AuthorTopic: The Environment Board  (Read 36661 times)

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #240 on: October 12, 2019, 01:26:16 AM »
#4 Shelter/ warmth/ cooling:
In JOW manor I have a wood fire we use predominantly through the winter. Also have ducted gas heating but we hardly use this. I enjoy cutting wood and it saves us money, not to mention its much nicer.
Have an old 4WD and trailer and a couple of cheap Chinese chain saws. They do the trick and usually last me 5 or 6 seasons before I buy another one, usually for around the cost of a bar and chain from Stihl. Dont get me wrong they are cheap and nasty and no where as good as a Stihl or Husky, but at 10% the cost of the good European stuff, I can buy one every 5 years and still never spend the same money. Usually I go for a bigger saw 60cc or so with 22" bar or bigger. Costs around $150 with 2 chains. Equivalent in a Stihl is maybe a smaller 40cc saw at around $1500! Sharpen my own chains with a cheap chain sharpener. See picture. Press in foreground is a Super Simplex loading press. Australian made. Nice little unit. Not sure if you guys see then in US. Thats another topic....
For summer when we are sure to get power outages, I have rigged up a small water spray unit to give some relief and avoid heat stroke. You get them in the local hardware. I will attach a link. Cant make it out too well in pic, but attached to garden hose it gives off a fine cooling mist to sit under in a shady spot next to my house. Het stroke is a real problem when we get heat waves. Will be huge issue when power goes out as well. Something everyone in hot areas should look at.
https://www.bunnings.com.au/holman-7m-misting-system-kit_p3120717 

Haven't built an underground bunker yet......

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #241 on: October 12, 2019, 01:57:52 AM »
#5 Other.
This is most important in my eyes.
All the preps in the wold will only last so long.
I have a lifetime of accumulated engineering junk, tools and gadgets, as well as half my fathers accumulated farming and engineering tools and knowledge he has passed on. This and relationships is what will keep you alive long term when things get bad.
I have my in laws living on my property, and I have a policeman living next door I get along well with and always make sure he has my mobile number and chat frequently over the fence and give a few lemons or other fruit to when I have plenty. Community and friends you can count on is what protects you long term.
Before people ask about personal protection, I have firearms, but remember we have a very different gun culture here in Oz than in the states. Here it is only professionals who need them for work, enthusiasts and hobbyist who own then. I am the last category. I get old junk and restore it, and get a lot of pleasure out of this, just as much as reloading and firing them. You are not allowed to own firearms in Australia for personal protection. It is not a valid reason. Farmers, sporting shooters and hunters only. You have to be licensed and guns registered. I will post a picture of an old AYA shotgun I picked up last year for $25 and cleaned up. Turned up a new firing pin on my lather and made up an extractor cam out of a piece of stainless steel cutlery. Its still a cheap shotgun, but it has been great fun working out how to fix it, and I have pulled the box lock action apart into 20 odd pieces several times now, and it still works!
Attached is a picture of a forge I built with my youngest son when he was about 12 out of a stainless steel beer keg and a vacuum cleaner. Works a treat! Was able to get cherry red steel and work on a makeshift anvil made from a piece of railway track seen in the background. This tinkering I think is important to push your mind and abilities to adapt and overcome. Neccesity is the mother of invention..

No RE. I don't have batteries. Solar and batteries is something I will look at when I retire. Also want to do something with wood gas to generate electricity as well as heat.

Most of what I have done has been either free or very cheap. I have been paying off a mortgage and sending my 2 lads to a very expensive school for last 20 years, (Now university!), so I have never had any cash to throw around at latest stuff. This has been a blessing in hindsight. I think I have achieved a lot very cheaply, and learnt a hell of a lot along the way. My grandparents made everything by hand, and never bought anything on credit, and they thrived in what we would describe as "The end of the world as we know it".   
 
Hope you enjoyed my rant and pictures. Any more info you need just ask.
Any more ideas please share.

JOW

Offline RE

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #242 on: October 12, 2019, 02:54:55 AM »
#5 Other.
This is most important in my eyes.
All the preps in the wold will only last so long.
I have a lifetime of accumulated engineering junk, tools and gadgets, as well as half my fathers accumulated farming and engineering tools and knowledge he has passed on. This and relationships is what will keep you alive long term when things get bad.
I have my in laws living on my property, and I have a policeman living next door I get along well with and always make sure he has my mobile number and chat frequently over the fence and give a few lemons or other fruit to when I have plenty. Community and friends you can count on is what protects you long term.
Before people ask about personal protection, I have firearms, but remember we have a very different gun culture here in Oz than in the states. Here it is only professionals who need them for work, enthusiasts and hobbyist who own then. I am the last category. I get old junk and restore it, and get a lot of pleasure out of this, just as much as reloading and firing them. You are not allowed to own firearms in Australia for personal protection. It is not a valid reason. Farmers, sporting shooters and hunters only. You have to be licensed and guns registered. I will post a picture of an old AYA shotgun I picked up last year for $25 and cleaned up. Turned up a new firing pin on my lather and made up an extractor cam out of a piece of stainless steel cutlery. Its still a cheap shotgun, but it has been great fun working out how to fix it, and I have pulled the box lock action apart into 20 odd pieces several times now, and it still works!
Attached is a picture of a forge I built with my youngest son when he was about 12 out of a stainless steel beer keg and a vacuum cleaner. Works a treat! Was able to get cherry red steel and work on a makeshift anvil made from a piece of railway track seen in the background. This tinkering I think is important to push your mind and abilities to adapt and overcome. Neccesity is the mother of invention..

No RE. I don't have batteries. Solar and batteries is something I will look at when I retire. Also want to do something with wood gas to generate electricity as well as heat.

Most of what I have done has been either free or very cheap. I have been paying off a mortgage and sending my 2 lads to a very expensive school for last 20 years, (Now university!), so I have never had any cash to throw around at latest stuff. This has been a blessing in hindsight. I think I have achieved a lot very cheaply, and learnt a hell of a lot along the way. My grandparents made everything by hand, and never bought anything on credit, and they thrived in what we would describe as "The end of the world as we know it".   
 
Hope you enjoyed my rant and pictures. Any more info you need just ask.
Any more ideas please share.

JOW

NF is the go-to guy on the Diner for wood gas and solar advice.

I am King of Batts.  :)  Gor tons of them, SLAs, Li-I, big and small.  My Cripple Carts run on them.  I can go several days now without having to flip on the gennie, although I do have to rewire by the second day or so, depending on the load.  Winter, load is quite low because I have the Great Outdoor Refrigerator up here. lol.  That's my biggest electric power eater, the fridge.  Don't need Air Conditioning here yet, although we did have one week this summer which made it to 90F.  Only in the hottest part of the afternoon though, and keeping the digs sealed up it stays tolerable, in the 70sF.  I just use a fan.  At night I open up the windows and that brings the temps down into the 60s in summer most of the time.

Water is no issue at all here, we have Glaciers all around.  Gonna take decades for them to melt off, even under worst case scenarios.  Biggest issues here are Wildfires in the summer, and of course the Shakers and Volcanoes. This place is smack dab on top of the Ring of Fire.  On balance though, I prefer that risk.

RE
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Online azozeo

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To Reduce Plastic Waste, Bars In Italy Are Switching To Pasta Straws
« Reply #243 on: October 17, 2019, 11:33:45 AM »


Posted on 2019/10/14

By Mayukh Saha / Truth Theory

Italy has been the inventor of many things, one of them being sunglasses. But in the current world, where the plastic menace is eating up the planet, newer inventions should be more on thesustainable side. Well, Italy is adding another interesting invention to its roster. Since the world is facing environmental troubles, Italy has gone for developing ‘pasta straws’.

Yep, it’s true. Reddit user u/GranFabio uploaded a photo to demonstrate the initiatives taken by a few Italian bars. The pasta straw idea as a replacement for plastic straws became a hit on the internet. Though the bars should work on replacing plastic cups too.

https://truththeory.com/2019/10/14/to-reduce-plastic-waste-bars-in-italy-are-switching-to-pasta-straws/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Online azozeo

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #244 on: November 08, 2019, 10:57:41 AM »


Nature Might Be Better Than Tech At Reducing Air Pollution
POSTED ON NOVEMBER 6, 2019

Restoring native vegetation could cut air pollution and costs, study finds

Adding plants and trees to the landscapes near factories and other pollution sources could reduce air pollution by an average of 27 percent, new research suggests.

The study shows that plants – not technologies – may also be cheaper options for cleaning the air near a number of industrial sites, roadways, power plants, commercial boilers and oil and gas drilling sites.

In fact, researchers found that in 75 percent of the counties analyzed, it was cheaper to use plants to mitigate air pollution than it was to add technological interventions – things like smokestack scrubbers – to the sources of pollution.

“The fact is that traditionally, especially as engineers, we don’t think about nature; we just focus on putting technology into everything,” said Bhavik Bakshi, lead author of the study and professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at The Ohio State University.

“And so, one key finding is that we need to start looking at nature and learning from it and respecting it. There are win-win opportunities if we do – opportunities that are potentially cheaper and better environmentally.”

The study, published today in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, found that nature-based solutions to air pollution might, in many cases, be better than technology at combating air pollution.

The analysis found that for one specific sector – industrial boilers – technology is cheaper at cleaning the air than ecosystem upgrades. And for the manufacturing industry – a broad sector – both ecosystems and technology could offer cost savings, depending on the type of factory.

To start understanding the effect that trees and other plants could have on air pollution, the researchers collected public data on air pollution and vegetation on a county-by-county basis across the lower 48 states. Then, they calculated what adding additional trees and plants might cost.

Their calculations included the capacity of current vegetation – including trees, grasslands and shrublands – to mitigate air pollution. They also considered the effect that restorative planting – bringing the vegetation cover of a given county to its county-average levels – might have on air pollution levels. They estimated the impact of plants on the most common air pollutants – sulfur dioxide, particulate matter that contributes to smog, and nitrogen dioxide.

They found that restoring vegetation to county-level average canopy cover reduced air pollution an average of 27 percent across the counties. This figure varies by county and region – consider, for example, a county in the desert of Nevada and a county in the farmlands of Ohio. Even if the counties were the same size, the county-average land cover in Nevada would be smaller than that in Ohio, because the desert could not grow as much vegetation as farmland.

Their research did not calculate the direct effects plants might have on ozone pollution, because, Bakshi said, the data on ozone emissions is lacking. The analysis also didn’t consider whether certain species of trees or plants would better “scrub” pollution from the air, though Bakshi said it is likely that the species of plant would make a difference in air quality.

They found that adding trees or other plants could lower air pollution levels in both urban and rural areas, though the success rates varied depending on, among other factors, how much land was available to grow new plants and the current air quality.

Reducing air pollution is critical to public health. The American Lung Association estimates that 4 in 10 people in the U.S. live in areas with poor air quality, leading to health issues including asthma, lung cancer and heart disease.

Bakshi said their findings indicate that nature should be a part of the planning process to deal with air pollution, and show that engineers and builders should find ways to incorporate both technological and ecological systems.

“The thing that we are interested in is basically making sure that engineering contributes positively to sustainable development,” Bakshi said.

“And one big reason why engineering has not done that is because engineering has kept nature outside of its system boundary.”

Sources:
Ohio State University
Journal Article


https://www.naturalblaze.com/2019/11/nature-might-be-better-than-tech-at-reducing-air-pollution.html
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

 

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