AuthorTopic: Wikileaks Updates-Julian Assange Thread  (Read 25555 times)

Offline Eddie

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Re: Wikileaks Updates-Julian Assange Thread
« Reply #90 on: April 07, 2019, 11:45:26 AM »
Assange'e problems are mainly related to the fact that his "journalism" targeted the outcome of the 2016 US election and possibly swung it to Trump. It certainly looks like he timed his leaks specifically to hurt Clinton (not that I'm a fan of Hillary).

Assange and Comey....the two of them, did far more to influence the outcome than Russia was able to do, no matter how much they wanted to see Trump win.

Forget the law. He pissed off the most powerful people on the planet. Australia will never stand up for him, and I doubt anybody else will either. Does he deserve what he's getting. Of course not. But it doesn't matter. Justice is not part of the equation here. It's damage control. Nothing is more important than controlling the news and keeping inconvenient facts from becoming public.
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Offline RE

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📰 “Assange Is Not A Journalist!” Yes He Is, Idiot.
« Reply #91 on: April 10, 2019, 01:59:35 AM »
https://www.greanvillepost.com/2019/04/06/assange-is-not-a-journalist-yes-he-is-idiot/

“Assange Is Not A Journalist!” Yes He Is, Idiot.


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As we discussed yesterday, whenever Assange is in the news and people are defending him you always see a bunch of hyper-emotional empire loyalists running around online trying to manage the narrative about him. One of the most common talking points which comes up is that Assange is “not a journalist”.

The reason this talking point comes up, of course, is because the WikiLeaks founder is besieged by powerful forces who are attempting to imprison him for publishing inconvenient facts about them, and his defenders often voice their concerns about what this means for the future of press freedoms. The completely baseless claim that Assange is “not a journalist” is used in an attempt to defuse the argument that his prosecution by the US government could lead to the same fate for any news media outlet which publishes leaks on the US government anywhere in the world. If he’s not a journalist, then his prosecution sets no precedent for real journalists.

This argument, if you can call it that, is fallacious for a number of reasons. For starters, as The Intercept‘s Glenn Greenwald explained last year, there’s not any legal distinction in the US Constitution between news media outlets like the New York Times and an outlet which solely focuses on publishing leaks. If you set the precedent with any publisher, you’re necessarily setting it for all of them. Greenwald writes the following:

    To begin with, the press freedom guarantee of the First Amendment isn’t confined to “legitimate news outlets” – whatever that might mean. The First Amendment isn’t available only to a certain class of people licensed as “journalists.” It protects not a privileged group of people called “professional journalists” but rather an activity: namely, using the press (which at the time of the First Amendment’s enactment meant the literal printing press) to inform the public about what the government was doing. Everyone is entitled to that constitutional protection equally: there is no cogent way to justify why the Guardian, ex-DOJ-officials-turned-bloggers, or Marcy Wheeler are free to publish classified information but Julian Assange and WikiLeaks are not.

Secondly, anyone with a functioning brain can see that Julian Assange is indeed a journalist. Publishing facts so that the citizenry can inform themselves about what’s going on in their world and what’s happening with their government is the thing that journalism is. Duh. The need for an informed citizenry is the entire reason why press freedoms are protected so explicitly under the US Constitution, and publishing facts about the most powerful institutions on earth indisputably does create a more informed citizenry.

You can look at any conventional dictionary definition of the word and come to the same conclusion. Merriam-Webster offers “the public press” and “the collection and editing of news for presentation through the media”. The Oxford English Dictionary offers “The activity or profession of writing for newspapers, magazines, or news websites or preparing news to be broadcast.” Your Dictionary offers ” the work of finding, creating, editing and publishing news, or material written and presented for a newspaper, magazine or broadcast news source.” These are activities that WikiLeaks is undeniably involved in; they collect and publish newsworthy information to be circulated by themselves and other news sources. The fact that they do their part differently (and better) than other outlets doesn’t change that.

Which explains why the WikiLeaks team has racked up numerous awards for journalism over the years, including the Walkley Award for Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism (2011), the Martha Gellhorn Prize for Journalism (2011), the International Piero Passetti Journalism Prize of the National Union of Italian Journalists (2011), the Jose Couso Press Freedom Award (2011), the Brazillian Press Association Human Rights Award (2013), and the Kazakstan Union of Journalists Top Prize (2014).

The claim that Assange is “not a journalist” is both an irrelevant red herring and a self-evident falsehood. It is made not by people with an interest in maintaining a small and specific linguistic understanding of what the word journalism means, but by people who want to see Julian Assange imprisoned by the same government which tortured Chelsea Manning because he made them feel emotionally upset. It’s a fact-free argument made entirely in bad faith for inexcusable motives: the desire to see a journalist imprisoned for telling the truth.

When someone says “Assange isn’t a journalist”, they aren’t telling you what Assange is. They’re showing you what they are.

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Offline RE

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📰 WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrested in London
« Reply #92 on: April 11, 2019, 06:22:27 AM »
http://www.14news.com/2019/04/11/julian-assange-arrested/

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrested in London

 

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange arrested in London

Assange’s attorney said he faces a U.S. extradition request

 
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Wikileaks co-founder Julian Assange arrested in London
 

(Gray News) - British law enforcement reported Julian Assange has been arrested.

The WikiLeaks founder was arrested in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, where he has been holed up after being granted political asylum in 2012.

Video shows arrest of Assange
CNN
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been arrested at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, police announced.
Published at: 4:25 AM, Thu Apr 11 2019
 
 
 
 
 
  • Video shows arrest of Assange
     
  • Who is Julian Assange?

 
 

“He has been taken into custody at a central London police station where he will remain, before being presented before Westminster Magistrates’ Court as soon as is possible,” the Metropolitan Police said.

Assange has left the police station and is on his way to court.

Assange’s attorney Jen Robinson said he’s been arrested on a U.S. extradition request as well as for breaching UK bail conditions, the Associated Press reported. Metropolitan Police confirmed he was arrested at the request of the U.S. on an extradition warrant.

 

The UK Home Office further clarified that “he is accused in the United States of America computer related offences.”

Assange is the Australian-born founder of WikiLeaks, an organization that facilitates anonymous online leaking of classified information.

 

Officials said the police were invited into the embassy after the Ecuadorian government withdrew asylum for Assange.

Ecuador’s president said the government withdrew Assange’s asylum status, citing international convention violations, the Associated Press reported.

Authorities haul out Julian Assange, who can't really be seen in the crowd, on Thursday in London after Ecuadorian authorities withdrew his asylum at the Eduadorian Embassy.
Authorities haul out Julian Assange, who can't really be seen in the crowd, on Thursday in London after Ecuadorian authorities withdrew his asylum at the Eduadorian Embassy. (Source: Courtesy Adrian Cotterill/CNN)

Reuters said his relationship with his hosts deteriorated after they accused him of leaking information about Ecuador President Lenin Moreno’s personal life.

Moreno denounced Assange’s interference in the internal affairs of other states: "The most recent incident occurred in January 2019, when WikiLeaks leaked Vatican documents. This and other publications have confirmed the world’s suspicion that Mr Assange is still linked to WikiLeaks and therefore involved in interfering in internal affairs of other states.”

 
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Assange repeatedly violated asylum terms, Ecuadorian president says

It’s been speculated that U.S. prosecutors could bring charges against Assange related to WikiLeaks’ role in releasing stolen emails from the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton’s campaign as part of the Russian government’s effort to meddle in the 2016 elections.

Special counsel Robert Mueller reportedly looked into WikiLeaks’ publication of the stolen emails as part of his investigation into Russian election meddling and any possible role the Trump campaign played.

 

WikiLeaks condemned on Twitter the arrest of Assange, saying “This man is a son, a father, a brother. He has won dozens of journalism awards. He’s been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize every year since 2010. Powerful actors, including CIA, are engaged in a sophisticated effort to dehumanise, delegitimize and imprison him. #ProtectJulian

Edward Snowden, who is in exile in Russia after leaking classified documents, said in a tweet that “the United Nations formally ruled his detention to be arbitrary, a violation of human rights. They have repeatedly issued statements calling for him to walk free - including very recently.”

 

Assange’s American lawyer called the arrest and “unprecedented effort by the United States seeking to extradite a foreign journalist.”

He founded WikiLeaks in 2006, and it was only a year later that the organization started to gain international infamy, starting with its release of a U.S. Army manual for handling prisoners at Guantanamo Bay.

 

In September 2008, WikiLeaks posted emails from vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin.

But it was in 2010 that WikiLeaks made its first really big splash, when it posted a video of a U.S. military helicopter shooting to death two journalists and several Iraqi civilians. Later that year, the organization released 90,000 classified U.S. military documents about the war in Afghanistan and classified military documents on the Iraq War.

 

It was also in 2010 that Assange ran into significant legal trouble, when he was accused of sexually assaulting two female WikiLeaks volunteers.

After Swedish authorities issued an arrest for Assange, he turned himself into London authorities but was soon released on bail and put on house arrest.

As Assange’s lawyers fought an extradition request from Sweden, WikiLeaks continued releasing classified information, including documents describing the treatment of detainees at Guantanamo Bay and more than 250,000 U.S. diplomatic cables.

 

On June 19, 2012, Assange entered the Ecuadorian Embassy in London to request political asylum, which was granted to him a month later. He’s been living there ever since.

But he stayed busy – and it was on July 22, 2016, that WikiLeaks released nearly 20,000 hacked emails from the DNC, which Assange admitted was timed to coincide with the Democratic National Convention.

On Oct. 7, 2016, WikiLeaks published 2,000 hacked emails from John Podesta, Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman.

In this May 19, 2017, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange gestures to supporters outside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, where he has been in self imposed exile since 2012. He was arrested at the embassy Thursday.
In this May 19, 2017, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange gestures to supporters outside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, where he has been in self imposed exile since 2012. He was arrested at the embassy Thursday.

Assange has denied that Russian hackers gave WikiLeaks the stolen emails, though in July 2018 the Justice Department announced indictments against 12 members of the Russian intelligence agency GRU for their alleged efforts in hacking Democratic party emails and computer networks during the 2016 election.

In April 2017, then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the Department of Justice was preparing charges against Assange related to WikiLeaks’ publication of secret documents, saying that arresting Assange was a “priority.”

A month later, Swedish prosecutors dropped their investigation into the rape allegations against Assange.

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Offline cernunnos5

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Re: Wikileaks Updates-Julian Assange Thread
« Reply #93 on: April 11, 2019, 07:03:35 AM »
Something interesting. The Democracy Now report on this is being blocked on youtube

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Re: Wikileaks Updates-Julian Assange Thread
« Reply #94 on: April 11, 2019, 08:35:26 AM »
Something interesting. The Democracy Now report on this is being blocked on youtube

I'm not having any trouble viewing it.  Maybe just in Canada?  Can you see the embed here?


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Offline K-Dog

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Re: Wikileaks Updates-Julian Assange Thread
« Reply #95 on: April 11, 2019, 08:48:21 AM »
Probably bandwidth.  Everyone wanted to see it at once!
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Re: Wikileaks Updates-Julian Assange Thread
« Reply #96 on: April 11, 2019, 03:10:35 PM »
Thanks guys but no. The original video is gone. Democracy Now has powered through it. CNN propaganda showed up. No problem.


4-5 hours were bought. C5 goes XFiles if you wish... you guys know me. I poo poo that shit... but a few hours are missing.... and my anus hurts... what might have happened?

Offline azozeo

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Re: Wikileaks Updates-Julian Assange Thread
« Reply #97 on: April 11, 2019, 05:27:33 PM »
Thanks guys but no. The original video is gone. Democracy Now has powered through it. CNN propaganda showed up. No problem.


4-5 hours were bought. C5 goes XFiles if you wish... you guys know me. I poo poo that shit... but a few hours are missing.... and my anus hurts... what might have happened?


Hypnotherapist can hook you up.  :icon_sunny:

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https://www.greanvillepost.com/2019/04/11/the-latest-on-wikileaks-founder-julian-assanges-arrest-us-extradition/

The Latest on Wikileaks Founder Julian Assange’s Arrest, US Extradition

Following nearly seven years and a protracted effort by US intelligence agencies, Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has been arrested by London Police.

April 11th, 2019

By MintPress News Desk / This is a crosspost with MintPress News


Latest | London Judge Michael Snow has found Assange guilty of breaching his bail at Westminster Magistrates’ Court after Assange appeared in a courtroom packed with supporters. Assange faces a sentence of up to one year for the conviction and has serious charges pending in the United States.

Assange’s defense hinges on the fact that he cannot expect a fair trial in British courts as the U.K.’s intends to “secure his delivery” to the United States.

The U.S. Justice Department charged WikiLeaks founder Assange with conspiring with Chelsea Manning to break into classified government computers on Thursday after Assange was taken into custody in London in connection with a U.S. extradition request, as well as for breaching U.K. bail conditions in 2012. His lawyer has previously said that Assange planned to fight any U.S. charges against him.

Watch | Julian Assange’s legal team make a statement following his arrest

The indictment accuses Assange of assisting Manning, a former U.S. intelligence analyst, in cracking a password that helped Manning infiltrate Pentagon computers.

According to Intercept journalist Glenn Greenwald, the U.S. Department of Justice indictment of Assange relates to Wikileaks’ publishing of U.S. war logs and diplomatic cables and is unrelated to the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Greenwald called the indictment a “huge attack on press freedom.”

 

Shadowproof Journalist Kevin Gosztola noted on Twitter that the language of the indictment contains the same words typically seen in Espionage Act charge. He said, “Prosecutors are clearly accusing Assange of aiding and abetting espionage, but they’re trying to do it within charge for computer crime.”

 

The full indictment can be read below:

Assange Indictment (1) by on Scribd

Initially, Sweden’s Chief Prosecutor Ingrid Isgren said, “we have not been able to decide on the available information” whether a stalled investigation into alleged sexual offenses against Julian Assange could be reopened if he returns to Sweden before the statute of limitations lapses in August 2020, but hours later following Assange’s appearance in the Westminster Magistrates’ Court, Swedish prosecutors reopened their preliminary investigation into allegations of rape against Assange after a lawyer for one of the alleged victims requested that Swedish prosecutors revisit the case. The prosecutors’ office has affirmed that the case against Assange will be reopened but did not give a deadline for the probe.

 

A senior member of Germany’s opposition Left party says Europe must not allow WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to be extradited to the United States for trial. Sevim Dagdelen said in a statement that the withdrawal of Assange’s political asylum by Ecuador and his subsequent arrest by British police was a “scandal, a violation of international law, and at the same time a severe blow to independent journalism.” She says it is the German government’s “duty” now to prevent Britain, which earlier Thursday was granted an extension to its departure from the European Union, from extraditing Assange to the U.S., “where he faces life imprisonment or even the death penalty for exposing U.S. war crimes.”

Bolivian president, Evo Morales, also condemned the detention of Assange, tweeting:

 

Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said Thursday the way Assange was treated gave “the full impression of an open and rude disregard for the human dignity of the arrested.” She said: Russia hopes “all the rights of Julian Assange will be respected.”

The UK Home Shadow Secretary Diane Abbot on Assange took to Twitter to defend Assage’s leak of U.S. war files and diplomatic cables, saying,”states don’t have the right to kill willy-nilly. Whistle blowers do us all a service.” In a separate tweet, Abbot said, “only need look at Chelsea Manning to see what awaits Assange. She’s indefinitely detained for refusing to expose whistle-blowers. And US officials have already deemed Assange guilty.”

The UK’s Labour’s Shadow Justice Secretary Richard Burgon hinted that Assange’s release of information related to U.S. killing of civilians in Iraq was the motivation behind his arrest.

 

The ACLU has slammed the U.S. prosecution of Assange. Ben Wizner, director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project, issued the following comment in response:

    Any prosecution by the United States of Mr. Assange for Wikileaks’ publishing operations would be unprecedented and unconstitutional, and would open the door to criminal investigations of other news organizations. Moreover, prosecuting a foreign publisher for violating U.S. secrecy laws would set an especially dangerous precedent for U.S. journalists, who routinely violate foreign secrecy laws to deliver information vital to the public’s interest.”

Journalists right’s advocates have also come out in defense of Assange, warning of the dangerous precedent the moves against him sets. The center for investigative journalism released a statement saying in part, “Any attempt to extradite #Assange to the United States for prosecution under the deeply flawed cudgel of the Espionage Act 1917, is an attack on all of us.”

 

Britain’s National Union of Journalists also released a statement, calling the actions of authorities “shocking” and saying the UK “should not be working on behalf of the Trump administration.”

 

Earlier | London Metropolitan Police arrested WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange at the Ecuadorian embassy in London on Thursday after Ecuador revoked the political asylum that had given him sanctuary for almost seven years following a deluge of pressure by the United States and Britain.

London police said they were invited into the embassy by Ecuador’s ambassador. Assange took refuge in the embassy in 2012 after he was released on bail while facing extradition to Sweden on sexual assault allegations that he has always denied and that have since been dropped.

Assange has been under U.S. Justice Department scrutiny for years for Wikileaks’ role in publishing thousands of embarrassing government secrets and was an important figure in the special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe as investigators examined how WikiLeaks obtained emails stolen from Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign and Democratic groups.

Video posted online by Ruptly showed several men in suits carrying Assange out of the embassy building and loading him into a police van while uniformed British police officers formed a passageway.

 

Assange sported a full beard and slicked-back grey hair and allegedly carried a copy of Gore Vidal’s History of the National Security State in his hands. The Wikileaks founder can also be heard shouting something as he is being dragged into the police van, but there is some debate about what he said. Wikileaks claims he was shouting “the UK must resist this attempt by the Trump administration.”

 

He was taken to a London police station and will be brought to Westminster Magistrates’ Court, according to his mother, Christine Assange.

 

Ecuador’s president, Lenin Moreno, said his government made a “sovereign decision” to revoke Assange’s political asylum due to “repeated violations to international conventions and daily-life.”  The moves came not long after the government of Ecuador accused Wikileaks of publishing embarrassing and potentially incriminating information on Moreno in a trove of documents referred to as the INA Papers.

“Today I announce that the discourteous and aggressive behavior of Mr. Julian Assange, the hostile and threatening declarations of its allied organization, against Ecuador, and especially the transgression of international treaties, have led the situation to a point where the asylum of Mr. Assange is unsustainable and no longer viable,” Moreno said in a video released on Twitter.  In the video, Moreno declared his Assange’s asylum “unsustainable and no longer viable” accused him of repeatedly violated “clear cut provisions of the conventions of on diplomatic asylum.”

 

Moreno lashed out against Assange again on Thursday evening, calling him a “miserable hacker” and “spoiled brat” who was disrespectful to officials charged with taking care of him at the country’s embassy in London. He then went on to repeat unproven allegations that Assange was smearing of his own fecal matter on the walls of the embassy building and said that was a sign of how the WikiLeaks founder viewed Ecuador as an insignificant, third-rate country.

“When you’re given shelter, cared for and provided food you don’t denounce the owner of the house,” said Moreno at an event outside Quito. He added that Ecuador will “be more careful in giving asylum to people who are really worth it and not miserable hackers whose only goal is to destabilize governments.”

Ecuador says that as part of its decision to expel Julian Assange from its embassy in London, it has withdrawn the Ecuadorian citizenship he was granted last year in a failed attempt to end the activist’s tumultuous stay at its diplomatic mission.

Ecuador also accused supporters of WikiLeaks and two Russian hackers of attempting to destabilize their country.

Interior Minister Maria Paula Romo said in Quito a close collaborator of WikiLeaks had traveled with former Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino this year to several countries, including Peru, Spain and Venezuela, in an attempt to undermine the government. She did not identify the individual but said their name, as well as two Russian hackers working in Ecuador, would be turned over to judicial authorities.

Former Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa accused the nation’s current leader of retaliating against Julian Assange for WikiLeaks’ publication of documents that could implicate President Lenin Moreno in corruption. Correa — who led the South American nation when Assange was granted asylum in Ecuador’s London embassy — said Thursday that the decision to revoke asylum is “cowardly.”

In a stream of remarks on Twitter, Correa criticized Moreno for allowing British authorities to arrest Assange, and linked that to WikiLeaks’ disclosure about an offshore bank account allegedly linked to Moreno’s family and friends. Correa said the decision “will never been forgotten by all of humanity.”

 

Wikileaks accused Ecuador of illegally terminating Assange’s asylum, adding that the Ecuadorian ambassador invited police inside the embassy to take Assange into custody and that Ecuadorian embassy officials denied the United Nations access to Assange in the weeks prior to his arrest.

 

 

 

UN Special Rapporteur on extra-judicial executions, Agnes Callamard, said that in “expelling Assange from the Embassy” and allowing his arrest, it had taken Mr. Assange “one step closer to extradition”. She added that the UK had now arbitrarily-detained the controversial anti-secrecy journalist and campaigner, “possibly endangering his life”.

 

His lawyer, Jennifer Robinson, said in tweet that he had been arrested for breaching his bail conditions and in relation to a U.S. extradition request. The U.S. warrant was apparently delivered in December 2017, meaning U.S prosecutors likely played a key role in Assange’s arrest.

 

 

Prosecutors in the Eastern District of Virginia have inadvertently disclosed the existence of a sealed criminal complaint against Assange, though no details have been publicly announced.

WikiLeaks quickly drew attention to U.S. interest in Assange.

“Powerful actors, including CIA, are engaged in a sophisticated effort to de-humanize, de-legitimize and imprison him,” said in a tweet over a photo of Assange’s smiling face.

Assange had not come out of the embassy for almost seven years because he feared arrest and extradition to the United States for publishing thousands of classified military and diplomatic cables through WikiLeaks. Although Sweden has dropped the sexual assault case that first led to Assange’s arrest in Britain, U.K. authorities said he would be rearrested if he ever left the embassy because he skipped bail in the original case.

Last week, a UN envoy on torture warned against the termination of Assange’s asylum, telling Ecuador that Assange could have torture at hands of U.S. officials if he were extradited to the United States.

Assange’s arrest came a day after WikiLeaks accused Ecuador’s government of an “extensive spying operation” against Assange. WikiLeaks claims that meetings with lawyers and a doctor inside the embassy over the past year were secretly filmed. The organization said in a tweeted statement that Ecuador illegally terminated Assange’s political asylum “in violation of international law.”

 

Following his arrest on Thursday, an independent U.N. human rights expert said that Assange’s arrest would not deter efforts to determine if the privacy rights of the WikiLeaks founder were violated, ostensibly by the Ecuadorian government who is accused of recording Assange and handing those recording to U.S. intelligence agencies.

UN Special Rapporteur Joe Cannataci had planned to travel to London on April 25 to meet with Assange at the Ecuadorian Embassy, where Assange sought asylum in 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden. Cannataci says he still plans to keep the meeting despite Assange’s arrest at the embassy on Thursday.

Cannataci said in a statement: “I will visit him and speak to him in a police station or elsewhere in the U.K. where Cannataci in a statement. He says the U.N. human rights office plans to ask the British government to give him access to Assange on April 25. And if Assange is extradited to the United States by then, Cannataci said “then I will direct my request for access to the government of the United States.”

British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt thanked Moreno for breaking the impasse, saying on Twitter that Assange “is no hero and no one is above the law.”

Wikileaks is asking supporters to donate to help Assange pay his legal fees as he readies for long and complicated trial and put blame on the CIA for orchestration his arrest.

 

 

Edward Snowden, the former security contractor who leaked classified information about U.S. surveillance programs, says the arrest of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is a blow to media freedom.

“Images of Ecuador’s ambassador inviting the UK’s secret police into the embassy to drag a publisher of–like it or not–award-winning journalism out of the building are going to end up in the history books,” Snowden said in a tweet.

He also beseeched journalists covering the story not to overlook United Nations rulings on Assange, which include calls for his release.

 

“Assange’s critics may cheer, but this is a dark moment for press freedom.”

Snowden was charged by the United States in 2013 of violating the country’s espionage act. He was granted asylum by Russia that year and the asylum has been extended until at least 2020.

Top photo | Julian Assange gestures as he arrives at Westminster Magistrates’ Court in London, after the WikiLeaks founder was arrested by officers from the Metropolitan Police and taken into custody Thursday April 11, 2019. (Victoria Jones | PA via AP

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Offline RE

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📰 The Martyrdom of Julian Assange
« Reply #99 on: April 12, 2019, 01:48:04 AM »
https://www.truthdig.com/articles/the-martyrdom-of-julian-assange/

The Martyrdom of Julian Assange
by Chris Hedges


Matt Dunham / AP

The arrest Thursday of Julian Assange eviscerates all pretense of the rule of law and the rights of a free press. The illegalities, embraced by the Ecuadorian, British and U.S. governments, in the seizure of Assange are ominous. They presage a world where the internal workings, abuses, corruption, lies and crimes, especially war crimes, carried out by corporate states and the global ruling elite will be masked from the public. They presage a world where those with the courage and integrity to expose the misuse of power will be hunted down, tortured, subjected to sham trials and given lifetime prison terms in solitary confinement. They presage an Orwellian dystopia where news is replaced with propaganda, trivia and entertainment. The arrest of Assange, I fear, marks the official beginning of the corporate totalitarianism that will define our lives.

Under what law did Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno capriciously terminate Julian Assange’s rights of asylum as a political refugee? Under what law did Moreno authorize British police to enter the Ecuadorian Embassy—diplomatically sanctioned sovereign territory—to arrest a naturalized citizen of Ecuador? Under what law did Prime Minister Theresa May order the British police to grab Assange, who has never committed a crime? Under what law did President Donald Trump demand the extradition of Assange, who is not a U.S. citizen and whose news organization is not based in the United States?

I am sure government attorneys are skillfully doing what has become de rigueur for the corporate state, using specious legal arguments to eviscerate enshrined rights by judicial fiat. This is how we have the right to privacy with no privacy. This is how we have “free” elections funded by corporate money, covered by a compliant corporate media and under iron corporate control. This is how we have a legislative process in which corporate lobbyists write the legislation and corporate-indentured politicians vote it into law. This is how we have the right to due process with no due process. This is how we have a government—whose fundamental responsibility is to protect citizens—that orders and carries out the assassination of its own citizens such as the radical cleric Anwar al-Awlaki and his 16-year-old son. This is how we have a press legally permitted to publish classified information and a publisher sitting in jail in Britain awaiting extradition to the United States and a whistleblower, Chelsea Manning, in a jail cell in the United States.

Britain will use as its legal cover for the arrest the extradition request from Washington based on conspiracy charges. This legal argument, in a functioning judiciary, would be thrown out of court. Unfortunately, we no longer have a functioning judiciary. We will soon know if Britain as well lacks one.

Assange was granted asylum in the embassy in 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden to answer questions about sexual offense allegations that were eventually dropped. Assange and his lawyers always argued that if he was put in Swedish custody he would be extradited to the United States. Once he was granted asylum and Ecuadorian citizenship the British government refused to grant Assange safe passage to the London airport, trapping him in the embassy for seven years as his health steadily deteriorated.

The Trump administration will seek to try Assange on charges that he conspired with Manning in 2010 to steal the Iraq and Afghanistan war logs obtained by WikiLeaks. The half a million internal documents leaked by Manning from the Pentagon and the State Department, along with the 2007 video of U.S. helicopter pilots nonchalantly gunning down Iraqi civilians, including children, and two Reuters journalists, provided copious evidence of the hypocrisy, indiscriminate violence, and routine use of torture, lies, bribery and crude tactics of intimidation by the U.S. government in its foreign relations and wars in the Middle East. Assange and WikiLeaks allowed us to see the inner workings of empire—the most important role of a press—and for this they became empire’s prey.

U.S. government lawyers will attempt to separate WikiLeaks and Assange from The New York Times and the British newspaper The Guardian, both of which also published the leaked material from Manning, by implicating Assange in the theft of the documents. Manning was repeatedly and often brutally pressured during her detention and trial to implicate Assange in the seizure of the material, something she steadfastly refused to do. She is currently in jail because of her refusal to testify, without her lawyer, in front of the grand jury assembled for the Assange case. President Barack Obama granted Manning, who was given a 35-year sentence, clemency after she served seven years in a military prison.

Once the documents and videos provided by Manning to Assange and WikiLeaks were published and disseminated by news organizations such as The New York Times and The Guardian, the press callously, and foolishly, turned on Assange. News organizations that had run WikiLeaks material over several days soon served as conduits in a black propaganda campaign to discredit Assange and WikiLeaks. This coordinated smear campaign was detailed in a leaked Pentagon document prepared by the Cyber Counterintelligence Assessments Branch and dated March 8, 2008. The document called on the U.S. to eradicate the “feeling of trust” that is WikiLeaks’ “center of gravity” and destroy Assange’s reputation.

Assange, who with the Manning leaks had exposed the war crimes, lies and criminal manipulations of the George W. Bush administration, soon earned the ire of the Democratic Party establishment by publishing 70,000 hacked emails belonging to the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and senior Democratic officials. The emails were copied from the accounts of John Podesta, Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman. The Podesta emails exposed the donation of millions of dollars from Saudi Arabia and Qatar, two of the major funders of Islamic State, to the Clinton Foundation. It exposed the $657,000 that Goldman Sachs paid to Hillary Clinton to give talks, a sum so large it can only be considered a bribe. It exposed Clinton’s repeated mendacity. She was caught in the emails, for example, telling the financial elites that she wanted “open trade and open borders” and believed Wall Street executives were best positioned to manage the economy, a statement that contradicted her campaign statements. It exposed the Clinton campaign’s efforts to influence the Republican primaries to ensure that Trump was the Republican nominee. It exposed Clinton’s advance knowledge of questions in a primary debate. It exposed Clinton as the primary architect of the war in Libya, a war she believed would burnish her credentials as a presidential candidate. Journalists can argue that this information, like the war logs, should have remained hidden, but they can’t then call themselves journalists.

The Democratic leadership, intent on blaming Russia for its election loss, charges that the Podesta emails were obtained by Russian government hackers, although James Comey, the former FBI director, has conceded that the emails were probably delivered to WikiLeaks by an intermediary. Assange has said the emails were not provided by “state actors.”

WikiLeaks has done more to expose the abuses of power and crimes of the American Empire than any other news organization. In addition to the war logs and the Podesta emails, it made public the hacking tools used by the CIA and the National Security Agency and their interference in foreign elections, including in the French elections. It disclosed the internal conspiracy against British Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn by Labour members of Parliament. It intervened to save Edward Snowden, who made public the wholesale surveillance of the American public by our intelligence agencies, from extradition to the United States by helping him flee from Hong Kong to Moscow. The Snowden leaks also revealed that Assange was on a U.S. “manhunt target list.”

A haggard-looking Assange, as he was dragged out of the embassy by British police, shook his finger and shouted: “The U.K. must resist this attempt by the Trump administration. … The U.K. must resist!”

We all must resist. We must, in every way possible, put pressure on the British government to halt the judicial lynching of Assange. If Assange is extradited and tried, it will create a legal precedent that will terminate the ability of the press, which Trump repeatedly has called “the enemy of the people,” to hold power accountable. The crimes of war and finance, the persecution of dissidents, minorities and immigrants, the pillaging by corporations of the nation and the ecosystem and the ruthless impoverishment of working men and women to swell the bank accounts of the rich and consolidate the global oligarchs’ total grip on power will not only expand, but will no longer be part of public debate. First Assange. Then us.
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Offline AJ

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Re: Wikileaks Updates-Julian Assange Thread
« Reply #100 on: April 12, 2019, 04:47:56 AM »
Of course Chris Hedges is spot-on with his analysis of the politics surrounding Assange. Even though press freedom and a functioning democracy would be great it sadly doesn't even begin to address the truly existential problems we face in the coming collapse: climate catastrophe, over population with a massive die off, nuclear war/poisoning of the biosphere and of course our own extinction. Still Assange is important as a symbol of empire and its control of our lives.
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Re: Wikileaks Updates-Julian Assange Thread
« Reply #101 on: April 12, 2019, 01:28:45 PM »

How Ecuador’s Globalist Regime Received Billions to Sell Out Julian Assange

Lenín Moreno will be remembered as one of the most cowardly and disgraceful leaders in world history.




Apr 11, 2019

By Shane Trejo

Ecuadorean President Lenín Moreno thrust a dagger into the heart of free speech today after he allowed a foreign country’s authorities into his nation’s embassy in Britain to arrest heroic whistle-blower and award-winning journalist Julian Assange.

What was Moreno’s price to commit this betrayal? A 4.2 billion loan guarantee from the International Monetary Fund (IMF), it seems.

The Economist published a profile on Moreno showing how he has reversed the policies of his predecessor, Rafael Correa. Correa was a populist who used oil revenues to fund social programs and stood firmly with Assange.

Moreno has moved Ecuador toward being a submissive vassal state of the globalists, begging international financiers for handouts to keep his corrupt regime afloat.

“Thanks to the firm decisions I have made, we are not what Venezuela is today . . . we have recovered democracy,” Moreno said in February. “This money will create work opportunities for those who have not found something stable.”

The IMF deal was announced on the seven-year anniversary of Julian Assange’s asylum at the Ecuadorean embassy in London, hardly a coincidence. It was clear in Moreno’s rhetoric that they were bowing to their global masters and readying to throw Assange under the bus.

“Our government is recovering its credibility,” Moreno said as he sold his nation to the IMF syndicate, also announcing that other globalist entities like Inter-American Development Bank and World Bank would be trampling over Ecuadorean sovereignty as well. “The fact that the world trusts us shows that we are on the right path.”

WikiLeaks noted that an embarrassing corruption scandal connected the Moreno government was being used as the pre-text to boot Assange:
WikiLeaks
✔@wikileaks
Corruption investigation opened against Ecuador’s president Moreno, after purported leaked contents of his iPhone (Whatsapp, Telegram) & Gmail were published. New York Times reported that Moreno tried to sell Assange to US for debt relief. http://inapapers.org/
4,048
4:53 PM – Mar 25, 2019
WikiLeaks
✔@wikileaks
BREAKING: A high level source within the Ecuadorian state has told @WikiLeaks that Julian Assange will be expelled within “hours to days” using the #INAPapers offshore scandal as a pretext–and that it already has an agreement with the UK for his arrest.https://defend.wikileaks.org/2019/04/03/ecuador-twists-embarrassing-ina-papers-into-pretext-to-oust-assange/




https://bigleaguepolitics.com/how-ecuadors-globalist-regime-received-billions-to-sell-out-julian-assange/
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Re: Wikileaks Updates-Julian Assange Thread
« Reply #102 on: April 12, 2019, 10:29:00 PM »
Thanks Az.  I used the info and link on my own website to show Moreno to be a pig.

http://chasingthesquirrel.com/
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🐈 Assange's Cat, not Schrödinger's
« Reply #103 on: April 13, 2019, 03:46:52 AM »

RE

https://www.npr.org/2019/04/12/712719377/the-mystery-of-julian-assanges-cat

The Mystery Of Julian Assange's Cat

April 12, 20195:01 PM ET
Matthew S. Schwartz 2018


Julian Assange's cat wears a striped tie and white collar as it looks out the window of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London in 2016.
Chris J. Ratcliffe/Getty Images

Ecuadorian President Lenín Moreno seemed annoyed when he announced an end to the seven-year residency of Julian Assange in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London:

"We've ended the asylum of this spoiled brat," he said.

But what about the asylum of Assange's cat?

The WikiLeaks founder, who was arrested Thursday, has been charged with conspiring to hack into a Pentagon computer network. Presumably, Assange's illegal interactions with former Army intelligence officer Chelsea Manning are the main interest of law enforcement.

Then there is the matter of paw enforcement. (Sorry.)

While holed up, Assange famously acquired a cat. The cat, named Michi, is more well known by its social media moniker, Embassy Cat. More than 30,000 Twitter followers, and 6,000 on Instagram, followed the self-described master of "counter-purrveillance."

Embassy Cat tweeted regularly beginning with its arrival in May 2016. Cute photos were the norm, with just a bit of political grandstanding thrown in — always with lots of puns. (Embassy Cat was proud to be a "#whiskerblower.")

But by the fall of 2016, its tweets had become much less frequent. In 2017 the cat tweeted only three times. In 2018, twice. It has been silent for more than a year. (The Instagram account has been crickets for more than two years.)
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The New Yorker reported in 2017 that Assange's interest in the cat was less as an animal lover and more as a master of his own brand. "Julian stared at the cat for about half an hour, trying to figure out how it could be useful, and then came up with this: Yeah, let's say it's from my children," the magazine quoted one of Assange's friends as saying. "For a time, he said it didn't have a name because there was a competition in Ecuador, with schoolchildren, on what to name him. Everything is P.R.—everything."

The cat arguably played a small role in Ecuador's decision to end its asylum agreement. Moreno explained that Assange treated his hosts disrespectfully; late last year the embassy implemented a series of rules for Assange, including a requirement to be responsible for the "well-being, food, hygiene and proper care of your pet." If Assange didn't, the embassy threatened to put the cat in a shelter.

In other words, it is likely that Assange didn't effectively clean up after his cat's own wiki-leaks.

After Assange was picked up Thursday, some people wondered what would become of Embassy Cat. "My sympathy to the cat," author Charlie Stross tweeted.

Journalist James Ball said that although he offered to adopt the cat, it was "reportedly given to a shelter by the Ecuadorian embassy ages ago."

But according to Hanna Jonasson, whom the Washington Post describes as a member of the Assange legal team, Assange was incensed by the threat to put Embassy Cat in the pound. "He asked his lawyers to take his cat to safety," Jonasson said. "The cat is with Assange's family. They will be reunited in freedom."

Wherever the cat is, it's no longer at the embassy. The Italian paper la Republicca wrote in November that the "friendly atmosphere" at the embassy was gone. "Not even the cat is there anymore. With its funny striped tie and ambushes on the ornaments of the Christmas tree at the embassy's entrance, the cat had helped defuse tension inside the building for years. But Assange has preferred to spare the cat an isolation which has become unbearable and allow it a healthier life."

The Ecuadorian Embassy in London did not respond to a request for comment. But a spokesperson told Sputnik that the cat hasn't been with the embassy since the fall. "It was taken by Mr. Assange's associates," the spokesperson said. "We are not a pet store, so we do not keep pets here."
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🐈 Julian Assange 'must face Swedish justice' if country asks, say MPs
« Reply #104 on: April 13, 2019, 03:54:12 AM »
Extradition to Sweden is definitely better than extradition to the FSoA.

RE

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-47917325

Julian Assange 'must face Swedish justice' if country asks, say MPs

    6 hours ago


Image copyright Getty Images

More than 70 MPs have signed a letter urging the home secretary to ensure Julian Assange faces authorities in Sweden if they request his extradition.

Labour's Stella Creasy tweeted a copy of the note sent to Sajid Javid.

WikiLeaks co-founder Assange was arrested on Thursday in relation to an extradition request from the US, where he is facing computer hacking charges.

He had spent seven years in Ecuador's London embassy, evading trial in Sweden for sex assaults which he has denied.

At the time, Assange said he had had entirely consensual sex with two women while on a trip to Stockholm and that the Swedish claims against him were part of a smear campaign.

Swedish prosecutors dropped a rape investigation into Assange in 2017 because they were unable to formally notify him of the allegations while he stayed in the embassy.

Two other charges of molestation and unlawful coercion had to be dropped in 2015 because time had run out.

But Swedish prosecutors say they are now re-examining the 47-year-old's case at the request of the lawyer acting for the alleged rape victim.

    Wikileaks' document dumps that shook world
    Why Julian Assange is a wanted man
    Why Ecuador ended Assange's stay in embassy

The letter, signed by mostly Labour MPs, urges Mr Javid to "stand with the victims of sexual violence" and ensure the rape claim against the 47-year-old can be "properly investigated".

"We do not presume guilt, of course, but we believe due process should be followed and the complainant should see justice be done," it says.

The rape allegation has a limitation period which expires in August 2020, it adds.

Inquiries into claims of molestation and unlawful coercion have already been timed out.

On Friday evening, shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry said Assange should be extradited to Sweden before any attempt to get him to the US.

She said she was "disgusted" the American allegation had been "allowed to eclipse" the sex offence case.
Media captionVideo footage shows Julian Assange being dragged from the Ecuadorian embassy in London

Extradition proceedings are dealt with by the courts.

According to the Home Office, the home secretary can bring a limited number of factors into consideration when deciding whether to order a person's extradition.

These include whether the person might be at risk of the death penalty or whether the requesting state might try to add additional charges it has not specified.

However, lawyer Rebecca Niblock said that, if Sweden made an extradition request, it would be for the home secretary to decide which would take precedence, considering factors such as which was made first and the seriousness of the offence.

Australian-born Assange faces a charge of conspiracy to commit computer intrusion in the US for his alleged role in one of the largest ever leaks of government secrets, in 2010, which could result in a prison term of up to five years.

The US Department of Justice has accused him of conspiring with former intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning to commit "one of the largest compromises of classified information in the history of the United States".
Advance notice?

Assange sought refuge in the Ecuador embassy, in Knightsbridge, west London, in 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden over allegations of sexual assault. But after seven years, Ecuador abruptly withdrew its asylum and invited the police to arrest him on Thursday.

The MPs' letter says both UK and US authorities seem to have been aware in advance of Ecuador's decision to rescind Mr Assange's political asylum.

"It is therefore of grave concern to us that it appears that the Swedish authorities were not aware of the plans made to arrest Mr Assange yesterday in London, and we would welcome clarity as to what action the UK authorities took to ensure that the Swedish prosecutors were informed in advance of this decision," it adds.

After his dramatic arrest, Assange was taken to Westminster Magistrates' Court and found guilty of a British charge of breaching bail. He spent Thursday night in custody and is facing up to 12 months in prison for that conviction.

Assange is due to face a hearing over his possible extradition to the US on 2 May.

Assange's lawyer Jennifer Robinson said they would be fighting the extradition request. She said it set a "dangerous precedent" for journalists publishing information about the US.

The UN has called for his right to a fair trial to be respected during any extradition process.
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