AuthorTopic: Election Errata  (Read 126548 times)

Offline knarf

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Re: 🗳️ Two more women come forward with Joe Biden accusations
« Reply #990 on: April 03, 2019, 04:20:44 AM »
  Joe does not deserve this.

You can kiss your City Council seat goodbye too.  :icon_mrgreen:

Al Franken and Garrison Keillor didn't deserve it either.  Since when does "deserve" have anything to do with this?

RE

I think this a perfect time to have #memetoo movement. We are not the prudish British! We tamed the west, gall darn it, all with a six shooters, and we have the male right to touch any female we want. It is just the way of nature. You know, all those pharimones, and natural selection. How else can a man have children? He's got to be able to approach the women for Christ's sake.  When young people are more interested in their damn phones than human contact, it is out right godlessness. We need a role model like Joe Biden, to re-kinder the intimacy that is possible between the sexes.
Everything, I mean EVERYTHING, is a BIG FUCKING MESS!!

Offline RE

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🗳️ Big Bucks Bernie
« Reply #991 on: April 03, 2019, 05:12:26 AM »
Still leading the pack with the biggest warchest, the Sandman!

RE

https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/02/politics/bernie-sanders-18-2-million-raised-first-quarter/index.html

Bernie Sanders raises $18.2 million during first 41 days of his 2020 campaign
Greg Krieg
Fredreka Schouten byline

By Gregory Krieg and Fredreka Schouten, CNN

Updated 11:38 AM ET, Tue April 2, 2019


Supporters of US Senator Bernie Sanders pose with a snow man before a rally to kick off his 2020 US presidential campaign, in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, on March 2, 2019 in.

(CNN)Sen. Bernie Sanders has raised $18.2 million from 525,000 individual donors since entering the Democratic presidential primary in February, his campaign said Tuesday.
One in five of those donors gave to Sanders for the first time, campaign manager Faiz Shakir told reporters. That total, amassed over 41 days culminating with Sunday's quarterly deadline, means Sanders enters the second phase of the campaign with $28 million in cash-on-hand.
Sanders' first quarter haul exceeded that of California Sen. Kamala Harris, who announced about a month earlier; she raised $12 million, her campaign said on Monday night. Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, took in more than $7 million, according to his team.
Sanders' average donation clocked in at around $20.
Content by The All-New Silverado
Wounded Nature Working Veterans
Rudy Socha, former Marine turned conservationist, runs a nonprofit called Wounded Nature Working Veterans. The organization helps marine life and provides a community for veterans.

The Sanders fundraising numbers confirm his status as a frontrunner in the increasingly crowded race for the Democratic nomination. Former US Rep. Beto O'Rourke has not yet released his figures for the quarter. O'Rourke raised $6.1 million during his first day as a candidate, slightly more than Sanders' $5.9 million. Sanders took in more than half his $18.2 million during the first week of his campaign.
The campaign fell short of its goal of collecting 1 million contributions by the deadline, and instead brought in about 900,000 contributions from its donors. Senior adviser Jeff Weaver said the campaign still has outpaced its 2016 performance, when it took Sanders 146 days to hit the 900,000-contributions mark.
Sanders' campaign said the makeup of their donors puts the Vermont independent in a good position to continue raking in contributions as the campaign heats up and they begin to set down stakes in new states. Shakir reported that 88% of the total came from donations of $200 or less and that 99.5% of donations were for $100 or less. The majority of donors were young, he said, and that the occupation most likely to give were teachers.
"With respect to how you finance campaigns, I believe (the source of donations) tells you a little bit about how much liberty you're going to have to govern," Shakir told reporters. "Bernie Sanders is a free man, not captured by industry, and is instead going to fight for all the people."
Candidates do not have to disclose full details of their fundraising and spending to the Federal Election Commission until April 15. But contenders with good news to share often release selected numbers to tout their fundraising prowess or grassroots support.
Of the three candidates to release numbers so far, Sanders is the only one to disclose how much cash he has remaining in the bank. Money leftover from his early campaigns have helped him amass the large reserves.

The campaign also said Tuesday that it had roughly 100 people currently on staff and Weaver touted plans to begin hiring in "the all-important" state of California, which moved up its primary date for 2020.
"While we had to in 2016 make choices about where we could compete, I'm certain that in this race, some of our opponents will also have to make similar difficult choices," Weaver said. "This campaign will have the resources and the volunteer grassroots strength to compete in every single state in the primary process."
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What's the Over-Under? Is Uncle Joe going to for it on 4th Down or Punt?



RE

Three more women accuse Biden of improper contact, say his video wasn't enough
Gregg Re
By Gregg Re | Fox News


Biden accusations spark conversation on personal space, affection, and PC culture

Is society becoming too cold and unemotional? 'Diversity Delusion' author Heather Mac Donald weighs in.

Just hours after former Vice President Joe Biden appeared on video to promise he'd be "more mindful" about others' personal space, three more women have gone public claiming he touched them inappropriately -- and all three said Biden's video didn't go far enough.

In an article published late Wednesday in The Washington Post, Vail Kohnert-Yount charged that when she was an intern in the White House in 2013, Biden approached her to introduce herself.

“He then put his hand on the back of my head and pressed his forehead to my forehead while he talked to me," Kohnert-Yount told The Post. "I was so shocked that it was hard to focus on what he was saying. I remember he told me I was a ‘pretty girl.'"

Although Kohnert-Yount said she did not consider Biden's behavior to be "sexual assault or harassment,” she added that "it was the kind of inappropriate behavior that makes many women feel uncomfortable and unequal in the workplace.”

Earlier on Wednesday, Biden -- who is widely expected to enter the 2020 presidential race soon -- responded to a series of other misconduct allegations leveled against him by promising to “be more mindful about respecting personal space in the future.”

BIDEN IS 'READY TO KILL BERNIE,' AMID ALLEGATIONS SANDERS TEAM MAY BE LEAKING ALLEGATIONS TO SABOTAGE HIM

Biden also acknowledged the allegations in a tweeted video.

“Social norms are changing. I understand that, and I’ve heard what these women are saying," Biden tweeted. "Politics to me has always been about making connections, but I will be more mindful about respecting personal space in the future. That’s my responsibility and I will meet it."

Responding to Biden's comments, Kohnert-Yount told The Post: “I appreciate his attempt to do better in the future, but to me this is not mainly about whether Joe Biden has adequate respect for personal space. It’s about women deserving equal respect in the workplace.”

PELOSI GIVES BIDEN SOME ADVICE TO AVOID FUTURE PROBLEMS: PRETEND YOU HAVE A COLD AND STAY AWAY

A second woman, Sofie Karasek, told The Post that Biden acted inappropriately when he placed his forehead against hers following the Oscars ceremony in 2016. Karasek had appeared on-stage with 51 other people who said they had experienced sexual assault. A photograph of the incident is widely available online.

In his comments Monday, Karasek said Biden “still didn’t take ownership in the way that he needs to.”

Biden "emphasized that he wants to connect with people and, of course, that’s important," Karasek said. "But again, all of our interactions and friendships are a two-way street. . . . Too often it doesn’t matter how the woman feels about it or they just assume that they’re fine with it."

Finally, Ally Coll said Biden squeezed her "for a beat too long" while she was a staffer organizing a reception for Democrats in 2008. She now runs the Purple Campaign, a nonprofit devoted to combating sexual harassment.

On its website, the Purple Campaign stated: "Courageous women have broken the silence by sharing their experiences with sexual harassment in the workplace, exposing a systemic problem that exists across every industry. Now we must work together to create lasting change."
Vice President Joe Biden with customers at a diner in Seaman, Ohio, in September 2012. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Vice President Joe Biden with customers at a diner in Seaman, Ohio, in September 2012. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

The page continued: "The Purple Campaign’s mission is to end workplace sexual harassment by implementing stronger corporate policies, establishing better laws and empowering people to create lasting change within their own workplaces and communities."

Coll told The Post that while Biden's behavior didn't concern her at first, over time she came to realize it was inappropriate.

She told The Post that Biden's video illustrated "a continued lack of understanding about why these stories are being told and their relevance in the #MeToo era.”
FILE - In this March 13, 2017, file photo, former Vice President Joe Biden, right, embraces University of Delaware President Dennis Assanis during an event to formally launch the Biden Institute, a research and policy center focused on domestic issues at the University of Delaware, in Newark, Del. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

FILE - In this March 13, 2017, file photo, former Vice President Joe Biden, right, embraces University of Delaware President Dennis Assanis during an event to formally launch the Biden Institute, a research and policy center focused on domestic issues at the University of Delaware, in Newark, Del. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

Other allegations against Biden surfaced Tuesday from two women who spoke to The New York Times. One of the claims dated from 2012, while the other encounter was said to have taken place a few years later.

In the 2012 incident, writer D.J. Hill said Biden put his hand on her shoulder, then dropped it down her back in a way that made her "very uncomfortable" while Hill and her husband posed for pictures with him at a fundraiser in Minneapolis. Hill said her husband noticed the movement and made a joke about it.
Tucker: We apologize for adding to the Biden hugging hysteria
Tucker: We apologize for adding to the Biden hugging hysteria

Former Vice President Joe Biden criticized for affectionate behavior.

In the second incident, former college student Caitlyn Caruso told the paper that Biden "rested his hand on her thigh — even as she squirmed in her seat to show her discomfort — and hugged her 'just a little bit too long' at an event on sexual assault at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas," as the paper reported. Caruso, now 22, said she was 19 at the time and had just recounted her own story of sexual assault.

On Monday, Amy Lappos, a former aide to Rep. Jim Himes, D-Conn., told the Hartford Courant that Biden touched her face with both hands and rubbed noses in 2009. Late last week, former Nevada politician Lucy Flores -- who campaigned for Bernie Sanders and served on the board of an activist group aligned with Sanders -- wrote that Biden had grabbed her shoulders, smelled her hair and kissed her on the back of her head at a campaign event in 2014.
FILE - In this May 22, 2013 file photo, Newly commissioned officer Erin Talbot, left, poses for a photograph with Vice President Joe Biden during commencement for the United States Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. AP Photo/Jessica Hill)

FILE - In this May 22, 2013 file photo, Newly commissioned officer Erin Talbot, left, poses for a photograph with Vice President Joe Biden during commencement for the United States Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. AP Photo/Jessica Hill)

A former Sanders staffer told Fox News on Wednesday that Flores is a "racist" and a "fraud."

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In his Twitter video, Biden discussed the "gestures of support and encouragement" that he said he's made to both men and women which "have made them uncomfortable."

"In my career, I’ve always tried to make a human connection," Biden said. "That’s my responsibility, I think. I shake hands, I hug people, I grab men and women by the shoulders and say ‘you can do this.’ And whether they’re women, men, young, old, it’s the way I’ve always been. It’s the way I’ve tried to show I care about them and I’m listening."

Fox News' Elizabeth Zwirz contributed to this report.
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Offline RE

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🗳️ Beto's Buckolas
« Reply #993 on: April 04, 2019, 03:21:20 AM »
https://www.politico.com/story/2019/04/03/beto-orourke-campaign-money-1253117


Beto O'Rourke said that 98 percent of the contributions to his campaign were less than $200 and that the average donation was $43. | Drew Angerer/Getty Images

2020 elections
Beto O'Rourke raises $9.4 million in 18 days

By DAVID SIDERS and REBECCA MORIN

04/03/2019 02:20 PM EDT

Updated 04/03/2019 02:50 PM EDT
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Beto O’Rourke’s astronomical first-day fundraising returned to strong but terrestrial levels following the launch of his presidential campaign, with the Texas Democrat announcing Wednesday that he raised $9.4 million in the first fundraising quarter of the year.

The sum includes the field-topping $6.1 million that O’Rourke raised in his campaign’s first 24 hours and the more than $1 million he posted this past weekend — when O’Rourke held a series of highly publicized kickoff rallies in Texas.

O’Rourke’s haul for the first quarter of 2019 remains relatively robust, given that he was a candidate for only 18 days, a small part of the fundraising period.

Still, Sen. Kamala Harris of California announced Monday that she had raised $12 million in the first quarter, and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont raised more than $18 million.

Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., said he collected more than $7 million.

O'Rourke's campaign said it received 218,000 contributions, that 98 percent of the contributions were for less than $200 and that the average donation was $43. The campaign also said the majority of its donors had not given to the former Texas congressman during a Texas Senate campaign in which he raised more than $80 million. Teachers were the top contributors by occupation, the campaign said.
Bernie Sanders

2020 Elections
Sanders raises $18 million in first quarter of presidential campaign

By HOLLY OTTERBEIN

Yet O’Rourke’s campaign did not say how many donors had given — a number that would account for people who donated more than once to his campaign. Nor did it disclose how much cash he has on hand.
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"In just 18 days, people in every state and from every walk of life have organized in homes, contributed a few bucks online and united together to show that the power of people is far greater than the PACs, corporations and special interest that have captured, corrupted and corroded our democracy for far too long," O'Rourke said in a prepared statement. "Not only is this a sign of our grassroots strength during the first two weeks of our campaign but it is a sign of what's possible when you put your full trust in the people of this country."

O’Rourke released his fundraising numbers before returning to Iowa on Wednesday evening for his second visit to the first-in-the-nation caucus state. O’Rourke is planning to hold nearly two dozen events in the state, remaining there through the weekend.

O’Rourke has been fundraising aggressively since entering the race, encouraging supporters to reach out to their own networks and targeting potential donors directly online. Over the weekend, the campaign set a $1 million fundraising goal for the final days before the campaign finance reporting deadline, sending multiple updates to supporters.

In his fundraising appeals, O’Rourke cast himself as running from behind, after entering the race later than most of his competitors.

“Beto is playing catch up to other candidates with more campaign funds,” the campaign said in one solicitation. “Some of our opponents started with millions of dollars from past campaigns. Plus Beto has had a lot less time to fundraise since we launched so recently. Still, we'll be compared to other candidates for president in these reports.”

On Wednesday, O’Rourke touted an average per-day contribution of $520,000 as evidence of his strength in the field. The campaign wrote that O’Rourke “continues to be the highest per-day raising candidate in the Democratic primary.”
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Offline RE

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Well, it's a start.

RE

Beto compared Trump’s immigration rhetoric to Nazi Germany. Activists say that’s not enough.
Beto O’Rourke should go further than criticizing Trump’s immigration rhetoric, activists say.

Elham Khatami
Apr 6, 2019, 8:12 am   


Former U.S. Representative and Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke speaks at the National Action Network's annual convention, April 3, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

At a town hall meeting of about 150 people in western Iowa Thursday, Democratic presidential hopeful Beto O’Rourke slammed President Donald Trump’s immigration rhetoric, comparing the president’s past comments to the language used in Nazi Germany. But immigration advocates say O’Rourke’s words fall flat without concrete policy proposals to back them up.

Referring to the president’s comments in which he “not only describes immigrants as ‘rapists’ and ‘criminals’ but as ‘animals’ and ‘an infestation,’” O’Rourke said, “Now, I might expect someone to describe another human being as ‘an infestation’ in the Third Reich. I would not expect it in the United States of America.”

According to The Washington Post, O’Rourke’s comments were met with applause. But although many immigration activists have expressed support for his comments, they also believe simply calling out the president isn’t enough.

“Beto’s right,” said Erika Andiola, chief of advocacy at RAICES, in a statement to ThinkProgress. “Trump’s language belongs more in the mouth of a Nazi than an American president … But this goes beyond rhetoric: The United States turned back Jewish refugees fleeing from Nazi Germany, sending them back to death in concentration camps. We are doing the same today to refugees coming across the southern border.”
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O’Rourke, who is from El Paso, Texas, and represented the border city for three terms in the House of Representatives, doesn’t quite have a strong immigration platform beyond theoretical talking points — he’s said the United States should provide a path to citizenship for recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, honor asylum laws, and end zero tolerance and family separation policies at the border.

“And if we’re serious about security, let this country of immigrants – republicans, independents and democrats – rewrite our immigration laws in our own image, from our own experiences, and in the best traditions of this great country,” O’Rourke’s official campaign website reads.

That’s an insufficient counter to Trump’s dangerous policies, activists argued. And O’Rourke is not alone. Of the more than a dozen Democratic candidates who’ve officially announced their intention to run, few have a clearly defined immigration platform. The exception appears to be former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro, whose People First Immigration Policy calls for decriminalizing border crossings outside of legal ports of entry, eliminating rules that ban undocumented immigrants from re-entering the United States a certain number of years after being deported, and overhauling the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, among other proposals.

Immigration is a matter of urgency, activists say, calling for all candidates to provide real policy solutions to address issues like family separation, the Muslim ban, and asylum.

“We are glad that presidential candidates are using their platform to call out Trump’s racism and race-baiting — but it cannot be a one-time thing,” United We Dream executive director Cristina Jimenez told ThinkProgress in a statement.
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“We need candidates who will offer an alternative to Trump’s hateful agenda on immigrants and people of color — with the number one goal of helping people without increasing the deportation force that hurts our community.”

O’Rourke told reporters after the event on Thursday, “If we don’t call out racism, certainly at the highest levels of power, in this position of trust that the president enjoys, then we are going to continue to get its consequences.”

“Silence is complicity in what this administration is doing, so let’s call it out,” he added. “Let’s also define a better future for this country, and that’s what I’ve been trying to do in this campaign.”   
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Offline RE

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This time, Beto stands on a Stump!  He's literally STUMPING! lol.

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https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2019/apr/7/beto-orourke-bernie-sanders-face-iowa/

Beto O'Rourke, Bernie Sanders face off in Iowa as 2020 Democratic derby heats up


In this Friday, April 5, 2019 photo, people listen as Democratic presidential candidate and former Texas Representative Beto O'Rourke stands on a stump to give his speech at the Mowry Irvine Mansion during a swing though Iowa in Marshalltown, Iowa. (Brian Powers/The Des Moines Register via AP)

By Laurie Kellman - Associated Press - Sunday, April 7, 2019

BURLINGTON, Iowa — They became notable presidential candidates in Iowa after narrow losses that nonetheless put them on the national political stage. They’re competing for some of the same young voters. And this weekend, they’ve been driving around this first-in-the-nation caucus state reintroducing themselves to voters as others in the 2020 Democratic field dispersed to New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada.

It’s been Bernie versus Beto all weekend in Iowa, with both hopefuls reintroducing themselves as the man with a plan to deny President Donald Trump a second term. Sanders swept back into the state as the early front runner after raising $18 million in 41 days during the first quarter of the year, the most of any candidate. O’Rourke raised $9.4 million in 18 days.

In dueling rallies, town halls and house parties, they spoke most of improving health care and affording college tuition.

Other hopefuls fanned out to political hot spots elsewhere, with much the same mission: Gauging early strength in a crowded field and raising enough money to secure a coveted spot in the presidential debates that begin in June.

Republican leaders have relished the jockeying among Democrats.

“I’d be happy with any of ‘em, to be honest,” the president said of the Democratic derby.
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Here’s a roundup of the crowded Democratic campaign.

___

Iowa Democrats know Sanders, the Vermont senator who lost the state - and the Democratic presidential nomination - to Hillary Clinton in 2016. At two town halls in counties he won during that caucus fight, Sanders’ questioners asked most about making health care more affordable.

Over and over, people told Sanders grim stories about medical bills putting them deeply in debt. He empathized, at one point putting an arm around a young woman who had begun weeping as she spoke. Sanders told his audience that he supports “Medicare for All” and a single-payer health care system. But he didn’t get into specifics.

Shannon Abel, a 28-year-old coordinator at a nonprofit organization in Muscatine, Iowa, said she still liked what she heard from Sanders. Then again, she had only begun seriously paying attention to politics after nearly a year of being ill and seeing the medical bills - with an $80 co-pay - put her family deeply in debt.

Of Sanders, Abel said, “He knows what it’s like to not have money.”

___

O’Rourke is calling for a range of educational changes to alleviate college debt, including providing free community college and allowing students to potentially eliminate or refinance their debt through public service.

“The cost of higher education, and not just tuition . is out of reach for so many of our fellow Americans,” O’Rourke told a crowd gathered for a campaign house party in Polk City, Iowa. He said the tens of thousands in debt that students carry when they graduate “is a weight that literally sinks them into the ground.”

To solve the problem, he offered a number of proposals to help students “stop digging the hole” and stop taking on debt when they go for a college degree: Making community college free, allowing students to earn an associate degree while they’re in high school so they’re “ready to earn a living wage on day one,” increase access to union apprenticeships. For those already saddled with student loan debt, O’Rourke said he’d like to “re-up the public service student debt forgiveness program” - a federal program that currently accepts only a fraction of applicants and is eliminated altogether in President Donald Trump’s latest budget proposal.

If students are willing to work in in-demand jobs at places like the Department of Veterans Affairs, or “willing to teach school or be in a support role in a community that needs your talent and human capital, I want to wipe clean your student loan debt. At a minimum I want to refinance what you have at a much lower rate.”

___

Sanders says he wants to make college free and pay for it by getting rid of tax havens and lowering taxes for the richest Americans.

That’s been received with some skepticism among budget and deficit hawks. But to Trevor Meyers, 19, it sounds right.

Meyers, like Sanders, is a democratic socialist. The Muscatine County resident attends a nearby college and lives at home with his family, which owns a farm. A sibling, he said, is five figures in debt from college.

“How is anybody in our society going to get started in life?” he wondered.

He liked Sanders, but said he’s going to check out one of O’Rourke’s events too.

___

Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper is discussing gun control and death penalty issues with survivors of a massacre that claimed nine Bible study participants at a historic black church in South Carolina.

Hickenlooper sat down on Saturday with Anthony Thompson and Polly Sheppard during a visit to Mother Emanuel AME Church in downtown Charleston.

Thompson’s wife was slain in the June 2015 shooting. Sheppard, who survived the ordeal but lost her son and aunt, has said the shooter told her he was sparing her life so she could tell others what happened. He is now on federal death row.

The church has become a place of pilgrimage for some 2020 presidential candidates as they campaign in the state, home of the first primary in the South.

Hickenlooper is known as a staunch advocate for gun control legislation. Following the fatal 2012 shootings in an Aurora, Colorado, movie theater, the then-governor called for and signed bills requiring universal background checks and limiting magazine capacity to 15 rounds.

Both Thompson and Sheppard told Hickenlooper they want those kinds of reforms in South Carolina and elsewhere.

___

Sen. Michael Bennet told reporters in Nashua, New Hampshire, that he hopes to be on the move again a few weeks after surgery for prostate cancer.

“I don’t think there’s any point in dwelling on it,” said the Colorado Democrat. “If it turns out to be worse than I think, I’ll deal with it then.”

The cancer diagnosis has “slowed us down a little bit,” Bennet said when asked about how it would impact him getting on the debate stage for the Democratic presidential debates, with well over a dozen candidates now running.

“It’s obviously slowed down our ability to raise money and at some point it could have an effect on whether we get to the debate stage or not, but I think we have a good chance to get there,” he said.

And with how he’s feeling right now, Bennet said he’s likely to run.

“I mean, I didn’t pick this particular set of circumstances,” he said. “This is not how I would have rolled it out.”

___

Democrats running for president will have to do more than campaign on an anti-Trump message if they want to take back the White House in 2020, Sen. Elizabeth Warren said on Saturday.

“If your message is ‘not-Trump,’ it’s not going to work,” the Democratic presidential hopeful told about 500 supporters who packed a high school gymnasium in Reno, Nevada. “Our job is to talk about our vision.”

Warren, D-Mass., blasted Trump’s economic and environmental policies and touted her plan to invest $500 billion over the next 10 years to build, preserve and rehabilitate affordable housing for low-income families. She said she would pay for it by returning the estate tax thresholds to where they were during President George W. Bush’s administration and imposing a new “wealth” tax on the nation’s 17,000 wealthiest families.

“Washington is working for the ultra-super-duper rich, and until we change that we are going to stay on this path. This is our moment,” she told the cheering crowd.

Warren was making her second campaign stop this year in the early caucus state, which on Feb. 22 follows only New Hampshire and Iowa in the nominating process. She spoke for about 30 minutes, took questions from the audience and posed for photographs for another half hour. More than half the crowd lined up to take selfies with her.

____

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg headed to New Hampshire after his campaign announced he’d raised more than $7 million this year.

Hundreds of voters interested in the mayor attended his two events in the state; some were turned away because the venues were at capacity.

The mayor gave short speeches at both his Friday and Saturday events and did not take town hall style questions from the two crowds.

Speaking at Gibson’s Bookstore in Concord on Saturday morning, the 37-year-old Buttigieg said he understands people’s difficulty in avoiding the spectacle of politics these days.

“As hard as it is to take our eye off what we see on cable, because grotesque things have the quality of drawing your eye, and we can’t take our eye off that show, but the show’s not what matters,” he said. “What matters is our everyday life.”

He later told voters, “We’ve got to change the channel, and that’s what we’re about.”

• Associated Press writers Alexandra Jaffe in Polk City, Iowa, Scott Sonner in Reno, Nevada, Meg Kinnard in Charleston, South Carolina, and Hunter Woodall in Nashua, New Hampshire, contributed to this report.
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How could anyone NOT have seen his face by now after all the press he has gotten?  ???   :icon_scratch:

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https://www.foxnews.com/politics/beto-orourke-is-asked-by-iowa-student-if-he-was-at-event-to-see-beto

Beto O’Rourke is asked by University of Iowa student if he was at town hall to ‘see Beto’

By Kathleen Joyce | Fox News


2020 presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke: What to know

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke has revealed that although he may have national name recognition, it is still somewhat difficult for new fans to put a face to that name.

O’Rourke, 46, called out his new friend, Matt, before a town hall on the University of Iowa’s campus Sunday, the Iowa City Press-Citizen reported.

“And to my friend, Matt, who I met in the men’s room as we were washing hands, and he said, ‘Are you here to see Beto?’” the former Texas congressman told a laughing crowd.

“And I said, ‘Yes, I am,” he continued. “Thank you for being here. I was wearing the hat you couldn’t tell!”
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BETO O'ROURKE CALLS ISRAELI LEADER NETANYAHU A 'RACIST'
Dr. Drew Pinsky: Beto O’Rouke’s Rhetoric Comparing President Trump To Nazi’s Is ScaryVideo

The student, Matthew Rowland, told the Iowa City Press-Citizen that he bumped into O’Rourke in the bathroom and the two made small talk.

"I was in the bathroom, minding my own business, and I was washing my hands," Rowland told the media outlet. "And this guy asked me how it was going, and I said good, 'How's it going,' going for some small talk.”

BETO O'ROURKE COMPARES TRUMP ADMINISTRATION RHETORIC TO NAZI GERMANY

When he asked the politician if he was there to see O’Rourke, he said the stranger looked at him and said, “That’s me.”

"I was in awe and shook his hand," Rowland said. "A super polite guy. I'm just glad I got a chance to meet him."

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O’Rourke announced his candidacy for the 2020 Democratic nomination in March. The former congressman said he raised $6.1 million online in the first 24 hours after his announcement. He is part of a crowded field of 20 people who are in the running for the Democratic ticket, including Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg and California Sen. Kamala Harris.

Kathleen Joyce is a breaking/trending news producer for FoxNews.com.
 
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🗳️ What If No Democratic Presidential Candidate Gets Enough Delegates?
« Reply #997 on: April 12, 2019, 12:23:50 AM »
https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/what-if-no-democratic-presidential-candidate-gets-enough-delegates/

What If No Democratic Presidential Candidate Gets Enough Delegates?
By Jim Geraghty

April 11, 2019 2:24 PM


Senator Kamala Harris launches her presidential campaign at a rally in Oakland, Calif., January 27, 2019. (Elijah Nouvelage/Reuters)

Over at Larry Sabato’s “Crystal Ball” site, Kyle Kondik observes that considering the size of the field and the Democratic party’s way of allocating delegates — no winner-take-all states, just a 15 percent threshold to win any delegates — the primary season could end with no candidate winning the necessary number of delegates and “the Democratic National Convention could hypothetically go to a second ballot.”

(Those who would like to see a party convention be newsworthy again will be cheering for this scenario.)

There’s a good chance that the 15 percent rule is going to cause Democrats headaches. Somebody at some point is going to win 13 or 14 percent of the vote a state primary and not get any delegates, and that candidate and their supporters are likely to be furious. You will probably hear a lot of cries of “rigged!” and claims that the process is unfair — or that it even represents “voter suppression” of some kind. (This is what a lot of Democrats do when they lose an election. They appear to believe in only two possible outcomes: they win or somebody else must have cheated.)
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Imagine a scenario where Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris, Beto O’Rourke, Pete Buttigieg, Elizabeth Warren, and Cory Booker all get roughly the same share of the vote in a state primary. That sort of split would give everyone . . .  14.2 percent of the vote. Who gets the delegates then? Or what if one candidate gets, say, 20 percent of the vote and everyone else is under 15 percent? Does the leading candidate get 100 percent of the delegates? Unless there’s a clear frontrunner, a lot of candidates will scream that the process is unfair and rigged against them.

3   

And Democrats shouldn’t count on low funds forcing some of the long-shot candidates to step off the stage. A candidate who just wants to hang around and get invited to debates and do television interviews can hang around for a long time, even without much money. In 2016, Jim Gilmore raised $824,000 in the entire cycle and stayed in the race until after the New Hampshire primary. John Kasich’s campaign raised $18 million, won 161 out of a possible 2,472 delegates, and he stayed in the race until May.

When do the Democrats start thinking about unity tickets?
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🗳️ Beto O'Rourke's stampede across Iowa proves he does have 'it'
« Reply #998 on: April 15, 2019, 02:01:49 AM »
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/apr/13/beto-o-rourke-2020-presidential-campaign-iowa

Beto O'Rourke's stampede across Iowa proves he does have 'it'
Art Cullen

The ex-congressman had some voters marveling as he waved his arms, stood on tables and drilled down on agriculture, climate change and universal healthcare

Sat 13 Apr 2019 06.00 EDT
Last modified on Sun 14 Apr 2019 03.36 EDT


‘A man either smart enough, modest enough or honest enough not to tread too far.’ Photograph: Jack Kurtz/Zuma Wire/Rex/Shutterstock

What is it with this Beto O’Rourke phenomenon? The Lone Star rock star just shot through, from Denison to Storm Lake and on to Fort Dodge. He has “it”, they said last Saturday in his wake.

“He brought tears to my eyes,” said Linda Torres, who was working the counter at Better Day Cafe as the former Texas congressman packed the house.
Who anointed Beto O'Rourke to be our political saviour? He did
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“He’s the white Obama,” marveled Diane Hamilton, who has studied every presidential candidate to come through since Jimmy Carter.

O’Rourke led with the border and closed with climate change, and held a crowd of 100 or more enrapt for over an hour, fielding questions in English and Spanish with fluency.

But is there any “there” there from this former punk rocker, who reflected on his epic Senate loss to Ted Cruz last fall by just 2.6% with a postmortem tour of the droughted western plains of Kansas and the poor indigenous people on the New Mexican mesas? He emerged from the desert with a theme of unity, embraced Oprah Winfrey and made Iowans wonder: where’s the beef? Which both humors and irritates the 46-year-old from El Paso.
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O’Rourke stampeded across Iowa last week waving his arms, standing on tables and sitting for an interview with the Storm Lake Times, where he drilled down on agriculture and climate change, universal healthcare and reducing student loan debt. He wants zero emissions and zero debt for students who are willing to pitch in where needed. He is a mix of New Deal, New Frontier (a la Camelot, and no, he was not named Robert Francis after RFK) and Bill Clinton’s nuanced Third Way.

There’s plenty of “there” there, we learned.

“If you think you have a problem at the border now, if this planet continues to cook like it is then you will have a real problem at the border,” O’Rourke said, “in the tens of millions of people. Look at Yemen. Look at Syria.”

Those are not the thoughts of a meandering mind.

He connected it to agriculture. He was talking up cover crops to suck up nitrate and hold back the floods that besieged south-west Iowa especially. He wants to pay farmers more for carbon sequestration by developing a credit market. He sees ethanol as preferable to oil and as a renewable energy pathway, regrets his vote to allow drilling in the Gulf of Mexico (he was a Texas congressman, after all), and clearly knows what bugs farmers: “Everywhere I go, whether it is Texas or Iowa, I hear farmers say: ‘I just want to be able to make a profit.’ They want to do their part. We should pay farmers to do this. Farmers understand better than anyone that we are living through the worst consequences of climate change.”

That kind of talk brought O’Rourke his first applause from the crowd – and it was sustained. Climate change is identified by the Iowa Poll as the top issue of likely caucus-goers next February, along with healthcare.

He knows that the south-west Great Plains are running dry. He knows it takes twice the acreage to run a steer in Texas than it did a decade ago. He describes Euless, Texas, as pictures in the Dust Bowl museum returning to life. There was a reason he was drawn to the small town, he thought, with that mystical appeal. “There was a lesson there for me: history doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes, as Mark Twain said.” He knows that the great feedlots in Kansas are sucking the huge Ogallala Aquifer dry, which will foreclose corn irrigation. How can we ease the transition as cattle slake their thirst by moving north from the region where a third of the nation’s beef is raised?

“I don’t know. I just don’t know,” he said.

Give him that. A man either smart enough, modest enough or honest enough not to tread too far. He said that’s what he learned in King county, Texas, which voted more than 90% for Donald Trump. He went there to campaign, and by listening to the local judge learned that 48 surrounding water districts could not produce potable water. The judge was frustrated that the EPA wouldn’t listen to local solutions. O’Rourke says he is learning by listening. And he got two more votes than Hillary Clinton did in King county.

“I don’t have all the answers,” he said.

He formally announced his campaign in El Paso on 30 March with a speech with a strong anti-trust flair, as if he were reading the tea leaves from Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders. Farmers who just want a profit could have one if economic power were dispersed, O’Rourke said, but his great-grandad James knew that when he hit Nebraska as a poor Irishman working for the railroad.

O’Rourke’s emphasis changed in Storm Lake. It became more biographical. He talked of rural places left behind, much like El Paso, where he served on the city council. “Far from the centers of power, we were on our own and realized that we must write our own story,” he said. “In Storm Lake, I see a community thriving because of immigration … where people are called to contribute to success, like Diego at Delicias Bakery here. It is the perennial story of this country.”

Which led him into a condemnation of the Trump administration, where locking down the border is the cause célèbre. When the president came to El Paso to build the wall, O’Rourke rallied home-towners across town against it. He said El Paso was safer before the wall created fear. He wants to take on Trump on that issue, when others prefer not to fight him on that ground.

“Men, women and children are put in a cage with barbed wire, having come here on top of a train they call ‘La Bestia’ or ‘The Beast’. That’s on every single one of us,” he said. “These people are refugees, fleeing violence. I remember the 14-year-old girl who asked: ‘Why does the president not like me?’ What does that do to her head? We need to call it what it is: racism.”
Barack Obama is stuck in the past. He represents the old Democratic party
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That had Linda Torres crying.

Diane Hamilton was impressed with his discussion of universal healthcare; he does not prescribe Medicare for All. “He had a lot of substance in what he said. He talked about the issues that are most important to everyday voters,” said Hamilton, who has a strong inclination towards Joe Biden as well. O’Rourke did not endorse tuition-free college, but debt-free for those who work.
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“We’ve only seen half the candidates, but Beto is up there,” Hamilton said.

Alan Maldonado, a senior business and Spanish major at Buena Vista University (BVU) from Kansas City, said he has followed O’Rourke since his run against Cruz. “He seems pretty rational. He’s not extreme. Some of the others may be too far left,” he said.

His friend Val Mota, a BVU senior from Sioux City, is eligible to caucus and she is giving O’Rourke a hard look. “If you can bridge the gap in Texas, you can take that to the presidency.”

    Art Cullen is editor of the Storm Lake Times in Iowa and won the 2017 Pulitzer prize for editorial writing. Cullen is the author of the book Storm Lake: A Chronicle of Change, Resilience, and Hope from a Heartland Newspaper (Viking 2018)
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https://www.vox.com/2019/4/15/18323347/bernie-sanders-town-hall-fox-news-bret-baier

Bernie Sanders’s Fox News town hall wasn’t a debate. Bernie won anyway.
Sanders was sincere with the audience, gracious to his Democratic opponents, and as prickly as ever to his Fox News hosts
.
By Dara Linddara@vox.com Apr 15, 2019, 8:57pm EDT


Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) participates in a Fox News town hall on April 15, 2019, in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Mark Makela/Getty Images

Bernie Sanders’s Fox News town hall, which aired Monday night, showed that contrary to the belief of many of his detractors (and some of his supporters), the Vermont senator really does have more than one rhetorical mode.

There was the mode he used for the town hall part, and the mode he used for the Fox News part — represented by anchors Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum, who liberally interspersed questions from the audience with questions of their own.

When speaking directly to audience members or to the TV audience watching at home, Sanders was sincere and open. When asked about President Donald Trump, he spoke with emotion about how he hoped everyone could agree a “pathological liar” should not be president; in his closing statement, he practically begged for more comity in the country, without backing off his insistence that the rich need to do more to provide for working families.

When speaking to Baier and MacCallum, however — or, in a couple of moments, directly to the Fox News-watcher-in-chief — Sanders was as prickly as you’d expect. “The president watches your network a bit, right?” he needled. He hectored the hosts for making more money than he did. He huffed that he’d give fair answers only if asked fair questions.

The uncomfortable dynamic between Sanders and the hosts occasionally served to sharpen intellectual differences. Early in the hourlong town hall, Baier asked whether Sanders’s millionaire status (earned, he said, by the success of his recent book) proved that capitalism worked; Bernie tartly responded “no,” then, after a pause, launched into a mini-lecture about the obligation to ensure a minimum standard of living for the least wealthy in America.

More often, though, it was just uncomfortably tense. And that worked great for Sanders.
It was Bernie’s crowd — to the Fox anchors’ apparent dismay

For one thing, the audience was on his side.

After Sanders answered an audience question about why government-provided versus private-sector health care by outlining his health care proposal, Baier decided to poll the audience about it, asking people if they’d prefer it to their current, private-sector-provided health insurance. (That frame evokes Barack Obama’s famous promise that “If you like your healthcare, you can keep it” — something conservatives and Fox News frequently point to as a symbol of Obamacare’s broken promises.)

The poll ... did not go the way Baier appears to have thought it would.

It’s apparent that Fox didn’t stack the town hall with conservatives or people who hated Bernie Sanders; while the first questioner was a student organizer with the conservative youth organization Turning Point USA, the second was a progressive organizer who’d campaigned for Hillary Clinton.

But Baier and MacCallum’s questions were often rooted in the conservative assumptions that a stereotypical Fox News viewer might have: that cutting the defense budget would “send a message” to other countries that the United States is weak, or that migrant asylum seekers “have to go somewhere” because there’s no room for them in border communities (and therefore, implicitly, that they should go to sanctuary cities). Sometimes, Sanders simply dodged them without any newsworthy gaffes or saying anything that Democratic primary voters might disagree with.

Sometimes, he fired right back and challenged the question. “Why are you so shocked by that?” he challenged MacCallum during a back-and-forth about paying for his health care proposal. When Baier characterized Sanders as a “staunch supporter of Congresswoman Ilhan Omar” during what was supposed to be a 15-second “lightning round,” Sanders spent at least 15 seconds rejecting the premise — “Hold it, hold it, hold it. I’ve talked to her about twice in my life” — before affirming that he supported the right of a “Muslim member of Congress not to be attacked every single day in outrageous, racist remarks.”

By the end of the town hall, audience members were booing the occasional Baier or MacCallum follow-up, even doing call-and-response with Sanders.

Maybe this proved the central point of Sanders’ campaign rhetoric: that the American people writ large, not just progressive Democrats, really do want the government to guarantee them a certain standard of living. Maybe it just proved that Sanders is a good politician who’s skilled at presenting his preferred policies in a way that sounds good to people.

Either way, Sanders looked like a frontrunner — which, if you look at the polls, is exactly what he is. Sanders lags behind former Vice President Joe Biden in some polls, but Biden hasn’t yet officially declared his candidacy; if Biden somehow decides not to run, polling experts say Sanders could inherit a big chunk of his supporters, making him the prohibitive favorite.

That’s a very unusual position for a politician who has won national fame by defining himself against other Democrats. And it’s an awkward fit with his gruffly persona. Sanders’s prickliness seems sensible when he’s punching up in the polls; but when there’s no one to punch up at, a combative attitude can come off as ungenerous or even bullying.

The Fox News hosts provided the perfect foil.

Sanders directed his irritations at them, giving the audience plenty of the authentic-seeming “Bernie from Brooklyn” without actually being irritated with any potential voters, and without saying anything negative about any of his fellow Democrats also running for the presidency. When MacCallum invited him to attack Biden as a centrist or South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg for suggesting Sanders might be too old, Sanders demurred — pointing out that Biden was a friend and that the primary was for voters to hear differences and make up their minds, or half-joking about his distant past as a long-distance runner.

The answer gave the impression of Sanders floating above the fray, frontrunner-style. But he wasn’t. He was fighting MacCallum and Fox News. And in the same way that one might win a debate — but not a typical town hall — he won.
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https://www.politico.com/story/2019/04/22/democrats-town-hall-1287203

2020 Elections
From impeachment to getting ‘Hillary’d’: 2020 Democrats face off in town halls

By STEPHANIE MURRAY

04/22/2019 09:48 PM EDT

Updated 04/23/2019 01:19 AM EDT


MANCHESTER, N.H. — Five presidential hopefuls squared off in back-to-back televised town halls on Monday night, showing divides in how each Democratic candidate wants to address issues ranging from student debt to the possible impeachment of President Donald Trump.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Sen. Kamala Harris of California, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., took turns on the stage during the event, hosted by CNN, at St. Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. The Democratic candidates are barred from appearing onstage together until the first 2020 debates this summer, according to Democratic National Committee rules.

The candidates courted millennial and Generation Z voters on Monday night, a bloc that’s growing in size and enthusiasm ahead of the 2020 election. Fifty-eight percent of Democratic voters ages 18 to 29 plan to participate in a primary or caucus in 2020 — a 14 percent increase over the 2016 election — according to a poll released by the Harvard Institute of Politics ahead of the town halls.

Here are some of the highlights of the evening:

On student debt: Klobuchar knocked Warren’s student loan forgiveness plan, saying that expanding Pell Grants, allowing students to refinance loans and bringing back an Obama-era plan for free two-year community college programs was a more realistic way to tackle student debt.

“I wish I could staple a free college diploma under every one of your chairs, I do,” Klobuchar said to the crowd of several hundred college students. “Don’t look — it’s not there. I wish I could do that, but I have to be straight with you and tell you the truth. You deserve more than to be saddled with more and more debt. Everything I have proposed to you I have found ways to pay for it that I think makes sense, that I think can actually get done.”
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Shots at Trump: Klobuchar took several shots at the president during her hour onstage, referring to Trump as “Mr. Umbrella Man” in response to his jokes about her 2020 campaign launch in a blizzard. This seemed to be a reference to a viral clip of the president opting not to close an umbrella when boarding a plane in October. When CNN host Chris Cuomo approached Klobuchar onstage while she was answering a question, she evoked Trump again. “I feel you creeping over my shoulder — not in a Trumpian manner,” Klobuchar said.
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Getting “Hillary’d”: Warren was asked how she would avoid being “Hillary’d” in the 2020 race, meaning facing increased scrutiny because of sexism. “You stay after it every day — one might say you persist,” Warren said to applause. “You organize, you build a grassroots-movement, you fight for working people, and that’s how I’m going to be the first woman elected president of the United States.”

Impeaching the president: Warren put down a marker on impeachment based on her reading of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, breaking with House leaders who are reluctant to start proceedings to remove Trump from office. “There is no political-inconvenience exception to the United States Constitution,” Warren said, calling on members of Congress to vote on impeachment. “They should have to take that vote and live with it for the rest of their lives.”

The most dangerous president: Sanders called Trump “the most dangerous president in American history“ and a “pathological liar,“ but stopped short of calling for his impeachment. “What is most important to me is to see that Donald Trump is not reelected president, and I intend to do everything I can to make sure that doesn‘t happen,“ Sanders said. “Congress has got to take a hard look at that and do a hard investigation and subpoena the people who are mentioned in that report.“

Getting realistic on impeachment: “I believe Congress should take the steps toward impeachment,“ Harris said. But the California lawmaker said she was a “realist“ when it came to how impeachment would fare in the Senate, which she expects will put partisanship over facts.
Bernie Sanders

2020 Elections
Town hall marathon exposes not 'terribly many differences' in 2020 primary

By DAVID SIDERS and STEPHANIE MURRAY

Soundbites: Sanders was asked whether people in prison should be allowed to vote, including the Boston Marathon bomber who is awaiting a death sentence connected with the 2013 attack. “I think the right to vote is inherent to our democracy — yes, even for terrible people — because once you start chipping away … you‘re running down a slippery slope,“ Sanders said. “Even if they are the jail, they‘re paying their price to society. That should not take away their inherent American right to participate in our democracy.“

“I've written many 30-second opposition ads in my life, this will be just another one,“ Sanders quipped after answering the question. Forty minutes later, the Republican America Rising PAC send a blast email to reporters with with a video of Sanders‘ comments.

Buttigieg disagreed with Sanders' stance, saying "part of the punishment" is losing certain rights and freedoms while incarcerated. "It does not make sense to have an exception for the right to vote," Buttigieg said. "I do believe when you are out, when you have served your sentence … one of the things that needs to be restored is your right to vote."

Who wants to be a millionaire? Sanders addressed the content of his tax returns, which showed he earned more than a million dollars and raised questions about his railing against the wealthy, especially on taxes. “I plead guilty to having written a book which was an international best seller,“ he said. “And when you write a book that makes it to the top of the NYT best-seller list, you make money.”

“I don't think anyone seriously believes that because I wrote a best-selling book that made money, that changed my views, that you‘ll hear me saying, ‘Gee, why don‘t we give tax breaks to millionaires?‘” Sanders added.
Donald Trump

White House
Trump’s aides ignoring impeachment chatter

By GABBY ORR and KATIE GALIOTO

The case for reparations: Harris voiced her support for a bill to study reparations Monday night, pointing to years of slavery, Jim Crow laws and segregation in America.

"To believe or suggest that those years of treatment and abuse and violent and crimes did not have an impact is to overlook the facts of history," Harris said.

Harris addresses that truancy policy: Harris defended a controversial truancy policy from her time as attorney general in California, saying she took on the issue of inequity in the education system.

"Nobody went to jail. And as a result of our initiative we improved attendance by over 30 percent," Harris said. "No child should be overlooked and this is what the system does, guys, For certain kids the system really doesn't expect much from them. That is a harsh reality in many places."

The dust bin of history: Buttigieg said Trump has made the case for his own impeachment on Monday night. "I think he's made it pretty clear that he deserves impeachment, but I'll also leave it to the House and Senate to figure that out." Buttigieg said his role is relegating Trump to the "dust bin of history" in the 2020 election.

On the verge of change: Addressing why he compared Sanders and Trump earlier this month, Buttigieg said both candidates tapped into a desire to "blow up the system" among voters.

"We need to make sure we don't come to be viewed as the defenders of the system that is letting people down. We wouldn't be here if the economic and political system hadn't failed people," Buttigieg said. "Once in an every half century or so, there is a moment that is a hinge point between eras in American history. We're at the dawn of something new and it could be really enlightened and really fantastic, and it could also be really ugly. And a lot of that is gonna depend on what happens now."
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🗳️ Uncle Joe throws his Jockstrap in the Ring
« Reply #1001 on: April 25, 2019, 06:26:16 AM »
The Horserace is now complete, all the horses are in the starting gate.  Will #MeToo go after him?  Who will the Winner be?

RE

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/joe-biden-2020-former-vice-president-running-for-president-political-party-views-stance-issues-age-candidate-for/

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/joe-biden-2020-former-vice-president-running-for-president-political-party-views-stance-issues-age-candidate-for/

Joe Biden says he's running for president, in video announcing bid

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/CJHumJ6wkkE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/CJHumJ6wkkE</a>

By Camilo Montoya-Galvez

Updated on: April 25, 2019 / 6:36 AM / CBS News

Ending months of speculation, former Vice President Joe Biden announced Thursday he is launching his third presidential campaign, instantly joining the race as an early frontrunner among more than a dozen major Democratic candidates seeking to deny President Trump a second term.

"We are in the battle for the soul of this nation," he said in the nearly four-minute long video. "If we give Donald Trump eight years in the White House he will forever and fundamentally alter the character of this nation. And I cannot stand by and watch that happen."

Unlike most of his competitors who only mentioned President Trump in passing when they announced their candidacies, Biden used his video to cast the race as a battle with Mr. Trump for the very soul and character of the country, calling him out by name.

The video opens in Charlottesville, Virginia, the scene of violent clashes between white nationalists and protesters which opens in Charlottesville, Virginia, where in 2017 there were violent clashes between white nationalists and protesters that resulted in the death of one woman. Mr. Trump, at the time, faced a backlash for saying that blame for the violence fell "on many sides."

    Who is Joe Biden, the latest Democrat in the 2020 race?

Biden announced his bid in a video released on social media. He is expected to hold a fundraiser Thursday evening in Philadelphia and hold his first formal campaign event in Pittsburgh on Monday. In his appeal to voters, Biden recounted the president's response to the violent white supremacist protests in Charlottesville, Virginia two years ago.

Biden said he's running for president because everything about American democracy is "at stake" under a Trump presidency. "We have to remember who we are, this is America," he added in a final appeal to supporters.

Already differentiating himself from the other 17 candidates running, Biden also immediately released Spanish-language advertising to target Latino supporters. None of the other candidates have done this from the start.

For about a year, many Democratic operatives, donors and voters have been encouraging Biden, who served as vice president for eight years under President Obama, to enter the crowded race, capture the nomination and thwart Mr. Trump's reelection bid in 2020. Despite not having formally announced his bid until Thursday, Biden has been leading several polls among primary voters, with only Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders coming close to matching the former vice president's support.

People familiar with the campaign's plans said Biden plans to place a particular emphasis on South Carolina, an early primary state where he enjoys strong support from longtime Democratic leaders and the state's large African American community. 

    The 2020 Contenders: Who's running for president?

The 76-year-old former Delaware lawmaker, a totem of the Democratic Party's establishment, is likely to quickly attract substantial financial support from the party's more moderate wing, as well as the backing of many top Democrats across the country and in Washington, where he worked for decades.

Unlike many of the other Democratic candidates in the race, Biden is already a household name across the country, and his allies argue he has the best chance to woo working-class voters in states like Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania who propelled Mr. Trump to victory during the 2016 presidential election. 

The former vice president, however, will also face scrutiny from progressives for some of the positions he held during his long tenure in Congress, where he represented Delaware in the Senate for more than 35 years. He has also come under scrutiny in recent weeks by several women who said that he touched them inappropriately at events over the years.

In the 1970s, Biden opposed busing to desegregate public schools. As chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, he oversaw the contentious Anita Hill hearings during the confirmation process for then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas in 1991. He also helped spearhead efforts to pass the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, which many believe fueled a period of mass incarceration that disproportionately affected African Americans and other minority groups.

Biden has since embraced more progressive policy stances. He staged two campaigns for the Democratic nomination in 1988 and 2008, dropping out during the primary contests in both.

The former vice president joins the largest — and the most diverse — Democratic primary field in U.S. history. To date, 20 other Democrats have declared their candidacy for president, including Sens. Sanders, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, Cory Booker and Elizabeth Warren; Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke; and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Ed O'Keefe, Emily Tillett and Caitlin Huey-Burns contributed to this report.

First published on April 25, 2019 / 6:04 AM
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Re: 🗳️ Uncle Joe throws his Jockstrap in the Ring
« Reply #1002 on: April 25, 2019, 08:42:01 AM »
The Horserace is now complete, all the horses are in the starting gate.  Will #MeToo go after him?  Who will the Winner be?

RE

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/joe-biden-2020-former-vice-president-running-for-president-political-party-views-stance-issues-age-candidate-for/

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/joe-biden-2020-former-vice-president-running-for-president-political-party-views-stance-issues-age-candidate-for/

Joe Biden says he's running for president, in video announcing bid

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/CJHumJ6wkkE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/CJHumJ6wkkE</a>

By Camilo Montoya-Galvez

Updated on: April 25, 2019 / 6:36 AM / CBS News

Ending months of speculation, former Vice President Joe Biden announced Thursday he is launching his third presidential campaign, instantly joining the race as an early frontrunner among more than a dozen major Democratic candidates seeking to deny President Trump a second term.

"We are in the battle for the soul of this nation," he said in the nearly four-minute long video. "If we give Donald Trump eight years in the White House he will forever and fundamentally alter the character of this nation. And I cannot stand by and watch that happen."

Unlike most of his competitors who only mentioned President Trump in passing when they announced their candidacies, Biden used his video to cast the race as a battle with Mr. Trump for the very soul and character of the country, calling him out by name.

The video opens in Charlottesville, Virginia, the scene of violent clashes between white nationalists and protesters which opens in Charlottesville, Virginia, where in 2017 there were violent clashes between white nationalists and protesters that resulted in the death of one woman. Mr. Trump, at the time, faced a backlash for saying that blame for the violence fell "on many sides."

    Who is Joe Biden, the latest Democrat in the 2020 race?

Biden announced his bid in a video released on social media. He is expected to hold a fundraiser Thursday evening in Philadelphia and hold his first formal campaign event in Pittsburgh on Monday. In his appeal to voters, Biden recounted the president's response to the violent white supremacist protests in Charlottesville, Virginia two years ago.

Biden said he's running for president because everything about American democracy is "at stake" under a Trump presidency. "We have to remember who we are, this is America," he added in a final appeal to supporters.

Already differentiating himself from the other 17 candidates running, Biden also immediately released Spanish-language advertising to target Latino supporters. None of the other candidates have done this from the start.

For about a year, many Democratic operatives, donors and voters have been encouraging Biden, who served as vice president for eight years under President Obama, to enter the crowded race, capture the nomination and thwart Mr. Trump's reelection bid in 2020. Despite not having formally announced his bid until Thursday, Biden has been leading several polls among primary voters, with only Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders coming close to matching the former vice president's support.

People familiar with the campaign's plans said Biden plans to place a particular emphasis on South Carolina, an early primary state where he enjoys strong support from longtime Democratic leaders and the state's large African American community. 

    The 2020 Contenders: Who's running for president?

The 76-year-old former Delaware lawmaker, a totem of the Democratic Party's establishment, is likely to quickly attract substantial financial support from the party's more moderate wing, as well as the backing of many top Democrats across the country and in Washington, where he worked for decades.

Unlike many of the other Democratic candidates in the race, Biden is already a household name across the country, and his allies argue he has the best chance to woo working-class voters in states like Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania who propelled Mr. Trump to victory during the 2016 presidential election. 

The former vice president, however, will also face scrutiny from progressives for some of the positions he held during his long tenure in Congress, where he represented Delaware in the Senate for more than 35 years. He has also come under scrutiny in recent weeks by several women who said that he touched them inappropriately at events over the years.

In the 1970s, Biden opposed busing to desegregate public schools. As chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, he oversaw the contentious Anita Hill hearings during the confirmation process for then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas in 1991. He also helped spearhead efforts to pass the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, which many believe fueled a period of mass incarceration that disproportionately affected African Americans and other minority groups.

Biden has since embraced more progressive policy stances. He staged two campaigns for the Democratic nomination in 1988 and 2008, dropping out during the primary contests in both.

The former vice president joins the largest — and the most diverse — Democratic primary field in U.S. history. To date, 20 other Democrats have declared their candidacy for president, including Sens. Sanders, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, Cory Booker and Elizabeth Warren; Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke; and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Ed O'Keefe, Emily Tillett and Caitlin Huey-Burns contributed to this report.

First published on April 25, 2019 / 6:04 AM

Big surprise there.

So....the question becomes, will Joe be smarter than Hillary and lay off the identity politics? If he does, he's still a contender. He's the choice of the old Demo regime, and the money will flow to him, until he is proven to be a loser.

The identity politics crowd and the young proto-socialists have lots of choices. Democratic people likely to vote in droves do not.

It will be a war, and it's split three ways as I see it. Biden is Hillary with a dick, basically.....but not quite as fake.

Bernie is the socialist who might actually be a fine President. He is a reality based socialist.

The rest.....the gay candidate, the women of color candidates, the female ex-military candidate, and all the rest...they only ascend if Bernie and Biden get something pretty wrong. But they are the future of the Democratic Party. May God have mercy on our souls.

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

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🗳️ The El Paso Homecoming That Set Beto O’Rourke’s Star on the Rise
« Reply #1003 on: April 27, 2019, 12:09:35 AM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/26/us/politics/beto-o-rourke-el-paso-texas.html

The Long Run
The El Paso Homecoming That Set Beto O’Rourke’s Star on the Rise

With help from his family, Mr. O’Rourke transitioned from rootless former musician to start-up founder, civic leader and candidate.


Two decades ago, Beto O’Rourke returned to his hometown and began a critical personal transformation. Last month, he kicked off his 2020 campaign there.CreditCreditRuth Fremson/The New York Times

By Stephanie Saul and Matt Flegenheimer

    April 26, 2019

EL PASO — Beto O’Rourke attracted the officers’ attention near the Texas-New Mexico state line, rocketing past them in a speeding Volvo, hustling to nowhere around 3 a.m.

He was so inebriated when the police reached him — after he had collided with a truck and pivoted to a stop across the center median of Interstate 10 — that he nearly collapsed when he tried to step out of the car.

Hours earlier, on Sept. 26, 1998, Mr. O’Rourke had turned 26. He was home again in El Paso, back for good after three searching years of post-college odd jobs in New York City. He had moved into an apartment near his parents, in an 18-unit building his family owned. His mother hired him to help with computers and inventory at her home-furnishings store. His father, a hard-charging former local politician, was dreaming bigger.

And an after-hours mistake, even one this serious, was not going to stand in the way.

“I remember he came home afterward; we were talking about it,” his mother, Melissa O’Rourke, said of the arrest. “It was just very, ‘How could I be so stupid?’”

Mr. O’Rourke’s fortunes would turn quickly. He had some help.

In the years that followed, he transitioned from rootless former musician to celebrated civic-leader-in-a-hurry. Within months, with a loan from his parents and a business plan guided by his father, Pat O’Rourke, he started a successful web design company and an online newsmagazine. Before long, despite having shunned politics for much of his life, he assumed the sheen of a rising star, poised to carry the family name to the ballot as his father had before him.

This critical period of Mr. O’Rourke’s life, spanning his late 20s and early 30s, was neither the first nor the last time an inherited tool kit of family influence and relative financial comforts helped smooth his stumbles and hasten his successes.

His step-grandfather, a former Navy secretary, had steered him to a prestigious Virginia boarding school. His father’s political connections had landed him a Capitol Hill internship. His eventual marriage to the daughter of one of El Paso’s wealthiest men, the developer William D. Sanders, would ease access to a new network of political allies.
Supporters of Mr. O’Rourke’s Senate run, at Southwest University Park on election night last November.CreditTodd Heisler/The New York Times
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Supporters of Mr. O’Rourke’s Senate run, at Southwest University Park on election night last November.CreditTodd Heisler/The New York Times
Amy O’Rourke appeared with her husband as he conceded the Senate race.CreditTodd Heisler/The New York Times
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Amy O’Rourke appeared with her husband as he conceded the Senate race.CreditTodd Heisler/The New York Times

Mr. O’Rourke’s tax returns, released this month, lay bare the extent to which he and his wife, Amy, have benefited from their parents’ largess, placing them among the wealthiest families in the Democratic presidential field. In the decade from 2008 through 2017, close to 40 percent of the O’Rourkes’ $3.4 million in income came from shares in partnerships gifted to them by their parents — dividends, interest, capital gains and rental revenue. More than $1 million came from two entities established by Amy O’Rourke’s father.

Friends from Mr. O’Rourke’s youth say this is not the life they imagined for him: ownership stakes, making money from money, a sprint into national politics.

Yet if Mr. O’Rourke’s punk-rock days and New York chapter were in some respects a reaction to his rearing — the son of a businesswoman and a glad-handing politician in search of something different — his El Paso re-entry made clear he was his parents’ child.

Coaxed for years by his achievement-minded father, Mr. O’Rourke grew increasingly self-motivated, former co-workers say. He began shuttling between meetings in blue button-downs and khakis. He took intensive Spanish lessons to reintegrate himself into the bilingual border city, his mother said. He recruited out-of-state talent to El Paso to work with him, promising a role in a “movement” to revitalize what was once a commercial hub of the American Southwest (and neglecting to mention the prevalence of sandstorms).

Mr. O’Rourke seemed to see the city as an extension of himself — a theme now underpinning his bridges-not-walls presidential messaging, with immigration at the national fore. He became a kind of evangelist for a 21st-century El Paso, celebrated in the local press as a returning Northeasterner “saving the city from the brain drain.”
Friends from Mr. O’Rourke’s youth say his wealth and his ascension in national politics are not part of the life they imagined for him.CreditIvan Pierre Aguirre/EPA, via Shutterstock
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Friends from Mr. O’Rourke’s youth say his wealth and his ascension in national politics are not part of the life they imagined for him.CreditIvan Pierre Aguirre/EPA, via Shutterstock

Mr. O’Rourke’s often-charmed trajectory has not been lost on some progressive skeptics, who wonder if a white man of relative privilege is the best fit for this Democratic moment. Mr. O’Rourke’s personality-driven political appeal — “Man, I’m just born to be in it,” he told Vanity Fair as he entered the race — has done little to discourage the trope, which some rivals have been quick to highlight.

“I wasn’t born to run, but I am running,” Senator Amy Klobuchar said on “Meet the Press.”

“I’m the one from the other side of the tracks,” Julián Castro, the former mayor of San Antonio and Obama-era housing secretary, told voters in Nevada, striking back at the impression that he was the lesser Texan seeking the nomination. “I’m the one that didn’t grow up as a front-runner.”

Mr. O’Rourke can be sensitive to the barb that he was raised in affluence, and the reality is indeed more nuanced. While his family held prominence and influence in El Paso, interviews and financial records indicate that the O’Rourkes were well off but hardly superrich.

He mentioned, unprompted, in a recent interview that he had received financial aid in college, and said his parents had taken out personal loans to help pay for his education. “They wouldn’t have done that unless we had to do,” he said. “And we had to do.”

At the same time, Mr. O’Rourke has acknowledged that his rise was made possible, at least in part, by the clear advantages he enjoyed, particularly during this stretch of his life.

Speaking last month in Iowa, he cited his two arrests: the drunken-driving episode — during which he tried to leave the accident scene, according to the police report, though Mr. O’Rourke has denied this — and a previous trespassing incident. He noted that neither had limited his opportunities.

“It’s not because I’m a great person, or I’m a genius, or I’ve figured anything out,” he said. “A lot of that has to do with the fact that I’m a white man, that I had parents who had the cash to post bail at the time. A lot of people don’t have that.”

South Toward Home

Just months before his car veered out of control, Mr. O’Rourke had reached a professional cul-de-sac.

Lingering in New York after graduating in 1995 from Columbia University with a degree in English literature, he worked in various jobs — at his uncle’s web business, as an Upper West Side nanny, in an entry-level publishing position. Nothing stuck.

At home in El Paso, his parents received a call.

“He said, ‘I don’t see my purpose here,’” his mother recalled. “‘I think I’m really ready to go back to where my roots are.’”
Mr. O’Rourke’s mother, Melissa O’Rourke, was able to offer him a job when he moved back to Texas in his 20s.CreditIvan Pierre Aguirre for The New York Times
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Mr. O’Rourke’s mother, Melissa O’Rourke, was able to offer him a job when he moved back to Texas in his 20s.CreditIvan Pierre Aguirre for The New York Times

His timing was good. There was an opening at his mother’s furniture and gift shop catering to El Paso’s well-to-do.

“It was perfect,” she said. “He showed me how to look things up in the computer.”

Founded in the 1950s by Mr. O’Rourke’s grandmother, the store — together with the surrounding family-owned shopping center and the O’Rourkes’ apartment building — set them firmly among El Paso’s financially comfortable.

Mr. O’Rourke and his two younger sisters had grown up in one of the nicer houses in a neighborhood near the University of Texas at El Paso: a 4,000-square-foot stucco-and-brick with a design inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright, complete with a backyard pool.

There had been domestic help as well. In the yearbook of Woodberry Forest School, the boarding school Mr. O’Rourke attended on the recommendation of his grandmother’s husband, former Navy Secretary Frederick Korth, he thanked faculty members; his family; and Coco, their housekeeper.

Back from New York, Mr. O’Rourke settled not at his boyhood home but at an apartment in the family’s building.

He began connecting with friends, in and outside the city. He had a big idea, a couple actually. His uncle, Brooks Williams, recalled that Mr. O’Rourke, skilled at drawing out even strangers in social settings, had expressed an interest in operating some kind of salon for civic discussion.
The apartment building on Stanton Street that the O’Rourke family owned.CreditRyan Christopher Jones for The New York Times
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The apartment building on Stanton Street that the O’Rourke family owned.CreditRyan Christopher Jones for The New York Times

“I want to have that burrito store,” Mr. Williams remembers Mr. O’Rourke saying after he returned home. “I want to have that place downtown where politicians come in and talk.”

But it was Mr. O’Rourke’s experience working with Mr. Williams’s technology company in New York that helped set him on his future path.

He began selling friends on the untapped potential of the tech market in El Paso, with a job environment far more accommodating than in a place like New York.

“Because the talent pool was shallow enough at that point, you could really move there and reinvent things,” said Lisa Degliantoni, a friend who moved to Texas to work with Mr. O’Rourke. “You could be the person who revitalized downtown El Paso.”

To Ms. Degliantoni, it sounded, endearingly, like “rose-colored glasses.”

To discerning locals, it sounded familiar.
Life of the Party

A major traffic jam snarled the on-ramp to Interstate 10 one St. Patrick’s Day morning years earlier as Bonnie Lesley, an El Paso educator, headed to work.

First assuming there had been an accident, Ms. Lesley soon came upon the true cause: Pat O’Rourke, a candidate for county office, dressed as a leprechaun and passing out fliers. “I’m having the time of my life,” he told her as she rolled down her window.

Mr. O’Rourke served on the El Paso County commission for four years, then won a four-year term as the county’s chief executive.

“He was mesmerizing,” said Pat Haggerty, a former Texas state representative. “He had facts. He had figures. He could spout them off.”

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2:14Who Is Beto O’Rourke? | 2020 Presidential Candidate
The former Texas congressman, who rose to national stardom during his unsuccessful 2018 Senate run, is joining a crowded Democratic field.CreditCreditTodd Heisler/The New York Times

Publicity stunts were common, and occasionally delivered Mr. O’Rourke a platform beyond El Paso. In 1986, after an influx of indigent Mexicans ran up costs at the county-funded hospital, Mr. O’Rourke sent an invoice for the charges — $7.5 million — to President Ronald Reagan. The story made The New York Times.

There was also a bit of controversy. In 1983, sheriff’s deputies installing a radio in Mr. O’Rourke’s Jeep found a white powdery substance in a condom. A deputy threw the substance away before it could be tested. Mr. O’Rourke insisted he had no idea what the substance was or why it was in his vehicle. But he feared the episode would mar his reputation, and did not run for re-election when his term expired three years later. He never held elected office again.

But he did not exactly slow down. He had always been an exercise fanatic, sometimes showing up at county offices in sweaty bicycling clothes. And he had long harbored grand visions for his son.
Mr. O’Rourke’s father, Pat O’Rourke, was a politician and a keen bicyclist.CreditIvan Pierre Aguirre for The New York Times
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Mr. O’Rourke’s father, Pat O’Rourke, was a politician and a keen bicyclist.CreditIvan Pierre Aguirre for The New York Times

“We had just finished reading ‘Peter the Great’ by Robert Massie,” Melissa O’Rourke remembered. “It’s a big book. And I think Beto was 10 years old. And Pat said, ‘Beto, you need to read this book.’ Pat was, I think, always seeing the potential. Not seeing the limits.”

As Beto O’Rourke grew into his teen years, Pat O’Rourke related little to a son who joined a computer hacking group and listened to music he did not understand.

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“Pat confided that he was very concerned and frustrated with the direction that Beto had taken,” said Flip Lyle, an El Paso businessman and former bicycling friend.

When his father arranged for him to intern with the Texas congressman Ron Coleman the summer before he started at Columbia, Beto O’Rourke chafed, telling friends he would have preferred to be elsewhere.

“I think Pat expected a lot of him, and probably pushed him some,” Ms. O’Rourke said. “Beto would just accept it and just say, ‘All right, I’m going to do it to keep the peace.’”

Despite his own business setbacks — a manufacturing operation in Mexico fizzled — Pat O’Rourke excelled at strategy. He helped his son map out a business plan for his new company, Ms. O’Rourke said.

Records show that his parents also lent him about $19,000 in start-up money. In the interview, Mr. O’Rourke said his father “had to take out a loan using, I would assume, our family home as collateral,” suggesting that his parents were hardly flush with cash.

“If my parents had 10,000 bucks or 20,000 bucks to give to me to help start that business or to personally loan to me, they would have done that,” he said. “They didn’t.”

Around the same time, Mr. O’Rourke said, he moved back in with his parents so he could stop paying rent on his apartment and “put every cent into the business.”

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It would be called Stanton Street Technology, named for the El Paso thoroughfare where the family-owned apartment building was located. Pat O’Rourke beamed.

“The dynamic had shifted,” said Mike Stevens, a close friend and former bandmate of Beto O’Rourke’s. “Pat seemed to me like he was not anxious for Beto. That seemed to be something from the past.”
Stanton Street

In November 1999, the drunken-driving case against Beto O’Rourke was officially dismissed. He had completed a court-sanctioned training program.

The same month, he posted on his company’s website, StantonStreet.com, hinting at a burgeoning interest in local public affairs. “The big issue today is access to capital,” he wrote, “and whether or not banks are making credit available to the qualified small businesses in town who need it.”

The posting was in the “City Talk Reader’s Forum,” a feature of the new company — part website developer, part online newsmagazine covering local affairs and culture.

The web design operation distinguished itself from competitors by catering to higher-end clients: companies, nonprofit organizations and even government-funded entities that recognized the need to establish a presence on the nascent internet.

“We just want to do the Cadillac sites,” Mr. O’Rourke’s partner, Grace Madden, whom he had recruited from New York, told the monthly publication El Paso Scene.

Rivals whispered that the company was cashing in on the O’Rourke family’s local reputation, but Stanton Street silenced naysayers by winning awards for its designs.

Mr. O’Rourke wrote infrequently for StantonStreet.com, tending mainly to the business operations. But his father became a regular contributor, crusading against public corruption and tax increases. Pat O’Rourke also posted diary entries during a cross-country trip on a recumbent bicycle — much as his son would do years later on a road trip while weighing his presidential run.

His familiarity to readers made what happened shortly thereafter, in July 2001, all the more wrenching for the city and Stanton Street: Pat O’Rourke was killed in a bicycle accident at age 58.

When word reached the office, the site had been approaching a major milestone, the planned debut of an alternative-weekly-style print publication. Shortly afterward, Mr. O’Rourke convened his employees. “He had to gather us and make a decision as a group whether we could emotionally handle proceeding without Pat,” Ms. Degliantoni said. “What would Pat want us to do?”

The first issue arrived in January 2002. In it, Beto O’Rourke eulogized his father as the project’s “inspiration.”
Covers from an alternative-weekly-style newspaper Mr. O’Rourke founded.Creditvia El Paso Public Library
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Covers from an alternative-weekly-style newspaper Mr. O’Rourke founded.Creditvia El Paso Public Library

At first, Mr. O’Rourke seemed inclined to treat the tragedy as a personal turning point.

“I decided all bets are off. I was going to live life differently from now on, do everything I wanted,” he told an interviewer in 2003. “And then you don’t really at all. Life is still life.”

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In the print journalism business, life was this: The publication lasted only a few months before Mr. O’Rourke was forced to pull the plug.
A New Family

His tenure as publisher was short but significant.

The purpose of Stanton Street, on the web and in print, was to “tell the stories of El Paso which I didn’t feel were being told,” Mr. O’Rourke said in the recent interview.

From there, friends draw a straight line to Mr. O’Rourke’s early political education. “One of the issues they covered was politics,” said Steve Ortega, a close friend who served with Mr. O’Rourke on the El Paso City Council. “That kind of sparked his interest.”
Steve Ortega, left, with Mr. O’Rourke in 2005. They served together on the El Paso City Council.CreditVictor Calzada/El Paso Times, via Associated Press
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Steve Ortega, left, with Mr. O’Rourke in 2005. They served together on the El Paso City Council.CreditVictor Calzada/El Paso Times, via Associated Press

So did the new mayor, Ray Caballero, elected in 2001 on a progressive platform, championing urban renewal and public transportation. Mr. O’Rourke forged an alliance with a group of the mayor’s young backers.

Soon, Mr. O’Rourke’s name was being floated for assorted local positions, often by Mr. O’Rourke himself. He expressed interest in an appointed school board position, agreed to serve on a task force promoting a new medical campus, and joined the Rotary Club and the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

“I joined every organization that would have me,” Mr. O’Rourke said. “If someone had an open slot, I wanted to be on it.”

Around the time he began considering a run for the Council against a popular incumbent, his personal and professional lives began to intersect — happily, in both cases, for Mr. O’Rourke.

Melissa O’Rourke had gotten a phone call from an old friend, Beth Galvin, an El Paso artist. She wondered if Beto would like to take out her niece, Amy Sanders.

Ms. Galvin remembered Beto as a bashful child. Now, he was part of a small group of young leaders imagining a new economy for a city once known as a low-wage garment center.
Crossing the border from Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, with a view of El Paso.CreditRyan Christopher Jones for The New York Times
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Crossing the border from Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, with a view of El Paso.CreditRyan Christopher Jones for The New York Times
Kentucky Bar in Juárez, where Mr. O’Rourke and his wife went on their first date.CreditRyan Christopher Jones for The New York Times
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Kentucky Bar in Juárez, where Mr. O’Rourke and his wife went on their first date.CreditRyan Christopher Jones for The New York Times

William Sanders, Amy’s father and Ms. Galvin’s brother, likewise understood the opportunities El Paso afforded. He had grown up there, left to make a fortune in Chicago and Santa Fe, then returned.

A pioneer in real estate investment, he was about to turn his gaze on downtown El Paso. Mr. Sanders, who said he was working at the mayor’s behest, would announce a controversial project that envisioned bulldozing parts of the city center — including sections of a historic barrio for Mexican immigrants near the Rio Grande — remaking it as an upscale shopping, dining and tourist destination. (Mr. O’Rourke’s support for the plan as a councilman drew the scorn of many barrio residents.)
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🗳️ ‘Sleepy’ or ‘Hyper’? Biden, Trump spar over age and energy
« Reply #1004 on: April 27, 2019, 12:25:06 AM »
It's Old Guy vs. Old Guy in the Battle for All the Marbles.  ::)

Looks like Uncle Joe is the Desgnated Trumpovetsky Attack Dog for the Demodopes.  Which one do you think grabbed more pussies?  What's the over-under on that?  ???  :icon_scratch:

RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/04/26/sleepy-biden-2020-1291181


Former Vice President Joe Biden’s campaign said President Donald Trump’s tweets “are a reminder of why we cannot afford four more years of this president.” | Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

2020 elections
‘Sleepy’ or ‘Hyper’? Biden, Trump spar over age and energy

A day after he entered the White House race, it appears the former vice president is getting under Trump's skin.

By NOLAN D. MCCASKILL

04/26/2019 05:12 PM EDT

Joe Biden is making Donald Trump feel young again — and he’s already riling up the president.

The 72-year-old president stopped short of saying Biden, 76, is too old to run. But on Friday, only a day after the former vice president jumped into the race, Trump suggested Biden’s candidacy was rejuvenating to him and his reelection bid.

“I just feel like a young man. I’m so young. I can’t believe it,” the president told reporters. “I’m the youngest person — I am a young, vibrant man. I look at Joe. I don’t know about him. I don’t know.”

The comments, coming after Trump sent snarky tweets about Biden a day earlier, represented more sustained fire than Trump has typically trained on Democrats entering the race. The president has for months been more occupied with bemoaning special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of the 2016 campaign. But it appears that Biden — who believes he can appeal to Trump voters in the Rust Belt and said Americans can decide for themselves if he has the energy to be president — is getting under Trump’s skin.

Most polls show Biden and Bernie Sanders — who, at 77, is the only candidate older than Biden — atop the 20-person Democratic primary, a diverse field that includes a 37-year-old openly gay mayor; two African American senators; a 44-year-old Latino ex-Cabinet secretary; and a half-dozen women. Biden’s campaign said Friday it raised $6.3 million since he announced, the biggest 24-hour haul by a Democrat this cycle.
Joe Biden

President Donald Trump welcomed former Vice President Joe Biden into the presidential race with a tweet Thursday. that called him "Sleepy Joe." | Scott Olson/Getty Images

Biden’s 3½-minute launch video Thursday went directly at Trump, invoking the 2017 clashes in Charlottesville, Va., involving white supremacists and anti-racism protesters. Trump, at the time, said “there were very fine people on both sides.”

“I believe history will look back on four years of this president and all he embraces as an aberrant moment in time,” Biden said in the video. “But if we give Donald Trump eight years in the White House, he will forever and fundamentally alter the character of this nation, who we are, and I cannot stand by and watch that happen.”

After Biden’s video was released, reporters peppered Trump with queries about his 2017 comments, prompting him to insist that he answered questions about Charlottesville “perfectly” at the time.

A Republican who speaks with the president often told POLITICO that bringing up the Charlottesville controversy “irks” Trump because “he knows it was the low point” of his presidency.

Trump’s reelection campaign said the president wasn’t singling the Delaware Democrat out for special treatment, just returning fire.

“Biden,” said Tim Murtaugh, communications director for Trump’s campaign, “came out of the gate shooting at him, so naturally the president is going to hit back.”
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“The president, as everyone knows, is not shy about sharing his view issues on his potential opponents. Joe Biden is not the first, nor is he likely to be the last,” Murtaugh said. “He will take on people by name when it strikes him. He sees targets of opportunity and takes them.”

Another Trump campaign official, however, said the president thinks Biden is vulnerable.

“Biden is an easy target, and [Trump] knows the Dem party is fractured and the energy of the party lies with its activists,” the official said. “So hitting Biden from one side, while the Dem activists pinch him from the other side, will effectively kill his campaign.”

Biden’s campaign declined to comment on their sparring. But a campaign source said the pair are polar opposites.

“He is change Americans are looking for,” this person said of Biden. “Voters know that, and clearly Donald Trump does too.”
Biden announces 2020 bid

2020 Elections
Biden goes to the dark side in launch video

By MARC CAPUTO and NATASHA KORECKI

Trump welcomed “Sleepy Joe” into the fold with a tweet Thursday that not only questioned the former vice president’s intelligence but predicted a “nasty” Democratic primary. “But if you make it, I will see you at the Starting Gate!” Trump added.

By Friday, Trump was already thinking about the finish line. “I think we beat him easily,” he said of Biden in a general election.

In a fundraising email Friday morning, Biden’s campaign said Trump’s tweets “are a reminder of why we cannot afford four more years of this president.”

“The only person who would be making this campaign ‘nasty’ is Donald Trump himself,” Biden’s campaign wrote.

As for the nickname, Biden said on ABC’s “The View” Friday that no one else has referred to him as “sleepy.”

“It’s usually the other end: Hyper Joe,” he said.

Marc Caputo and Gabby Orr contributed to this report.
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Started by Guest The Kitchen Sink

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Last post October 13, 2016, 02:05:21 AM
by Guest
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Last post November 08, 2016, 02:26:52 PM
by monsta666
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Last post February 28, 2017, 06:54:54 AM
by RE