AuthorTopic: The Environment Board  (Read 42454 times)

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #255 on: December 05, 2019, 04:34:43 PM »
Seems dry everywhere here AJ.
We have below average rainfall where I am even though still a bit of green around due to some recent rains. Rain in spring and summer just makes more fuel for later in the season.
January and February is usually when the SHTF fire wise in Vic.
Here is some quite accurate Wikipedia info on Black Saturday fires I often refer to.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Saturday_bushfires
This was a shit fight. Weather that day was horrendous. We were in the middle of it but got out unscathed due to a wind change when Kilmore East fire was about 10km from Wallan.

Fires so far:
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-06/properties-destroyed-total-fire-bans-in-place-as-nsw-burns/11772568
Real time updates:
https://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/fire-information/fires-near-me
https://www.ruralfire.qld.gov.au/map/Pages/default.aspx
West Oz getting in on the action:
https://www.emergency.wa.gov.au/
Still pretty calm down here in Victoria:
https://www.emergency.vic.gov.au/respond/


JOW

Offline RE

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #256 on: December 05, 2019, 04:47:44 PM »

Here is some quite accurate Wikipedia info on Black Saturday fires I often refer to.

You need to write that article about Black Saturday in Oz!

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #257 on: December 05, 2019, 05:06:38 PM »

Here is some quite accurate Wikipedia info on Black Saturday fires I often refer to.

You need to write that article about Black Saturday in Oz!

RE
Plan to this summer.
Expecting a replay any day soon...

Have just been reading the wikipedia page and am choking up remembering the day. Obviously still effects me and I was not directly impacted. I was preparing for the firefight when the wind changed and sent the freight train from hell to Kinglake. Place I regularly cut firewood burnt to the ground and friends narrowly escaped despite best efforts to do everything wrong... This will be in the essay..

Visited Marysville about 12 months later, which had less loss of life than Kinglake (Just), but was hit pretty bad. I was absolutely shocked. Place was literally no longer on the map. Main street was bare paddock where houses and shops had been. This really brought it into perspective.

Like I said, I will write a personal account of the day this Christmas break. 


JOW

Offline RE

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #258 on: December 05, 2019, 05:12:07 PM »
Like I said, I will write a personal account of the day this Christmas break. 

Personal, Boots on the Ground articles are the very BEST the Diner has to offer.  I look forward to reading that account.

RE
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Offline RE

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https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/environment/article239524263.html

‘Forever chemicals’ are in nearly all U.S. drinking water, activists say. Miami is #3 on the list.

By Adriana Brasileiro
January 23, 2020 06:00 AM

Miami-Dade last year closed three wells for high levels of chemicals engineers think are linked to contamination from Miami International Airport. Tests show drinking water from the plant served by those wells remains safe.

Drinking water contamination with “forever chemicals” — present in Teflon cookware and Scotchgard stain repellent — is far more widespread than previously estimated, with some of the highest levels found in Miami, according to a study by an environmental group.

The chemicals known as PFAS don’t break down easily and have been a problem for water quality managers in Florida and across the country as concerns grow about potential health risks. Miami-Dade last year closed three wells that were above federal health standards.

The Environmental Working Group, an advocacy nonprofit, said Wednesday that PFAS — short for Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances — are likely detectable in all major water supplies in the United States. A previous estimate that 110 million Americans could be exposed to the potentially toxic chemicals is “much too low” in light of the new findings, EWG said.
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Extensive exposure to the substances has been linked to higher risks for cancer and birth defects, though the chemicals are so common that most people have been exposed to them.
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Because PFAS are not regulated, the federal Environmental Protection Agency doesn’t have a firm rule on how much can be present in drinking water. The agency established a non-enforceable “health advisory level” of 70 parts per trillion for the most prevalent PFAS compounds, which are also widely used in firefighting foams. Advocacy groups like EWG and health advocates consider that threshold too high to be considered safe, and 10 states have implemented or are preparing to implement their own standards.

EWG didn’t provide its testing locations but tests conducted in Miami in July last year showed PFAS levels of 56.7 parts per trillion, below the federal advisory level but much higher than EWG’s recommended level of 1 ppt. Florida doesn’t have its own standard, and Miami-Dade said it uses the EPA guideline for its yardstick on PFAS contamination.

EWG sampled tap water in 31 states and the District of Columbia. Only Brunswick County in North Carolina and the Quad Cities area in Iowa had higher PFAS concentrations than Miami.

Miami-Dade said that all the drinking water its treatment plants provide is well within the EPA advisory level for PFAS, according to Water and Sewer Department spokeswoman Jennifer Messemer-Skold.

Still, six water supply wells out of 89 wells sampled have been found to exceed health advisory levels, leading to the closure last year of three of those wells, she said.

The closed wells, near Miami International Airport, supply the Hialeah and Preston water plants in the Hialeah area. Firefighting foam has been used for years in training and rescue operations at MIA, which could explain the high level of contaminants.
Adriana Brasileiro
(305) 376-2576
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Eddie

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https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/environment/article239524263.html

‘Forever chemicals’ are in nearly all U.S. drinking water, activists say. Miami is #3 on the list.

By Adriana Brasileiro
January 23, 2020 06:00 AM

Miami-Dade last year closed three wells for high levels of chemicals engineers think are linked to contamination from Miami International Airport. Tests show drinking water from the plant served by those wells remains safe.

Drinking water contamination with “forever chemicals” — present in Teflon cookware and Scotchgard stain repellent — is far more widespread than previously estimated, with some of the highest levels found in Miami, according to a study by an environmental group.

The chemicals known as PFAS don’t break down easily and have been a problem for water quality managers in Florida and across the country as concerns grow about potential health risks. Miami-Dade last year closed three wells that were above federal health standards.

The Environmental Working Group, an advocacy nonprofit, said Wednesday that PFAS — short for Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances — are likely detectable in all major water supplies in the United States. A previous estimate that 110 million Americans could be exposed to the potentially toxic chemicals is “much too low” in light of the new findings, EWG said.
TOP ARTICLES
They learned about Ukraine’s at-risk children and asked: How can we help kids in need here?
They learned about Ukraine’s at-risk children and
asked: How can we help kids in need here?
They learned about Ukraine’s at-risk children and asked: How can we help kids in need here?

Extensive exposure to the substances has been linked to higher risks for cancer and birth defects, though the chemicals are so common that most people have been exposed to them.
Local News at Your Fingertips

Get unlimited digital access for just $3.99 a month to #ReadLocal anytime, on any device.
GET OFFER

Because PFAS are not regulated, the federal Environmental Protection Agency doesn’t have a firm rule on how much can be present in drinking water. The agency established a non-enforceable “health advisory level” of 70 parts per trillion for the most prevalent PFAS compounds, which are also widely used in firefighting foams. Advocacy groups like EWG and health advocates consider that threshold too high to be considered safe, and 10 states have implemented or are preparing to implement their own standards.

EWG didn’t provide its testing locations but tests conducted in Miami in July last year showed PFAS levels of 56.7 parts per trillion, below the federal advisory level but much higher than EWG’s recommended level of 1 ppt. Florida doesn’t have its own standard, and Miami-Dade said it uses the EPA guideline for its yardstick on PFAS contamination.

EWG sampled tap water in 31 states and the District of Columbia. Only Brunswick County in North Carolina and the Quad Cities area in Iowa had higher PFAS concentrations than Miami.

Miami-Dade said that all the drinking water its treatment plants provide is well within the EPA advisory level for PFAS, according to Water and Sewer Department spokeswoman Jennifer Messemer-Skold.

Still, six water supply wells out of 89 wells sampled have been found to exceed health advisory levels, leading to the closure last year of three of those wells, she said.

The closed wells, near Miami International Airport, supply the Hialeah and Preston water plants in the Hialeah area. Firefighting foam has been used for years in training and rescue operations at MIA, which could explain the high level of contaminants.
Adriana Brasileiro
(305) 376-2576


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What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

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https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/environment/article239524263.html

‘Forever chemicals’ are in nearly all U.S. drinking water, activists say. Miami is #3 on the list.


The Berkey takes it out.

Now THAT is good to know.
"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

Online Surly1

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #262 on: February 07, 2020, 10:37:11 AM »
Another panic-inducing story from the mainstream media, posted by the hopelessly naive.
Don't worry, be happy.

Record-breaking temperature of nearly 65ºF logged in Antarctica as scientists sound alarm over rapid ice melt



"Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world's grief. Do justly now, love mercy now, walk humbly now. You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it."

Offline azozeo

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The Deer in Your Yard Are Here to Stay
« Reply #263 on: February 22, 2020, 02:19:37 PM »
The deer population of the eastern U.S. has exploded and cities are trying to keep it in check. But the options available to them are limited, and fraught.



A decade ago, deer were a rare sight on Staten Island. White-tailed deer are thought to have abandoned the island in the late 19th century, pushed by human development to open land in nearby New Jersey. In 2008, the estimated deer population of the 60-square-mile borough of New York City was only 24.

Then the deer came back, swimming across the Arthur Kill and Raritan Bay from New Jersey in search of new habitat. And they reproduced—boy, did they reproduce. An aerial survey of the deer population in 2014 put it at 793. By 2017, the new estimate was between 1,918 and 2,188, an increase of 9,000 percent in just nine years.

To various degrees, towns and cities across the Northeast have been seeing an ongoing resurgence of deer populations in recent decades, as suburbanization patterns deepened and hunting practices faded. If you live anywhere outside of an urban downtown, you’ve probably noticed this trend yourself.

Deer are cute. We’ve all cried watching Bambi. So what’s the problem?

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-deer-in-your-yard-are-here-to-stay?utm_source=pocket-newtab
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

 

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