AuthorTopic: Official Noah's Ark Thread  (Read 24635 times)

Offline RE

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🌊 Cometh the "Perfect Storm" to NOLA?
« Reply #15 on: May 29, 2019, 07:11:21 PM »
Should be interesting when this Wave of Water makes its way down the Mississippi River to NOLA.  If it comes in conjunction with a King Tide, things could back up pretty big.  Add to that he possibility of T-storms or even a Hurricane (the season begins!), and you have the makings of the"Perfect Storm".

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https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/2019/05/29/flooding-western-iowa-pacific-junction-natural-disaster-aid-relief-march-may-i-29-i-34-weather-flash/1274689001/

'Here we go again': Western Iowa communities, many already evacuated, face second wave of flooding
Shelby Fleig, Kim Norvell and Robin Opsahl, Des Moines Register Published 7:17 p.m. CT May 29, 2019


GLENWOOD, Ia. — Jason Parr has spent every day since mid-April gutting his century-old house at the tail of a dead end just outside Pacific Junction. Sometimes, his 4-year-old twin boys ride their bikes up and down the gravel road, competing with the ailing house for his attention.

Other times, he works alone, quickly draining his data plan with podcasts to break up the monotony of ripping out layers of floorboards and drywall ruined in sudden and severe mid-March flooding.

“Is this all worth it?" he asks himself.

Since Tuesday night, up to four feet of water has inundated the area around the intersection of Interstate 29 and Highway 34, and large portions of both roads now are closed. Heavy rainfall upstream and in southern Iowa have caused the Missouri River to swell, sending water over and through six levees still breached in Mills County.

The county urged some residents to evacuate Tuesday, as emergency officials anticipated more severe flooding by Thursday, when the Missouri River is expected to crest.

In mid-March, heavy rainfall and snowmelt inundated the small town with as much as 10 feet of water, but with little warning. The water has receded slowly over the past several weeks, exposing debris strewn across the county.

"This is like, here we go again," said Mills County Emergency Management Director Larry Hurst. "We're going into the third month. This whole thing could continue on (for months) like it did in 2011, when we just couldn't get the water out."
Debris along Kane Ave. just outside Pacific Junction, IA is seen on May 29, 2019. Parts of the town initially flooded up to 10 feet in March, and many residents of Mills County evacuated Tuesday in anticipation of more storms and water runoff.Buy Photo

Debris along Kane Ave. just outside Pacific Junction, IA is seen on May 29, 2019. Parts of the town initially flooded up to 10 feet in March, and many residents of Mills County evacuated Tuesday in anticipation of more storms and water runoff. (Photo: Olivia Sun/The Register)

At Gavins Point Dam, in Yankton, South Dakota, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers increased releases of water on the Missouri River. Those releases will raise downstream river levels even higher over the coming days.

Some of the rising water is a result of the pressure that immense flooding has put on the area, forcing water up out of the saturated ground, Hurst said. Officials can create drainage once the river recedes to 20 or 21 feet.

"I don't see when that's going to happen," he told the Register on Wednesday morning, standing at the edge of the flooded interstate.
To rebuild or to flee? Residents weigh finances, fear and frustration.

Parr wants a buyout. A native of nearby Glenwood, he purchased the airy yellow farmhouse in 2008. Since then, he’s met and married Fran Parr, an engineer, and is co-raising two energetic boys.

Normally surrounded by corn and beans, “like a privacy fence,” the still-damp house now sits in a swamp.

By gutting the house, he’s preserving it as well as he can in case a buyout doesn't come.
Jason Parr stands outside his residence in Pacific Junction, IA on May 29, 2019. Parr and other residents remain wary of anticipated floods in coming days, some pursuing buyouts and others planning to rebuild.Buy Photo

Jason Parr stands outside his residence in Pacific Junction, IA on May 29, 2019. Parr and other residents remain wary of anticipated floods in coming days, some pursuing buyouts and others planning to rebuild. (Photo: Olivia Sun/The Register)

He and his wife have welcomed three Democratic presidential candidates to their home since the ordeal started. The floods have gained national attention and are cited as a climate change issue by 2020 hopefuls. U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, pulled drywall from his home for two hours, he said.

Another flood would hopefully “flow through” the empty house, rather than sit and soak in like a sponge, he said. Working on the bathroom floor Wednesday, he wasn’t taking the latest threat lightly.

"We were so naive the first time around," he said. "We aren't doing that again."

Conditions around the house have deteriorated since the first flood.

He's seen more snakes in recent weeks than he remembers in past years. Mosquitoes are growing huge thanks to weeks of standing water with no man-made drainage, he said. He worries they'll bite his two boys and spread disease.

"We want to get out. We'd move up to Pottawattamie County."

► Support local journalism. Subscribe to the Des Moines Register.

Neighbors have diverging views on the prospects of rebuilding.

Kevin Barnes, 59, was cleaning up his white two-story house in Pacific Junction on Wednesday afternoon, as locals decided if and what to salvage with more water inching closer.

“I don’t want to be naive, but I also don’t want to be paranoid,” Barnes said. Like Parr, he hasn’t been able to return to his job in weeks. Unlike Parr, he’s cleaning up his property, hoping to rebuild and stay put.

Like nearly all of his neighbors, Barnes didn’t have flood insurance. But he received some grant money.

"It's a lot of devastation here, a lot of broken hearts. A lot of memories totally gone," Barnes said. "But there's, potentially, chances for new beginnings and things to be better, too."

► Previously: Some Iowa towns have been under water for weeks. The big question: Will residents come back?
Floodwaters surround an Iowa Department of Transportation facility Monday, March 18, 2019, in Pacific Junction, Iowa. (Chris Machian/The World-Herald via AP)

Floodwaters surround an Iowa Department of Transportation facility Monday, March 18, 2019, in Pacific Junction, Iowa. (Chris Machian/The World-Herald via AP) (Photo: Chris Machian, AP)
Record-high runoff caused by exceptionally rainy spring

The Missouri River basin has experienced more than a year's worth of runoff in the span of three months, the Corps said Wednesday.

The runoff — from heavy rains and saturated soils — has contributed to widespread flooding in southwest Iowa since early March. Flooding is again inundating homes, farmland and roads there.

The Missouri River endured 26.3 million acre-feet of runoff in March, April and May, said Kevin Grode, reservoir regulation team lead for the Corps. It normally sees about 25 million acre-feet in an average year — making 2019 a record for runoff.

► More: A timeline of 2019 spring flooding in Iowa

"We've already seen the second highest runoff for May" behind the flood of 2011, Grode said. "And that follows two extremely high runoff months in March and April."

That runoff can be attributed to the "tremendous amount" of precipitation seen in South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas over the past few weeks, he said.

"To exacerbate the situation, the soil conditions are extremely wet," Grode said. " ... While this rain is falling, very little is infiltrating into the soil. It's all becoming runoff into the rivers."
A makeshift levee holds back floodwaters from the Missouri River in Hamburg, Iowa, on Friday, May 10, 2019.

A makeshift levee holds back floodwaters from the Missouri River in Hamburg, Iowa, on Friday, May 10, 2019. (Photo: Nati Harnik, AP)
Officials start again on efforts to recover from flood damages

After the March flooding, the Corps began working on constructing temporary levees around the state to protect affected towns from further damage. But the new flood waters threaten some of those projects.

The temporary levee protecting downtown Hamburg is in danger of re-inundation there if the Missouri River reaches 24 feet, the Corps reported. It's currently forecast to reach 23.5 feet Thursday.

"It is what it is and we have to deal with it," said Mike Crecelius, emergency management director for Fremont County.

Levee breaches have also contributed to ongoing flooding, with more than 40 breaches reported in mid-March. Every levee between Council Bluffs and the Missouri state line remains compromised.

The Corps has identified 19 breaches in Iowa that will get immediate repairs. But it will take weeks and months to finish the work, and some may not be complete until July. Other repairs could take years, the Corps has said.

The rebuilding process — and the focus of the Corps — is currently debated as farmers argue that the agency left communities vulnerable to flooding so it could protect endangered species in the Missouri River.

Currently, Iowa farmers are suing the corps for five years of flood damages, estimated at $300 million.

Midwestern communities are also on track to receive some level of federal aid for flooding after March's natural disasters, but action recently stalled when a Republican representative blocked legislation to provide disaster relief aid to the Midwest, California and Florida, citing the lack of border wall funding.

"We've had months to figure this out and to do our job to secure our border," U.S. Rep. Chip Roy, R-Texas, said in an almost empty House chamber. "We now are expected to let the swamp continue to mortgage the future of our children and grandchildren, making it less likely they will inherit a stronger and better country with a government capable of defending the nation and responding to disasters such as these."
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🌊 'Tracking Arkansas River Flood Levels
« Reply #17 on: May 30, 2019, 01:35:17 AM »
Down the lazy river on its way to join with the Mighty Mississippi.  Looks like around mid-late June to hit NOLA.

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https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/05/29/arkansas-river-flood-danger-levees-threatened-arkansas-oklahoma/1268616001/

'Slow-motion disaster' along Arkansas River: Every large community will see major flooding within 7-10 days
Doug Stanglin and Doyle Rice, USA TODAY Published 12:46 p.m. ET May 29, 2019 | Updated 3:29 p.m. ET May 29, 2019

After days of storms in the midwest, the Arkansas River reached 45.86 feet, just under the 1943 record of 48.3 feet. USA TODAY


Every large community along the Arkansas River will see major or record flooding within the next week to 10 days as swift-moving water from weeks of heavy rain challenges Arkansas' aging levee system, the National Weather Service said Wednesday.

Worse, more heavy rain is on the way.

Arkansas is not alone. Record flooding is also creating havoc in Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and northeast Oklahoma, both from locally heavy rainfall and from swollen rivers bringing water south from the north-central U.S.
This May 28, 2019, aerial photo shows flooded homes along the Arkansas River in Sand Springs, Okla.

This May 28, 2019, aerial photo shows flooded homes along the Arkansas River in Sand Springs, Okla. (Photo: DroneBase via AP)

Eight states along the Mississippi have seen the longest period of flooding since the Great Flood of 1927, according to the NWS. The river has been at flood stage in Baton Rouge since January as snowmelt and rainfall waters make their way downstream.

More: Mississippi River flood is longest-lasting in over 90 years, since 'Great Flood' of 1927

One death in Arkansas has been attributed to the floods. Police said a 64-year-old victim apparently ignored a barricade and drove his minivan into floodwaters near the main gate at Fort Chaffee near Fort Smith.

The Arkansas River, swollen from water released upriver in Oklahoma, is expected to crest Wednesday near Fort Smith, Arkansas, at 41 feet, well above the previous record of 38.1 feet.

The weather forecast offers scant hope for relief: Severe thunderstorms were predicted for the Fort Smith area both Wednesday and Thursday.

The Arkansas Department of Emergency Management said floodwaters had already overwhelmed a levee in Logan County, in an area of mostly farmland, and one in Perry County, at the unincorporated town of Toad Suck.

In Van Buren, Arkansas, police Chief Jamie Hammond warned residents in the most vulnerable areas not only of potential flooding, but also of snakes and other dangerous animals fleeing the rising water.
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More: 'I thought I was going to die': Tornado barrage leaves path of destruction from Kansas to Pennsylvania

“Those critters don’t have anywhere to go, so they go to dry land. Unfortunately, that’s in the city,” Hammond said, according to the Fort Smith Times Record.

In Little Rock, Pulaski County officials closed the Big Dam Bridge while the U.S. Corps of Engineers fortified the lock and dam beneath the bridge against rising floodwaters, said Laurie Driver, a spokeswoman for the Corps.

"The structures on the Arkansas River in Arkansas are not built to hold back floodwaters," Driver said, the Arkansas Democrat Gazette reported. "They're there to hold back water in low-water conditions to ensure we have a 9-foot channel for barge traffic."

In Fort Smith, where some homes have already been flooded, officials shut down two bridges over the Arkansas River and closed schools through Thursday.

Water was already creeping into homes in Pine Bluff along the river, inching higher hour by hour.

"It's a slow-motion disaster," said Constable Steve Tidwell of nearby Spring Township, according to ArkansasOnline. "It's taking a long time to rise, and it'll take a long time to fall."
Oklahoma

The mayor of Tulsa said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to continue releasing 275,000 cubic feet of water per second to help drain the swollen Keystone Lake reservoir. Mayor G.T. Bynum said on his Facebook page that the number could increase, depending on the rainfall.

While expressing confidence that a 70-year-old levee system would protect Sand Springs and west Tulsa, he strongly urged residents to evacuate vulnerable areas along the 20-mile system voluntarily.

"The levees have never been tested like this, and if anything were to go wrong the amount of time to evacuate could be minutes rather than hours,“ he warned.

As a sign of concern, an Oklahoma National Guard helicopter has dropped sandbags north of west Tulsa to shore up a seeping spot along the levee.

More: Oklahoma, Arkansas cities brace for 'the worst flood in our history'

After eyeballing the levee, Vernon Ramsey was among some 80 people seeking shelter at the Crosstown Church of Christ, one of many Red Cross shelters opened in the city.

"The way I see it, there's a 79-year-old man holding that water back. And I know with my age, I'm not as strong as I used to be," Ramsey told KTUL.

Adding to the headaches, the National Weather Service forecasts up to three inches of rain in some parts of the state through Thursday, and warns of a "potential for catastrophic flooding" in areas near the Arkansas River channel.
Mississippi

Floodwaters have swamped 860 square miles north of Vicksburg, which is perched on a bluff above the Mississippi River. Unlike other states, where water from the Mississippi or Arkansas rivers spill into adjoining land, the Vicksburg area flooding is caused by keeping floodgates on the Mississippi closed, blocking water pouring into the south end of the Delta region from entering the big river.

More: 'Everything is underwater.' Floods claim homes, farms, livelihoods. Recovery years away.

Current forecasts suggest the water won’t drain significantly from the backwater area in Mississippi until July at the earliest.
Louisiana

In Louisiana, where the Mississippi has been at flood stage since January, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is meeting this week with residents of Butte La Rose and Morgan City who face potential floods with the opening of the Morganza Spillway on Sunday.

More: Morganza Spillway: Preparations for opening underway, thousands of acres expected to flood

The rare move, which has occurred only twice in more than 60 years to relieve pressure on the Mississippi, will inundate tens of thousand of acres of the Atchafalaya River Basin.
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20 FEET above flood stage in Ft. Smith!  ::)

It's getting positively Biblical.

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🌊 Get Aboard the Ark! NOW!
« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2019, 05:21:37 PM »
20 FEET above flood stage in Ft. Smith!  ::)

It's getting positively Biblical.

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Break out the Kayaks!

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https://www.cnn.com/2019/05/31/us/arkansas-levees-flooding-friday-wxc/index.html

Hundreds of roads under water as historic flooding breaches levees and threatens communities
Madeline Holcombe
Joe Sutton Profile

By Madeline Holcombe and Joe Sutton, CNN


Updated 10:33 AM ET, Fri May 31, 2019
daily weather forecast severe storms flooding levees Arkansas Missouri_00010912

(CNN)Heavy rains in the Midwest are causing levees to breach along the Mississippi and Arkansas rivers, which may eventually put thousands of homes in danger.
Arkansas fears historic flooding as a slow-motion disaster unfolds
Arkansas fears historic flooding as a slow-motion disaster unfolds
The Dardanelle Levee along the Arkansas River breached early Friday near the community of Holla Bend, sending water gushing into farmland that already had been saturated by leaks in the levee a day earlier, video from CNN affiliate KARK shows.
About 75 homes around Holla Bend, just downriver from the city of Dardanelle, have so far been impacted by flooding in a three-mile area, Yell County Emergency Management Director Jeff Gilkey said Friday. Yell County Judge Mark Thone told CNN affiliate KATV that he urged everyone in the area to evacuate immediately.

The rushing water is expected to spread to Smiley Bayou, an area of about 500 people. Because the terrain is hilly, only an unspecified number of people in low-lying areas are expected to evacuate, Gilkey said.
Water gushes past a breach in an Arkansas River levee Friday morning near the Arkansas communities of Holla Bend and Dardanelle.
Water gushes past a breach in an Arkansas River levee Friday morning near the Arkansas communities of Holla Bend and Dardanelle.
Just upriver, Dardanelle -- a city of about 4,700 people -- was preparing for flood waters eventually to encroach "from the bayou side," Mayor Jimmy Witt wrote Friday morning on Facebook.
"I ask you to please not panic, we have time to prepare for this," Witt wrote in the Facebook post.

Holla Bend
The Arkansas River at Dardanelle was nearly 2 feet above its record crest before the breach.
More than 500 homes have been directly impacted by flooding in Arkansas already, state emergency management spokeswoman Melody Daniel told CNN.
If more levees along the swollen Arkansas River breach, many more could be in the path of flooding.
Thousands of homes affected
People stand in the middle of the street and look out over the flooded Massard Creek in Arkansas.
People stand in the middle of the street and look out over the flooded Massard Creek in Arkansas.
The biggest concern is in the unprecedented pressure the flooding has put on the levees: They have never held back this much water for this long, the Arkansas Department of Emergency Management said Wednesday
Flooding could affect thousands of homes in 14 counties near the river, ranging from minor damage to destruction, Daniel said. Two levees -- one of them in Logan County along state Highway 309 -- have overtopped so far, but none has failed, Daniel said.
"This is looking to be record-breaking all along the Arkansas River, and this is something we have never seen before," she said.
How to help victims of devastating tornadoes and floods across the US
How to help victims of devastating tornadoes and floods across the US
The Arkansas River was at or near record levels in several locations Friday morning, including at the Arkansas communities of Fort Smith and Ozark. Record crests for the Arkansas River have already been set in Ponca City, Oklahoma, and in the cities of Van Buren, Dardanelle, Morrilton and Toad Suck in Arkansas. More record crests are predicted downstream, including the city of Pendleton, Arkansas.
Gov. Asa Hutchinson sent a letter to President Donald Trump requesting that he declare a state of emergency for 15 counties in the state, but that number is expected to increase.
Mandatory evacuations in Missouri
Nick Sweeney and his wife Tara watch the water level from flooding on their home in Portage des Sioux, Missouri.
Nick Sweeney and his wife Tara watch the water level from flooding on their home in Portage des Sioux, Missouri.
Arkansas isn't the only state worried about the overflow of its rivers and levees. States along the Mississippi are experiencing their own threats from the rising water levels. In fact, 80 flood gauges running through 10 different states -- from North Dakota to Louisiana-- are indicating major flooding, the highest category.
A levee failure on the Mississippi River has caused a mandatory evacuation of residents in West Quincy, Missouri, the Marion County Sheriff's Office told CNN.
And according to the Missouri Department of Transportation, more than 300 roads are under water, with the potential for more to come.
The Mississippi River in St. Louis is expected to crest next Tuesday around 46 feet -- the second-highest level on record behind the 1993 floods. It would also be the second Top 7 crest of all time just this year -- with the previous being 41.7 feet on May 6.
Some of the high water has come from heavy rains: CNN Meteorologist Brandon Miller says portions of northern Oklahoma through central Kansas have seen 15-20 inches of rain during the month of May, which is 300 to 400% of the normal amount.
There's a brief break in the rain this weekend, but heavy rain is forecast for parts of Oklahoma and Kansas, with another 4-6 inches possible next week.
Emergency flooding
The Army Corps of Engineers' New Orleans district announced that while it will be later than expected, they plan to operate the Morganza Floodway on June 9.
The continental US just had the wettest 12 months in the 124 years on record
The continental US just had the wettest 12 months in the 124 years on record
The floodway is designed for emergency flooding and when operated, diverts excess floodwater from the Mississippi River to the Atchafalaya Basin, according to the Army Corps of Engineers.

The operation of the floodway itself can cause damage to properties surrounding it, the department said.
It was only operated twice before: once in 1973 and once in 2011.

CNN's Jason Hanna, Rosa Flores, Amanda Watts, Eliott C. McLaughlin and Jeremy Grisham contributed to this report.
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🌊 Flooding moves down the Mighty Mississippi to St. Louis
« Reply #22 on: May 31, 2019, 06:33:00 PM »
Houseboats!  We need Houseboats ASAP!  :o

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🌊 'It's Never Done This': Arkansas River Keeps Flooding
« Reply #23 on: May 31, 2019, 07:51:44 PM »
Special Edition Collapse Morning Wake-Up Call coming for Sunday Brunch on the Diner to a Laptop near you.

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https://www.npr.org/2019/05/31/728498303/it-s-never-done-this-arkansas-river-keeps-flooding-testing-levees-and-patience

'It's Never Done This': Arkansas River Keeps Flooding, Testing Levees And Patience

May 31, 201910:06 AM ET

Rebecca Hersher at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)

Rebecca Hersher

Nathan Rott at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)

Nathan Rott

Businesses are underwater along the Arkansas River, including near Dardanelle. A levee broke just across the river overnight on Thursday.
Nathan Rott/NPR

Updated at 9:35 p.m. ET

The Arkansas River just keeps rising. The usually placid tributary of the Mississippi has become a bloated torrent carrying entire trees downstream, drowning riverfront property and halting commerce for hundreds of miles.

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said Thursday the high water is costing the state economy an estimated $23 million each day. The river is currently forecast to crest on Wednesday in Little Rock, and there is so much water moving downstream that it will likely be more than a week before floodwaters begin to recede from many areas.

His state joins others from the Dakotas down to Louisiana that have been dealing with weeks or even months of record-breaking flooding along the Mississippi River and its major tributaries. Back-to-back rainstorms have swept across the region, sometimes dumping inches of rain in just hours.

And, while flooding is a part of life along the rivers, this spring's relentless, extreme rain makes the disaster unfolding at the center of the country emblematic of a larger trend: Climate change is causing more extreme rain in some parts of the U.S., and that can cause more extreme flooding.
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Scientists Know How Tornadoes Form, But They Are Hard To Predict
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Scientists Know How Tornadoes Form, But They Are Hard To Predict

According to the most recent National Climate Assessment, "The frequency and intensity of heavy precipitation events across the United States have increased," especially in the northern and central parts of the country.

That means, although this flood is breaking records across the central U.S., it may not be the last time officials, and infrastructure, will be forced to deal with a disaster of this magnitude. On the Arkansas River, levees were built more than 60 years ago in most cases, and were not necessarily designed to withstand the kind of constant onslaught of high water that comes with a multiweek flood.

And the locks and dams along the river aren't there to protect against flooding — they're designed to make sure there's enough water in the river for barge traffic. "They are there to make sure there's a minimum of 9-feet of water in the channel," says Army Corps of Engineers spokesperson Laurie Driver.

It all adds up to hundreds of thousands of people, and millions of dollars in commerce, relying on infrastructure that, in many cases, was not designed to protect against so much water for such a long period of time.

So far, water has come over the top of a handful of levees on the Arkansas, including a major break near Dardanelle overnight on Thursday. Hundreds of workers are surveying the structures, looking for weaknesses and patching low areas with extra sand.

The prolonged flooding also has created problems for emergency officials who rely on evacuations to keep people safe. In some areas, it's been difficult to convince residents whose homes have never flooded that they need to leave.

"There are a lot of people who just didn't want to leave," says Jesse Cantu, who evacuated with his four children from near the community of Toad Suck. On Thursday, they were one of the only families at the Red Cross shelter nearby.

"Actually, our landlord hasn't evacuated," Cantu said. "Hopefully it doesn't get to a situation where they have to rescue him. It's pride, and it's, like, he's seen the river come up before and it's always been fine, so he just said, 'I'm not leaving.' "

John and Louise Hutchins stand in their garage in Fort Smith, Ark., behind a homemade sandbag barrier. They chose not to evacuate, in part because they did not think their neighborhood would flood.
Nathan Rott/NPR

"It's been less busy than what we thought it would be," says Red Cross volunteer Jim Hewitt, standing in a nearly empty gymnasium filled with cots. "We'll be here until they don't need us anymore. It's going to take a long time for the water to go down."

Even Cantu's sister-in-law and her family have refused to evacuate to the shelter. "She didn't want to leave because it never happened before. Like, last time it hit it didn't even get to our parking lot," he says. "I'm like, "Yeah, but this time it is. It's going to crest even more than record.' So you have to understand that, and leave. Or you might not survive this."

Cantu says, so far, he hasn't been able to convince all his extended family to come to the shelter, and the water has cut off access to some neighborhoods, stranding those who stayed behind.

Upstream in Fort Smith, John Hutchins and his wife of 42 years, Louise, stand in their open garage behind a knee-high wall of sandbags, looking at their flooded street. What had been parking spots looks like a pond, complete with a flock of geese. There's a parked car with water up to the wheel wells. Many of their neighbors have evacuated.

"We just felt like we didn't need to leave our home," Louise says. "We had a fire battalion chief that said he recommended that we leave, and I looked at him and said, 'OK, thank you.' And I didn't go anywhere."

"So as long as we had power, we was gonna stay," John adds.

"This isn't a flood zone," Louise says. "Supposedly. Talking to some of the neighbors who've lived here for years, it's never done this."
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https://www.npr.org/2019/06/03/729191928/u-s-farmers-hit-with-bad-weather-and-trade-disputes

'Completely Catastrophic': Flooding And Tariffs Causing Chaos For Farmers

June 3, 20195:00 AM ET
Heard on Morning Edition
Nathan Rott at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)


Robert Stobaugh looks at a field of rice, planted a few weeks ago, that has been flooded by the nearby Arkansas River.
Nathan Rott/NPR

Standing next to his mud-splattered red pickup in Central Arkansas, a tired Robert Stobaugh watches an osprey soar over a field of flooded rice. If anything can survive flooding, he says, it's rice.

"But even rice doesn't like this," he says, looking at the swamp of rust-brown water in front of him.

The fields around Stobaugh's truck are usually planted with soybeans, corn and rice. This year, because of weeks of heavy rain, most of them still haven't been seeded. Of the fields that have, Stobaugh says, many look like the field in front of him that has been swallowed by the surging Arkansas River.

The osprey dives low over the pooled water and ruined crops.

"I'm sure their hunting grounds have been vastly expanded by the water," Stobaugh says with a chuckle. "Tears of joy and tears of sadness are the same color. So if you don't laugh a little with all this stuff, you just about go crazy."

Farmers up and down the Arkansas River, the Missouri and the Mississippi are experiencing an unusual — unprecedented, some would say — combination of circumstances this year that are putting many in a difficult situation.
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Weeks and weeks of rain across the Midwest and the Great Plains have kept many farmers from planting crops. Surging rivers have broken levees, flooded fields and brought barge traffic to a halt on some of the nation's biggest waterways.

"Even if I could get a good crop planted and cut, I don't know how I'd move it," says Matt Crabtree, a farmer in the Arkansas River Basin and president of the Farmers Cooperative.

Robert Stobaugh tries driving his pickup down a flooded road on his property. He backs up when the water reaches the wheel wells. "I just don't feel comfortable going any farther," he says.
Nathan Rott/NPR

On top of that, farmers are dealing with the effects of President Trump's ongoing trade dispute with China and the prospects of a new one with Mexico.

"If you just had one individual [issue], farmers would take a loss but it probably wouldn't be all that bad," says Jeremy Ross, a soybean agronomist with the University of Arkansas' Division of Agriculture. "But then you start adding all these together, and it just starts snowballing, and it just becomes this big huge problem."
Severe Weather And Storms Pummel Southern States
National
Severe Weather And Storms Pummel Southern States
'It's Never Done This': Arkansas River Keeps Flooding, Testing Levees And Patience
Science
'It's Never Done This': Arkansas River Keeps Flooding, Testing Levees And Patience

In Arkansas, like many other parts of the country, the naturally caused problems started early this year.

Intermittent rains through April and May saturated the soil and kept many farmers from planting.

According to recent data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. corn planting was at its slowest pace in recent history.

At this time last year, the biggest corn-producing states in the U.S. had planted 90% of their acreage. This year, roughly 60% has been planted.

Soybean and rice crops have been behind, too.

We haven't planted rice this slowly in about 25 years. For many farmers, it's completely catastrophic.

Jarrod Hardke

"We haven't planted rice this slowly in about 25 years," says Jarrod Hardke, a rice agronomist at the University of Arkansas' agriculture division. "For many farmers, it's completely catastrophic."

Compounding the problem, the window to plant corn or rice with the hope of still getting a good harvest is closing, and the National Weather Service is warning of more heavy rains later this week.

Farmers who might look to soybeans as a fill-in crop are finding themselves square in the middle of the trade dispute with China.

Transportation and industry have been disrupted all along the Arkansas River. Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson says the high water is costing the state economy an estimated $23 million each day.
Nathan Rott/NPR

China is a major customer of American soybeans, but the country has reportedly put a hold on buying U.S. soybeans because of escalating trade tensions.

The Trump administration has announced a $16 billion aid package for farmers who are being hurt by the yearlong trade war between the U.S. and China, the world's two largest economies.

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue says the package ensures that "farmers will not bear the brunt" of the trade war.

But U.S. farmers and agriculture workers are now facing the prospect of another trade war, this time with the United States' southern neighbor.

President Trump says he'll begin imposing tariffs on all Mexican goods beginning June 10 unless that country does more to reduce immigration to the U.S. from Central America.

"Mexico is a very important buyer — one of our most important buyers — of agricultural goods produced here in the Midwest," says Scott Irwin, an agricultural economist at the University of Illinois.

Irwin, who has watched the impact of the China trade dispute and the "exceptional" weather events occurring around the country, says it's not all bad though.

Many farmers were facing projected losses this year because of low prices and surpluses of corn and other grains. The fast-fizzling farming season may change that outlook.

"Mother Nature has basically provided a clearing of the decks of our surplus supplies that we needed to get higher prices," Irwin says.

That doesn't take away the sting in the short term for many growers around the country who are reluctant to rely on crop insurance or federal aid packages to soften the blow. And higher prices won't do much for growers who aren't able to produce any crop.

But, Irwin says, the agriculture economy is complicated, and it might take some time yet to see how it all shakes out.

A flooded road and empty soybean fields in central Arkansas. The road is usually about a mile from the Arkansas River, but it has been inundated by recent flooding.
Nathan Rott/NPR

Leaning against his truck back in Central Arkansas, Stobaugh tries to remain optimistic.

"We're not going to lay down and just let this thing steamroll us and go to the house. That's not what's going to happen," he says. "We get an opportunity to get some crops in here and we think we can do anything, we're gonna do it."

With more rain in the forecast, though, and no end to the trade disputes in sight, the prospects for many farmers in his region are looking increasingly bleak.

Acknowledging that, Stobaugh sighs and says, "We have a very slim chance of eking out anything that resembles what we're typically blessed to do."
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🌊 Nearly 400 Missouri roads closed by flooding
« Reply #25 on: June 05, 2019, 12:08:12 AM »
Break out the Gondolas!  St. Louis is the New Venice!


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https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/ongoing-flooding-may-threaten-mississippi-rivers-old-river-control-structure/70008430

How catastrophic flooding could change the course of the Mississippi River

How catastrophic flooding could change the course of the Mississippi River

By Chaffin Mitchell, AccuWeather staff writer


Floodwaters rushing toward the rising Mississippi River forced the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to make the decision to open the rarely used Morganza Spillway on Thursday, June 6, to divert part of the river's flow into the Atchafalaya Basin.

About 24,000 acres are expected to flood as the water is funneled from the Mississippi River into the Atchafalaya River, according to USA TODAY. Residents and landowners in the path of the expected floods were alerted about the possibility last week.

The Old River Control Structure, known as America's Achilles' heel to some, is a floodgate system which regulates the flow of water leaving the Mississippi River into the Atchafalaya River in Vidalia, Louisiana.

The Old River Control Structure lies on a rural stretch of the Mississippi River in Louisiana, a few miles east of the tiny town of Simmesport.

The system is designed to prevent the Mississippi River from permanently altering course down the Atchafalaya River, bypassing Baton Rouge and New Orleans, but current flooding could put a strain on the system and in a worst-case scenario make it fail, causing the Mississippi River to change course down the Atchafalaya River.

"If the Mississippi River changes its course during a major flood, it would be a disaster for shipping and economic impacts in New Orleans and the lower end of the waterway," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski said.

Mississippi River Flooding Lawsuit

This Aug. 2, 2018, file photo shows the Old River Control Structure. The state of Mississippi is suing the federal government for at least $25 million, claiming a federal dam complex in Louisiana that keeps the Mississippi River from changing course is harming state land. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)


Industries and agricultural interests use the Mississippi River to transport goods upstream and downstream. Grain is hauled downstream, while raw materials are hauled upstream. It is more cost efficient to ship it by barge rather than rail or trucks because tug boats can pull a dozen or more barges up and down the river. However, if the flow is too great or water is too shallow, the boats can't haul as much.

The US Army Corps of Engineers currently has the rivers and structures under control, but some wonder how long that will last.

The Mississippi River has been above flood stage in Louisiana at some points for more than four months now, which is the most consecutive days in modern history.

During flooding in 1973, the Old River Control Structure almost failed when a hole developed in the structure, causing part of it to collapse. The Army Corps of Engineers dumped rock behind the dam, narrowly preventing it from failing. If the dam failed, the Mississippi River would have most likely changed course that day.

Screen Shot 2019-06-01 at 3.32.33 PM.png

Map of part of the Old River Control Structure and lock. (Image via the Army Corps of Engineers)


Improvements were made following 1973 flooding, and it also led to the opening of the Morganza Spillway to help relieve the pressure.

The Old River Control Structure was tested again during the flood of 2011, and thanks to the improvements made to the structure, was able to withstand the flooding.

"That part of the Mississippi River is in the Delta region, so if unchecked, you could have the main channel of the Mississippi shift to the Atchafalaya during and after a flood. That is why they built those structures," Sosnowski said.

To prevent possible catastrophic failure of the Old River Control Structure on the Mississippi, the Morganza spillway is getting opened for only the third time in its history.

"They are going to be releasing water into the Morganza spillway later this coming week, in stages. They delayed the opening a week to give property owners time to prepare," Sosnowski said.

7b203e0d-8270-4902-8425-be6d5eaee4ec-Screen_Shot_2019-05-28_at_3.30.54_PM.png

Potential flooding of the Morganza Spillway opening. (Photo: Courtesy of the Army Corps of Engineers)


They have only opened the spillway two other times, in 1973 and 2011, so when they do, Sosnowski said, it's historic.

Gov. John Bel Edwards has requested a federal emergency declaration as the Mississippi River and other waterways continue to swell. However, Sosnowski doesn't think these floods will be too much to handle for the structures unless heavy rain from a tropical disturbance were to become involved over the next few weeks.

"I don't think the Morganza spillway will fail. I'm not sure about the Old River Control Structure, but I doubt it. They would just release more water through it if they had to," Sosnowski said.

Gov. Edwards said the state will also begin the process of sinking a barge in Bayou Chene Thursday to mitigate backwater flooding in Iberville and other parishes. The barge will act as a temporary floodgate at Bayou Chene, a tributary of the Atchafalaya River, to stop the flow there once the Morganza spillway is opened.

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🌊 Think the Flooding is bad here? Check out Old Mejico!
« Reply #27 on: June 05, 2019, 04:08:45 AM »
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🌊 Swollen Rivers Flood Homes, Force Evacuations In Several States
« Reply #28 on: June 06, 2019, 02:33:34 AM »
They can't Contain the Rain in the Plains and it is Mainly a total fucking DISASTER!

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🌊 Mississippi River flooding creates dire situation in some towns
« Reply #29 on: June 06, 2019, 05:15:19 PM »
This would be a good time to abandon Grafton.

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