AuthorTopic: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart  (Read 22324 times)

Offline edpell

  • Waitstaff
  • ***
  • Posts: 307
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #30 on: February 25, 2017, 08:49:50 AM »
At the mall in Kingston, New York the JC Penney went out about five years ago. The Macy's one year ago. The Sears is on its last legs most of the stock is gone expect it to die this year. The Target seems to be going strong but they do not stock up scale cloths like plain slacks and button down shirts just adult baby clothes. Good thing I have Land's End. Why the $%# can't a reasonably price supplier from China, Egypt, India run an online story and sell direct to me and cut out the leaches of Land's End?

Online Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 16105
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #31 on: February 25, 2017, 11:03:08 AM »
It's only a five hour drive to L.L. Bean.

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 34162
    • View Profile
So What Are We Going to Do with the Retail Malls?
« Reply #32 on: March 02, 2017, 12:51:19 AM »
Homeless Shelters!  :icon_sunny:




Perfectly sized for efficiency apartments!

RE


http://wolfstreet.com/2017/02/28/collapse-brick-and-mortar-retail-what-do-with-retail-malls/

So What Are We Going to Do with the Retail Malls?
by Wolf Richter • Feb 28, 2017 • 90 Comments   

The Painstaking Relentless Collapse of Brick-and-Mortar Retail.

“Our fourth quarter results reflect the impact of rapidly-changing consumer behavior, which drove very strong digital growth but unexpected softness in our stores,” lamented Target CEO Brian Cornell this morning in the earnings release.

“Unexpected” is a hilarious choice of words. Because we, mere outsiders, have been vivisecting the now structural brick-and-mortar retail quagmire for a long time, and no deterioration is “unexpected.”

Target’s revenues in the fourth quarter fell 4.3% year-over-year to $20.7 billion. Revenues for the whole year dropped 5.8% to $69.5 billion. Down from $69.8 billion in fiscal 2011. That makes for six years of sales stagnation.

Net income plunged 43% to $817 million for the quarter, and 19% for the year to $2.7 billion. But at least, Target is still making money – unlike other retailers, many of which are either already in bankruptcy or are slithering toward it.

Sales at stores open for at least a year fell 1.5% in the quarter and 0.5% for the year. It expects same-store sales to fall further in the “low-to-mid single” digits. Target also lowered its outlook for earnings, which caused even retail optimists to howl in pain.

Target’s shares crashed 14% at the open today – which would be its worst one-day dollar-decline since its IPO in 1972. Currently at $58.53, shares are down 30% from their 52-week high.

But Target has a plan. It has had plans for years. So another plan, including 12 new brands over the next two years. And it “will invest in lower gross margins” to get competitive.

Which means it will cut prices. Which means it’ll have to sell more merchandise just to keep dollar sales even. And that’s unlikely. Which means it’s going to hurt dollar sales further. Which is going to maul earnings even more. Hence the dive in the shares.

Everyone is trying to be competitive. Wal-Mart started running price-comparison tests in about 1,200 stores, and it’s pressuring suppliers to cut prices, something Wal-Mart has long been infamous for. Being a supplier to Wal-Mart can be a curse.




Wal-Mart too is under pressure. Last week it reported that quarterly revenues inched up merely 1% year-over-year, after announcing last year that it would close 154 stores. But its online sales jumped 36%, after the acquisition of Jet.com last year, for which it had shelled out $3 billion.

Brick-and-mortar retailers all know what they have to do to survive: ease out of brick-and-mortar, and get big online. Or else.

Target’s crummy results too were boosted by a 34% jump in online sales. But from a small base. So it wasn’t nearly enough. And online is even more competitive than brick-and-mortar.

J.C. Penney touted its buy-online-pickup-in-store options when it reported “positive net income” – instead of negative net income, we assume – of $1 million for the year on a decline in sales. And analysts cut their price target to $7.50 a share from $12. Shares currently trade at $6.35, down 4.3% for the day.

To raise cash, the company is trying to sell distribution centers and other properties that aren’t leased, but most of the stores are leased and there isn’t much to sell. In January it sold its headquarters in Plano, Texas, for $353 million. It’s also shuttering two distribution centers, which it owns and might be able to sell.

On Friday, it said it would shutter between 130 and 140 stores over the next few months, or around 13% to 14% of its 1,014 or so stores. But closing a leased store isn’t cheap – lease termination expenses can add up. J.C. Penney tried to put a positive spin on it, claiming that the closings would save roughly $200 million a year. But it would cost $225 million to do so. Once retailers decline, there’s no easy way out.

Macy’s too is focusing on its thriving online presence and slashing its brick-and-mortar footprint. Last August it announced the closure of 100 stores. It already sold its flagship men’s store in the prime Union Square location in San Francisco.

They’re all doing it. Target has pulled out of Canada in 2015 and has been closing stores in the US since 2016. Sears Holdings, which is skittering into bankruptcy, but not before the second half of 2017, has been shuttering Sears and Kmart stores left and right. It announced another 150 store closings in January.

Ratings agencies have been warning about retailers. Fitch expects their default rate to spike to 9% by the end of this year.

Moody’s yesterday warned that retailers have replaced oil & gas as the most distressed sector. Of the retailers it rates, 14% are rated Caa/Ca, which is in deep junk. At the worst point during the Financial Crisis, 16% were rated that low, and many buckled under their debts. It expects current retailers to beat that sad record over the next few years.

But credit is still flowing as investors chase yield, for now. Moody’s retail analyst Charles O’Shea:

    “While credit markets continue to provide ready access for companies spanning the rating spectrum—allowing many to proactively refinance debt and bolster balance sheets—that could change abruptly if market conditions or investor sentiment shift.”

Retail chains – some due to bankruptcy or restructuring, others due to “foot-print rationalization” – have announced plans to shutter over 2,500 stores last year and so far this year, according to my own estimates, which are limited to the biggest names in retail. Smaller operations just disappear. That adds up to some serious mall space. The pace of store closings will pick up from here. And it will go on for years to come.

In some cases, these locations can be redeveloped. Uber bought the art-deco Sears Building in Oakland and is remodeling it for its new headquarters. The buyer of Macy’s men’s store in San Francisco will redevelop it into something else. No problem. But closing thousands of stores at already struggling malls around the country, in an industry – brick-and-mortar retail – that will remain on a sharp downward curve, cannot be so easily dealt with. And it will dog investors in that space for years to come.

This is happening for the first time in the US since the Financial Crisis. Read… Oops, this Isn’t Supposed to Happen in a Rosy Credit Scenario
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 16105
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #33 on: March 02, 2017, 05:19:26 AM »
A few might get repurposed in some way. It won't be for housing. Most will get bulldozed and the land sold.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 34162
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #34 on: March 02, 2017, 05:28:40 AM »
A few might get repurposed in some way. It won't be for housing. Most will get bulldozed and the land sold.

It costs a LOT of money to Bulldoze a Mall and then truck all the debris to Landfill in the Land of Away.  Who pays for that?

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 34162
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #35 on: March 02, 2017, 05:40:15 AM »
A few might get repurposed in some way. It won't be for housing. Most will get bulldozed and the land sold.

It costs a LOT of money to Bulldoze a Mall and then truck all the debris to Landfill in the Land of Away.  Who pays for that?

RE

There's a REASON the Packard Factory in Detroit was never demolished, you know.  ::)


RE

SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 16105
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #36 on: March 02, 2017, 05:45:14 AM »
Whoever buys the land for pennies on the dollar.

The mall owners, who are mostly private, will take a paper loss (although I'd bet most of the empty malls already paid for the real estate before starting to fail).

One of the Simon brothers is already dead, and the other one has to be pretty old now. I don't know about their younger generation, but they  have very deep pockets. Malls are probably a small part of their private equity portfolio these days. They made so much money for so long off mall properties, I expect they aren't about to go bust.

Some of them might sit vacant, but probably not nearly all of them. Commercial real estate located near major traffic hubs is not analogous to the Packard plant.

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 34162
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #37 on: March 02, 2017, 05:54:42 AM »
Whoever buys the land for pennies on the dollar.

The mall owners, who are mostly private, will take a paper loss (although I'd bet most of the empty malls already paid for the real estate before starting to fail).

One of the Simon brothers is already dead, and the other one has to be pretty old now. I don't know about their younger generation, but they  have very deep pockets. Malls are probably a small part of their private equity portfolio these days. They made so much money for so long off mall properties, I expect they aren't about to go bust.

Some of them might sit vacant, but probably not nearly all of them. Commercial real estate located near major traffic hubs is not analogous to the Packard plant.

Who is gonna buy the space Eddie, and for what purpose?  It's exactly the same situation as the Packard plant.  The whole model doesn't work.  There is no reason for anyone to buy this retail space anymore.  Every single Anchor is going BK.  Macy's, JC Penny, Sears, you name it they are ALL in the toilet.

There are empty and boarded up malls all over the country.  Nobody is buying them for "pennies on the dollar", because those are just lost pennies and taking on a huge liability of cleanup.  WTF would they put in their place that would make money to justify such an investment?


RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 16105
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #38 on: March 02, 2017, 06:05:12 AM »
WTF would they put in their place that would make money to justify such an investment?

Somebody with a conduit scheme that's still working. Here it was the local community college system. Imagine that. Wonder where they got the money?

Highland Mall
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Highland Mall
HighlandMallAustinTX.JPG
Location   Austin, Texas, USA
Opening date   1971[1]
Closing date   2015
Management   General Growth Properties (retail space only)[2]
Owner   Austin Community College District
No. of stores and services   130+
No. of anchor tenants   0 (space for 4)
Total retail floor area   575,334 sq. ft.
No. of floors   4 (Dillard's Womens only; the rest of the mall is 2 floors)
Website   HighlandMall.com
Highland Mall was a shopping mall located in north Austin, Texas, on Airport Boulevard west of I-35 and north of US Route 290. Opened in 1971, Highland Mall was Austin's first suburban shopping mall.[1] Highland Mall was jointly owned by General Growth and Simon Property Group until 2011. Austin Community College began acquiring the surrounding land in 2010, assumed ownership of the last parcel it did not already control in August 2011. [3] On April 29, 2015, Highland Mall officially closed its doors.[4]

Contents  [hide]
1   Anchors
2   Mall in decline
2.1   Acquisition by ACC
3   References
4   External links
Anchors[edit]
Joske's/Dillard's Women - The former Joske's location at the south end of the mall when it purchased the entire Joske's chain by Dillard's in 1987.[5] Dillard's closed in May 2009.
JCPenney - JCPenney, an original tenant when the mall opened in 1971, closed its anchor store in Highland Mall on September 30, 2006.[6]
Dillard's Men - The Dillard's Men's store occupied the anchor store location originally held by Scarbroughs, once Austin's largest locally owned department store chain, from 1992-2011.[7]
Foley's/Macy's - The former Foley's anchor store was renamed Macy's in September 2006 as a result of Federated Department Stores' purchase of the May Company in 2005.[8] Macy's closed in March 2011.
In addition, the Greyhound bus terminal for Austin is located immediately southeast of the mall.

Mall in decline[edit]
Two of the mall's seven retail sectors are closed. Press reports describe the mall as "in decline" and say it is "likely to be demolished in 2010" to make way for a mixed-used development.[9]

On June 26, 2009, Yahoo! reported that it was one of "America's Most Endangered Malls":

While gleaming new stores have been springing up in some parts of Austin, this 38-year-old mall along I-35 has struggled to keep stores open--and avoid embarrassing controversies. Anchor JCPenney left in 2006, and this year Dillard's sued the mall's owners, claiming they let the mall become a "ghost town." The owners countersued, claiming that the suit is part of a scheme to help Dillard's get out of its lease early.

— Rick Newman, Yahoo! Finance[10]
As Austin has grown and expanded in the years since Highland Mall's opening, the demographics of the surrounding neighborhoods, once considered somewhat upscale, have moderated; the mall is the closest major regional shopping center serving the eastern portion of the city, which has traditionally been populated primarily by working-class African American residents. Highland Mall has been known in recent years for large crowds of visitors to the mall during the Texas Relays (a major track and field event held at the University of Texas at Austin), generating controversy and allegations of racial discrimination, or at the least, a less-than-welcoming attitude, on the part of mall management towards the visitors, mainly younger African Americans, many who visit from out-of-state.[11] During the 2009 Texas Relays, management decided to close the mall several hours earlier than normal, presumably in an attempt to control the crowds and promote safety, prompting protests from the local chapter of the NAACP and a possible boycott of the mall (all part of a larger controversy over perceived negative attitudes in Austin towards the Texas Relays and its largely younger Black fan base, which uses the Relays as a social event comparable to the controversial Freaknik events in Atlanta in the early 2000s).[12]

The former JCPenney wing was known at one point as the Fun Zone.

Charles Heimsath, president of an Austin-based real estate research firm, suggested that local malls such as Barton Creek Square and The Domain have siphoned off clientele from Highland Mall.[13] Despite Highland Mall's relative proximity and convenience to the University of Texas at Austin, many UT students elect to use these other shopping venues.

On June 3, 2009, the Austin Chronicle reported that Austin's professional soccer team, the Austin Aztex, were interested in using part of the site for a soccer stadium.[14] The site would have also included "pedestrian-friendly street frontage in a mixed-use design, rapid bus transit and rail right across the street, and structured parking." Grassroots Austin Stadium Supporters (GRASS) was a group that has formed to push for the stadium project.[15]

On April 30, 2015, Highland Mall officially closed after 44 business years.

Acquisition by ACC[edit]
Austin Community College purchased Highland Mall and is redeveloping the site as a regional education center. The first phase, ACC’s Highland Campus, opened in fall 2014. It includes classrooms, labs, study areas, library and media center, student commons, and ACCelerator, a 600-station learning lab for individualized instruction through technology.[16] [17]

Preparation is under way for additional redevelopment at Highland Mall. Plans call for a digital and creative media cluster, expanded information technology programs, culinary and hospitality center, professional incubator space, an advanced manufacturing center, workforce innovation center, and regional health sciences center with simulator lab.[18] ACC also is developing a partnership with Rackspace Hosting, provider of managed cloud hosting services, in which Rackspace will lease Highland space and provide internships and other opportunities for students.[19]

Over the long term, space not used by the college at the Highland Mall site will be available for private mixed-use development.[20]

References[edit]
^ Jump up to: a b Morton, Kate Miller (2008-07-27). "Congress Avenue redeveloped at a crawl; Some new stores opened or planned but challenges remain". Austin American-Statesman.
Jump up ^ "Properties: Highland Mall". General Growth Properties. Retrieved 2008-08-11.
Jump up ^ http://insideacc.austincc.edu/index.php/2011/08/04/acc-finalizes-purchase-of-j-c-penney-property-at-highland-mall/
Jump up ^ http://kxan.com/2015/04/30/highland-mall-closes-for-good-thursday-night/
Jump up ^ Breyer, R. Michelle (1993-11-13). "Dillard location at Highland Mall finishes facelift". Austin American-Statesman. p. E1.
Jump up ^ Novak, Shonda. "J.C. Penney leaving Highland". Austin American-Statesman. p. F01.
Jump up ^ Tyson, Kim (1992-02-18). "Local landmark Scarbroughs selling 2 stores to Dillard". Austin American-Statesman. p. A1.
Jump up ^ Novak, Shonda (2006-09-08). "Macy's to open, grandly, in place of area Foley's". Austin American-Statesman. p. D01.
Jump up ^ Grimes, Andrea (2008-07-15). "Girl On Top: Scenes from a 'ghetto mall'". That Other Paper.
Jump up ^ Rick Newman, America's Most Endangered Malls Yahoo Finance June 26, 2009. Accessed June 29, 2009.[dead link]
Jump up ^ Dunbar, Wells (2009-03-20). "Ghost Mall? Retail Bagpipes Sound a Dirge for Highland Mall". Austin Chronicle.
Jump up ^ Sanders, Joshunda (2009-04-12). "Activists, residents protest outside Highland Mall". Austin American-Statesman.
Jump up ^ http://impactnews.com/central-austin/news/8813-malls-face-redevelopment
Jump up ^ Barbaro, Nick (2009-06-03). "Aztex Stadium/Aztex Station at Highland Mall". The Austin Chronicle.
Jump up ^ Grassroots Austin Stadium Supporters website
Jump up ^ http://www.statesman.com/photo/news/local-education/austin-community-college-highland-campus/pCLkQH/
Jump up ^ http://impactnews.com/austin-metro/central-austin/austin-community-college-debuts-highland-campus/
Jump up ^ http://sites.austincc.edu/newsroom/acc-begins-work-on-highland-phase-ii/
Jump up ^ http://www.bizjournals.com/austin/blog/real-estate/2014/07/rackspace-to-shift-570-employees-to-accs-highland.html
Jump up ^ http://impactnews.com/austin-metro/central-austin/plans-for-acc%27s-highland-include-apartments%2C-retail/
External links[edit]
   Wikimedia Commons has media related to Highland Mall.
ACC Highland Campus
Highland Mall official website
Photos from Highland Mall's last day in operation







What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 34162
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #39 on: March 02, 2017, 06:13:33 AM »
WTF would they put in their place that would make money to justify such an investment?

Somebody with a conduit scheme that's still working. Here it was the local community college system. Imagine that. Wonder where they got the money?


Community Colleges are ALSO going BK!  ::)

http://jacksonville.com/business/real-estate/2017-03-02/regency-square-50-years-old-and-not-alone-its-struggles

Besides that, there are WAY more Malls than Community Colleges.  Please try again. Thanks for playing.  ;D

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline monsta666

  • Administrator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 1380
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #40 on: March 02, 2017, 06:21:58 AM »
Please try again. Thanks for playing.  ;D

Prisons! The prison industry is always in need of extra prisoners and with low priced housing stock this could be a good investment. In a way your wish is also granted as the way things are going they can make homelessness an arrestable offence! Other closed malls can also be used as sweat shops to house inmates who are paid below minimum wages to produce goods and services. By doing so Trump can achieve his other promise of bringing back industry to America and making hard working Americans work in said factories!

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 34162
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #41 on: March 02, 2017, 06:31:54 AM »
Please try again. Thanks for playing.  ;D

Prisons! The prison industry is always in need of extra prisoners and with low priced housing stock this could be a good investment. In a way your wish is also granted as the way things are going they can make homelessness an arrestable offence! Other closed malls can also be used as sweat shops to house inmates who are paid below minimum wages to produce goods and services. By doing so Trump can achieve his other promise of bringing back industry to America and making hard working Americans work in said factories!

Prisons are a better idea than Community Colleges, but even if Privatized still require Goobermint input of money.  Da Goobermint pays X # of Dollars per prisoner.  In order to do that, Da Goobermint needs to tax at a higher rate, so the non-prisoner portion of the population has less money to spend on what the Prisoners make, at slave wages.  Also unclear is what the prisoners can produce that robots cannot, so why feed them?

Try again & Thanks for Playing.  :icon_mrgreen:

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 16105
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #42 on: March 02, 2017, 07:01:40 AM »
WTF would they put in their place that would make money to justify such an investment?

Somebody with a conduit scheme that's still working. Here it was the local community college system. Imagine that. Wonder where they got the money?


Community Colleges are ALSO going BK!  ::)

http://jacksonville.com/business/real-estate/2017-03-02/regency-square-50-years-old-and-not-alone-its-struggles

Besides that, there are WAY more Malls than Community Colleges.  Please try again. Thanks for playing.  ;D

RE

The death of malls is expected by people who build malls. As long as new suburbs are being built and demographics shift and change, new retail springs up and old retail gets shuttered. The property value drops but in most cases it's still commercial property with some  value to someone...and if its not, it's no skin off Simon Brothers, because they already made their money the first year or two the place was open. They buy corn fields by the acre and turn it into $100/ft property. Malls have a 60% ROI in five years.

There are two inner city malls that have failed here, the one I cited already, and one more, which is not vacant either. It is mixed use, offices and some short term convention space.

I'm not sure you're right about the mall/community college ratio either. The community college system here has twelve campuses.

Look, the empty malls are definitely a symptom of decline. For the particular demographic area they were built to get their customer base from. But I don't think the decline of the suburban shopping mall is the best leading indicator for collapse. It's misleading. There are many factors involved, not the least of which is Amazon.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 34162
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #43 on: March 02, 2017, 07:06:43 AM »
WTF would they put in their place that would make money to justify such an investment?

Somebody with a conduit scheme that's still working. Here it was the local community college system. Imagine that. Wonder where they got the money?


Community Colleges are ALSO going BK!  ::)

http://jacksonville.com/business/real-estate/2017-03-02/regency-square-50-years-old-and-not-alone-its-struggles

Besides that, there are WAY more Malls than Community Colleges.  Please try again. Thanks for playing.  ;D

RE

The death of malls is expected by people who build malls. As long as new suburbs are being built and demographics shift and change, new retail springs up and old retail gets shuttered. The property value drops but in most cases it's still commercial property with some  value to someone...and if its not, it's no skin off Simon Brothers, because they already made their money the first year or two the place was open. They buy corn fields by the acre and turn it into $100/ft property. Malls have a 60% ROI in five years.

There are two inner city malls that have failed here, the one I cited already, and one more, which is not vacant either. It is mixed use, offices and some short term convention space.

I'm not sure you're right about the mall/community college ratio either. The community college system here has twelve campuses.

Look, the empty malls are definitely a symptom of decline. For the particular demographic area they were built to get their customer base from. But I don't think the decline of the suburban shopping mall is the best leading indicator for collapse. It's misleading. There are many factors involved, not the least of which is Amazon.

I sniff a serious case of Normalcy Bias.  ::)



You need to write yourself a scrip for some meds to handle this problem.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 16105
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death of Retail Thread: Life Without Walmart
« Reply #44 on: March 02, 2017, 07:13:25 AM »
I haven't been keeping up. Simon Brothers went public in the 90's. Does this look like the stock of a failing company to you, Mr. Investment Banker?

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
1 Replies
1470 Views
Last post December 01, 2013, 11:40:59 PM
by RE
0 Replies
321 Views
Last post January 16, 2016, 02:55:02 AM
by azozeo
1 Replies
256 Views
Last post May 15, 2018, 04:01:16 PM
by Palloy2