AuthorTopic: The Environment Board  (Read 55036 times)

Offline Phil Rumpole

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #315 on: August 16, 2020, 10:08:38 PM »
If you can identify this morning's fresh shit outside the house, you know for sure if it's the island with the bushy bikiniline coastline. where Eharmony or tinder don't allow matches within 250km

I'm not interested in getting that close.  Just which continent or island you reside upon.

RE

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=s-GQ63NStxk
The triangular inbreeding island is only 250 wide and 250 long. With the poop, think of looney tunes cartoon characters...
« Last Edit: August 16, 2020, 10:17:20 PM by Phil Rumpole »
Women are like hurricanes: Wet and wild when they come, take your house when they leave

Offline RE

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #316 on: August 16, 2020, 11:18:00 PM »
If you can identify this morning's fresh shit outside the house, you know for sure if it's the island with the bushy bikiniline coastline. where Eharmony or tinder don't allow matches within 250km

I'm not interested in getting that close.  Just which continent or island you reside upon.

RE

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=s-GQ63NStxk
The triangular inbreeding island is only 250 wide and 250 long. With the poop, think of looney tunes cartoon characters...

This URL brings up nothing.  Just answer a direct question wwith a direct answer please.  Stop being evasive.

RE
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Offline RE

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #317 on: August 17, 2020, 12:19:43 AM »
If you can identify this morning's fresh shit outside the house, you know for sure if it's the island with the bushy bikiniline coastline. where Eharmony or tinder don't allow matches within 250km

I'm not interested in getting that close.  Just which continent or island you reside upon.

RE

Ah, I finally got this url to register.  So you do live on Tasmania.   Are you an Aussie or a transplant from elsewhere?

You should meet up with Uncle Bob.   :icon_sunny:

RE

The triangular inbreeding island is only 250 wide and 250 long. With the poop, think of looney tunes cartoon characters...
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Offline Phil Rumpole

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #318 on: August 17, 2020, 12:30:49 AM »
If you can identify this morning's fresh shit outside the house, you know for sure if it's the island with the bushy bikiniline coastline. where Eharmony or tinder don't allow matches within 250km

I'm not interested in getting that close.  Just which continent or island you reside upon.

RE

Ah, I finally got this url to register.  So you do live on Tasmania.   Are you an Aussie or a transplant from elsewhere?

You should meet up with Uncle Bob.   :icon_sunny:

RE

The triangular inbreeding island is only 250 wide and 250 long. With the poop, think of looney tunes cartoon characters...

I heard that handsome DEVIL forgot his password. Rumpolestiltskin likes brain teasers though.
The loony tunes character that took that dump is not coyote, bugs bunny, bulldog, Elmer fud, or Daffy duck. It's one that spins around like a tornado in the cartoons and near extinction irl.

« Last Edit: August 17, 2020, 12:38:09 AM by Phil Rumpole »
Women are like hurricanes: Wet and wild when they come, take your house when they leave

Offline RE

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #319 on: August 17, 2020, 12:38:26 AM »
If you can identify this morning's fresh shit outside the house, you know for sure if it's the island with the bushy bikiniline coastline. where Eharmony or tinder don't allow matches within 250km

I'm not interested in getting that close.  Just which continent or island you reside upon.

RE

Ah, I finally got this url to register.  So you do live on Tasmania.   Are you an Aussie or a transplant from elsewhere?

You should meet up with Uncle Bob.   :icon_sunny:

RE

The triangular inbreeding island is only 250 wide and 250 long. With the poop, think of looney tunes cartoon characters...

I heard that handsome DEVIL forgot his password and created a new account, Rumpolestiltskin likes brain teasers though.
The loony tunes character that took that dump is not coyote, bugs bunny, bulldog, Elmer fud, or Daffy duck. It's one that spins around like a tornado in the cartoons and near extinction irl.

Uncle Bob!  You're BACK!   :icon_sunny:

RE
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Offline RE

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⛏️ Trump set to block controversial Alaska gold mine
« Reply #320 on: August 23, 2020, 06:07:48 AM »
A good result, but it's not due to environmental concerns of Trumpovetsky.  It's economics.  The mine was never going to be profitable.  About nobody up here supported it besides the mine developers and their lobbyists.

RE

https://www.politico.com/news/2020/08/22/trump-set-to-block-alaska-pebble-mine-400206

Trump set to block controversial Alaska gold mine

The about-face by the administration likely signals more about issues with this specific mine than a sea change in Trump’s overall support for big development projects.

Workers with the Pebble Mine project test drill in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska, near the village of Iliamma, in July 2007. | Al Grillo/AP Photo

By ZACK COLMAN and ALEX GUILLÉN

08/22/2020 01:00 PM EDT

Updated: 08/22/2020 07:04 PM EDT


The Trump administration is planning to block the proposed Pebble Mine in Alaska early next week, six people familiar with the plans told POLITICO, marking a surprise reversal that could be the death knell for the massive copper and gold project.

Environmentalists and conservation groups have warned that the project would threaten world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery, and the move to block it comes after President Donald Trump faced pressure to nix it from an array of interests, including GOP mega-donor Andy Sabin, Bass Pro Shops CEO Johnny Morris and the his eldest son, Donald Trump, Jr.

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“With any government, whether it be Obama or Trump, nothing is certain until it happens and that’s just the nature of this beast,” Sabin, who has spoken directly with Trump about the proposed mine, told POLITICO. “But I’m fairly certain that you’re going to get good news.”

The Army Corps of Engineers office in Alaska is planning to hold a conference call on Monday with groups connected to the proposed mine discuss the decision, three people with knowledge of the call told POLITICO. An administration official confirmed the call with POLITICO.

Corps officials will say outstanding technical issues with a key permit remain, the people said, adding they anticipate Trump will then follow with a public statement opposing the project. The people said they're not entirely sure what form Trump's disavowal will take, although they said it is more likely to come as a rejection of the Army Corps of Pebble’s water permits rather than a veto from EPA, which earlier this year indicated it would not exercise that power.

“There are people that have been told there will be a [Corps] press event and that it will be positive,” said a Washington-based person who works on efforts opposing the mine and who requested anonymity to discuss sensitive conversations.

White House spokesman Judd Deere directed POLITICO to the Army Corps.

"The White House is not in a position to comment at this time," he said in an email. Neither the Army Corps nor EPA immediately responded to requests for comment.

But Pebble Partnership CEO Tom Collier, who worked as chief of staff for Clinton-era Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, denied that the project was about to be blocked.

"We’ve worked with the Trump administration and the message that we have received from the Trump administration has been that this is a president who believes that there’s no place in the permitting process for political influence," Collier said.

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"I do not believe he will be returning to Obama-like interference in the permitting process. We have those assurances that he will not do so," he added.

In a statement issued Saturday evening, Collier again disputed this story and said Pebble was told earlier in the week to expect a letter on Monday calling for "a significant amount" of compensatory mitigation, in which Pebble promises to restore or preserve other nearby wetlands to make up for those affected by the mine, a standard step in the Army Corps' permitting process.

"This has been our working premise for quite some time and has been the focus of our recent efforts near the site to complete additional wetlands survey work to better inform our plan," Collier said in the statement. He added that the time needed to develop a plan might delay a decision beyond what was previously expected, but that the company will provide the Corps with any needed information "as soon as possible" with the goal of remaining on track.

The Pebble Mine has been planned to be built in the headwaters for Bristol Bay, home of the world's biggest sockeye fishery which provides up to 11 percent of all wild salmon harvests.

“I have been there more than 10 times. It is like no place on Earth,” Trout Unlimited CEO Chris Wood told POLITICO.

The about-face by the administration likely signals more about issues with this specific mine than a sea change in Trump’s overall support for big development projects. But with Trump expected to let it die and his White House challenger Democrat Joe Biden opposed to the project, Pebble Mine appears to have few options to advance it despite more than a decade of planning, ownership changes and political fights.

At the end of July, Trump’s administration appeared to be on track to approve the project as early as this month over the protests of environmentalists and Alaskan Native groups opposed to the 8,400-acre open pit mine.

Then in early August, Trump signed the Great American Outdoors Act, which secured almost $1 billion a year for conservation work. “There hasn't been anything like this since Teddy Roosevelt, I suspect,” Trump said. Later that day, Trump's son Donald Jr. publicly raised the issue of the controversial mine project, tweeting along with Nick Ayers, former chief of staff to Vice President Mike Pence, to urge Trump to reject Pebble.

The duo cited outdoors recreation groups' concerns that it threatens the Bristol Bay salmon fishery, which is commercially important and an increasingly popular destination for adventurous anglers.
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Joining the hook-and-bullet crowd’s influence campaign was Fox News host Tucker Carlson, one of the president’s favorite TV personalities who elevated the matter in an Aug. 14 segment called “The Case Against Alaska's Pebble Mine.” Carlson and his guest, Bass Pro Shops founder Morris, invoked Theodore Roosevelt, who Trump had just called “truly the great conservation President” — and who he's suggested he should join on Mount Rushmore.

Trump has been unabashedly pro-mining, though that has been largely focused on coal mining; Pebble would mine a large deposit of copper, gold, molybdenum and silver ore, so it has no direct connection to the issue of climate change.

“Maybe not all environmentalism is about climate,” Carlson said on his show.

Long-held skepticism about the mine from many Alaskans should also provide Trump some political cover. The late Republican Sen. Ted Stevens in 2008 famously called it “the wrong mine for the wrong place.” And while she has yet to ultimately take a side, Senate Energy and Natural Resources Chair Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) in 2019 questioned Pebble’s environmental impacts.

Shortly after the Trump administration took office, it settled a lawsuit with the mine’s developer that included withdrawing the Obama-era proposal to preemptively veto the mine. Instead, the mine would be allowed to continue through the permitting process at the Army Corps of Engineers.

As a consulting agency, EPA last year was critical of the Corps’ environmental study, warning of “substantial and unacceptable adverse impacts” on the fisheries. But EPA in May indicated it was backing off those criticisms and would not use its Clean Water Act power to veto the project’s permits.

EPA’s criticisms were based on unique characteristics that ultimately managed to bring environmentalists and Trump to the same side.

The mine, being developed by a U.S. subsidiary of the Canadian company Northern Dynasty Minerals, was proposed to tap a huge reserve on state land a few miles north of Iliamna Lake. The mine plan calls for producing an average of 70 million tons of copper, gold and molybdenum ore annually over 20 years, amounts worth potentially hundreds of billions of dollars. The mine’s opponents argue the company would eventually push to expand the mine to extract even more of the deposit.

The Corps determined in July that Pebble Mine "would not be expected to have a measurable effect on fish numbers and result in long-term changes to the health of the commercial fisheries in Bristol Bay."

But the commercial fishing industry, recreation groups, environmentalists and local Native Alaskan groups have all long complained about the destruction of streams critical to salmon’s procreation and the danger of mining waste contaminating the bay.
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Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #321 on: August 29, 2020, 08:42:04 PM »
Planted 16 trees this week. About 10 or 11 varieties. All natives and all bird attracting.
Various Banjsias, Hakeas, Calistemons, Acacias and Gums.
I do like my Calistemons. (Bottle brushes). I have about a dozen trees is at least 5 o6 varieties and colours now.
I think my new favourite tree might be the snow gun I just planted. Only small now, but will be a spectacular tree in 50 years or so, and a monster in 100.

Have another 5 trees to plant when I figure out where to put them!
Might do me for the rest of the year actually...

Pretty well back on track for a tree a week until I die I think.

JOW

Offline RE

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💡 California’s Climate Crisis Is Deepening as 500,000 Go Dark
« Reply #322 on: September 09, 2020, 12:55:45 PM »
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-09-08/california-power-crisis-worsens-with-pg-e-ordering-outages

California’s Climate Crisis Is Deepening as 500,000 Go Dark
By Joe Ryan and Brian Eckhouse
September 7, 2020, 5:31 PM AKDT Updated on September 8, 2020, 8:35 AM AKDT


    Dry and windy weather creates conditions ripe for wildfires
    Oregon utility cuts power for first time in response to fires

Current Time 2:37
/
Duration 6:30
 

In a matter of weeks, California has been hit with two record-breaking heat waves, hundreds of blazes, freak lightning storms and dangerously poor air quality, and now unusually strong winds are threatening to knock down power lines and ignite more wildfires.

That’s prompting the state’s largest utility to impose power cuts for more than 500,000 people, and with dangerous conditions stretching across the West, Portland General Electric Co. has also switched off power to some Oregon customers.

The shutoffs that PG&E Corp. began late Monday are the latest blow for the disaster-weary California, where climate change is making weather ever more extreme. Temperatures have soared to records from Napa to Los Angeles. Wildfires have torched more than 2.2 million acres, the most in records stretching back three decades. Hundreds of thousands of people may go dark for days while trapped indoors due to wildfire smoke and Covid-19 outbreaks.

Officials are responding with equally extreme measures. In August, California carried out its first rotating blackouts since the 2001 energy crisis, drawing the ire of millions who went powerless amid extreme temperatures. The Trump administration declared a power emergency, allowing power plants to run at full bore, regardless of environmental limits.
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The preventative shutoffs that began late Monday are a fairly new and controversial practice, and their use last year triggered investigations while utilities defended them as necessary in the face of increasingly wild weather.

Now, as a second round of ferocious temperatures abates, so-called Diablo winds sweeping in have set the conditions for even more outages. PG&E, which filed for bankruptcy last year after its equipment sparked deadly wildfires, warned the precautionary shutoffs could impact portions of 22 counties from late Monday through Wednesday, including in the Sierra foothills and North Bay.
PG&E PSPS

PG&E’s PSPS plan for Sept. 7-9

PG&E presentation

“Unfortunately, the continued hot and dry weather is going to continue to dry out vegetation across California -- and make that vegetation even more susceptible to new admissions and large fires,” Scott Strenfel, a PG&E meteorologist, said during a public briefing late Monday.

PG&E, which emerged from Chapter 11 in July after agreeing to pay $25.5 billion to settle wildfire lawsuits, said shutoffs could leave about 172,000 homes and businesses in the dark. That could impact up to 516,000 people, based on the size of the average California household.

Shutoffs were expected to affect about 104,000 customers starting from 9 p.m. local time Monday, with the remainder going down in two phases Tuesday. Some customers may not have power restored until 9 p.m. Wednesday, according to an announcement Tuesday morning.

PG&E also plans to turn off about 100 transmission lines and 145 distribution lines, it said during the briefing.

The state’s two other major utilities are also making plans to cut power if necessary. Southern California Edison Co. said it may shut off electricity to more than 66,000 customers Wednesday, and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. is considering doing so for more than 16,000 customers.

In Oregon, high winds have knocked out electricity to about 80,000 Portland General customers, and for the first time the company intentionally cut power to about 5,000 homes and businesses near Mt. Hood.

The U.S. Forest Service said in a statement Monday that most of California “remains under the threat of unprecedented and dangerous fire conditions.” It has temporarily closed eight national forests, including Sierra National Forest.

“Existing fires are displaying extreme fire behavior, new fire starts are likely, weather conditions are worsening, and we simply do not have enough resources to fully fight and contain every fire,” Randy Moore, regional forester for the forest service’s Pacific Southwest Region, said in the statement.
US-CALIFORNIA-FIRE

A firefighter douses flames during the Creek fire in the Cascadel Woods area of California on Sept. 7, 2020.

Photographer: Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

California narrowly escaped rotating blackouts Saturday and Sunday, as temperatures soared past 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius) in much of the state, squeezing the power grid to its brink. The fires only made things worse, taking down power plants and transmission lines, cutting power to 70,000 homes and businesses.

The heat is poised to ebb only slightly Tuesday. Sacramento is forecast to hit 97. Oakland will be 91. And Los Angeles will be 87.

The latest blazes are already wreaking havoc on the grid. The Creek Fire in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, which has scorched more than 78,000 acres, knocked out transmission from a hydro plant on Saturday.

September and October typically mark the peak of California’s fire season, when plants have been sapped of moisture by the state’s dry summer. Rains most often return in October or November.

Last year, when California’s utilities first began carrying out widespread blackouts like this, some homes and businesses were left in the dark for days. That drew outrage from state and local officials, triggered investigations and prompted PG&E to reassess the scope of future shutoffs. The company has taken steps to limit the size and duration of outages, including putting wires underground in some locations.

— With assistance by David R Baker
(Updates with additional utility outage plans in 11th paragraph.)
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Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #323 on: September 09, 2020, 05:56:45 PM »
Its the usual story;
When you need power the most for AC is when ithe grid fails.
When you need the fire brigade the most they are busy elsewhere fighting fires burning across the state.
When you need to sell your house due to a financial downturn there are no buyers due to the same financial downturn.
When you need medical attention the most is when the system is stretched and failing.
When there is civil unrest and you need the police the most is when they are too busy elsewhere.

Collapse means we can not rely on external help and resources like emergency services, utilities and even water supply like we used to. As we go down the collapse bell curve we will need to be more self sufficient and resourceful. We are experiencing the collapse trifector; ecconomic, energy and environmental.

Money wont buy you electricity if the grid is down, or food if the shops are empty, or ensure your home is protected if the police are busy with the downtown riots. While services are available money will help people ignore the reality of the incoming collapse plague steadily creeping accross the globe by buying up the increasingl scarce resources and paying others to do the hard work. Long term resilliance needs self sufficiency as much as possible and community cooperation for the big items.

It aint going to be pretty. Its not pretty now in many places.

JOW

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #324 on: October 20, 2020, 11:49:05 PM »
Planted another tree today.
Just about dried up enough in my paddock to not need gumboots. Another 25mm due Friday. Very wet spring so far...
Eucalyptus scorpia. Sounds like a nice little tree.

When you piss off to the big blog in the sky RE, I will plant a tree in your honour sunshine.
I reakon it definately needs to be thorny though.
Should probably handle the cold, but hardy enough to survive in many areas.
Will be pest attracting for sure.
Should probably bear fruit too.
Maybe not known to be an attractive specimen tree though...
Should definately be useful in a SHTF situation.
 :-\
What do you think?



A tree a week until I die.

JOW

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #325 on: November 12, 2020, 10:17:16 AM »
When the yanks stop bickering about which moron they want to steer the sinking ship, they might realise there are more pressing issues...

JOW

Link:
https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2020/11/13/australia-climate-change-bom-csiro/

Text:
Cooked: Another year of record heat, and it’s only going to get worse
he year 2019 was Australia’s hottest year on record.

But one day in the next 100 years, we will remember it as among our coolest.

That’s the warning from the latest State of the Climate report, released on Friday by the Bureau of Meteorology and the CSIRO.

And so far, their predictions of rising temperatures have come true.

The report, released every two years, shows that not only is Australia continuing to warm, we are also experiencing more frequent extreme weather events like bushfires, droughts and marine heatwaves.

Since the 1950s, Australia’s fire weather has become more extreme and our fire seasons have become longer – especially in southern Australia, the report found.

Sea levels have risen 25 centimetres since 1880 as a result of melting ice and thermal expansion, said Dr Jaci Brown, director of the CSIRO’s Climate Science Centre.

“That’s quite confronting,” she said.

“Half of that has happened around the 1970s.”


Our oceans are getting warmer and acidifying as a result of global warming. Photo: BOM/CSIRO
The researchers also found the nation’s climate has warmed on average by 1.44 degrees since 1910, while the oceans around us have warmed by about one degree.

To the average reader, this increase may not sound like much.

But the difference just one degree can make to our weather systems is enormous.

First of all, you can say goodbye to our Great Barrier Reef.

If our planet heats up by more than two degrees, coral reefs and entire ecosystems will collapse, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Up to several hundred million more people become exposed to climate-related risks and poverty such as tsunamis.


Japan’s twin quake and tsunami in 2011 was the country’s worst crisis since World War II, sweeping away entire communities and killing more than 9000 people. Photo: Getty
Emissions from fossil fuels are the main contributor to the observed growth in atmospheric CO2, the report found.

About 85 per cent of global CO2 emissions in the decade from 2009 to 2018 were from fossil fuel sources.

Without action, it’s going to get worse.

“2019 was the warmest year on record,” Dr Brown said.

“But 10, 20 years from now, 2019 won’t be unusual.

“In fact, we think of this decade being hot, but this decade will be one of the coolest in the next 100 years.”

What weather changes should we expect?
Put simply, weather events are going to get more and more extreme.

Heatwaves will be hotter and longer, and droughts will be even more devastating.

In a cruel twist, when rain does come, it will likely bucket down and may lead to flooding on hardened landscapes no longer able to soak up the much-needed water.

“We will see sea levels continuing to rise, heatwaves becoming more frequent, and tropical cyclones – we’re expecting fewer, but when they do come they’ll have higher intensity,” Dr Brown said.

“The cool season rainfall through southern and eastern Australia will continue to decline.

“The rainfall – when it does come – you may see more heavy rainfall or intense rainfall events and, of course, the longer fire season and more dangerous fire weather.”


Key predictions outlined in the State of the Climate report. Photo: BOM/CSIRO
These changes are already happening.

Earlier in January, as bushfires raged across the ACT, Canberra suffered a freak hailstorm in which abnormally large hailstones fell from the sky and destroyed homes and cars.

Meanwhile, hundreds of Queenslanders living in the state’s south-east are still recovering from a recent hailstorm on October 31 that left some residents homeless.

Giant hail was reported in Logan, south of Brisbane, while hail up to 7cm in diameter fell at Ipswich and the Lockyer Valley to the city’s west.

queensland storms
Rosewood, west of Ipswich, was hit with giant hail. Photo: Facebook
This is why Australia’s response to climate change must cover mitigation, as well as adaptation, Dr Brown said.

“A lot of climate change is locked in, and so adaptation is a very big part of what we do for climate change,” she said.

Offline Eddie

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #326 on: November 13, 2020, 10:46:06 AM »
A Biden administration is bound to be better than a Trump administration on climate change.....Biden is going to get us back into the Paris Accords......but let’s face it. No modern civilization is really doing much to reduce carbon emissions.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #327 on: November 13, 2020, 07:09:39 PM »
A Biden administration is bound to be better than a Trump administration on climate change.....Biden is going to get us back into the Paris Accords......but let’s face it. No modern civilization is really doing much to reduce carbon emissions.

Nope. Just more pissing in the wind I am afraid.

JOW

Offline John of Wallan

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #328 on: November 13, 2020, 08:15:23 PM »
Interesting article. Going into Winter and North Pole is above freezing.
Must be a beat up!
I wish.

JOW

Link:
http://arctic-news.blogspot.com/

Text:
Above Zero Celsius at North Pole November 2020
The image below shows how a hot Arctic Ocean distorts the Jet Stream and hot air moves all the way up to the North Pole.

Above image shows the Northern Hemisphere at November 12, 2020, with a temperature forecast of 2.0°C or 35.5°F at the North Pole at 1000 hPa at 15:00Z. On the right, jet stream crosses the Arctic Ocean (at 250 hPa). At surface level, a temperature was forecast to be 0.6°C or 33.2°F.

As it turned out, the highest temperature at the North Pole was 1.1°C or 34.1°F on November 12, 2020, at 1000 hPa at 18:00Z, as above image shows. At 15:00Z that day, a temperature of 1.9°C or 35.3°F was recorded at 1000 hPa just south of the North Pole, at 89.50° N, 1.50° E.
The image below shows temperature anomalies for November 12, 2020, with forecasts approaching 30°C.

These high temperatures over the Arctic Ocean are caused by transfer of huge amounts of heat from the Arctic Ocean to the atmosphere, indicating severe overheating of the Arctic Ocean as a result of the ongoing movement of ocean heat at the surface of the North Atlantic to the Arctic Ocean along the Gulf Stream.

The resulting distortion of the Jet Stream can at times speed up winds that move hot air from the North Atlantic Ocean toward to Arctic Ocean, as illustrated by the image at the top.

More ocean heat can move into the Arctic Ocean for a number of reasons, including:
At times, the Jet Stream becomes very elongated, speeding up the flow of ocean heat along the Gulf Stream all the way to the Arctic Ocean;
Overall, winds are getting stronger, speeding up ocean currents running just below the sea surface;
Stratification of the North Atlantic results in less heat mixing down to lower parts of the ocean; and
Increased evaporation and rainfall further down the path of the Gulf Stream can create a colder freshwater lid at the surface of the North Atlantic near the Arctic Ocean, sealing off tranfer of heat from ocean to atmosphere and consequently moving more heat just underneath the sea surface into the Arctic Ocean.

from earlier post
As the image below shows, sea surface temperatures as high as 16.6°C or 61.9°F were recorded north of Svalbard on November 9, 2020.

The danger is that more heat will reach the shallow parts of the Arctic Ocean that contain huge amounts of methane in the form of hydrates and free gas in sediments at the seafloor.

Latent heat loss, feedback #14 on the Feedbacks page

The situation is dire and calls for comprehensive and effective action, as discussed in the Climate Plan.

Links

• Climate Plan
https://arctic-news.blogspot.com/p/climateplan.html

• Why stronger winds over the North Atlantic are so dangerous
https://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2020/02/why-stronger-winds-over-north-atlantic-are-so-dangerous.html

• Feedbacks in the Arctic
https://arctic-news.blogspot.com/p/feedbacks.html

• September 2015 Sea Surface Warmest On Record
https://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2015/10/september-2015-sea-surface-warmest-on-record.html

• When will we die?
https://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2019/06/when-will-we-die.html

• A rise of 18°C or 32.4°F by 2026?
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Online K-Dog

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Re: The Environment Board
« Reply #329 on: November 13, 2020, 10:26:56 PM »


The Arctic is reaching a tipping point

It's mid-November, the sun has already set for the winter, and the Arctic is in 24-hour darkness. But the sea ice north of Siberia is basically still in a state of mid-summer.

Current sea ice extent in the Arctic is roughly equal to the summertime lows during the 1980s – two months after the typical start to the freeze-up season. There’s never been this little sea ice this late in the year, for at least a thousand years.

The worst of the unusual warmth is concentrated near Siberia, where current temperatures in the Laptev Sea are more than 20°C (36°F) warmer than normal for this time of year. Large stretches of the ocean are returning to ice for the winter, but were open water up until just a few days ago.

Scientists have begun referring to the region as the ‘new Arctic’, because fundamental ecosystem and weather shifts are happening so rapidly. Three years ago, in the first region-wide assessment under President Trump, scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration wrote that the “Arctic shows no sign of returning to [the] reliably frozen region of recent past decades.” Since then, the changes have only become more stark.

For one thing, the evidence connecting the Arctic to the rest of the planet’s weather and climate system has grown stark: Melting sea ice makes weather across the entire Northern Hemisphere more extreme. Those changes are having compound and cascading effects year after year, which beget faster ice loss, which beget faster changes to the planet at large.

This year has been a shocking example. In Siberia, the combination of spring and summer thunderstorms and an impressive heat wave created enormous wildfires. In June, temperatures reached 100°F about 70 miles north of the Arctic Circle, in a multi-month heat wave scientists found was made 600 times more likely because of greenhouse gases produced by human activity. In July and August, the last fully intact ice shelf in the Canadian Arctic collapsed. By September, the Siberian fires had burned around 34 million acres, more than eight times the size of this year’s record-setting California wildfires.

On the timespan of a single human lifetime, changes this drastic are essentially unrecoverable, but that doesn’t mean catastrophe is permanent or inevitable. It means we have entered a new era in the Arctic.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/DF3KfF29mMA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/DF3KfF29mMA</a>

People have lived and thrived in the Arctic for thousands of years, and that’s not going to change any time soon.

Right now, the Arctic Council, a group of eight nations and six Indigenous councils, is hosting the Arctic Resilience Forum, a multi-week virtual gathering of people from around the Arctic focused on building resilience of Arctic communities and ecosystems in the face of this change. The first session features a discussion of youth leaders from across the region and gives an incredible insight into the daily lives of people who call the Arctic home. I highly encourage you to check it out.

Protecting Arctic ecosystems won’t be possible until we radically reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but it also won’t be possible until the rest of us understand and learn from the people who know the Arctic best.

https://thephoenix.substack.com/p/the-arctic-is-refusing-to-refreeze
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

 

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