AuthorTopic: Election Errata  (Read 100197 times)

Offline azozeo

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Re: Election Errata
« Reply #885 on: January 22, 2019, 03:40:46 PM »
I'm not happy to see my taxes going to a 70% marginal rate, and I guaran-damn-tee you you wouldn't be happy about that either, if it was  aimed at you.

And the truth is that it won't help. You can't spend endlessly. That's the problem here. Our taxes should be low and we should have decent social programs too.....but instead we get Stealth Bombers and nukes and drones and 1.2 million warm bodies in uniform. Until that's fixed, a 100% marginal tax rate won't help dig us out the hole, because it's just going to get deeper.

It's true that a huge portion of the tax receipts go for military expenditures, but they do in fact get some return because they bring in the Oil from other parts of the world.  They also provide a paycheck to the folks working for the military.  Where will those grunts and cannon fodder go to work if you cut the military budget?  Starbucks Barristas?    These guys are not generally the brightest bulbs in the box.

RE

They follow orders well.

I know, A Police State to keep an EYE on the wall  :icon_sunny:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline Surly1

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Re: Election Errata
« Reply #886 on: January 22, 2019, 04:24:20 PM »

Poor Llpoh.  Moved to Australia, to escape the US. I guess he doesn't believe in climate change?  What a jerk.

I didn't know that. Hope he is enjoying his 50 C summers.
Makes me happy.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: Election Errata
« Reply #887 on: January 22, 2019, 04:40:38 PM »

Poor Llpoh.  Moved to Australia, to escape the US. I guess he doesn't believe in climate change?  What a jerk.

I didn't know that. Hope he is enjoying his 50 C summers.
Makes me happy.

Baked LLPOH!  :icon_sunny:

RE
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Offline RE

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🤑 Liz Warren's Tax the Rich Plan is Constitutional say the experts!
« Reply #888 on: January 26, 2019, 01:05:40 AM »
Tax the Living Shit out of the $$RICH$$! 🤑  Good Strategy for Liz here.  :icon_sunny:

RE


https://www.latimes.com/business/hiltzik/la-fi-hiltzik-warren-wealth-tax-20190125-story.html
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Offline RE

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🗳️ Liz Officially throws her panties in the ring
« Reply #889 on: February 09, 2019, 12:47:17 PM »
Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders & Beto O'Rourke still question marks.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/azuSsFVGGd4" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/azuSsFVGGd4</a>
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Offline knarf

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Re: 🗳️ Liz Officially throws her panties in the ring
« Reply #890 on: February 09, 2019, 02:52:55 PM »
Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders & Beto O'Rourke still question marks.

RE

If the the climate continues to blast the world next year, these candidates are going to have to address global warming, and what they intend on doing about it.  Warren would be my choice to re organize the government so that we could have a major focus on adapting to global warming.

TAX THE HELL OUT OF THE 1%!!!!!!!
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Offline azozeo

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Re: 🗳️ Liz Officially throws her panties in the ring
« Reply #891 on: February 09, 2019, 04:01:31 PM »
Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders & Beto O'Rourke still question marks.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/azuSsFVGGd4" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/azuSsFVGGd4</a>

This must be an "Official Narrative" candidate, for those diners keeping stats  :icon_mrgreen:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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🗳️ Sanders and O’Rourke Are Way Ahead in Race for Small-Dollar Donors
« Reply #892 on: February 10, 2019, 01:22:54 AM »
Bernie & Beto appear to becoming closer to throwing their Jockstraps in the ring.

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/09/us/politics/2020-democrats-campaign-funding.html

Sanders and O’Rourke Are Way Ahead in Race for Small-Dollar Donors


Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont has by far the largest number of low-dollar online donors of any current or likely 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, according to a Times analysis of campaign finance data.Credit Travis Dove for The New York Times

By Shane Goldmacher, Lisa Lerer and Rachel Shorey

    Feb. 9, 2019

Senator Bernie Sanders would begin a 2020 presidential bid with 2.1 million online donors, a massive lead among low-dollar contributors that is roughly equivalent to the donor base of all the other Democratic hopefuls combined.

Beto O’Rourke, the former Texas congressman who narrowly lost a Senate race last year, is also poised to be a fund-raising phenom if he runs for president: He has twice as many online donors as anyone eyeing the race besides Mr. Sanders.

Three senators who are already running have their own solid track records with small donors. Senator Elizabeth Warren, with the third-highest number, has notable strength in New Hampshire, even topping Mr. O’Rourke there. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand has built up broad national support among small donors, despite a reputation as a big-money fund-raiser, while Senator Kamala Harris raised $1.5 million online in her first 24 hours as a presidential candidate.

Small-dollar donations are expected to be a huge deal in 2020 — the renewable resource that Democratic candidates will depend upon to fuel their campaigns. And those five Democrats represent a distinctive top tier with the most formidable followings, each counting a base of at least 230,000 online donors, according to a New York Times analysis of six years of federal election filings from ActBlue, the Democratic Party’s dominant donation-processing platform.

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[Check out the 6 days when 2020 Democratic hopefuls scored big with small donors.]

The findings provide a window into one of the most closely guarded and coveted resources of a modern campaign: the digital donor lists that bring in the vast bulk of low-dollar donations. These online donations average just under $40, and candidates like to point to such modest amounts as evidence of the breadth and depth of their support among regular people.

In the early stages of a presidential race, when polling measures little more than name recognition, the relative size of donor networks can provide one of the best metrics of strength.

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“The people who have a strong base right now have a material head start,” said Teddy Goff, who served as a top digital strategist for the campaigns of President Barack Obama in 2012 and Hillary Clinton in 2016. “And more often than not, there is a good reason they have that base, and it’s that they have a talent for connecting with the grass roots of our party.”

For Mr. Sanders and Mr. O’Rourke, the enormous early edge in their donor rolls has afforded them the flexibility to wait longer before deciding to jump in, and has sparked a sense of urgency in other campaigns. Both men have signaled they would rely overwhelmingly on small donors to fuel any campaign.

[Make sense of the people, issues and ideas shaping American politics with our newsletter.]

The particular power of Mr. Sanders’s list was on display in late December when he emailed supporters with the provocative subject line, “If I run.” That single email netted $299,000 from 11,000 donations, according to a senior Sanders official.
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Offline RE

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https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/10/us/trump-trail-of-tears.html

Trump Mocks Warren With Apparent Reference to Trail of Tears, Which Killed Thousands


A 2017 exhibition on the Trail of Tears at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Tahlequah, Okla. Some 15,000 Native people died during the journey from exposure, malnutrition, exhaustion and disease.CreditCreditRuth Fremson/The New York Times

By Sarah Mervosh

    Feb. 10, 2019

When Senator Elizabeth Warren formally announced her 2020 presidential bid this weekend, President Trump responded with a familiar line of attack.

He mocked Ms. Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, for her claims to Native American ancestry, again calling her by the slur “Pocahontas.” Mr. Trump then appeared to refer to the Trail of Tears, the infamously cruel forced relocation of Native Americans in the 19th century that caused thousands of deaths.

“Will she run as our first Native American presidential candidate, or has she decided that after 32 years, this is not playing so well anymore?” Mr. Trump tweeted. “See you on the campaign TRAIL, Liz!”

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(Ms. Warren had recently apologized to the Cherokee Nation for taking a DNA test to prove her ancestry.)

The comments drew immediate blowback on social media, with accusations that the president was making light of one of the worst tragedies Native Americans have experienced. Mr. Trump previously invoked the Wounded Knee massacre, one of the deadliest attacks on Native American people by the United States military, in another jab at Ms. Warren.

“He actually is condoning a narrative that supports a genocide and a forced removal,” said Betsy Theobald Richards, who works on changing cultural narratives for The Opportunity Agenda, a social justice organization.

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Ms. Richards, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, said most people have been taught only the “dominant narrative” of history in the United States, which she said has long devalued the experiences and voices of Native American people.

“People don’t really realize these are real people who live among you,” she said. “These are their ancestors that are survivors, or carry on the memory of the people who were massacred or removed.”

For those who need a refresher, here is a brief history of the Trail of Tears:
What is the Trail of Tears?

In the 1830s, federal and state officials forced thousands of Native Americans from their land in the southeastern United States, including Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee. The forced relocation affected thousands of Cherokees, as well as the Creek, Chickasaw, Choctaw and Seminole tribes, among others.
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The Native people were forced out of their homes and put in internment camps before they were pushed westward to designated Indian Territory, in present-day Oklahoma, according to the Trail of Tears Association, a nonprofit that works to preserve the historic trail and promote awareness.

Some 15,000 Native people died during the journey from exposure, malnutrition, exhaustion and disease, including about 4,000 Cherokees.

“It’s a terribly tragic event in Cherokee history and looms large,” said Jace Weaver, the director of the Institute of Native American Studies at the University of Georgia, who has studied the Cherokee removal.
What led to the forced relocation?

In the early 1800s, the federal government made an agreement with Georgia to remove all Native Americans from the state. But little was done to enforce it immediately, according to Dr. Weaver.

Then, in 1829, gold was discovered on Cherokee land in northern Georgia, which ramped up efforts to dislodge the Cherokees, according to the Trail of Tears Association. Around the same time, Andrew Jackson became president and began to “aggressively” pursue a policy of relocating Native populations, the association said.

Jackson signed into law the Indian Removal Act of 1830, which authorized the government to relocate Indian tribes in exchange for unsettled territory in the west.

Most Native Americans opposed the policy, and the Cherokee Nation brought a lawsuit in the United States Supreme Court. In one ruling, in 1832, the court sided with the Cherokees, Dr. Weaver said.
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“They have this victory, but President Jackson refuses to enforce it,” he said. So, he said, “a group of Cherokees come to the view that removal is inevitable and they need to negotiate the best deal they can.”

In 1835, a faction of Cherokees signed a treaty with the federal government agreeing to move west to Indian Territory. The agreement, the Treaty of New Echota, “was illegal under the laws of the Cherokee Nation,” Dr. Weaver said, but it went into effect anyway.

“The Senate ratified the treaty despite knowledge that only a minority of Cherokees had accepted it,” the Trail of Tears Association said on its website.

On the journey west, the association said, a harsh winter and illnesses made death “a daily occurrence.”
Part of the Trail of Tears in Pea Ridge National Military Park in Arkansas.CreditTerry Smith/Alamy
Image
Part of the Trail of Tears in Pea Ridge National Military Park in Arkansas.CreditTerry Smith/Alamy
What is the legacy of the Trail of Tears?

In 1987, Congress designated the Trail of Tears a national historic trail. It covers nine states and thousands of miles.

Because of what is taught in school, many people have limited knowledge of events like the Trail of Tears and Wounded Knee, Ms. Richards said. “They’ve heard these terms, but they really don’t understand,” she said.

But citizens of tribal nations, Ms. Richards said, know the history intimately: “These are genocides that we remember, that are part of our family memories, that are part of our blood memory.”

She advocated more Native American voices in Hollywood, the news media and the education system.

“It’s time for the United States to step up and integrate Native history and Native culture into curriculums,” she said. “Ignorance is no longer acceptable.”

Follow Sarah Mervosh on Twitter: @smervosh
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Offline RE

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🗳️ Beto takes on Trump in tale of 2 mega-rallies
« Reply #894 on: February 12, 2019, 12:32:27 AM »
I think this clinches it.  BETO IS GOING TO RUN!

IMHO, the Winning Ticket for the Demodopes is a Beto-Liz Ticket.  Which one gets top spot as POTUS and which one is VEEP depends on how they do in the early primaries and caucuses.  Bernie as Secretary of State would be good too.  Liz will bring in the Wimmen voters, and Beto will bring in the Millenials and Latinos & Brown voters without himself being Latino or Brown (though he does speak fluent Spanish).  He's a proven fund raiser and when (if?) he declares, the money will flow like water over Niagara Falls over the internet into his campaign Warchest.

Basically, the Demodopes just have to keep from shooting themselves in the foot, always a distinct possibility.  ::)

RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/02/11/trump-beto-orourke-el-paso-border-wall-1163893


A supporter dressed as Uncle Sam awaits the arrival of President Donald Trump at a rally in the El Paso County Coliseum on Feb. 11. The exchange of speeches was the most direct real-time clash yet between Trump and a 2020 Democratic hopeful. | Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Immigration
Beto takes on Trump in tale of 2 mega-rallies

The president held a campaign event in the hometown of his likely 2020 rival — and O'Rourke hit back with a speech blasting the border wall.

By DAVID SIDERS and ANITA KUMAR

02/11/2019 05:30 PM EST

Updated 02/11/2019 11:13 PM EST
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EL PASO, Texas — The showdown between Donald Trump and Beto O’Rourke Monday night over the president's border wall unfolded at competing rallies with thousands of people in venues barely a block apart.

But the events practically took place in parallel universes: One with rowdy MAGA-gear wearing Trump backers chanting "USA, USA!"; the other serenaded by a mariachi band before O'Rourke took the stage for a lengthy takedown — at times in Spanish — of the president's signature project.

Welcome to 2020. O'Rourke has a long way to go before becoming Trump's general election opponent, but the clashing events showed the fight over immigration and border security is certain to keep electrifying Trump's voters — and animate the Democratic determination to make him a one-term president.

Trump, true to form, kicked off his speech by mocking O’Rourke, without uttering the former congressman's name.

“A young man who’s got very little going for himself except he’s got a great first name, he challenged us," Trump said. "I would say that may be the end of his presidential bid.”

Trump said O’Rourke’s presidential aspirations were probably ended because of the low attendance at his event. However, an event organizer, citing law enforcement, said 8,000 people attended.

“This is where we make our stand!” O’Rourke said to screaming fans from a stage on the infield of a baseball field.
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O’Rourke was mobbed by thousands of supporters as they marched to a baseball field so close to Trump’s rally that the loud speakers from Trump’s event could be heard at O’Rourke’s.

“With the eyes of the country upon us, all of us together are going to make our stand, here in one of the safest cities in the United States of America,” O’Rourke said. “Safe not because of walls, but in spite of walls. Secure because we treat one another with dignity and respect.”
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He said, “We are the example that the United States of America needs right now.”

The bitter call-and-response in West Texas on Monday night crystallized the partisan battle over immigration. Staring down a potential second government shutdown over border security, Trump picked this heavily Democratic and Latino issue to pound away at the issue that propelled him to the presidency and remains at the center of his re-election campaign.

A large chunk of his speech was devoted to immigration, particularly the wall he wants to build on the southern border.

“Walls are not immoral,” Trump said. “Walls work...Walls save lives.”

The crowd broke into a familiar chant — “Build that wall!” — Trump said, “You really mean finish that wall because we’ve built a lot of it.”

The speeches were the most direct real-time encounter between Trump and a 2020 Democratic hopeful. O’Rourke, who is expected to decide whether to run by the end of the month, would join the top tier of Democratic presidential candidates if he gets in.

He got an early taste of what that would be like.

Trump was introduced by his son, Don Jr., who previewed the night with an attack on O’Rourke.

“I’d be more impressed if he had the guts to go do his rally on the Juarez side, on the other side of the wall!” he said.

Trump said 69,000 people signed up to attend the rally at the coliseum, but that only about 10,000 were allowed inside. Later, he said 35,000 people showed up.

“It looks like Beto only has 900 guests at his so called March, tiny!” Trump’s campaign manager Brad Parscale tweeted. “We have over 35000 in attendance. 8000 inside and tens of thousands in the parking lot and streets. @realDonaldTrump had 70,000+ RSVPs and thousands couldn’t make it. #winning”

At his rally, Trump launched into his standard campaign speech fare, with boasts of the economy and military, criticism of the media and, of course, tough talk on immigration. He vowed to build a border wall whether or not Congress agreed — and said he already was.

“Today we started a big beautiful wall right on the Rio Grande,” he said as the crowds broke into chants of “USA!”

Trump didn’t just blast O’Rourke, but the Democratic Party, too. “They’re becoming the party of socialism, late-term abortions, open borders and crime,” he said.

And he blasted the so-called Green New Deal: “I really don’t like their policy of taking away your car, of taking away your airplane rights, of let’s hop a plane to California, of you’re not allowed to own cows anymore," he said to cheers.

poster="http://v.politico.com/images/1155968404/201902/2044/1155968404_6000990347001_6000981971001-vs.jpg?pubId=1155968404"
true

O’Rourke said he did not interpret Trump’s visit as a personal challenge to him, but rather as “an effort to use this community as a prop to make his case for the border wall.”

Yet when Trump touched down in El Paso, it marked the most direct, real-time clash yet between Trump and a 2020 Democratic contender. O’Rourke, a former congressman, would join the top tier of Democratic presidential candidates if he decides to run.

The location of the dueling rallies appeared destined to inflame controversy. A city of about 680,000 people, El Paso is a Democratic oasis in a heavily Republican state – closer geographically to the California state line than to San Antonio or Houston. More than 80 percent of the population in El Paso County is Hispanic, and Trump is so deeply unpopular here that in 2016, he won just 26 percent of the county’s vote.

O’Rourke, meanwhile, has made immigration a central part of his platform following his closer-than-expected loss to Republican Ted Cruz in last year’s Texas Senate race. Before the counter-rally against Trump, O’Rourke drew publicity for walking across the border form El Paso to Juarez to meet with asylum seekers and for visiting a detention camp for migrant children at Tornillo. On Christmas Eve, he was photographed passing out pizza slices to immigrant children in El Paso.
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Trump is under pressure across the political spectrum on immigration. His base is demanding money for a border wall, of course. But a majority of voters oppose shutting the government down again to force Congress to appropriate money for a wall, according to recent polls. And declaring a national emergency is no quick fix for Trump — the idea lacks broad support.

Trump has dismissed O’Rourke as a “total lightweight,” saying in December that “I thought you were supposed to win before you run for president.” But his singling out of El Paso — first in his State of the Union address, and then on Monday — only increased attention on the former congressman and his city.

“The border city of El Paso, Texas used to have extremely high rates of violent crime — one of the highest in the entire country, and considered one of our nation’s most dangerous cities,” Trump said in his State of the Union address. “Now, immediately upon its building, with a powerful barrier in place, El Paso is one of the safest cities in our country. Simply put: Walls work, and walls save lives.”

Trump’s claim that El Paso used to be one of the nation’s most dangerous cities before erecting a barrier has been widely discredited. El Paso has long enjoyed a violent crime rate lower than the national average for cities of similar size, according to PolitiFact, the political fact-checking website.
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Offline Surly1

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Re: 🗳️ Beto takes on Trump in tale of 2 mega-rallies
« Reply #895 on: February 12, 2019, 01:58:34 PM »
RE had this article in the wee small hours. Here's a follow-up.

I think this clinches it.  BETO IS GOING TO RUN!

IMHO, the Winning Ticket for the Demodopes is a Beto-Liz Ticket.  Which one gets top spot as POTUS and which one is VEEP depends on how they do in the early primaries and caucuses.  Bernie as Secretary of State would be good too.  Liz will bring in the Wimmen voters, and Beto will bring in the Millenials and Latinos & Brown voters without himself being Latino or Brown (though he does speak fluent Spanish).  He's a proven fund raiser and when (if?) he declares, the money will flow like water over Niagara Falls over the internet into his campaign Warchest.
Basically, the Demodopes just have to keep from shooting themselves in the foot, always a distinct possibility.  ::)

RE


[size=1spt]Beto takes on Trump in tale of 2 mega-rallies[/size]

The president held a campaign event in the hometown of his likely 2020 rival — and O'Rourke hit back with a speech blasting the border wall.

EL PASO, Texas — The showdown between Donald Trump and Beto O’Rourke Monday night over the president's border wall unfolded at competing rallies with thousands of people in venues barely a block apart.


Here's the followup by Vanity Fair.

DID TRUMP JUST TURN BETO INTO A 2020 FRONT-RUNNER?

With dueling rallies, the president appeared to re-energize O’Rourke’s passion to seek the presidency—and established him as the Democratic candidate to beat in the primary.
beto-orourke.jpg
Beto O'Rourke speaks to thousands of people gathered to protest a U.S./Mexico border wall being pushed by President Donald Trump.
By Christ Chavez/Getty Images.

In a spine-tingling preview of the 2020 general election,Donald TrumpandBeto O’Rourkesquared off Monday night in El Paso with dueling rallies so close together that attendees at O’Rourke’s event could reportedlyhear the speakersblaring from the County Coliseum. O’Rourke has yet to leap into the presidential race, and plans tomake an announcement by the end of the month. But with the two men within literal shouting distance of each other, the cable-news split screen played out as a sort of test run for how an O’Rourke-Trump showdown might look.

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Beto O'Rourke@BetoORourke

Very very proud of this community. We are the example that the United States of America needs right now.

19.9K people are talking about this

The president seemed intent on diminishing O’Rourke, but ended up elevating him. A “young man who’s got very little going for himself, except he’s got a great first name,” he said dismissively, while asserting with usual Trumpian aplomb that 69,000 people had signed up to be at his rally, and that the El Paso Fire Department had packed about 10,000 people into an arena meant to hold 8,000. (The fire department responded in astatementto theEl Paso Timesthat the arena fits roughly 6,500 people, and there were precisely that number in attendance.) Minutes later, Trump tripled his own number. “So we have, let’s say, 35,000 people tonight. And [O’Rourke] has 200 people, 300 people. Not too good,” Trump told the crowd. “In fact, what I would do is I would say that may be the end of his presidential bid. But he did challenge us.”

In fact, O’Rourke had closer to7,000 or 8,000 peoplein attendance at his own rally (possiblyeven 10,000 or 15,000)—perhaps more than Trump himself. “What a gift Trump is giving Beto,”Mark McKinnon,a former chief media adviser to five presidential campaigns,toldtheHouston Chronicle.El Paso, after all, is one of the most liberal areas in Texas—the centerpiece of the state’s 16th Congressional District, which O’Rourke represented for six years before retiring to run for U.S. senator. While Trump has tried to take credit for the border city’s low crime rate, El Paso officials have made a point offormally rebutting the president. “Even if you give [the] president the benefit of the doubt, the fence that was built in 2008 has made really no difference one way or the other,” said District AttorneyJaime Esparza,knocking down Trump’s argument.

On Monday night, while Trump was in Texas, congressional lawmakersagreed in principleto a deal that would provide $1.375 billion for fencing and other physical barriers at the U.S.-Mexico border, less than a quarter of the amount he had demanded.

O’Rourke, meanwhile, came off sounding downright presidential. “With the eyes of the country upon us, all of us together are going to make our stand, here in one of the safest cities in the United States of America,” O’Rourke told a roaring crowd. “Safe not because of walls, but in spite of walls. Secure because we treat one another with dignity and respect.” After months of aimless ennui following his narrow loss toTed Cruzin the midterms, the rally appeared to energize O’Rourke. “Yeah, I’m back in the mix,” hetoldPolitico before going onstage. “All of us right now have a responsibility to do all that we can, and this is me doing my best.”

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: 🗳️ Beto takes on Trump in tale of 2 mega-rallies
« Reply #896 on: February 12, 2019, 02:18:08 PM »
RE had this article in the wee small hours. Here's a follow-up.

Like all Politicians, Beto has a big ego.  If there is anything that will fire him up and piss him off, it is the kind of demeaning remarks Trumpovetsky made about him at his rally.  I can't wait to see Beto in a debate against Trumpsky if he gets the nomination.  He will wipe the floor with him.

RE
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After all this hype, at this point I don't see how he could NOT run.

RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/02/12/trump-beto-orourke-2020-1164647


Former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke has said he will decide whether to run for president by the end of the month. | Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images

2020 Elections
‘This is where we make our stand’: Beto O’Rourke finally looks like a 2020 candidate

With Donald Trump holding a rally in O'Rourke's backyard, the former Texas congressman takes it up a notch.

By DAVID SIDERS

02/12/2019 08:27 AM EST
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EL PASO, Texas — If Beto O'Rourke runs for president, he should thank President Donald Trump for the kick in the pants.

For three months, O’Rourke had drifted in and out of public view, slipping slightly in public opinion polls as he vacillated on a 2020 bid.

But Trump’s appearance in O’Rourke’s hometown on Monday night served to elevate the former Texas congressman as a potential rival. And as Trump confronted O’Rourke at a campaign-style rally on an issue central to both of their political identities — immigration and the border wall — O’Rourke seized the opportunity to re-establish his footing.

“Yeah, I’m back in the mix around an issue that could not be more important for our country and for our community,” he told POLITICO before addressing thousands of screaming supporters at a baseball field steps from the coliseum where Trump was redoubling his call for a U.S.-Mexico border wall.

To oppose Trump’s agenda, O’Rourke said, “All of us right now have a responsibility to do all that we can, and this is me doing my best.”
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If O’Rourke was testing Democrats’ appetite for his potential candidacy, the signs he saw on Monday were reaffirming — beginning with a march to the rally that was so thick with supporters that organizers linked arms in a circle around O’Rourke and his family to keep them moving through the crowd. Young Democrats rushed the line, wearing “Viva Beto!” buttons and hoisting “Beto 2020” signs. Chants of “Beto, Beto” echoed under freeway overpasses as O’Rourke and the throng passed through.

“You did good, El Paso!” O’Rourke said when he arrived at the baseball field on a cold, windswept night. “We have so much to give, so much to show the rest of the country, and we’re doing it right now.”
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The speech — and O’Rourke’s promotion of it beforehand — marked a pivot for O’Rourke from a contemplative period of wayfaring to a more traditional brand of campaign politics following his closer-than-expected loss to Republican Ted Cruz in the Texas Senate race last year.

Engaging the president on the wall, O’Rourke did not retreat to his online journal or livestream a conversation with his dental hygienist about life on the border, as he did last month. Nor did he break for the interstate for a soul-searching journey through the Southwest.

Instead, O’Rourke did what any Democrat tilting toward a run for president might do. He participated in a conference call with reporters Monday afternoon, before Trump arrived for his campaign rally here. Then he timed his speech to bracket Trump’s appearance, ensuring side-by-side coverage.
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“There’s certain things where you just can’t go off in the desert and act like Job in the wilderness,” said New Hampshire attorney and Democratic activist Jay Surdukowski, who co-chaired Martin O’Malley’s 2016 presidential campaign in New Hampshire and who traveled to El Paso for O’Rourke’s rally. “You’ve got to get real, and he really is showing he can turn it on and get right back in the campaign mode.”

Trump was dismissive of O’Rourke, mocking him as “a young man who’s got very little going for himself except he’s got a great first name.” But even Republicans could appreciate O’Rourke’s deft political play. Jeff Roe, who was Cruz’s chief strategist, called his handling of Trump’s visit a “home run swing.”

“It shows that if he can find a balance between being smart and strategic and a [yin] to the president’s yang, that’s what Democrats are seeking,” Roe said. “When he’s doing a bong tour through Southwest America, it’s a little less invigorating to Democratic primary voters.”

O’Rourke told reporters Monday that he did not interpret Trump’s visit as a personal challenge, but rather as “an effort to use this community as a prop to make his case for the border wall.”

O’Rourke has been criticizing the existing fencing along the border since long before Trump turned the construction of a wall into a centerpiece of his 2016 campaign and, now, his bid for a second term. Never before could O’Rourke draw so much attention to the issue.

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“All of a sudden, out of the blue, El Paso’s gotten big on the national radar,” said Boyd Brown, a former South Carolina lawmaker and former Democratic National Committee member now working on a “Draft Beto” campaign.

The former Democratic congressman has said he will decide whether to run for president by the end of the month, expressing lingering concerns about the effect a campaign might have on his young family. Some rallygoers yearning for a 2020 run took it as a positive sign that O’Rourke was joined by his wife and children Monday, though they often accompany him to events.

O’Rourke himself called the protest rally “inspiring.”

“Oh, man, I get to be with and behind my community,” O’Rourke said backstage, along the backstop of the baseball diamond. “I love it … This is America, this is the border, this is El Paso. It’s all of those things at their best. It’s so positive, there’s no hate, there’s nothing negative in the slightest about it.”

Then O’Rourke removed his jacket and climbed onto a platform in the infield to address the crowd.

“We are the example that the United States of America needs right now," he said to cheers. "This is where we make our stand!”
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Re: Election Errata
« Reply #898 on: February 14, 2019, 10:34:08 AM »


Tulsi Gabbard Wants to Legalize Marijuana, Punish Big Pharma and End Private Prisons

Tulsi Gabbard, Hawaii’s democratic congresswoman and one of many entrants in the crowded 2020 presidential race, is already turning heads thanks to her anti-interventionist foreign policy approach and progressive stance on a variety of issues, making her an outlier among establishment Democrats.

If her pre-campaign messaging and campaign launch speech are any indicator, the potential presidential contender has no intention of backing down – especially when it comes to her strong advocacy of medical marijuana and harsh criticisms of the criminal justice system and pharmaceutical industry.

Declaring her formal entrance into the Democratic Party presidential primaries, Gabbard issued a rousing call to end the for-profit prison industry, which has seen private corrections corporations rake in profits while shirking prisoners’ and immigrant detainees’ food, health care, and other essential services while exploiting incarcerated people as essentially slave labor.


https://www.activistpost.com/2019/02/tulsi-gabbard-wants-to-legalize-marijuana-punish-big-pharma-and-end-private-prisons.html
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Election Errata - When The Field Gets Big, The Primaries Get Weird
« Reply #899 on: February 15, 2019, 04:23:40 AM »


Everyone’s Running — And That Could Be Dangerous For The Democrats
When the field gets big, the primaries get weird.



https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/everyones-running-and-that-could-be-dangerous-for-the-democrats/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

 

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