</p>
<p>Analyzing five risk factors for societal collapse (population, climate, water, agriculture and energy), the report says that the sudden downfall of complicated societal structures can follow when these factors converge to form two important criteria. Motesharrei's report says that all societal collapses over the past 5,000 years have involved both "the stretching of resources due to the strain placed on the ecological carrying capacity" and "the economic stratification of society into Elites [rich] and Masses (or "Commoners") [poor]." This "Elite" population restricts the flow of resources accessible to the "Masses", accumulating a surplus for themselves that is high enough to strain natural resources. Eventually this situation will inevitably result in the destruction of society.</p>
<p>Elite power, the report suggests, will buffer "detrimental effects of the environmental collapse until much later than the Commoners," allowing the privileged to "continue 'business as usual' despite the impending catastrophe."</p>
<p>Science will surely save us, the nay-sayers may yell. But technology, argues Motesharrei, has only damned us further:</p>
<p>In other words, the benefits of technology are outweighed by how much the gains reinforce the existing, over-burdened system — making collapse even more likely.</p>
<p>The worst-case scenarios predicted by Motesharrei are pretty dire, involving sudden collapse due to famine or a drawn-out breakdown of society due to the over-consumption of natural resources. The best-case scenario involves recognition of the looming catastrophe by Elites and a more equitable restructuring of society, but who really believes that is going to happen? Here's what the study <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/environment/earth-insight/2014/mar/14/nasa-civilisation-irreversible-collapse-study-scientists" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">recommends[/url] in a nutshell:</p>
<p>These are great suggestions that will, unfortunately, almost certainly never be put into action, considering just how far down the wrong path our civilization has gone. As of last year, humans are using <a href="http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-08/congratulations-today-we-are-officially-consuming-more-earth-can-replenish" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">more resources[/url] than the Earth can replenish and the planet's distribution of resources among its terrestrial inhabitants is <a href="http://www.globalpost.com/special-reports/global-income-inequality-great-divide-globalpost" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">massively unequal[/url]. This is what happened to Rome and the Mayans, according to the report.</p>
... historical collapses were allowed to occur by elites who appear to be oblivious to the catastrophic trajectory (most clearly apparent in the Roman and Mayan cases).

<p>And that's not even counting the spectre of global climate change, which could be a looming <a href="http://www.thenation.com/article/177614/coming-instant-planetary-emergency" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">"instant planetary emergency."[/url] According to Canadian Wildlife Service biologist Neil Dawe:</p>
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Economic growth is the biggest destroyer of the ecology. Those people who think you can have a growing economy and a healthy environment are wrong. If we don't reduce our numbers, nature will do it for us ... Everything is worse and we’re still doing the same things. Because ecosystems are so resilient, they don’t exact immediate punishment on the stupid.

<p>In maybe the nicest way to say the end is nigh possible, Motesharrei's report concludes that "closely reflecting the reality of the world today ... we find that collapse is difficult to avoid."</p>
<p><a href="http://www.theguardian.com/environment/earth-insight/2014/mar/14/nasa-civilisation-irreversible-collapse-study-scientists" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">Writes[/url] Nafeez Ahmed at The Guardian:</p>
<p>"Although the study is largely theoretical, a number of other more empirically-focused studies — by <a href="http://www.kpmg.com/global/en/issuesandinsights/articlespublications/future-state-government/pages/resource-stress.aspx" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">KPMG[/url] and the <a href="http://www.bis.gov.uk/assets/goscience/docs/p/perfect-storm-paper.pdf" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">UK Government Office of Science[/url] for instance — have warned that the convergence of food, water and energy crises could create a 'perfect storm' within about fifteen years. But these 'business as usual' forecasts could be <a href="http://ceasefiremagazine.co.uk/the-end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it-the-rise-of-the-post-carbon-era/" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">very conservative[/url]."</p>
<p>Well, at least zombies aren't real.</p>
<p>Update: NASA has issued a <a href="http://www.space.com/25160-nasa-statement-civilization-collapse-study.html" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">clarification[/url] about its role in the study, saying that while the study relies on NASA research tools developed for another project, it did not directly solicit, direct, or review Motesharrei's paper. "As is the case with all independent research, the views and conclusions in the paper are those of the authors alone. NASA does not endorse the paper or its conclusions."</p>
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https://www.mic.com/articles/85541/nasa-study-concludes-when-civilization-will-end-and-it-s-not-looking-good-for-us


Great post. It will be sooner than later. Will the next decade be called the roaring twenty's ?
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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🏞️ Lies, Damned Lies, and Sustainable Development
« Reply #198 on: August 17, 2019, 12:23:04 AM »
https://dissidentvoice.org/2019/08/lies-damned-lies-and-sustainable-development/

Lies, Damned Lies, and Sustainable Development

by Bill Willers / August 16th, 2019

    [W]hy do so many assume that a ‘Green New Deal’ won’t just empower those same forces that have run havoc upon the world for the past half century and just cause more death and starvation than has already been suffered under Globalization?
    — Matthew Ehret, 2019

Sustainable development, the concept, was advanced in 1987 by the United Nations in “Our Common Future,” aka The Bruntland Report, in which it was defined as “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” In truth, the Report, intended for “those who shape policy and make decisions that affect the course of development and the condition of the environment”, has served as justification for sustained growth: “A five to tenfold increase in manufacturing output will be needed”; “Painful choices have to be made.” In an alarming display of ecological ignorance, there was admission of guaranteed biological destruction: “Efforts to save particular species will be possible for only relatively few of the more spectacular and important ones.”

Not long thereafter, the concept of sustainable development was boosted by organizations with clout. The World Conservation Union (IUCN) produced in 1991 “Caring For The Earth: A Strategy For Sustainable Living,” a declaration of principles by a coalition of conservation organizations, supported by “sponsors” and “collaborators” that included national develop agencies, the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. The IUCN therein defined sustainable development as “improving the quality of human life while living within the carrying capacity of supporting ecosystems.” In the same year, the Trilateral Commission published a book, Beyond Interdependence, in which, in a chapter titled “The Growth Imperative and Sustainable Development”, the authors declared that “The maxim of sustainable development is not ‘limits to growth’; it is ’the growth of limits’,” a direct attack on the Club of Rome’s 1972 “The Limits To Growth.”

Sustainable development was quickly introduced into the educational system. In 1992, educators all over the U.S. were receiving a slick promotional brochure for a book, “World Resources 1992-93: A Guide to the Global Environment.” A few weeks later, the book was sent gratis to key educators. A publication of the World Resources Institute (WRI), it was promoted as “the overpowering challenger in the contest for primacy among environmental almanacs”. WRI described its goal as an organization “to help….. grapple with one of our time’s most pressing questions: How can societies meet human needs and nurture economic growth without destroying the natural resources and environmental integrity that make prosperity possible (emphasis added). WRI was supported financially by Corporate Property Investors, Mitchell Energy and Development Corporation, and foundations for Weyerhaeuser, Amoco and Shell Oil. A category “Corporate Associates” included Waste Management, Inc., Monsanto, Chevron and E. I. duPont de Nemours, with “cooperating organizations” including the World Bank, the Overseas Development Association, and other organizations devoted to growth and resource exploitation (current WRI support here).

The Federal Government championed sustainable development from the beginning. In 1992 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sent a report (230-R-93-005) to Congress with “EPA is … assisting regional, state, and local efforts to promote sustainable development … The Nation can only achieve and maintain sustainable development when its citizens understand the concept and embrace it as a national priority.” President Clinton’s 25-person Council on Sustainable Development was co-chaired by Dow Chemical vice president David Buzzelli. Eight representatives had corporate ties (e.g., Chemical Manufacturer’s Association, the Committee for Economic Development, the American Petroleum Institute, and the Business Council for Economic Development), whereas the five environmentalists were administrators for “Big 10″ environmental organizations, themselves recipients of corporate largesse. And why be surprised? The Council just mirrored Clinton and his Vice President, as they expressed the view that “We will renew America’s commitment to leave our children a better nation … whose leadership for sustainable global growth is unsurpassed” (emphasis added).

In 1972, the Club of Rome published “The Limits To Growth” grounded on a study of five factors: resource depletion, industrial output, pollution, agriculture, and population growth, and the dynamics of their interactions. Conclusions of the study were a harsh warning regarding limitations that our beautiful home planet places on human activities, because system collapse was predicted for the middle of the current Century if a “business-as-usual” model were to be maintained, which, despite much political posturing, has been the case. There have been periodic updates of the study. Such “doomsday” talk has not been what industrial and financial interests have wanted to hear, and since publication there has been much criticism of “The Limits To Growth” from economists and the business community. However, a recent “40 year update”, a 2014 study released by the University of Melbourne, reveals that the business-as-usual scenario of The Limits To Growth “… aligns well with historical data that has been updated for this paper.” Data came from the UN and federal sources. That the gravity of this global situation is not front-and-center news is itself a reflection of media ownership.

Sustainable development, in sum, was captured early on by global financial forces the life blood of which is unending growth. As history confirms, it has proven to be a highly manipulable concept for a corporate/political/media network to normalize in the public mind. The suggestion of sustainability indicates things are going to be just fine, so it has been employed as a kind of mass tranquilizer. As the sustainability idea has advanced over the decades, discussions surrounding it have shifted easily, as required, between ‘development’ and ‘growth.’ Among the UN’s many laudable Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), such as peace and the eradication of poverty, one also finds the advancement of “inclusive and sustained economic growth” in which “business and the private sector” are to play a key role, this expressed in its Agenda 2030. The admittedly “supremely ambitious” Agenda 2030 looks like 15,000 words of wishful thinking considering the profit-driven interests that have been — and that are intent on remaining — at the helm. The banking world certainly has lost no time in the creation of “green financial instruments” for the Green New Deal.

The prospect of the Green New Deal becoming morphed into Sustainable Development by another name is real, given the powerful forces so adept at co-opting and repackaging things to serve their own ends. The development/growth debate has long been dominated by business interests, economists, advertisers and corporate journalists, with biologists neglectfully absent. And yet, it all boils down to biology, for when species “overshoot” the capacities of their environments to support them, collapse is the result. Our species is certainly unique in the ability to modify ecosystems (typically at the expense of other life forms) as a means of staving off the impacts of our having exceeded — as we know we have — earth’s ability to support our resource-hungry billions. But we are not immune to natural laws, and this party cannot last forever. It’s not clear, exactly, how it will play out in the long run, but one thing is certain: Ultimately, we shall find out.

Bill Willers is an emeritus professor of biology, University of Wisconsin at Oshkosh. He is founder of the Superior Wilderness Action Network and editor of Learning to Listen to the Land, and Unmanaged Landscapes, both from Island Press. He can be contacted at willers@uwosh.edu. Read other articles by Bill.

This article was posted on Friday, August 16th, 2019 at 7:42am and is filed under Environment, Sustainability, United Nations.

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Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #199 on: August 17, 2019, 02:42:20 AM »
https://dissidentvoice.org/2019/08/lies-damned-lies-and-sustainable-development/

Lies, Damned Lies, and Sustainable Development

by Bill Willers / August 16th, 2019

Blah blah blah........

 It’s not clear, exactly, how it will play out in the long run, but one thing is certain: Ultimately, we shall find out.

It wont play out in the long run.
It will play out in the very short term.... Perhaps in my lifetime. Depends on how long I live when shit gets really silly....
Too many rats in too small a cage.

Attached is the following pictures:
The 5 bottle brush trees and the 5 blackwoods I have planted over the last few months. Blackwoods are native to area and were propagated from seed off the tree in background in photo.
My 3 avocados in their winter guards. Centre one is grown from seed we sprouted inside on the window sill in a glass of water, and is double in size compared to the same age grafted trees from a nursery. all need front protection here in winter. Still a little too cold here for avocados in winter when young. 
Also a picture of the golden wattles next door just getting to the end their full bloom. Great for bees in winter! Plan to jump the fence and grab a few seed pods when I know they are not home....
Have had a planting lull for last 2 weeks getting cuttings ready for a spring offensive!
As you can see from photos nice and green right now. Plenty of water around. Gets pretty hot and dry in summer.

Plant a tree a week until I die is my plan.
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Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #200 on: August 24, 2019, 10:55:37 PM »
Tree of the week: More shrubbery than trees this week...
Leucadendrin laureolum x salignum 'Inca Gold" South African origin I believe but does well here.
https://www.australianplants.com/plants.aspx?id=1331
Good bird attracting and drought tolerant once established.
Also planted a Rhododendron "Cowbell" to please the most important bird indoors.
https://garden.org/plants/view/765345/Rhododendron-Cowbell/
Everything else in the paddock looking well. Deciduous fruit trees buds starting to swell and a few blossoms already out on the almond.
Still frost danger for another 3 or 4 weeks. Plenty of moisture around at he moment, and plenty of underground mutton around. (rabbits)

Plant a tree a week until you die. Save what you can.

JOW

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #201 on: August 24, 2019, 11:43:58 PM »
Fools & Dreamers: Regenerating a Native Forest (Full Documentary)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VZSJKbzyMc

This guy has the right idea.

JOW

Offline azozeo

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Fire Resistant Coconut Husks Can Replace Wood and Save Millions of Trees
« Reply #202 on: August 31, 2019, 02:48:04 PM »
by John Vibes, Guest writer

According to a study published in Nature, 15.3 billion trees are chopped down every year, and roughly 46% of the world’s trees have been cleared over the past 12,000 years.

For most manufacturing, wood is not even necessary anymore, but unfortunately, humans have been slow to develop alternatives. A Dutch start-up called CocoPallet is one of the companies that are working to change this.

CocoPallet makes transportation pallets from coconut husks, which means that the material is 100% organic and it also being recycled from a waste product.

The process used by CocoPallet is actually cheaper than using wood, and the design is more practical and durable as well. It is estimated that the company saves roughly 200 million trees from being cut down every year since shipping pallets are used everywhere.

The technology was initially developed by researchers at Wageningen University but was later commercialized by Michiel Vos, founder of CocoPallet.

Crafting objects out of coconuts never occurred to Jan Van Dam, a plant scientist at Wageningen University, but over 20 years ago, an Indonesian man entered his office at the college to show him something. At the time, Van Dam specialized in developing materials out of plant fiber, but this was something he had never seen before.

“It looked like a normal piece of hardboard. But according to this man, it was not made out of logged trees, but completely made out of coconut bark, the outer shell of the fruit. Rock hard, wood-like board material from coconut husk? That was new to me,” Van Dam told Dutch news source ‘de Volkskrant’.

Van Dam also explained that a recyclable product like this is needed, especially in places like Asia where coconut waste is abundant.


http://humansarefree.com/2019/08/fire-resistant-coconut-husks-can.html
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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Ireland Pledges to Plant 440 Million Trees Over the Next 20 Years
« Reply #203 on: September 08, 2019, 10:35:53 AM »
Tree of the week: More shrubbery than trees this week...
Leucadendrin laureolum x salignum 'Inca Gold" South African origin I believe but does well here.
https://www.australianplants.com/plants.aspx?id=1331
Good bird attracting and drought tolerant once established.
Also planted a Rhododendron "Cowbell" to please the most important bird indoors.
https://garden.org/plants/view/765345/Rhododendron-Cowbell/
Everything else in the paddock looking well. Deciduous fruit trees buds starting to swell and a few blossoms already out on the almond.
Still frost danger for another 3 or 4 weeks. Plenty of moisture around at he moment, and plenty of underground mutton around. (rabbits)

Plant a tree a week until you die. Save what you can.

JOW




https://themindunleashed.com/2019/09/ireland-plant-440-million-trees.html




I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline azozeo

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South African Miracle Plant Can Remove More CO2 Per Ac Than Subtropical Forests
« Reply #204 on: September 08, 2019, 10:40:47 AM »


By Mayukh Saha / Truth Theory

Its humble claim to fame is as a beautiful plant used for indoor decoration and food and medicinal purposes. It is known to adapt to multiple conditions from the rainy tropics to the arid lands typical to South Africa. But this modest plant has acquired international fame as a plant capable of sponging out carbon dioxide from the atmosphere at a higher rate per hectare than even the Amazon rainforests! Say hello to the Elephant Food, just one of its many names.

A surprising ally in the fight against global warming, the humble Portulacaria Afra (Elephant Food, Porkbush and Spekboom in Afrikaans) is a common, luscious, fleshy, and juicy plant used as a decorating plant. But it has a surprisingly important quality as it is effective in binding carbon dioxide in semi-arid landscapes and thicket vegetation.

Also read: How A Brazilian Photographer Restored An Entire Forest With 2.7 million Trees In 20 Years

A hectare of Porkbush consequently can absorb more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere than any other plant or tree, even more than the Amazon forests, know to take in almost half of the world’s greenhouse gases. This makes the Porkbush one of the most promising weapons in the fight against global warming. The plant is a succulent, hardy and soft-wooded bush with brownish stems. The leaves are plump, juicy, and bright green.
Some Alarming CO2 Facts

Check this out: the amount of carbon dioxide has spiked alarmingly in the past decades. It peaked at an alarming 405 parts per million in 2017, a 3 million years high when temperatures were 2-3 degrees higher than during the pre-industrial years and the sea level was 15-25 meters higher.

Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas, the excess presence of which is contributing to the global rise in earth’s temperature and climate change.


https://truththeory.com/2019/09/02/this-south-african-miracle-plant-can-remove-more-co2-per-hectare-than-subtropical-forests/
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Offline azozeo

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Pre-Historic Plants Reproduce for the 1st Time !
« Reply #205 on: September 13, 2019, 07:52:47 AM »


Prehistoric Plants Reproduce In The UK For The First Time In Human History Due To Climate Change

2019/09/4

By Mayukh Saha / Truth Theory

Botanists are of the opinion that the Isle of Wight contains a palm tree of prehistoric origin which has recently produced cones of both genders. It is believed that climate change is the major reason behind the flowering and flourishing of this tree, which used to be extremely prevalent on Earth nearly 250 million years ago. The tree is situated in the Ventnor Botanic Gardens.

One of the reasons climate change affects this palm is because the Gardens has a temperature difference of nearly 5 degrees with the rest of England. Incidentally, this is the second warmest place in all of the United Kingdom, behind the Isles of Scilly. Liz Walker of the abovementioned garden is quite excited to find out about the different seeds that might come up after the pollen is transferred.

She also believes that this could be considered as conclusive proof that climate change exists. For, this plant had no chance of growing in the temperate regions of the UK, and it is the heatwave of the last few months which has led to its growth.

This plant’s other known name is the Japanese Sago Palm, scientifically referred to as Cycas revoluta. It was prevalent in the Jurassic times and found in the steep cliffs of limestone, which gave rise to the UK. The Jurassic period had a large amount of CO2 in its atmosphere which led to the plant flourishing. Could it be possible that the carbon emissions have gone up so high so as to facilitate the growth of such plants yet again?

The curator of the Gardens, Chris Kidd told CNN that the cycads were grown to experiment on, something that was unheard of a decade and a half ago. While this cone was extremely widespread before the evolution which made plants flowered, now it is simply used as an ornament in British homes.

Kidd mentions that 15 years ago, the cycad not only survived the harsh English winter but also grew leaves. Half a decade back, a cycad of masculine nature produced something akin to a cone, which was not expected. And recently, in an even more surprising turn of events, both genders producing cones.

There has been the presence of prehistoric cycads fossilized near the reproducing cycads. Yet, due to a considerable distance between them, biologists and scientists have to manually transfer their pollen from one place to the other.


https://truththeory.com/2019/09/04/prehistoric-plants-reproduce-in-the-uk-for-the-first-time-in-human-history-due-to-climate-change/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline John of Wallan

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Water water everywhere and not a drop to drink
« Reply #206 on: September 15, 2019, 03:13:22 PM »
Our country is the worlds biggest island and driest continent.
Some are waking up to the fact that no one, not even 1st world countries are immune from drought. No rain eventually means no water.
A lot of city people think this is only a 3rd world African or Middle East problem.
These major, modern towns will literally have no water coming through the taps.
Australia's biggest city, Sydney, is not far away from the same situation.
Big wake up calls are coming.

We all need to spend our scarce resources on water and food security, not guns, bombs, tanks, electric self driving cars, mcmansions and gadgets with screens..

JOW


The towns that are at risk of running out of water
The drought crisis crippling parts of the eastern seaboard will come to a head within just a few weeks. Photo: AAP

The drought crisis crippling parts of the eastern seaboard may come to a head within weeks as several regional centres are set to completely run out of water within two months.
Parts of regional NSW could run out of water as early as November, with data showing the worst-case scenario for the state if there’s no rain or government intervention.
The projections from NSW’s river operator and bulk water supplier, WaterNSW, show without significant rain, the first towns to lose water supply will be Dubbo, Cobar, Nyngan and Narromine in central NSW, with the Macquarie River forecast to run dry by November.
Normally, the Macquarie River experiences an average inflow of 1448 gigalitres a year, but in the past two years has seen just 97 gigalitres enter the river system, the data, seen by AAP shows.
Meanwhile, the Queensland state government has announced drastic measures to combat the falling water levels and keep some of its regional towns alive.
The NSW situation has been described as “critical” by state Water Minister Melinda Pavey, with the government insisting it’s doing everything it can to make sure the State gets through the devastating drought.
Australia’s longest river – the Murray – has been severely affected with 901 gigalitres of water entering the system in the past 12 months, compared with its annual average of 5000 gigalitres.
The data shows that Menindee Lakes, which is a source of flows for the lower Darling and is a vital fish nursery, received just six gigalitres of water in the past year.
Its annual inflow average is 1387 gigalitres.
The lakes sit within the town of Menindee, which experienced mass fish deaths along the Darling River last summer.
Residents have questioned the drainage of the lakes twice in 2017 with some suggesting the fish carnage wouldn’t have happened if the lakes were full.
The Water NSW data shows the lakes received 2100 gigalitres of water in 2016-17 followed by just 52 gigalitres of water in 2017-18.
Under the worst-case scenario, the Lachlan River, which runs through the state’s central west, is projected to run dry by March 2020 leaving the towns of Forbes, Cowra and Parkes without water supply.
The river is the fourth-longest in Australia and annually receives an average of 1212 gigalitres of water, but in the last year recorded inflows of just 107 gigalitres.
summer promises more dry weather and fires
Cattle at a property in Quilpie, in south-west Queensland in late August. Photo: AAP
The state’s north-west, including the small towns of Manilla and Boggabri, could also run out of water by the same date if the upper Namoi River doesn’t receive any rainfall.
A group of rivers that straddle the NSW and Queensland border and supply water to the towns of Boggabilla, Ashford and Goondiwindi, received just 17 gigalitres of inflows in the past year compared to an annual average of 1000 gigalitres.
WaterNSW also predicted the Border rivers will run dry by September 2020 without government intervention and rain.
Water is projected to stop flowing from taps in the northern NSW town of Inverell in March 2021 where the Gwydir River, which usually receives 1141 gigalitres of rain a year, will dry up after just 19 gigalitres entered the system last year.
The data predicts that most of Sydney’s water supply will remain flowing until at least October 2021 when, under the worst-case scenario, the upper Nepean River will run dry.
Australia’s largest urban water-supply dam – Warragamba Dam – is projected to stop flowing by January 2022, according to the data.
Warragamba Dam received 105 gigalitres of water in the last year, compared with its annual average of 1069 gigalitres.
Outlooks for spring and December again point to above-average temperatures.
With the exception of only parts of Western Australia and the west coast of Tasmania, the outlook for rainfall across the country is below average.

Relief for southern Queensland
With less rainfall and high temperatures, it means some governments are resorting to drastic measures to keep towns hydrated.
Over the weekend Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced that the Queensland government would provide $800,000 a month to truck in water to drought-stricken Stanthorpe, about 220 kilometres south-west of Brisbane.
Between 30 and 40 trucks will cart the water into the town every day.
A further $2.4 million will be spent on two one-megalitre tanks in Stanthorpe to hold supplies that will be trucked in when the dwindling local dams run out.
The drastic measure will ensure residents of the town will have a secure drinking water supply until 2020.
“With bushfires following the prolonged drought, Stanthorpe will not be left to battle through this alone,” Ms Palaszczuk said.

-with AAP

Link:
https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2019/09/15/drought-eastern-states/

Offline Surly1

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'Dead tree after dead tree.' The case of Washington's dying foliage
« Reply #207 on: September 19, 2019, 03:52:57 AM »
'Dead tree after dead tree.' The case of Washington's dying foliage


Trees are shown through fog on Friday, April 5, 2019, in the Hoh Rainforest on the Olympic Peninsula.
CREDIT: KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER
When Jim and Judy Davis moved to their property in Granite Falls two and a half years ago, the trees in their 25-acre forest were healthy.

Then the hemlocks started to turn brown.

Now, “if we were to walk this path completely -- it’s about a quarter of a mile -- this is what you would see,” Jim Davis said, “just dead tree after dead tree.

“It’s just a feeling of sadness and helplessness."

News outlets around the country are providing special coverage this week of climate change. KUOW will have stories and interviews on the crisis and what to do about it. #ClimateCoverageNow

So the Davises called in Kevin Zobrist.

“I feel like I'm always coming out to a crime scene, you know: another dead tree, another one lost, coming out to investigate,” Zobrist said.

Zobrist is a forestry professor at Washington State University. He said this isn’t just a problem on the Davis’ property.

“When I drive up and down the highways around western Washington, I just see dead and dying hemlocks all up and down the roads,” Zobrist said. “We first noticed it right around 2016, and now I just see it everywhere.”

And it’s not just hemlocks. Western red cedars and big-leaf maples are struggling as well. All three species are native to western Washington.

Zobrist isn’t the only one seeing this: KUOW’s listeners have been writing in to ask about why they’re seeing so many dead trees.

Zobrist thinks the answer lies in climate change.

“At this point in time, my top suspect is drought — drought stress from climate change,” he said. “We've seen records being set for heat and drought in a number of years in a row now, starting with 2012.”

“This summer was a little bit better,” he said. “But that cumulative drought stress is really taking its toll.”

Thirst can weaken trees’ immune systems, and then something else, like an insect or fungus, can kill them.

It's not just happening in places we can see it, like gardens, parks and roadways. It’s happening deep in the forest as well.

Glenn Kohler, a forest entomologist for the Washington Department of Natural Resources, visits a forest near Bellingham where he spotted dead trees during an annual forest health survey.
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Glenn Kohler, a forest entomologist for the Washington Department of Natural Resources, visits a forest near Bellingham where he spotted dead trees during an annual forest health survey.
CREDIT: KUOW PHOTO/EILIS O'NEILL

Glenn Kohler, a forest entomologist for Washington’s Department of Natural Resources, and his colleagues fly over every forested acre of the state every year and measure how many trees have died.

“So the individual trees or a patch of dead trees are going to have the same kind of red color that's easy to see from an airplane,” Kohler said. “That's what we're mapping.”

“The amount of that is increasing right now,” he said.

In 2018, Kohler and his colleagues found that nearly 500,000 acres of Washington’s forests had some level of damage. That’s an area bigger than all of Kitsap County.

In short, western Washington’s forests are changing, Zobrist said. Some trees may be lost in places where they used to be able to survive.

“This is, I think, the first really visible impact of climate change in our area,” Zobrist said. “And it's kind of a warning of things to come.”

Jim and Judy Davis say, now that the initial shock of the dying hemlocks has worn off, they’ve come up with a plan. They’re going to take out some of the dead trees and limbs to reduce fire risk around their house, and they’ve started to plant new trees, choosing drought-tolerant native species.

Zobrist said other homeowners can do the same thing.

Also, he said, take a look around the tree, at what else might be competing for water.

“Grass is the worst,” he said. “I see lots of situations where there's a lawn or tall grass all the way up to the edge of the tree and that grass layer robs all the water, so get the grass out of there. Replace that with a good three to four inches of mulch.”

The Davises hope measures like these will help their forest survive for decades to come, for their kids and seven grandkids.

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 220 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.

« Last Edit: September 19, 2019, 03:55:01 AM by Surly1 »
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Millions hit the streets for global climate change strike - live updates
« Reply #208 on: September 20, 2019, 12:45:19 PM »
Joan of Arc was 16 also.


She was Burned at the Stake at Age 19.

RE

https://www.cbsnews.com/live-news/global-climate-change-strike-protests-today-2019-09-20-live-updates/

Millions hit the streets for global climate change strike - live updates


By Haley Ott

Updated on: September 20, 2019 / 3:27 PM / CBS News

    Millions of people are skipping school and work around the world to protest climate change.
    They are demanding "an end to the age of fossil fuels."
    Climate activist Greta Thunberg is one of thousands participating in the New York City march.
    Thousands joined in marches in New York City, Chicago, Denver and more cities across the country.

Millions of people around the world are walking out of their schools and workplaces Friday to demand urgent action on climate change. The global climate strikes, which are taking place in more than 150 countries, were scheduled ahead of the opening of the United Nations General Assembly and the Climate Action Summit on September 23.

The protests have been organized by young people around the world who are part of the "Fridays for Future" campaign, which has seen students walk out of their schools on Fridays to demand their political leaders take urgent action to address climate change.

"We need to act right now to stop burning fossil fuels and ensure a rapid energy revolution with equity, reparations and climate justice at its heart," organizers say.
Climate Change More

    Amazon promises to use only renewable energy in 10 years
    Which businesses are closing for Friday's climate strike?
    Wall Street sees profits in a heating planet
    Greenland's disappearing ice sheet: "One degree is everything"

Climate activist Greta Thunberg is participating in the protests in New York City, where 1.1 million students have been given permission to skip school to join in. She tweeted from the march that "New York City is looking huge! Lower Manhattan is absolutely packed with people."

Follow live updates below.
Thunberg says millions attended early marches

Greta Thunberg tweeted the New York City strike is "looking huge" and posted a photo of packed streets in Lower Manhattan. She is expected to speak at the rally later Friday.

    The preliminary numbers say there are at least 3 million people in today's #ClimateStrike And that is before counting North and South America!! To be updated... #FridaysForFuture pic.twitter.com/9C8SE5kSxZ
    — Greta Thunberg (@GretaThunberg) September 20, 2019

Thunberg said the city was "looking huge" and tweeted photos of packed streets in Lower Manhattan.

Demonstrators held signs that read "climate change is real"; "there is no Planet B": and "if you did your job, we would be in school."

Manhattan borough president Gale Brewster tweeted video showing protesters filling the streets from Foley Square to Centre Street and Chambers Street and across Broadway.

    NYCs massive #ClimateStrike march has begun, from Foley Sq down Centre St to Chambers St across to Broadway... and down to the Battery! Thank you @ClimateCrisis and everyone else marching! pic.twitter.com/WUpeRP0ZQS
    — Gale A. Brewer (@galeabrewer) September 20, 2019

Brewster is one of a number of local New York City elected officials who were attending the strike, which took place outside City Hall. New York City Council speaker Corey Johnson tweeted he had "never seen so many people before. So inspired by these young people! There are people as far as you can see!"

    I'm at the #climatestrikenyc and I've never seen so many people before. So inspired by these young people! There are people as far as you can!
    — Corey Johnson (@CoreyinNYC) September 20, 2019


Thousands join in near Nancy Pelosi's San Francisco office
Climate Strike
Google employees hold signs outside of their offices before marching to join others in a climate strike rally at City Hall Friday, September 20, 2019, in San Francisco. Eric Risberg / AP

In San Francisco, thousands rallied near House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office at the Federal Building at Seventh and Market streets. Protesters took off marching down Market Street at about 10:30 a.m. chanting, "climate change has got to go" and "climate justice now," CBS San Francisco reports.

They marched to U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein's office at 1 Post Street and they plan to return to the Federal Building for a rally. Traffic and Muni service was blocked along a large segment of Market Street.

Organizers for the San Francisco action said that they are calling on Pelosi and Feinstein to back the Green New Deal, an ambitious climate action plan introduced by Congresswoman Alexandria Ocascio-Cortez of New York.

They are also calling on corporations like Bank of America, Amazon and PG&E to divest from the fossil fuel industry and improve their own reliance on renewable energy sources.

Many students from Oakland schools were attending the rally on field trips, district spokesperson John Sasaki said.

Students are also expected to walk out of the University of California at Berkeley. As of about 11 a.m. PT, they were gathering at Sproul Plaza.

Students participating said that dire forecasts of rising global temperatures made them fearful of the consequences if there is not immediate action.

"I'm scared for our future, if we even have one," said Otto, a 13-year-old student from San Francisco.
Thousands join Chicago strike

Thousands of people joined the strike in downtown Chicago, CBS Chicago reported. Protesters began gathering Friday morning at Grant Park and the plan is to march to Federal Plaza.

The Illinois Chapter of the Youth Climate Strike organized the protest. Speakers started at 12 p.m. CT, with the group calling on Governor J.B. Pritzker to pass the Clean Energy Jobs Act. The bill aims to put the state on a path to 100% clean energy by 2050.

    The voices of global climate strike marchers, led by young people, reverberate through the streets of Chicago. @cbschicago pic.twitter.com/gixicoBiFj
    — Wendy Widom (@wendywidom) September 20, 2019

New York City students won't be punished for leaving school
nyc-student-climate-protest-2019-09-20.jpg
CBS New York

The New York City Department of Education said that students who had parents' approval would not get in trouble for attending. Younger students can only leave school with a parent and teachers are barred from atending.

"We applaud our students when they raise their voices in a safe and respectful manner on issues that matter to them. Young people around the world are joining the #ClimateStrike this week--showing that student action will lead us forward," the New York City Department of Education tweeted on September 12.

There are 1.1. million students in New York City's public school system, the largest in the country.

Tens of thousands are expected at the downtown rally, and 16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg is expected to address the crowd.
Germany agrees $60 billion climate policy package
APTOPIX Germany Climate Protests
Three people stand on ice blocks under gallows to protest against climate change in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany, on Friday, September 20, 2019. AP

The German government announced a $60 billion package of measures to address climate change on Friday as protesters marched across the country to demand urgent action.

"We believe that we can achieve the goals and that we've truly laid the foundations for this," German Chancellor Angela Merkel said.

The country aims to cut emissions by 55% by 2030 compared to 1990 levels.

Despite the environment being one of the most important issues to German voters, Germany's environmental protection has lagged behind other countries in Europe in recent years, and it's on course to miss its emissions targets for 2020 by a wide margin, the Associated Press reports.
Kabul climate protesters march despite violence

Approximately 100 climate change protesters marched through the Afghan capital city of Kabul on Friday, following an armed personnel carrier and surrounded by soldiers with guns to protect them, the Associated Press reports.

Afghanistan has been declared the most dangerous country in the world by the Institute for Economics and Peace.

"We know war can kill a group of people," one of the organizers, Fardeen Barakzai, said. "The problem in Afghanistan is our leaders are fighting for power, but the real power is in nature."
Thousands of protesters turn out in London

Thousands of protesters have turned out in London, CBS News' Imtiaz Tyab reports, as climate strikes take place across the United Kingdom.

Demonstrators are gathered outside the Houses of Parliament.

Weather experts say climate change is making Britain more rainy: For the past nine years, winters have been 5% wetter on average than they were between 1981 and 2010, according to BBC News.
Germany inches toward new climate policy

Following all-night talks in Berlin, the German government came closer to agreeing new measures for tackling climate change on Friday, local media reported, as protesters took to the streets to demand action.

How Europe's biggest economy decides to tackle greenhouse gas emissions is being closely watched by other nations.

    Like the sea we rise!
    Liebes Klimakabinett, ihr habt euch mit den falschen angelegt...#AlleFuersKlima #FridaysForFuture pic.twitter.com/RW5jn9RnWf
    — Fridays for Future Freiburg (@F4F_Freiburg) September 20, 2019

    #allefürsklima ist im vollen Gange💚‼️ Wir streiken bis ihr handelt!#FridaysForFuture #week4climate #roteklimakarte pic.twitter.com/M72GkKNx3Y
    — Fridays For Future Bonn (@BonnFuture) September 20, 2019

The environment is a major issue for German voters, and students have been holding large weekly protests, inspired by Swedish activist Greta Thunberg.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel planned to present details of the plan later on Friday.
Low turnout in Nigeria's largest city

The turnout for climate strike protests in Lagos, Nigeria's largest city, is low, BBC News reports. Approximately 30 people were in the streets.

Because it's on the coast, Lagos will be affected by rising sea levels. More people were protesting in Abuja, however, where hundreds gathered.

    Happening Now in Abuja Nigeria #FridaysForFuture #ClimateStrike #ClimateAction pic.twitter.com/pUSbNjwJqJ
    — David Mike Terungwa (@miketerungwa) September 20, 2019

    Today is my 45 weeks of #FridaysForFuture in Abuja, Nigeria and the #globalclimatestrike. Climate change crises cannot wait, it is time for us to demand for climate justice. Join us anywhere you here, for the people and the planet.#ClimateStrike pic.twitter.com/f6PTQ1CCBI
    — Oladosu Adenike (@the_ecofeminist) September 20, 2019

“I want to breathe clean”
INDIA-ENVIRONMENT-POLLUTION
Indian commuters drive amidst heavy smog in New Delhi on December 6, 2018. Getty Images

New Delhi in India is one of the world's most polluted cities, and dozens of climate protesters gathered outside the Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs on Friday as part of the worldwide climate strikes.

"I want to breathe clean," demonstrators shouted, according The Associated Press. Some carried signs with slogans like: "There is no Earth B."

An estimated 100,000 children under 5 are killed by air pollution in India every year.
Australia’s Great Barrier Reef is dying
Around the Games - Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games Day 8
An athlete swims near Australia's Great Barrier Reef on April 12, 2018. Getty

The Great Barrier Reef in Australia is one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, but half of its coral has died.

Scientists say warming waters are what pose the greatest threat to the system, last year causing a "mass bleaching event" that "cooked" it, BBC News reports. And coral is struggling to regrow.

The United Nations is considering adding the reef to its list of endangered sites.
"We are not sinking, we are fighting"
Australians Gather As Part Of Global Climate Strike
Thousands of protesters march as part of a climate strike rally on September 20, 2019 in Sydney, Australia. Getty Images

Thousands of protesters in Asia and the Pacific kicked off Friday's global climate strike, which is expected to be the largest climate change protest in history.

In Australia, an estimated 300,000 people took to the streets. Events also took place on the low-lying islands of Vanuatu and Kiribati, which are facing disaster as sea levels rise.

"We are not sinking, we are fighting," children in Kiribati chanted.

"There are a lot of people here who can feel the effects of climate change already, for example with typhoons," one 23-year-old protester in the Philippines told French news agency AFP. Experts say increasingly violent storms and rising sea levels are already having an impact on the island nation.
Businesses supporting the climate strikes

Some businesses are letting workers take the day off to participate in the strikes, while others are closing outright, CBS News MoneyWatch reporter Irina Ivanova reports. More than 7,000 companies have pledged to draw attention to the protests by either donating ad space or putting banners on their sites.

CBS News put together a list of the businesses that are closing here.

First published on September 20, 2019 / 4:45 AM
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Offline RE

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👸 Joan of Arc Speaks: "We Will Make Them Hear Us"
« Reply #209 on: September 21, 2019, 08:57:34 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/F7xCSTV0muE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/F7xCSTV0muE</a>
« Last Edit: September 21, 2019, 09:00:46 AM by RE »
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