AuthorTopic: Election Errata  (Read 95033 times)

Offline Palloy

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Re: Election 2016
« Reply #705 on: December 13, 2016, 04:40:26 PM »
Quote
Is it really ANYONE's business who is "sleeping" with whom?  What is the point of this other than to perpetuate a smear campaign?  I don't give a damn who's sleeping with whom.  Yes, I do care about folks being lied to and cheated upon, but that's a family matter, not a public one.

When you write a controversial Op-Ed in the NYT, and claim to be an Elector of conscience, it definitely does make a difference if you turn out to be cheating on your wife, and a bankrupt, and using a PR firm that is in bed with Trump's enemies.  To make that public is definitely a smear campaign, but the claims are well-referenced, and it DOES matter because he will now be fighting to retain his Elector position.  The RNC-TX were probably looking for an excuse to drop him already, and now they've got it.  What else did he expect?

Quote
Tyler Durden, by the way, is not a single person.  And "his" name isn't Tyler.

Yes, we all know that.
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But I thought the Cold War was supposed to have been about ideology...
« Reply #706 on: December 15, 2016, 02:05:02 AM »
Nope.  It was about OIL.

Eric doesn't cover that though.

RE

http://www.greanvillepost.com/2016/12/13/but-i-thought-the-cold-war-was-supposed-to-have-been-about-ideology/


But I thought the Cold War was supposed to have been about ideology.
December 13, 2016 shorty   

horiz-black-wideDispatches from Eric Zuesse
pale blue horiz
Was the Cold War against communism, or against Russia? Russia was our ally in World War II, and we’d have a Nazi world today if 26 million Russians hadn’t died from Hitler’s bombs and attacks while Russia fought on with courage amidst desperation, finally to crush his regime.
ABOVE IMAGE: Polish NATO troops on parade. Poland, traditionally an extremely reactionary country, has become (with Ukraine) a battering ram for America’s designs against Russia.  Foolhardy for the Poles to lend themselves to such dangerous maneuvers.
But Russia was communist, so the Cold War developed after that alliance (the Allies in WW II) ended. Then, Russia abandoned communism in 1990, and ended its own Warsaw Pact military alliance in 1991, while America’s military alliance NATO expanded right up to Russia’s borders — and yet the West claims that Russia and not NATO are the ‘aggressor’ here? Sorry: I don’t get it. I really do not. Not at all.
 ..
The Cold War should have ended in 1991 when communism and the Warsaw Pact did, but instead it continued on in the form of NATO (very profitable for what Dwight Eisenhower called “the military-industrial complex” — and its U.S. military is also the employer, direct or indirect, of much of our workforce, especially when arms-manufacturers are counted in). And now Donald Trump is being called by haters-of-Trump (who are almost exclusively lovers-of-Hillary) a U.S. national-security risk because he wants to end the Cold War on the U.S. side — 25 years after it had ended in 1991 on the communist side. Oh, it’s still too soon to do that? Really?
 ..
On December 12th, appeared a call for a re-do of the election (technically it was a letter to the CIA urging an immediate report to members of the Electoral College on whether Trump is a secret Russian agent or won by means of Russian manipulation of the election), and it was signed by 9 Electoral College electors for Hillary Clinton, and by 1 Electoral College elector for Donald Trump (the latter of whom, Chris Suprun of Texas, had written in the New York Times on December 5th pouring hatred against Trump and lauding George W. Bush, who “led us through the tragic days following the [9/11] attacks. His leadership showed that America was a great nation” — so we won’t need to wonder what type of President he admires).

    “The bipartisan electors’ letter raises very grave issues involving our national security,” Clinton campaign chair John Podesta said.
    ‘Bipartisan’ — my foot!

Democrats (the Party I left during Obama’s second term, as he ratcheted-up fake charges against Russia, and cooperated with the neocons — most of whom then were Republicans — to bring the Cold War back to a boil) are trying every trick they can to un-do the election’s result, and this is merely their latest such tactic.

The only valid claim they can make (but they don’t) is that Hillary Clinton (she’s their candidate — the Obama Administration’s super-neocon and the bloodthirsty hawk who had famously said upon learning of Muammar Gaddafi’s gory ending, “We came, we saw, he died. Ha ha!” — oh, wasn’t that a wonderful victory ‘we’ can all be proud of!) beat Trump by 2% in the popular vote. But that claim is irrelevant under the Constitution. (We’re supposed to be a nation under laws, under the U.S. Constitution — right?)
 ..
This isn’t the first time in our nation’s history when a President was elected who had lost the popular vote. Unless and until we amend our Constitution to impose a popular-vote Presidency (and so to remove the existing regional-state role in the selection of our President and Commander-in-Chief), Donald Trump won the 2016 election. Any Electoral College elector who was sworn prior to the election to vote for a candidate but who after having been elected on that basis, has gone turncoat against that candidate, is turncoat against our nation. He (or she) should consider, in this light, what he has done. He’s turncoat not against Russia, but against America, and against the voters whom that person represents (or is supposed to represent). But, above all, he’s turncoat against the Constitution itself, whose 12th Amendment says of members of the Electoral College:
 ..
… They shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President. … The President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certificates and the votes shall then be counted. The person having the greatest number of votes for President, shall be the President. …
 ..
The presumption is that each person who “pledged” to vote there for a particular candidate will write that person’s name onto one of the 538 ballots and hand it in to be counted for that person, once all of the 538 ballots have been collected and the final tally of the 538 is publicly counted in Congress, in Washington DC.
 ..
If Mr. Suprun fails to honor that commitment or “pledge,” then his only punishment — if any — for having done so, will be his own conscience (presuming that he has any), but as far as the law is concerned, he will have committed no crime, and not even a misdemeanor, even though his action on that occasion (his vote in the Electoral College) will have violated his very solemn “pledge,” on the very basis of which pledge he had acquired this awesome right, and extraordinary privilege, in our ‘democracy’. As an Elector he represents around 600,000 voters, maybe none of whom have even heard his name, and yet he will be their lone voice in selecting America’s next President.
 ..
Though Suprun, and the nine other signatories (among the 538 Electoral College members), might actually believe that, as their letter says, this is about “a foreign power, namely Russia, [which] acted covertly to interfere in the presidential campaign with the intent of promoting Donald Trump’s candidacy,” it’s really about America — what type of nation we really are, not what type of nation Russia is.

About the author

EricZuesseInvestigative historian Eric Zuesse is the author, most recently, of They’re Not Even Close: The Democratic vs. Republican Economic Records, 1910-2010, and of CHRIST’S VENTRILOQUISTS: The Event that Created Christianity.
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Election 2016 - Why the Democrats Can't Let Go of Losing
« Reply #707 on: December 16, 2016, 04:34:17 AM »
Oh my Goodness Charles, Are you sure you want tell them?  :icon_scratch: Did Putin make you do it?? :exp-grin: :exp-grin: :icon_mrgreen:

Seriously though Charles, Speaking truth to the Lefties and telling them about their stench can be a problem. Hide your location and Keep your car inside the garage. Your going to be labeled a Trump supporter for this BLASPHEMY known as the TRUTH.

Why the Democrats Can't Let Go of Losing

The Democratic Party has become everything it once was against.

Let's get one thing straight right at the start: criticizing the Democratic Party and its ruling elites is not the same as "supporting Trump."

The either-or accusation is a classic propaganda technique to silence dissent. During the Vietnam War, for example, anyone dissenting against the official narratives supporting the war was accused of "supporting the Communists." In other words,criticizing the Powers That Be or their narrative is treason.

This either-or choice was designed to silence dissent by eliminating the possibility that domestic critics had valid reasons to disagree with the war that had nothing to do with Communism and everything to do with America.
Now we hear the same propaganda technique being wielded by Democrats:any criticism of the Democratic Party is "supporting Trump."

 Hogwash. Any institution that can't accept achingly obvious critiques is doomed. Resilient, confident people and organizations welcome fair criticism, as honest criticism (i.e. intended to improve performance and understanding) is essential to the process of successful adaptation to changing conditions.
So now that we've got that straightened out--criticism isn't necessarily support for "the other side," it stands or falls on its own merits--let's nail down why the Democratic Party didn't live up to expectations in the election.
And we're not talking about the presidential race, in which the Democrats scored a substantial advantage in the popular vote--we're talking to the entire election results: state legislatures, the House of Representatives and the Senate.
The Democrats picked up two senate seats and eight in the House, three of which were vacant. Democrats lost the majority in the Senate in 2014 and in the House in 2010, so the the 2016 election was a continuation of a trend begun six years ago.
United States Congress elections, 2016
Why has the nation turned away from the Democratic Party? Perhaps one reason is that the Democratic Party has become everything it once was against.
George McGovern's 1972 campaign slogan was Come home, America. The current version of the Democratic Party never met a globalist treaty or agenda that it didn't approve.

The Democratic Party turned anti-war after Lyndon Johnson's withdrawal from the 1968 race; the current version of the Democratic Party has embraced endless war via proxies, drones and Special Forces--they support interventions and unlimited violence in other nations, as long as American combat deaths are few and far between.
In years past, the Democratic Party presented itself as the party of "the working people" against the business interests of banks and corporations. The current version of the Democratic Party has embraced big banks, financiers, billionaires and corporations, cozying up to Big Money for hundreds of millions in campaign contributions and Super-PAC funding.

Former President Bill Clinton and his wife Hillary earned $230 million between 2001 (when they left the White House) and 2015. How The Clintons Have Made $230 Million Since Leaving The White House (Forbes). Their foundation has collected some $2 billion, and the foundation's track record of large donations from non-U.S. players and its modest charitable effectiveness has opened questions about pay-for-play.

 As for supporting "the working people"--Hillary's comment about "deplorables" summed up the unspoken view of the Democratic Party elites.

The Democratic Party has become everything that it once loathed: elitist, globalist, interventionist, self-serving, warmongering and overflowing with hubris.
To avoid looking at their reflection honestly, humans project their own failures and destructive traits onto others, blaming others for their own faults. They justify their self-serving actions, and deny responsibility for their clearly self-destructive behaviors.
This describes the Democratic Party elites to a T. It's all Trump's fault, or the Russian hackers, or the "deplorables"--anyone but themselves.
Not that long ago, the Republican Party was being dragged toward a shallow grave -- a party drained of ideas and ideals. Trump's campaign bypassed the Republican Party's self-serving, hubris-soaked elites, and whether the party will survive the internecine warfare between the Trump camp and the Old Guard remains an open question.

If the Democratic Party clings to elitism, indignation, denial and self-justification, it will be digging its own shallow grave beside the one awaiting the Republican Party should it fail to embrace practical, affordable solutions to the stagnation of opportunity and rising inequality.

http://charleshughsmith.blogspot.com/2016/12/why-democrats-cant-let-go-of-losing.html    :icon_study: :icon_study: :icon_study: :icon_study: :icon_study:

Offline Palloy

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Re: Election 2016
« Reply #708 on: December 17, 2016, 02:01:16 PM »
At one stage Hillary was happy with the FBI investigation into her email server, then when the case was reopened to examine the Weiner files, she was very unhappy, then when that cleared her, she was happy but still annoyed that it had been brought up at all in the election run up.  One assumes from that that the FBI DID influence the election.

Then the CIA came out with 'Russia influenced the election', and FBI couldn't bring itself to say it agreed (according to Senator Nunes after a briefing).  Now the Washington Post reports that the CIA Director sent a message to CIA staff saying that CIA, FBI and DNI broadly agree.

"The FBI official’s more cautious presentation of the intelligence to the House panel left some Republican and Democratic lawmakers in the room with the impression that the FBI disagreed with the CIA."

Move along please. Nothing to see here.

https://www.rt.com/usa/370641-fbi-cia-agree-russia/
FBI chief agrees with CIA on Russia’s alleged election help for Trump – report
17 Dec, 2016

FBI and National Intelligence chiefs both agree with the CIA assessment that Russia interfered with the 2016 US presidential elections partly in an effort to help Donald Trump win the White House, US media report.

FBI Director James B. Comey and Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper are both convinced that Russia was behind cyberattacks that targeted Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and her campaign chairman, John Podesta, The Washington Post and reported Friday, citing a message sent by CIA Director John Brennan to his employees.

“Earlier this week, I met separately with FBI [Director] James Comey and DNI Jim Clapper, and there is strong consensus among us on the scope, nature, and intent of Russian interference in our presidential election,” the message said, according to officials who have seen it.

“The three of us also agree that our organizations, along with others, need to focus on completing the thorough review of this issue that has been directed by President Obama and which is being led by the DNI,” it continued.

Previously it was believed that the two agencies – CIA and FBI – were not on the same page regarding the matter.

Last week, the CIA announced it has come up with a secret assessment that says Russia did meddle with the 2016 US election. The agency reportedly identified those connected to Russia who provided WikiLeaks with hacked emails of the Democratic National Committee and took other steps aimed at slashing Clinton’s chances to win.

“It is the assessment of the intelligence community that Russia’s goal here was to favor one candidate over the other, to help Trump get elected. That’s the consensus view,” a senior US official said.

In response, outgoing President Barack Obama blamed Russia for compromising the “integrity” of the US elections and pledged to take counteraction against Russia which may be both “explicit and publicized” and covert.

“I think there is no doubt that when any foreign government tries to impact the integrity of our elections ... we need to take action. And we will – at a time and place of our own choosing,” he said in an interview with NPR on Friday.

President-elect Donald Trump has repeatedly shrugged off the allegations and called the CIA findings “ridiculous.”

“I think it’s ridiculous. I think it’s just another excuse. I don’t believe it... No, I don’t believe it at all,” Trump said in an interview with Fox News Sunday in November.

Russia, in turn, has also denied the allegations with Russian presidential spokesman Dmitry Peskov saying in an interview with RT that Russia’s alleged interference into the US elections is “nothing but nonsense.”

In November, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov told Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera “that the whole story is from the field of myth-making with a goal to solve the short-term political objectives.”

President Vladimir Putin, commenting on the issue in October, doubted that anyone could “seriously think that Russia can somehow influence the choice of the American people.”

“Is America some sort of a banana republic?” Putin wondered, speaking at a meeting of the Valdai Discussion Club in Sochi.

The Russian president believes that the “Russian card” was intentionally used during the American presidential campaign to distract attention from the real problems the US currently faces, including the enormous federal debt and police brutality.
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Trumpty-Dumpty & Vlad the Impaler celebrate Christmas
« Reply #709 on: December 18, 2016, 12:30:35 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/VRntRsFHLEY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/VRntRsFHLEY</a>
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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Election 2016 - Hillary Blames Huma Abedin for E-mail Scandal
« Reply #710 on: December 18, 2016, 07:55:02 AM »


                                             

The Clintons will never accept responsibility for anything. Now they are blaming Huma Abedin for the Hillary’s lost election. Vanity Fair reported that one campaign insider commented, “[Abedin] was enjoying the red carpet and enjoying the photo spreads much too much in my opinion. She enjoyed being a celebrity too much.”

Obama blamed Putin for revealing the truth about the corruption inside the Democratic Party, as if that was unfair because they would have gotten away with it. ::) In the same manner, Hillary is blaming Abedin because her emails were discovered on Abedin’s estranged husband Anthony Weiner’s computer, which then prompted a letter to Congress from FBI Director James Comey in late October. Here too, it’s certainly not that Hillary did anything wrong, it’s that she would not have been caught had it not been for Abedin.

The Democrats tried rigging the whole game by outspending Trump about 2 to 1. Additionally, 77% of the press on Trump was negative whereas about 99% endorsed Hillary. In her mind, she should have won. She had all the cards in order. She cannot accept that there is a civil uprising against corruption spanning across the world. This is not just a USA trend.

https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/international-news/north_america/2016-u-s-presidential-election/hillary-now-blames-huma-abedin-for-if-her-emails-were-not-on-humas-computer-she-would-have-gotten-away-with-it-all/  :icon_study:

Offline Palloy

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Re: Election 2016
« Reply #711 on: December 19, 2016, 03:11:47 PM »
The power of the party machines on full display here.

https://www.rt.com/usa/370835-faithless-electors-electoral-college/
Faithless’ electors rejected or forced to vote along party lines for Clinton
19 Dec, 2016

As Electoral College voting for the president is underway, electors tried to dodge the party line. A Minnesota elector was replaced, four Washington State voters chose other candidates than Clinton, and a Maine elector cast for Senator Bernie Sanders.

"I cast my vote for Bernie Sanders not out of spite, or malice, or anger, or as an act of civil disobedience. I mean no disrespect to our nominee," David Bright, a Maine Democratic elector, wrote in a statement posted on Facebook prior to casting his vote for Sanders during the Electoral College vote on Monday.

"I cast my vote to represent thousands of Democratic Maine voters — many less than a third my age — who came into Maine politics for the first time this year because of Bernie Sanders," he added.

Bright's vote was ruled out of order by the Electoral College president, and he recast it for Clinton.

    Revote: 3 Clinton , 1 Trump vote pic.twitter.com/GbBLHAt0tx
    — MaineSOS (@MESecOfState) December 19, 2016

Bright would have cast his vote for Clinton if it could have helped the Democratic nominee win the White House, he said, adding that he saw “no likelihood of 38 Republican electors defecting from their party and casting their ballots for Secretary Clinton.”

In Maine, Clinton was expected to get three of the state's four electoral votes, with the other one going to Trump, who won the state's 2nd Congressional District.

    #ElectoralCollege protests underway but all pledged votes to #Trump have been cast accordingly thus far https://t.co/CMAGXaTlzHpic.twitter.com/55u70igfM2
    — RT America (@RT_America) December 19, 2016

Overall, 538 electors are gathering in statehouses nationwide to vote for president. There is no federal law that requires electors to vote according to the results in their states. However, 29 states prohibit “faithless” voting.

Currently, 306 electors are pledged to Republican Donald Trump, and 232 are pledged to Clinton, the Democratic presidential candidate.

    #POTUS-picking: Electoral College under intense focus in controversial election year https://t.co/OKa5RJY215pic.twitter.com/BmGhwZywXr
    — RT America (@RT_America) December 19, 2016

In Minnesota, Muhammad Abdurrahman was declared a “faithless” elector.

The content of his vote was not discussed, and an alternate was substituted. Abdurrahman, however, was a Sanders delegate to the Democratic National Committee.

    The faithless elector in MN. His ballot declared invalid. An alternate elector is appointed. pic.twitter.com/SivTu31E6G
    — Brian Bakst (@Stowydad) December 19, 2016

Later Abdurrahman told reporters he voted for Sanders and Representative Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii).

In Texas, 36 out of 38 electors voted for Trump, with Ohio Governor John Kasich and former Texas Congressman Ron Paul each garnering one from two "faithless" electors.

    Texas 36 for Trump, 1 for Ron Paul, 1 for John Kasich
    — Jamie Dupree (@jamiedupree) December 19, 2016

A Texas elections official said four of the state’s presidential electiors will be replaced.

The Texas Secretary of State spokeswoman Alicia Pierce told the AP three electors were disqualified for having federal government jobs. The fourth elector resigned after expressing concern about Trump’s presidential qualifications.

There are 38 presidential electors in the state.

In Washington State, four of the state's 12 electors refused to vote for presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Three of the state's 12 electors voted instead for former Secretary of State Colin Powell, and one voted for Faith Spotted Eagle, a Sioux tribe elder who has led protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota.

Clinton was allotted all 12 of the state's electoral votes on Election Day, when she beat Donald Trump with 54 percent of the vote.

For vice president, Clinton's running mate Virginia Senator Tim Kaine received eight votes, and Senator Elizabeth Warren (Massachusetts), Senator Maria Cantwell (Washington) and environmentalist Winona LaDuke each received one vote.

One other Democrat in the state of Colorado tried to cast their vote for someone other than Clinton but were barred due to state laws and replaced.
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Election 2018: The Battle for CONgress
« Reply #712 on: November 10, 2017, 03:46:05 AM »
Official thread for the next year of buffoonery until the 2018 Fake Election.  ::) Kickoff article below.

RE

http://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/359685-mounting-gop-retirements-threaten-majority

Mounting GOP retirements threaten House majority
By Jonathan Easley and Scott Wong - 11/10/17 06:04 AM EST

Mounting GOP retirements threaten House majority


© Greg Nash

A retirement wave has hit House Republicans, emboldening Democrats who have become increasingly bullish about their prospects of winning back a majority in 2018.

House Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) on Thursday became the latest Republican to announce he would not seek another term.

The 13-term Virginian followed Reps. Ted Poe (R-Texas) and Frank LoBiondo (R-N.J.), both of who announced Tuesday — hours before Republicans suffered sweeping losses at the polls — that they’d retire from Congress.

All told, 29 Republicans will not seek reelection to their House seats, compared to only 11 for Democrats. Fifteen Republicans are retiring outright, rather than seeking other political offices or positions. Only two Democrats are doing the same.

“Anybody who has a pair of eyes and ears knows that the House is in play and at risk,” Rep. Charlie Dent (R-Pa.), who heads a moderate GOP caucus and is not seeking reelection next year, told The Hill. “And I’m sure that fact enters into the calculation of many members who are contemplating their futures.

“Do you really want to go through another year like the last one?” Dent asked.

Republicans face enormous electoral headwinds heading into 2018.

President Trump’s approval rating is at historic lows for a first-term president, and the party that controls the White House almost always loses seats in midterm elections. The GOP held on to four House seats in special elections this year that took place in red districts, but Tuesday’s shellacking at the polls is more in line with how many political observers believe 2018 will shake out.

And the stampede for the exits could continue.

Republicans said more retirement announcements are expected in the coming days and weeks. The other veteran GOP chairmen who are facing term limits and could retire are Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-Pa.), Foreign Affairs Chairman Ed Royce (R-Calif.) and Homeland Security Chairman Mike McCaul (R-Texas).

Another long-serving Texas Republican, powerful Rules Chairman Pete Sessions, isn’t facing term limits but represents a congressional district that’s trending blue.

Sessions is on Democrats’ retirement watch list, as well as Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-N.J.), former Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton (R-Mich.), former Homeland Security Chairman Peter King (R-N.Y.), and Reps. Leonard Lance (R-N.J.), Patrick Meehan (R-Pa.) and Bruce Poliquin (R-Maine).

After Tuesday’s landslide in Virginia, buzz around the Capitol centered on vulnerable GOP Rep. Barbara Comstock, who represents affluent Northern Virginia suburbs just outside of Washington, D.C. In addition to electing Ralph Northam as governor, Democrats took back seven GOP-held state delegate seats that overlap Comstock’s sprawling district, the Washington Post reported.

GOP lawmakers are also closely watching former Oversight Chairman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), who nearly lost his seat to Democrat Doug Applegate last year, and former Appropriations Chairman Hal Rogers (R-Ky.), who was forced to relinquish his gavel two years ago due to term limits but stuck around.

After the Goodlatte news broke, Rogers, the Appropriations chairman emeritus, said he’s not going anywhere.

“I’m busy, I’m happy, hardworking, and hate to see some of these great people retire,” said Rogers, who turns 80 next month.

Democrats are relishing every new departure.

Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee chairman Ben Ray Lujan (D-N.M.) released a strategy memo on Thursday announcing that the national party had expanded its list of targeted House seats from 80-Republican-held districts to 91 in the wake of Tuesday’s elections.

Democrats need to flip 24 seats to win back the majority in the House.

Lujan cited the rapid pace of GOP retirements in his memo. He pointed to a Sabato’s Crystal Ball study that found the president’s party has historically shed 22 points in races for open seats that take place midterm years.

“In general, eliminating the power of incumbency creates a great deal of advantage for House Democratic challengers,” Lujan wrote.

The DCCC outraised the National Republican Congressional Committee by $9 million in the most recent quarter, although the NRCC still has about $12 million more in cash-on-hand.

But perhaps the most startling fundraising trend was uncovered by a Brookings Institution study. Analyst Michael J. Malbin found that nearly 100 Democrats running in GOP-held districts in 2018 had already raised at least $50,000. The last comparable election cycle was the 2010 GOP wave election, when 60 Republicans running in Democratic-held district had raised the same amount at this point.

House GOP leaders aren’t publicly panicking over retirements just yet.

“It’s a lot of good talent that we’re going to lose. It’s tough,” Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.), the GOP’s chief vote-counter, told The Hill. But he joked: “I told [retiring colleagues] to stop talking to one another because somebody else might want to join them. The sad thing is they start smiling more and more after they make the announcement.”

“We just have to tamp that down.”

National Republicans say the retirements are being overplayed, noting that they’re happening for a variety of reasons.

Reps. Hensarling, Goodlatte, and Poe were term-limited for their positions as committee chairs. Many House members have left for administration posts or are leaving to run for higher office. GOP Reps. Raul Labrador (Idaho), Kristi Noem (S.D.), Diane Black (Tenn.), Jim Renacci (Ohio) and Steve Pearce (N.M.) are all running for governor of their states, while others are running for the Senate.

Rep. Pat Tiberi (R-Ohio) was offered a job atop the Ohio Business Roundtable that he said would allow him to spend more time with his family.

One House GOP strategist argued that only a handful of retirements are taking place in Democratic-leaning districts, pointing to seats currently held by Reps. Lobiondo, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and Dave Reichert (R-Wash.). Republicans believe state Sen. Dino Rossi (R-Wash.) will hold Reichert’s seat.

And Republicans still have way more incumbents running than Democrats do. In many districts, Democrats will have to survive multi-candidate primaries, potentially weakening them ahead of the general election.

“If you look across the board it’s a variety of reasons and most of the retirements are in very red districts that we’ll keep,” said a House GOP strategist who requested anonymity. “Each member that retires does sow with their own reasons….Dent mentioned he wasn’t happy, but other than that, it hasn’t been a lot of folks leaving because of their electoral prospects, it’s been normal attrition. You go into any cycle prepared for retirements.”
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Putting the CON back in CONgress
« Reply #713 on: January 11, 2018, 02:21:54 AM »
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/joe-arpaio-2018-election_us_5a563b5ae4b03417e8743168

 POLITICS 01/10/2018 01:00 pm ET Updated 2 hours ago
Republicans Have 4 Convicted Criminals Running For Congress In 2018
Three of them are bragging about it.
By Paul Blumenthal


WASHINGTON ―  When Joe Arpaio, the former Maricopa County sheriff, announced his Senate candidacy on Tuesday, he became the fourth viable Republican 2018 congressional candidate who’s been convicted of a crime. And like two of the other GOP cons running for office, he has cited his criminal record as a partial justification for his candidacy.

Arpaio was convicted of misdemeanor criminal contempt of court in July 2017 for defying a court order requiring him to stop illegally detaining people he suspected of being undocumented immigrants based on their race. President Donald Trump pardoned him one month later.

The other convicted criminals running for office as Republicans are Don Blankenship, the former head of the coal mining company Massey Energy who is running in the Republican primary to challenge Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.); former Rep. Michael Grimm, who is challenging incumbent Rep. Dan Donovan (R-N.Y.) to reclaim the Staten Island congressional seat he once held; and Rep. Greg Gianforte (R-Mont.), who is running for re-election.
Bloomberg via Getty Images
Don Blankenship is running for Senate in West Virginia as a Republican after serving a one-year sentence in prison for conspiracy to evade mine safety laws that led to the deaths of 29 miners.

Blankenship served one year in prison on a misdemeanor conviction for conspiring to evade safety laws after the death of 29 miners at his Upper Big Branch Mine in 2010. Grimm, a former FBI agent, pleaded guilty to felony tax evasion in 2014. And last year, Gianforte also pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault for body-slamming a reporter days before winning a 2017 special election. So far, the national Republican Party has said it supports Donovan over Grimm, but it is also backing Gianforte, who is the only one of these convicted candidates currently in office. The party has not endorsed anyone in either West Virginia or Arizona.

The only Democrat with a record running for office is David Alcorn, convicted of stalking, who is one of nine candidates for the party’s nomination in New Mexico’s 2nd Congressional District. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee would not support Alcorn, saying “he is not fit to run for office.”
The “Politically Incorrect Prisoners” Brand

Three of these men — Arpaio, Blankenship and Grimm — have suggested that their convictions show they were persecuted by the Obama administration for their political beliefs. The actual evidence suggests otherwise.

Blankenship referred to himself as a “political prisoner” of the Obama administration and is seeking to rehabilitate his image through an electoral run. Grimm claims that he was a victim with “the entire Obama Justice Department weaponized against me.” And Arpaio called his conviction for refusing to follow a lawful court order a “political witch hunt by holdovers in the Obama justice department.” At a rally in Phoenix before Trump issued his pardon, the president asked the pro-Arpaio crowd, “Was Sheriff Joe convicted for doing his job?”
Stephanie Keith / Reuters
Former Rep. Michael Grimm is trying to reclaim his seat after pleading guilty to felony tax evasion in 2014.

It’s not uncommon to see politicians attempt to spin investigations or convictions as some kind of attack on their politics or identity. But there is a certain type of Republican political candidate whose campaign rationale is directly wrapped up in their criminal or rule-breaking identity. These candidates claim, whether in truth or not, that they have been personally persecuted by the liberal establishment for either trying to run a business or defending the American people.
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The trailblazer for this type of candidacy was Oliver North, the National Security Council staffer under President Ronald Reagan who shot to conservative stardom after his defiant congressional testimony about how he helped illegally fund the right-wing Contras militias in Nicaragua by selling arms to Iran. North was convicted of three felonies for his part in the scandal, although the convictions would later be vacated after an appeals court found that his immunized congressional testimony had been improperly used in his criminal trial. He captured the Republican Party nomination for a Virginia Senate seat in 1994 off his Iran-Contra fame.
Mark Reinstein via Getty Images
Oliver North became a conservative star after he defiantly admitted to breaking the law in the Iran-Contra scandal. His supporters rallied to his side ahead of his sentencing hearing in 1989.

And although former Alabama Supreme Court chief justice Roy Moore was never convicted or charged with any crime, his political star rose after he was kicked out of his judicial seat twice. He was first removed from office in 2003 for refusing to comply with an order to remove a monument to the Ten Commandments from courthouse property. Then in 2016 he was kicked off the state court for refusing to acknowledge the Supreme Court’s ruling legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide. These actions, which he and his supporters perceived as anti-Christian persecution, made him a star among a large enough group of conservatives in the state to win the Republican nomination for Senate in a 2017 special election.

Among the current crop of convicted criminal candidates claiming political persecution, Arpaio stands out as the one with the most convincing appeal to right-wing Republican voters. Many of these voters agree with Trump that Arpaio was convicted for just doing his job. While the Arpaio pardon has polled poorly overall, strong supporters of Trump back it. A national poll by YouGov found that 61 percent of strong Trump supporters approved of the Arpaio pardon. A poll of Arizona residents by OH Predictive Insights found 50 percent of respondents opposed to the pardon, but did not release data based on partisan affiliation or presidential approval. Republican politicians in Arizona including Gov. Doug Ducey and Rep. Andy Biggs praised Trump for pardoning Arpaio. But Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), whom Arpaio is running to replace, said he wished Trump had not pardoned the ex-sheriff.

Like Ollie North, Arpaio was just trying to protect Americans, in the eyes of this block of voters. They support his lawless brand of law enforcement. Like Roy Moore, Arpaio’s crime was being politically incorrect. The crime and the conviction fit his brand. A poll released Tuesday night found Arpaio jumping to a statistical tie for first place in the Republican primary.

However, Arpaio lost his 2016 re-election campaign in Maricopa County by 11 points even as Trump narrowly won the county in the presidential election. North and Moore also lost in their general election races. It appears general election voters don’t tend to care much for the persecution narrative branding.

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GOP angst over midterms grows
« Reply #714 on: January 11, 2018, 05:02:39 AM »
http://thehill.com/homenews/house/368436-gop-angst-over-midterms-grows

GOP angst over midterms grows
By Scott Wong - 01/11/18 06:00 AM EST


Issa retiring from Congress
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For some Republicans, it’s starting to feel like 2006 — a wave election year that swept Democrats back into power in the House and Senate.

The retirement of two longtime California Republicans this week — just the latest in a string of House Republicans heading for the exits — has caused panic among some in the GOP who say it’s yet another sign that an anti-Trump, Democratic wave is forming.

“It’s a tough election cycle for Republicans; we know that going in,” said Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.), who is not running for reelection after representing a heavily Hispanic Miami district for nearly 30 years.

“It’s starting to feel very scary for moderate Republicans,” she said.

Rep. Darrell Issa, who won reelection by a slim 1,621-vote margin in 2016, said Wednesday this term would be his last, despite insisting for months that he was running for reelection.

The stunning announcement from the former Oversight and Government Reform Committee chairman came just two days after another veteran Republican from Southern California, Foreign Affairs Chairman Ed Royce, also called it quits.

Asked for his reaction to Issa’s retirement, Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer (Md.) paused, smiled, then exclaimed: “We’re gonna win the House back!”

The pair of retirements in California has altered the 2018 midterms landscape, forcing the House GOP’s campaign arm to decide whether it will defend two districts that overwhelmingly voted for Democrat Hillary Clinton in 2016 or shift resources elsewhere.

Winning both districts could be costly. San Francisco billionaire Tom Steyer, who’s led a campaign to impeach President Trump, this week pledged $30 million to help Democrats take back the House and said he would specifically target Issa.

Republicans have other reasons to be worried about the elections, including Trump’s approval rating, which sits in the high 30s.

History shows that a president’s party typically loses an average of 32 House seats during a midterm election. But Ros-Lehtinen said Trump might be a bigger liability than past GOP presidents in many parts of the country.

“In many districts like Darrell’s and mine, having President Trump an ever-present figure is a drag on the ticket,” she said. “In many districts, he’s a positive, but in districts like mine, it doesn’t help the Republican candidate.

“The Trump symbol, the Trump brand and Mr. Trump himself is a drag on moderate districts.”

The wave of GOP retirements in competitive districts also has set off alarm bells among some senior Republican strategists.

“I’m alarmed, but we should have already been alarmed. It’s a tough environment, and there’s a chance the Republicans can lose control of the House,” said Scott Jennings, a GOP political strategist who has worked on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s (R-Ky.) reelection campaigns.
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“It’s starting to feel like 2006 to me,” he added, “which was a bad year for Republicans.”

Democrats picked up 31 House seats in 2006, a victory that propelled them forward to win complete control of Washington in 2008.

This year, House Democrats need to flip 24 GOP-held seats to win back the majority. And the path to that new majority runs right through Orange County and San Diego, where traditional Republican districts like Royce’s and Issa’s have been getting more diverse and trending bluer.

Other top Democratic targets in Southern California include GOP Reps. Mimi Walters, Steve Knight and Dana Rohrabacher, a lawmaker whose ties to Russia are receiving extra scrutiny amid the investigations into 2016 election meddling.

“You can’t hold this majority if you lose California districts because California districts look like suburban Pennsylvania districts and New Jersey [swing] districts,” explained Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.), who served as chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) during the successful 2014 and 2016 cycles.

“It’s a big concern,” a GOP aide said of the pair of California retirements. “These Orange County seats are majority makers.

“I hope [Rohrabacher] retires,” the aide added. “That’s a seat that can be held.”

But other retirements certainly aren’t helping the GOP. In addition to Issa, Royce and Ros-Lehtinen, moderate Reps. Charlie Dent (R-Pa.), Dave Trott (R-Mich.), Dave Reichert (R-Wash.) and Frank LoBiondo (R-N.J.) are not seeking reelection, providing more pick-up opportunities for Democrats.

The Cook Political Report, a campaign handicapper in Washington, moved Royce’s seat from “lean Republican” to “lean Democratic” this week; it moved Issa’s seat from “toss up” to “lean Democratic.”

“If you’re NRCC chairman, the last thing you want is a retirement in almost every case,” Walden told The Hill.

But he added that retirements sometimes allow a party to recruit a strong candidate who doesn’t have the political baggage of a veteran lawmaker.

“It does allow a reset,” Walden said.

Walden and many other senior Republicans insist they aren’t panicking, despite the fresh warning signs. Because of 2010 redistricting, most congressional districts are “baked in,” drawn in a way that favors either Republicans or Democrats, resulting in fewer swing districts than in past decades.

Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and other Republicans believe they have a winning campaign message in 2018, as most Americans will see a boost in their paychecks and lower tax bills following the historic passage last month of the tax overhaul. Republicans are also touting a slew of regulatory reforms and the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch.

“I think it’s more likely that the House would change majorities than the Senate, given the map,” said Rep. Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.), “but we have also done some good things that we can campaign on, and hopefully we will do some good things [this year] that we will continue to campaign on.”

Jennings, the GOP strategist, said he has a high degree of confidence in Ryan and the campaign team led by current NRCC Chairman Steve Stivers (R-Ohio), especially given their big legislative victory on taxes. 

Two Ryan-aligned super PACs — the American Action Network and Congressional Leadership Fund — said they raised a record $66 million in 2017, helping the latter to open offices in 27 GOP-held districts this cycle, including in California.

“I know the political team around Speaker Ryan has been anticipating open seats in tough districts. I don’t think anyone is caught flat-footed,” Jennings said. “But what I’m worried about is the macro conditions that appear to be lining up against Republicans.”

“The Republicans can hang on ... but it’s gonna take a lot of focus and smart campaigns,” he added.

Some GOP sources familiar with the NRCC’s operation are conceding the party could lose as many as 15 seats this fall, but that would still keep the House in Republican hands.

The wild card, of course, is whether any more vulnerable Republicans decide they’ve had enough of Congress. Other long-serving Republicans who’ve landed on Democrats’ retirement watch list include former Energy Chairman Fred Upton (R-Mich.), Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-N.J.), Rules Chairman Pete Sessions (R-Texas), Rep. Leonard Lance (R-N.J.) and Rep. Pete King (R-N.Y.).

So far, all have indicated they are running for another term.

When asked if he would retire after 12 terms in the House, Frelinghuysen replied tersely, “Certainly not.”

Sessions, too, said he’s not going anywhere, even though Clinton beat Trump in his Dallas-area district by roughly 2 percentage points. 

“I still have a good bit of things that I intend not only to get done, but to see through,” Sessions, who’s served since 2003, told The Hill. “This is an important time for our conference to express what we’re doing for the American people [and] to go help sell that fight.”

Melanie Zanona and Cristina Marcos contributed.
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Chelsea Manning files to run for U.S. Senate in Maryland
« Reply #715 on: January 13, 2018, 05:30:37 PM »
https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/md-politics/chelsea-manning-files-to-run-for-us-senate-in-maryland/2018/01/13/6439f0d0-f88c-11e7-beb6-c8d48830c54d_story.html?utm_term=.3d62cdcd34f7

Maryland Politics
Chelsea Manning files to run for U.S. Senate in Maryland


Chelsea Manning arrives for a forum last year in Nantucket, Mass. The appearance at the forum is part of the Nantucket Project’s annual gathering on the island. Manning is a former U.S. Army intelligence analyst who spent time in prison for leaking classified documents. (Steven Senne/AP)
By Justin Jouvenal and Jenna Portnoy January 13 at 6:30 PM

Chelsea E. Manning, the transgender former Army private who was convicted of passing sensitive government documents to WikiLeaks, is seeking to run for the U.S. Senate in Maryland, according to federal election filings.

Manning would be challenging Democrat Benjamin L. Cardin, who is in his second term in the Senate and is up for reelection in November. Cardin is Maryland’s senior senator and is considered an overwhelming favorite to win a third term.

Manning declined to speak about her filing or to say why she might be running when reached at her home in Bethesda on Saturday.

She said she might release a statement in the coming days.

“Our only statement on the record is ‘No statement,’ ” Manning said.
1:27
Chelsea Manning says she's not a traitor
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Chelsea Manning appeared on stage in the final interview of the four-day Nantucket Project conference on the island of Nantucket, Mass., on Sept. 17. (AP)

Manning, 30, who was formerly known as Bradley Manning, was convicted in 2013 of the largest leak of classified documents in U.S. history and was sentenced to 35 years in prison. Last year, as President Barack Obama was nearing the end of his term in office, he commuted Manning’s sentence to time served, and she was released from a military prison in Kansas.

The news of Manning’s filing caught Maryland’s political class by surprise Saturday afternoon. It was first reported in a tweet by the conservative media outlet Red Maryland.

Cardin, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has an extensive fundraising base in Maryland and is not considered particularly vulnerable to a challenge from any known figures within the state. However, a candidate with national name recognition, such as Manning, who comes in from the outside could tap a network of donors interested in elevating a progressive agenda.

Without mentioning Manning, Sue Walitsky, Cardin’s spokeswoman, said: “Senator Cardin is looking forward to a vigorous debate of the issues and a robust conversation with Maryland voters.”

Manning would also have to file with Maryland State Board of Elections to get her name on the ballot.

Manning moved to Maryland after her release from prison. Since then, she has written for the Guardian and Medium on issues of transparency, free speech and civil liberties, transgender rights and computer security, according to her website.

Manning’s statement of candidacy was filed with the Federal Election Commission on Thursday.

She is running as a Democrat and refers to Maryland as her “home state” on her website. The Democratic primary is scheduled for the end of June.

Manning’s first column for the Guardian said Obama’s election in 2008 was a political awakening for her.

Manning wrote that Obama left behind “hints of a progressive legacy” but very few permanent accomplishments.

“This vulnerable legacy should remind us that what we really need is a strong and unapologetic progressive to lead us,” Manning wrote. “What we need as well is a relentless grassroots movement to hold that leadership accountable.”

Evan Greer, campaign director of the nonprofit organization Fight for the Future and a close supporter of Manning’s while she was imprisoned, said the news is exciting.

“Chelsea Manning has fought for freedom and sacrificed for it in ways that few others have,” Greer wrote in an email. “The world is a better place with her as a free woman, and this latest news makes it clear she is only beginning to make her mark on it.”

Todd Eberly, a political-science professor at St. Mary’s College in Maryland, said Donald Trump’s unexpected rise to the presidency opened the door for political neophytes such as Manning.

“My initial thought quite literally was, ‘Donald Trump is president, Oprah Winfrey is the leading contender for Democrats in 2020, why the hell not Chelsea Manning in the U.S. Senate?’ ” he said

Judging from her past statements, Manning’s brand could be one of “unapologetic progressivism, no compromise, take no prisoners,” he said.

Manning enlisted in the military in 2007 and was deployed to Iraq two years later as an intelligence analyst, according to her website.

In 2010, Manning was arrested after she provided a trove of nearly 750,000 documents to WikiLeaks that included information about the U.S. war efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan, State Department cables and information about prisoners in Guantanamo Bay.

Manning’s high-profile leak drew media coverage around the world. U.S. officials said the material placed the lives of U.S. soldiers and Afghan informants at risk, but Manning said she had a duty to inform the public about how the United States was conducting its wars.

Three years later, Manning was convicted on multiple charges, including violating the Espionage Act, and received a lengthy sentence. While serving time at Fort Leavenworth, Manning attempted suicide and went on a hunger strike, before the Army approved her for gender reassignment surgery.

Local Headlines newsletter

Daily headlines about the Washington region.

Her case remains politically divisive. She has been lauded as a hero by some on the left but also decried as a traitor by many, including President Trump.

Her felony convictions do not appear to bar her from running for the Senate. The Constitution simply requires that a senator be at least 30 years old, have been a citizen of the United States for nine years and be a resident of the state from which the person is seeking office.

Katherine Shaver contributed to this report.
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Re: Chelsea Manning files to run for U.S. Senate in Maryland
« Reply #716 on: January 13, 2018, 05:34:30 PM »
https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/md-politics/chelsea-manning-files-to-run-for-us-senate-in-maryland/2018/01/13/6439f0d0-f88c-11e7-beb6-c8d48830c54d_story.html?utm_term=.3d62cdcd34f7

Maryland Politics
Chelsea Manning files to run for U.S. Senate in Maryland


Chelsea Manning arrives for a forum last year in Nantucket, Mass. The appearance at the forum is part of the Nantucket Project’s annual gathering on the island. Manning is a former U.S. Army intelligence analyst who spent time in prison for leaking classified documents. (Steven Senne/AP)
By Justin Jouvenal and Jenna Portnoy January 13 at 6:30 PM

Chelsea E. Manning, the transgender former Army private who was convicted of passing sensitive government documents to WikiLeaks, is seeking to run for the U.S. Senate in Maryland, according to federal election filings.

Manning would be challenging Democrat Benjamin L. Cardin, who is in his second term in the Senate and is up for reelection in November. Cardin is Maryland’s senior senator and is considered an overwhelming favorite to win a third term.

Manning declined to speak about her filing or to say why she might be running when reached at her home in Bethesda on Saturday.

She said she might release a statement in the coming days.

“Our only statement on the record is ‘No statement,’ ” Manning said.
1:27
Chelsea Manning says she's not a traitor
Embed
Share

Chelsea Manning appeared on stage in the final interview of the four-day Nantucket Project conference on the island of Nantucket, Mass., on Sept. 17. (AP)

Manning, 30, who was formerly known as Bradley Manning, was convicted in 2013 of the largest leak of classified documents in U.S. history and was sentenced to 35 years in prison. Last year, as President Barack Obama was nearing the end of his term in office, he commuted Manning’s sentence to time served, and she was released from a military prison in Kansas.

The news of Manning’s filing caught Maryland’s political class by surprise Saturday afternoon. It was first reported in a tweet by the conservative media outlet Red Maryland.

Cardin, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has an extensive fundraising base in Maryland and is not considered particularly vulnerable to a challenge from any known figures within the state. However, a candidate with national name recognition, such as Manning, who comes in from the outside could tap a network of donors interested in elevating a progressive agenda.

Without mentioning Manning, Sue Walitsky, Cardin’s spokeswoman, said: “Senator Cardin is looking forward to a vigorous debate of the issues and a robust conversation with Maryland voters.”

Manning would also have to file with Maryland State Board of Elections to get her name on the ballot.

Manning moved to Maryland after her release from prison. Since then, she has written for the Guardian and Medium on issues of transparency, free speech and civil liberties, transgender rights and computer security, according to her website.

Manning’s statement of candidacy was filed with the Federal Election Commission on Thursday.

She is running as a Democrat and refers to Maryland as her “home state” on her website. The Democratic primary is scheduled for the end of June.

Manning’s first column for the Guardian said Obama’s election in 2008 was a political awakening for her.

Manning wrote that Obama left behind “hints of a progressive legacy” but very few permanent accomplishments.

“This vulnerable legacy should remind us that what we really need is a strong and unapologetic progressive to lead us,” Manning wrote. “What we need as well is a relentless grassroots movement to hold that leadership accountable.”

Evan Greer, campaign director of the nonprofit organization Fight for the Future and a close supporter of Manning’s while she was imprisoned, said the news is exciting.

“Chelsea Manning has fought for freedom and sacrificed for it in ways that few others have,” Greer wrote in an email. “The world is a better place with her as a free woman, and this latest news makes it clear she is only beginning to make her mark on it.”

Todd Eberly, a political-science professor at St. Mary’s College in Maryland, said Donald Trump’s unexpected rise to the presidency opened the door for political neophytes such as Manning.

“My initial thought quite literally was, ‘Donald Trump is president, Oprah Winfrey is the leading contender for Democrats in 2020, why the hell not Chelsea Manning in the U.S. Senate?’ ” he said

Judging from her past statements, Manning’s brand could be one of “unapologetic progressivism, no compromise, take no prisoners,” he said.

Manning enlisted in the military in 2007 and was deployed to Iraq two years later as an intelligence analyst, according to her website.

In 2010, Manning was arrested after she provided a trove of nearly 750,000 documents to WikiLeaks that included information about the U.S. war efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan, State Department cables and information about prisoners in Guantanamo Bay.

Manning’s high-profile leak drew media coverage around the world. U.S. officials said the material placed the lives of U.S. soldiers and Afghan informants at risk, but Manning said she had a duty to inform the public about how the United States was conducting its wars.

Three years later, Manning was convicted on multiple charges, including violating the Espionage Act, and received a lengthy sentence. While serving time at Fort Leavenworth, Manning attempted suicide and went on a hunger strike, before the Army approved her for gender reassignment surgery.

Local Headlines newsletter

Daily headlines about the Washington region.

Her case remains politically divisive. She has been lauded as a hero by some on the left but also decried as a traitor by many, including President Trump.

Her felony convictions do not appear to bar her from running for the Senate. The Constitution simply requires that a senator be at least 30 years old, have been a citizen of the United States for nine years and be a resident of the state from which the person is seeking office.

Katherine Shaver contributed to this report.

Dafuck?!!
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Roy Moore Goes Begging
« Reply #717 on: March 03, 2018, 07:21:31 AM »
Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.  :icon_mrgreen:

RE

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/roy-moore-says-hes-struggled-to-make-ends-meet-asks-for-250000-from-supporters-2018-03-03

Roy Moore says he’s ‘struggled to make ends meet,’ asks for $250,000 from supporters

Published: Mar 3, 2018 9:30 a.m. ET


The former Republican Senate candidate from Alabama says he faces six-figure legal expenses
Getty Images

Roy Moore, an unsuccessful Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, says he faces escalating financial problems.


By
Quentin Fottrell
Personal Finance Editor

Roy Moore, the failed Republican Senate candidate from Alabama who faced allegations of sexual misconduct and inappropriate sexual contact with underage girls in the 1970s, say he’s asked God and his supporters for help with his legal defense fund.

In a Facebook FB, +0.39%   post this week, Moore said he pleaded for $250,000 in financial help to deal with his mounting legal expenses. “I have lawyers who want to help but they are not without cost and besides their fees, legal expenses could run over $100,000,” wrote.

Doug Jones beat Moore in a bitter race last December for the Alabama Senate, becoming the first Democrat to win a seat in the Senate since 1992. Moore fought the allegations, first reported in the Washington Post, that he dated and pursued young teenage girls in the 1970s.

“This article is a prime example of fake news, intended to divert attention from the true issues that affect our country, like health care, military readiness, tax reform, immigration and the national debt,” Moore said at the time.
4 things rich people do with their money that you should be doing too

But those child-molestation allegations, plus deeply divisive positions that led to Moore being removed from the state’s Supreme Court twice, led to Jones’s narrow victory in the Senate race last December. Jones also received a boost from Alabama’s African-American voters.

Moore said this week that his legal battles has taken its toll on his family and friends. “My resources have been depleted and I have struggled to make ends meet, but I have not lost my faith in our God, who is our true source of strength and will never leave or forsake us,” he said.

“I have had to establish a legal defense fund, anything you give will be appreciated,” Moore wrote on Facebook. “The liberal media, in association with some who want to destroy our country, do not want my influence in the 2018 elections and are doing everything they can to stop me.”

Thus far, Moore has raised over $32,000 of his $250,000 goal. He added: “Your financial contributions helped me fight over $50 million dollars from Washington insiders who did not want me to bring the truth about God and our Constitution to Washington D. C.”
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Re: Roy Moore Goes Begging
« Reply #718 on: March 03, 2018, 07:30:45 AM »
Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.  :icon_mrgreen:

RE

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/roy-moore-says-hes-struggled-to-make-ends-meet-asks-for-250000-from-supporters-2018-03-03

Roy Moore says he’s ‘struggled to make ends meet,’ asks for $250,000 from supporters

As a friend of mine say, "When your opponent is drowning, throw him an anchor."

Plenty of options for the geriatric kidfucker. Was-Mart is hiring:

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Re: Election Errata
« Reply #719 on: March 03, 2018, 03:46:01 PM »
Moore's idiot religious conservative base will give him the money he needs to pay his lawyers. That's the sad part.  He's a Godly man, dont'cha know. Alabama has a collective IQ in the low 80's.
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