AuthorTopic: Election Errata  (Read 108625 times)

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37718
    • View Profile
🗳️ Biden nearly declares his candidacy with a slip of the tongue
« Reply #930 on: March 17, 2019, 12:22:37 AM »
OK, we can count him as "Jockstrap In".  ;D

RE

Biden nearly declares his candidacy with a slip of the tongue

Politics News

"I have the most progressive record of anybody running,” the former vice president said Saturday before correcting himself.


U.S. former Vice President Joe Biden delivers remarks at the First State Democratic Dinner in Dover, Delaware on March 16, 2019.Jonathan Ernst / Reuters
March 16, 2019, 5:37 PM AKDT
By Mike Memoli

DOVER, Del. — Joe Biden nearly declared his candidacy several weeks ahead of schedule as he previewed the message he’d take to the campaign, telling his home state Democrats that he had “the most progressive record of anybody running” even as he appealed for a return to bridge-building politics of consensus.

Biden’s keynote address to the Delaware Democratic Party’s largest annual fundraising dinner was not supposed to be an announcement speech. But for the second time in less than a week he walked close to the line as he addressed a very friendly audience.

As he spoke longingly of what he called the “Delaware Way” — the politics of a small state where Republicans and Democrats can do battle but do so respectfully — Biden noted he has been criticized at times by what he called the “New Left.”

“I have the most progressive record of anybody running,” he said, prompting a standing ovation from the hundreds on hand and a quick correction from the former vice president. “I didn’t mean it. Of anybody who would run!”

“We have to bring this country back together again,” he said, returning to his larger argument that reaching consensus is critical.

Biden bemoaned how the nation’s political debate has become “so mean, so petty, so vicious that we can’t govern ourselves.” But he also excoriated President Donald Trump for bringing the nation’s democratic institutions to a breaking point, saying the danger posed by his administration “is not hypothetical or exaggerated. It’s real. It’s existential.”

“We better wake up to what’s happening right in front of our eyes,” he said. “If you asked me a few years ago whether our American democracy would ever crumble, I would have laughed at you.”

Biden closed by suggesting that what motivated voters in 2018 to lift Democrats into office across the nation was what he could offer in 2020.
Recommended
news
College cheating scandal: Two ex-admissions officers explain the behind-the-scenes process
news
U.S. Navy veteran held in Iran sentenced to 10 years, lawyer says

“Everywhere I went there was an insatiable desire by Republicans as well as Democrats for women and men of high character running for public office,” he said. “People are making their decisions more on what they believe to be the character and authenticity of the candidate than a particular position they take on an issue. Voters understood that the very character of our country was on the ballot. And they stood up and they spoke. And we won.”

Biden’s speech Saturday came at something of an informal deadline among his political team for a final decision about the race, as they eye a potential early- to mid-April announcement.

Speakers before Biden all teased the likelihood of a Biden candidacy even as he has insisted no final decision has been made.

Talking with reporters before the dinner, Sen. Chris Coons (D-Del.) had little doubt about Biden’s plans.

“He has told me he is all but certain to run,” he said.
Mike Memoli

Mike Memoli is a political reporter for NBC News based in Washington, D.C.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37718
    • View Profile
🗳️ Is Beto the 2nd Coming of Christ?
« Reply #931 on: March 17, 2019, 12:30:57 AM »
Does this kind of press help or hurt Beto?  :icon_scratch:

RE

Is the Force With Beto?
Maureen Dowd

By Maureen Dowd

Opinion Columnist

    March 16, 2019


Beto O’Rourke floating above the political fray, at least as a newly minted presidential candidate. Credit: Daniel Acker/Reuters

WASHINGTON — The heavens part. The light shines down. The rise in the oceans begins to slow. The world is once more bathed in the mystical glow of a messiah. Our redemption from Donald Trump is at hand.

We have The One again, a New One — another lanky, bookish, handsome man with an attractive young family, a thin résumé, an exotic name, a hip affect, a rock star aura, an enticing smile, a liberal press corps ready to fluff his pillows and a frothing Fox News.

Let Elizabeth Warren knock herself out with policy proposals. Let Kamala Harris be the adult in the room. Let Bernie Sanders bellow away.

The magical man-boy, Beto O’Rourke, has come back from his 40 days in the desert — vlogging, contemplating, floating in and out of a funk — to share his gifts.

He has given us the blessed news: “Man, I’m just born to be in it.” He told Vanity Fair that his words at a Texas campaign stop when he was trying to unseat Ted Cruz were pulled out of him “by some greater force,” musing: “Everything that I said, I was, like, watching myself, being like, How am I saying this stuff? Where is this coming from.”

Annie Leibovitz advised Beto to wear a blue button-down shirt for her Vanity Fair cover shoot if he was going to run. And now we can hear, as Hillary Clinton noted sardonically about Barack Obama in 2008, “celestial choirs.”

Beto floats above the fray, staying vague on nettlesome issues. The 46-year-old offers the politics of feelings.

“I don’t have a team counting delegates,” he told Vanity Fair, adding, “It’s probably not the most professional thing you’ve ever heard about this, but I just feel it.”

Joe Kennedy built his family’s political myth on good hair, white teeth and glossy star quality. Why shouldn’t Beto?

After all, during his 2008 campaign, Obama merely went back to Chicago to see Malia perform in “The Odyssey.” Beto loved the epic so much, he thought about naming his son “Odysseus,” settling instead for “Ulysses.”

Wandering alone, as Jesus, Barack and Beto did, is part of the hero’s journey defined by Joseph Campbell. Beto loves Joseph Campbell and “Star Wars,” which was inspired by Campbell’s work.

The last One, about the same age when he jumped into national politics precociously aiming to usurp his elders, was also a uniter who went on an odyssey of self-discovery in New York while at Columbia.

The last One also sold a cult of personality, offered himself as a symbol of modernity, sparked Oprah’s interest and had a preoccupation with being cool.

Indeed, Obama told David Axelrod recently on “The Axe Files” that Beto reminded him of himself.

The One anointing the New One. Joe Biden, pushed aside by Obama in the last election, was understandably irritated.

Just as reporters once swooned when Obama made like Jay-Z and brushed imaginary dirt off his shoulder after a tough primary debate in Philly in 2008, reporters were entranced when O’Rourke air-drummed “Baba O’Riley” by the Who at a Whataburger drive-through after his debate with Cruz.
Sign Up for Paul Krugman's Newsletter

Paul Krugman did explanatory journalism before it was cool, moving from a career as a world-class economist to writing hard-hitting opinion columns.

To many, Beto’s appeal is his persona as a quasi-rebellious ’90s suburban teenager, a skateboarding punk rocker who seems to have modeled his campaign logo on the spicy ketchup logo at Whataburger.

But others are less charmed. A satirical video on Twitter by skaters mocked “bad-skater Beto” as the kind of middle-school poser who “went to Zumiez and spent $27 on stickers.”

In a new Reuters story, Joseph Menn reveals that while O’Rourke was still a teenager, he was a member of the Cult of the Dead Cow, a stealthy hacking group named after an old Texas slaughterhouse. A kind of Neo-lite, he used the handle “Psychedelic Warlord,” looking for free video games. (Socialist alert!)

A hacker might be refreshing after a president who refers to Tim Cook as Tim Apple. Still, Menn writes, “it’s unclear whether the United States is ready for a presidential contender who, as a teenager, stole long-distance phone service for his dial-up modem, wrote a murder fantasy in which the narrator drives over children on the street, and mused about a society without money.”

The 15th entry in the Democratic race is at the nexus of many tricky issues for a party desperate to oust Individual 1 from the White House.

Is it better to nominate a celebrity like Obama with a slight record that cannot be targeted or someone with established credentials? Should the nominee spring from the far left, the vector brimming with electricity and fight, or is that suicidal in a national election?

Can white men jump in, or is this post-#MeToo era the time when Democratic and independent women will demand a woman at the top of the ticket? Will Democratic voters longing for another Obama and the minority voters who strayed from Hillary want an African-American?

Can pugilistic progressives stomach a rich kid like Beto at a time when the country is in an eat-the-rich mood? Will they tolerate candidates like Beto and Biden, who speak well of Republicans and have a history of working with them?

As The Wall Street Journal reports, O’Rourke tried to please Texas Republican business leaders when he “opposed Obamacare, voted against Nancy Pelosi as the House Democratic leader and called for a raise in the Social Security eligibility age.”

The fever is running high in his party. Will Beto turn out to be born for it or borne away by it?
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15606
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: 🗳️ Biden nearly declares his candidacy with a slip of the tongue
« Reply #932 on: March 17, 2019, 02:56:09 AM »

Biden nearly declares his candidacy with a slip of the tongue

"I have the most progressive record of anybody running,” the former vice president said Saturday before correcting himself.

Uh-huh. Let's check in with Anita Hill on that assertion, shall we?

Or his own past statement: “When it comes to civil rights and civil liberties, I’m a liberal but that’s it. I’m really quite conservative on most other issues.”

In truth, this was in the 70s, and (some) people evolve over time. Yet Joe Biden has proudly called himself a “Third Way” Democrat who hates “class warfare.” His forty-five-year political career shows demonstrates that. And that's the problem with having a record, something that does not trouble Beto.

Here's where the opposition research will begin. Cue the assassins:

MBNA and Biden's votes against a measure requiring credit card companies to warn consumers of the consequences of making only minimum payments. Biden also voted four times for an industry-supported bankruptcy bill that made it harder for financially strained borrowers to get protection from creditors. The kind corporations typically hide behind.

The doings of his sone Hunter, who remarkably became employed boy the same MBMA at th same time Biden was lead-blocking for favored legislation. Hunter later started a lobbying firm, and was later accused in a lawsuit of defrauding a business partner in a hedge fund deal worth millions — a deal, the partner alleged, that only existed to get Hunter out of the lobbying industry so as not to cause headaches for Biden during his 2008 presidential campaign.

In recent years, Ukraine’s biggest private gas producer hired Hunter to serve on its board at the same time his father was acting as the Obama administration’s point man on Ukraine policy. Whocoodanode?

Biden has long been active as a speaker for hire. By 1979, he was one of the Senate’s top twenty-five earners of outside income — and, along with twenty-two others on that list, voted against a bill to limit such earnings. At least Now is transactional, in that he did something for the money, as opposed to the whores who just take it as proof of the Divine Will.

Biden’s office has a history of close relationships to lobbyists. Longtime staffers have passed through the revolving door from Biden’s office to the lobbying industry — and back again. Join me in another rousing chorus of "Drain The Swamp!!!" As if. But you can already hear how Trump will use these datapoint in his Nuremberg rallies. Biden will be a sitting duck for exactly the sort of hypocritical Republican attacks that helped sink Clinton’s campaign.

A larger issue with Biden: at a time when left-wing populism is increasingly accepted as the antidote to Trump and the GOP’s nativist and corporate-friendly pitch, Biden is a remnant of precisely the sort of left-averse, triangulating Democratic politics that Hillary Clinton was relentlessly criticized for personifying. That "Third Way" Bill Clinton bullshit which made Hillary's husband the most successful republican President of the 20th century.

Quote
“I don’t think five hundred billionaires are the reason we’re in trouble. The folks at the top aren’t bad guys.” --Biden

You start to see where so-called "good ol' Joe" might be dragging his feet about throwing his hat in. But he's not; just being coy.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2019, 04:16:09 AM by Surly1 »
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37718
    • View Profile
If he keeps up the pace, he can buy the election.

RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/03/18/beto-orourkes-fundraising-1225345


Beto O’Rourke announced Monday that in the first 24 hours of his presidential campaign, he had raised a staggering $6.1 million. | Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

2020 Elections
‘He’s the real deal’: Beto’s jaw-dropping windfall quiets critics

‘Six million bucks overnight is impressive and anyone who says otherwise doesn’t understand the game,’ said one top Democratic donor.

By DAVID SIDERS and DANIEL STRAUSS

03/18/2019 02:12 PM EDT

Updated 03/18/2019 02:42 PM EDT

CENTER LINE, Michigan — One great question surrounding Beto O’Rourke has been whether he could replicate the massive fundraising totals he mustered in the Texas Senate race last year.

On Monday, O’Rourke put any doubt to rest, announcing that in the first 24 hours of his campaign, he had raised a staggering $6.1 million.

In so doing, the Texas Democrat signaled that he’s in for a sustained campaign— with the fundraising capacity to last deep into the primary and to compete with anyone in the race.

“Six million bucks overnight is impressive and anyone who says otherwise doesn’t understand the game,” said Kirk Wagar, a former top Barack Obama donor who is backing Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.). “It’s not the same as when Jeb Bush did it, where he had everyone lined up when they all donated. This guy, as far as I know, didn’t make a bunch of calls. Didn’t have a bunch of people that were pounding people.“

Standing in front of a strip mall coffee shop in this suburb of Detroit, O’Rourke proclaimed Monday that he was building “the largest grassroots campaign this country has ever seen, funded completely by, powered completely by people, not PACs, not lobbyists, not corporations and not special interests.”

He said, “It’s one of the best ways to bring the country together, to make sure that we are listening to one another, and not that entrenchment of wealth and power and privilege that has defined so much of our politics from before.”

Perhaps no other candidate’s first 24-hour fundraising total was as closely watched as O’Rourke’s, whose credibility as a national contender largely rested on the small-dollar fundraising list he developed as a Senate candidate. But O’Rourke, despite raising more than $80 million in that campaign, was running against Ted Cruz, a Republican universally loathed by Democrats — a different fundraising proposition than the large field of Democrats with whom he is now competing for money and support.

“He had to raise more than everyone to continue his momentum. He did. Otherwise, they would have said people gave against Ted Cruz, not for Beto,” said Michael O’Neil, a former Midwest finance director for the Obama campaign. “It is clear, donors were excited to invest in Beto.”

O’Rourke’s total crushed the first day hauls of many of his Democratic competitors and surpassed even Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), the fundraising pace-setter and a far better-known candidate who collected $6 million in the first 24 hours of his own campaign. In an email to supporters Monday, the Sanders campaign pointed to O’Rourke’s total and asked to help “close the gap” before the first official Federal Election Commission fundraising deadline.
Beto O'Rourke

2020 elections
‘Not one woman got that kind of coverage’: Beto backlash begins

By NATASHA KORECKI

“We’ve finally got a candidate, and he can raise money,” said Boyd Brown, a former South Carolina lawmaker and former Democratic National Committee member who was part of a ‘Draft Beto’ effort in South Carolina. “It shows everybody what some of us knew: He’s the real deal. Right out of the gate, he’s just right back in the saddle as to what he was doing in Texas.”

O’Rourke’s fundraising announcement came as the former congressman continued a furious spate of campaigning across the Midwest, appearing in Detroit and its suburbs on Monday. After flying from Milwaukee to Detroit, the candidate drove a rented Dodge Grand Caravan to Cleveland on Monday afternoon before motoring on toward New Hampshire. He is expected to visit all 10 of the first-in-the-nation primary state’s counties over the course of one night and two days, ending Friday.

O’Rourke had demurred when asked last week about his first-day fundraising. On Monday, he said he declined to announce his results because he was campaigning in southeastern Iowa, “not a part of the country and of the state that is often visited.”

“I wanted the attention of our campaign and, frankly, the people who are following our campaign, to be on the people of Iowa.”

Asked Monday for the average amount of his contributions — a traditional marker of small-dollar support — O’Rourke said he does not know. He added, “As I get more details on how those contributions came in and the number in which they came in, I’ll share that.”

However, he said he had received contributions from every state and that “I think this is a great sign that in the first 24 hours, this many people were able to come together.”
Beto O’Rourke

2020 Elections
Despite crowds, Beto campaign gets a rocky rollout

By DAVID SIDERS

The cash windfall was no accident. O’Rourke began preparing for a robust online fundraising push even before he announced his run for president, alerting top supporters to be ready to solicit contributions from their lists. Once he announced his candidacy on Thursday, the campaign began aggressive texting, email and social media appeals. O’Rourke spent more than $157,000 on Facebook last week, running more than 2,300 ads after his presidential launch — many of them soliciting donations, with the campaign telling donors that “what we raise in the first 24 hours will set the tone in the national conversation about the viability of our campaign.”

On Monday, he said he hopes the total “sends a message to everyone who’s out there, who’s looking for a different way” to run a campaign.

“I think this is a great sign that in the first 24 hours, this many people were able to come together,” he said.

O’Rourke’s campaign is still without a manager and was scrambling to staff up in early primary states. O’Rourke is expected to remain on the road campaigning before returning to his home in El Paso, Texas, for a March 30 rally.

Before last week, it was Sanders who had set the bar for first-day 2020 fundraising, raking in $6 million in 24 hours after announcing his run for president. Harris’ launch had been the second-most lucrative so far, raising over $1.5 million in her first day in the race.

Several of O’Rourke’s fellow Democrats, such as Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), Gov. Jay Inslee (D-Wash.) and former Gov. John Hickenlooper (D-Colo.), broke the $1 million threshold after about 48 hours, their campaigns said.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37718
    • View Profile
MOAR Beto!

He's as good as Trumpovetsky at getting the media to pay attention to him.  None of the other Demodope wannabees pull this kind of press.  This from the BBC too!  Not even FSoA newz organization!

RE

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-47614978

Beto O'Rourke: Why this Texan is causing such a stir in the 2020 race
Anthony Zurcher North America reporter @awzurcher on Twitter

    18 March 2019

    US election 2020
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Beto O'Rourke on the campaign trail in Washington, Iowa

Beto O'Rourke made headlines while losing an election last year. Now he's running for president and already breaking fundraising records, but is this Texan the real deal?

O'Rourke arrived at a gourmet coffee shop in the small south-eastern Iowa town of Mount Pleasant and immediately jumped up on the store's counter to address the packed room.

It was the second day of his presidential campaign, which he announced via an early morning YouTube video, and the O'Rourke operation was opting for a soft launch. He visited smaller towns, in smaller venues, with little advanced fanfare.

The coffee shop in Mt Pleasant, an art gallery in Washington, a sing-along bar in Mt Vernon and a house party in Dubuque were among the stops.

All told, the candidate, behind the wheel of a dirty black minivan, covered more than 800 miles in three days.

If he had travelled to the big state-college towns of Iowa City or Ames, he probably could have packed a sports arena. Instead, he went for more intimate settings in parts of the state that trend more conservative - counties that were, by and large, carried by Donald Trump when he became only the second Republican to win Iowa in a presidential election since 1984.

Last year, O'Rourke himself nearly made history when he came close to unseating a senior Republican in Texas, Ted Cruz.

It's part of O'Rourke's presidential campaign message, as it was in that failed Senate bid, that he won't take any votes for granted or look past any voters.

Elana Joram, a college professor who saw O'Rourke on Saturday in Waterloo, was impressed. The Texan is a polished speaker, she said, who hits just the right tone - the kind of candidate who could have broad appeal.

"Donald Trump and George W Bush, they can communicate in such a simple, compelling way, and the Democrats get so carried away with themselves that they just forget who they're talking to," she said. "Beto, he's really good in that respect."


Image copyright Getty Images

If there's a defining attribute of the O'Rourke political phenomenon, it's his ability to connect with an audience. In fact for Democrats - many of whom first learned of the Texan when a YouTube video of him talking about national anthem protests during his Senate campaign went viral - that may be the only attribute they know.

At least for now.

On Friday morning, O'Rourke, perched on the coffee-shop bar, launched into the topic making headlines that morning - the shooting at a mosque in New Zealand that took 50 lives.

After extending his prayers to the victims, he said the attack is part of a "larger disease of intolerance" spreading in the Western world, including the US, which he added was once thought of as the "most open, most welcoming country" in the world. Hatred, Islamophobia and intolerance are on the rise, he asserted.

"The violence predictably follows from the rhetoric that we use. We must be far better than that."

All this is a preface for what has become the central thrust of O'Rourke's nascent campaign - a call for renewed kindness and decency in the country; an insistence that Americans need to heal the way people of all political views and backgrounds interact with one another.

It sounds vaguely similar to the "hope and change" mantra that propelled Barack Obama to the presidency. It can be a winning message, even if the results of Obama's election didn't exactly heal the national divides.
Capturing the imagination

O'Rourke has drawn comparisons with other Democratic politicians - to former New York Senator Robert Kennedy, who had a similar shock of brown hair and a penchant for waxing philosophical. And to his brother, President John F Kennedy.

"The torch has been passed," one elderly supporter bubbled as O'Rourke arrived, a reference to a line about generational change from Kennedy's 1961 inaugural address.

O'Rourke said later on Friday that he's flattered people see a connection to Obama, although he says that he doesn't come "anywhere close" to the former president.

Content is not available

Another, more modern comparison might be more appropriate, however. And it's one O'Rourke probably won't be as eager to welcome, given a recent spate of scandal - Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Like O'Rourke now, four years ago the Liberal Party leader represented generational change after a stretch of conservative dominance. Both have engendered resentment from some within their party for being unqualified for the high political office they sought - a product, it was said, of unearned privilege. Yet both captured the imagination of many.

O'Rourke (46) and Trudeau (then 43) seemed young for their age, with a sometimes-too-tightly-wound energy. The Canadian on the campaign trail had a quick, breathless delivery, while the Texan's every sentence is punctuated by a cavalcade of arm gestures.
More on the 2020 race

    Who will take on Trump in 2020?
    The Democratic big ideas
    What's the Green New Deal?
    Do Democrats want to steal our hamburgers?

He waves, he stretches, he chops. In one frequent move, he shoots one arm straight out and the other back - as though he has caught a wave on a surfboard or, perhaps more appropriate for the former punk band bassist, is riding a skateboard.

The mannerisms have already drawn the attention of the man he hopes to defeat next year.

"I've never seen so much hand movement," Donald Trump said last week. "Is he crazy, or is that just the way he acts?"

Reporters following O'Rourke on the stump jokingly share sped-up videos of the his gyrations captured on their mobile phones, which making the candidate look like fighter in an old Kung-fu film.

It's a manner that's easy to parody - late-night comedy spoofs are only a matter of time - but it's also memorable. And his habit of climbing on to restaurant furniture may seem a bit over-the-top, but it also emphasises his youth and vigour in a race where he will face off against several prominent septuagenarians.
'I'm not big on labels'

One of the early critiques of O'Rourke's campaign has been that it's style over substance - that the delivery and the lofty rhetoric is all there is. In his Iowa campaign appearances, however, the framework of a stump speech began to take form.

He talked about changing the attitude in Washington, with a favourite example of how the congressman worked with Republicans to pass a veteran's aid bill. He made a mention or two of his time as a member of the El Paso city council, where he said he learned to be responsive to his constituents.

And, in event after event, he pushed three issues - healthcare, immigration and climate change, which he calls "the challenge of our lifetime, perhaps the challenge of human existence".

The bulk of an O'Rourke campaign event isn't the stump speech, however, it's the question-and-answer session that comes after.

"Having the humility to listen to and understand things from other people's perspective is not just the best way to run, I think it may be the only way to win and the best way to serve once in office," he said in Cedar Rapids.
Media captionWho is Beto O'Rourke?

The topics reveal the tensions that have been pulling at all the other candidates, as well. Is he a capitalist or a socialist? A moderate or a progressive? A pragmatist or an idealist? An optimist or a realist?

O'Rourke, with his stump-speech vagueness, tries to straddle these lines - or, perhaps, blur them.

"I'm not big on labels," he said at a town hall event in El Paso last December. "I don't get all fired up about party or classifying or defining people based on a label or a group."

Under pressure from his audience, however, candidate O'Rourke sometimes tips his hand. At least three times during his Iowa tour, the Texan used some version of the line about the "perfect being the enemy of the good" - in regards to healthcare reform, gun control and the need for cross-party co-operation.

That is, needless to say, the language of a pragmatist. Democratic socialist Bernie Sanders, also running for president, would choke on those words.

Although he talks about progressive goals, his means to achieving them are incremental. He wants a $15 minimum wage, but he'll get there "as quickly as we can". He calls universal healthcare "the ultimate answer", but suggests a first step is to address the rising cost of prescription drugs and give Americans the choice of private plans or access to the government-run Medicare insurance programme.

For gun control, he backs universal background checks and a ban on new sales of assault-style rifles, allowing current owners to keep their firearms - a position that may anger both sides of the heated issue.

    Five reasons US gun control won't happen

He says he's a capitalist, noting that he started a technology business in the late 1990s, but goes on to call the current system in the US "imperfect, unfair, unjust and racist".

"I think there is a lot more we can do to make sure that this capitalism is just," he said in Mt Pleasant.

Progressive critics also point to O'Rourke's voting record during his three terms as congressman, breaking ranks at times to vote with Republicans on tax, energy and immigration legislation.

In Mt Pleasant, Tom Williamson - a retired IT professonal from Fairfield, Iowa - asked O'Rourke to explain his votes.

"All I can tell you is what I've shared with you," the ex-congressman said. "The things I believe in, and the things I want to do."
Image caption Tom Williamson thinks he will support Sanders

Williamson, who supported Bernie Sanders in 2016 and is leaning towards him in 2020, says he remains sceptical.

"If he's going to put himself squarely in the middle, I wonder how much progress we're really going to make," he says.

A few hours later in Washington, Iowa, O'Rourke felt the heat from the other side, when asked to explain a call he made in February to tear down the border wall in El Paso. The Texan sidestepped the issue entirely, instead discussing citizenship for undocumented migrants who entered the US as children - a popular position with most Americans.

"I understand the argument that we don't need to build more walls, but I don't understand the argument that we need to tear down walls," said the man who posed the question, Ryan Turner, a driving instructor from Kalona.

"If you have that pendulum swing too far to the left, you're going to have those of us in the middle sit this one out."
Past mistakes

Discussions of policy details - or lack thereof - weren't the only headaches for the newly minted candidate during his opening presidential tour.

O'Rourke's somewhat chequered past - an arrest for burglary (which he says was a misunderstanding) and driving while intoxicated (for which he says there is no excuse) - once again became uncomfortable topics which he tried to reshape as best he could.

He told an audience at a podcast recording in Cedar Rapids that he was fortunate the the incidents did not derail his life.

"It's not because I'm a great person, or I'm a genius, or I've figured anything out," he said. "A lot of it has to do with the fact that I'm a white man."

The experience, he continued, has given him an appreciation for how the criminal justice system does - and doesn't - work in the US and the need for reform.
Learn more about the 2020 candidates

    Three things that could stop Elizabeth Warren
    Kamala Harris and the rise of California
    Should Bernie Sanders' fundraising worry rivals?
    Nine 2020 Democrats. One event. Who shone?

Newly revealed skeletons joined old ones in O'Rourke's closet over the weekend, following a Reuters report that, as a teenager, the Texan had been a part of a notorious hacking group and had penned poetry and stories with violent, misogynistic themes under the pseudonym "Psychedelic Warlord".

In Cedar Rapids, O'Rourke called the language he used "hateful".

"I have to look long and hard at my actions, at the language that I have used," he said. "And I have to constantly try to do better."

The revelations may have particularly damaging resonance for O'Rourke because he's already taking criticism for, to put it bluntly, being a white man with a thin political resume running against a crop of much more experienced women and people of colour.

He seems to be getting more attention from the media, including a Vanity Fair cover story, and more money - $6m raised in the first 24 hours is the highest of any candidate so far.

On Saturday morning, Amy Klobuchar - a two-term senator from Minnesota who is also positioning herself as a pragmatic, solution-oriented presidential candidate - spoke at the Blackhawk County Democratic headquarters in Waterloo before a couple of cameras and a room with several dozen supporters.

A few hours later, O'Rourke also addressed the Blackhawk County Democrats - from the bed of a red pick-up truck across the street, surrounded by a crowd of more than 150 and at least half a dozen cameras.

Part of the attention can be explained by the fact that he is the new face in Iowa, but that hasn't stopped some from taking note.

"Beto gets treated like a rock star," says Denny McCabe, a retired teacher and drummer who attended the Klobuchar event. "The women, not so much. It just seems like it's time for a woman."

O'Rourke isn't helping his cause, either. In his campaign kick-off video, his wife Amy sat silently by his side the entire time, while the candidate spoke. Several times on the trail, he mentioned that she was at home, raising their three kids, "sometimes with my help".

"Imagine [Democratic candidate Kirsten] Gillibrand saying this about her kids and still having a viable campaign," tweeted Marie Claire editor Chloe Angyal.
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption O'Rourke's table-top style has drawn attention

In Cedar Rapids on Friday night, he acknowledged his "ham-handed attempt" at giving credit to his wife had generated some deserved criticism.

"Not only will I not say that again, but I'll be more thoughtful going forward in the way that I talk about our marriage, and also the way in which I acknowledge the truth of the criticism that I have enjoyed white privilege," he said.

"I hope as I have been, in some instances, part of the problem, that I can be part of the solution, and I stand very ready and very open to those who can guide me to do a better job going forward," he said.

O'Rourke may try to pivot and shift and turn a weakness into a strength, but the reality is, at this moment, someone who looks like him, even with his Spanish nickname, may not be what the rank and file of the party are looking for.

Lori Feldman, an accountant who attended a Cory Booker rally in Indianola on Saturday, was blunt.

"I think we really need a strong black man to turn our country back after Trump," she said, and for her O'Rourke "is not going to cut it".

In Mt Pleasant, after O'Rourke's coffee shop appearance, Winfield high school senior Liana Sweezer expressed a similar sentiment.

"I would like to look for a candidate who is a woman or a person of colour, because we have just too many white men in the political system right now," she said.
Image caption Liana Sweezer

Even Elana Joram, the Waterloo professor who praised O'Rourke's rhetorical skill, had her concerns.

"I am a little concerned that he's a white male, and not that I think that's intrinsically a problem, but there are groups of people that I think may not get motivated to come out and vote for him," she said.

In the current Democratic field, they'll have plenty of choices.
In the spotlight

Before O'Rourke's appearance in Waterloo, while Klobuchar was still shaking hands and her aides were pulling down her campaign signs in the Blackhawk County Democratic headquarters, an old Iowa political hand was throwing a bit of cold water on the Beto excitement.

"We've seen a lot of huge stars come through Iowa," said former Iowa Congressman Dave Nagle, now a lawyer in Waterloo. "The question is, can he sustain it over a long period of time? A hot start doesn't get you home."

He quipped that "presidents" Howard Dean and Ben Carson are visiting Iowa next week, a reference to past candidates who generated the kind of buzz O'Rourke is getting, only to fizzle out in the home run.

According to Nagle, the keys to Iowa success are organising and finishing strong at the end - and the first helps make the second possible.
Media captionO'Rourke (left) first made headlines on a road trip with a Democrat

O'Rourke has hired a veteran Iowa campaign strategist, Norm Sterzenbach, who helped write the convoluted rules by which the Iowa caucuses will be conducted early next year. That, at the very least, will ensure that the Texan has a solid ground game.

The pressure of national politics, the glare of the presidential spotlight, is something a candidate can't understand until they start to experience it, however. O'Rourke, with questions about his past, controversy over his comments and scrutiny of his record, is just beginning his time in the crucible.

For every Kennedy and Obama, there's a Dean and a Carson - flashes in the pan who could inspire a crowd but not get them to the voting booth when it counted.

O'Rourke has the attention. He's getting the money. He has the charisma. But it's a long way, and a long time, from these winding roads in Iowa to the White House.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37718
    • View Profile
🗳️ Beto O’Rourke On Ohio GM Plant Closure: 'Trump Flunks"
« Reply #935 on: March 20, 2019, 12:24:57 AM »
We still have not reached Peak Beto.  ::)

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ENHel9egf44" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ENHel9egf44</a>
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37718
    • View Profile
🗳️ Is Betomania Real or Phony?
« Reply #936 on: March 20, 2019, 07:51:25 AM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/20/opinion/beto-presidential-campaign.html

Opinion
Is Betomania Real or Phony?

The advent of Beto O’Rourke’s presidential candidacy has Democrats arguing ferociously among themselves.

By Thomas B. Edsall

Mr. Edsall contributes a weekly column from Washington, D.C. on politics, demographics and inequality.

    March 20, 2019


Beto O’Rourke on the opening day of his campaign for president.  Credit: Todd Heisler/The New York Times

Within days of his announcement that he was running for the Democratic presidential nomination, Beto O’Rourke shot up in the rankings in terms of money, media coverage and Google searches.

Then the knives came out — progressives, women, African-Americans and party loyalists all took a stab at him.

The response to Beto is polarizing the Democratic activist community. The overriding question for Democrats is electability: who can beat Trump is a matter of pressing concern and profound anxiety for at least half the nation. The wrong choice would be disastrous.

Let’s start with O’Rourke’s negatives and we’ll get to the positives later.

“I’ve been quite critical of O’Rourke because I don’t really think the 2020 race needs him. We already have a pretty good bench of Democrats, and they mostly have thought far more about policy and politics than O’Rourke has,” Sean McElwee, a co-founder of Data for Progress, whose views represent those of many on the outspoken left, told me:

    I think he’s vulnerable because of his gaffes and vague policies, but I think he’s most weak due to his pretty pro-development tenure on the El Paso City Council.

McElwee contended that O’Rourke is

    no more electable than Kamala Harris or Elizabeth Warren and would be far less prepared to staff and run a White House. He’s never shown a commitment to progressive policies in the past, why should we trust him now? We don’t need a superstar, we need someone ready to push all-out to implement the progressive agenda.

Gina Glantz, a co-founder of GenderAvenger, an organization determined to ensure “women are represented in the public dialogue,” replied to my inquiry about O’Rourke:

    I must admit after a few days of watching and reading about his opening gatherings I am less rather than more intrigued. To me, he exudes a sense of entitlement, which I find off-putting.

How about O’Rourke and the white working class?

Paul A. Sracic, a political scientist as Youngstown State University, emailed me:

    O’Rourke’s vague, “We all need to come together” message will not resonate with people who see life as a battle. Working class voters believe in pugilistic politics. And I suspect that O’Rourke’s punk rock background will seem odd to working class voters. These voters want to feel as if their candidates are “one of them.”

Negative coverage in the press has been abundant:

“The Unbearable Male Privilege of Beto O’Rourke" (The Daily Beast). He voted for Republican legislation (The Wall Street Journal). He put his adolescent fantasies into print (The Resurgent). He’s a wealthy dilettante (The National Review), an empty shell (The New Republic), a teenage hacker (USA Today), a master class in male entitlement (The Guardian).

At the same time, O’Rourke has captured the imagination of millions of voters and donors.

Frank Wilkinson, a former colleague of mine, wrote at Bloomberg:

    O’Rourke is not the only candidate modeling decency as an antidote to Trumpism. But he’s the one who has best harnessed the anxiety and rage generated by Trumpism’s assaults on democratic values and transformed them into willful, defiant optimism.

Don Fowler, former chair of the Democratic National Committee, captures this feeling: “He clearly possesses a charismatic charge, a spark that few others have.” Still, Fowler goes on to enumerate O’Rourke’s liabilities:

    His impressive campaign for the Senate in Texas was a combination of luck and a damaged opponent. His ability to conduct an effective national campaign is totally unknown. His recent tour of the country was essentially by himself — a very poor way to test a candidate’s national potential in a crowded, competitive field. As to issues, the same unknown quality of his organizational potential characterizes his policy and ideological stances. Both major prongs of a national campaign are truly unknown and must be tested in the public crucible. Only time will tell on both policy and operational scores — wait and see.

A Texas Democratic operative lavished praise on Beto, on background, in order to speak freely:

    O’Rourke has an intangible energy that goes beyond the litmus test. On a national scale that could be monumental. It’s emotional. It’s not tangible. Beto tapped into something with nontraditional voters. People who never publicly supported a campaign were putting Beto signs in their yard. LeBron James wore his logo on a hat.

“I first saw the momentum in late spring 2018,” reports the Republican strategist Scott Reed:

    I live in Dallas and saw the yard signs popping up, all in front of large homes and mansions that would traditionally have been straight G.O.P. It almost became a badge of courage for many of the limousine liberals in Dallas.

Reed, who ran Bob Dole’s 1996 presidential campaign, went on:

    His Willie Nelson event in Austin drew 50k folks and was also a strong signal to young voters — even though very few voted. His performances in the debates was exceptional and added to his momentum. Cruz was the #1 G.O.P. fund-raiser and he got swamped every quarter. I see a little Bobby Kennedy in him.

Richard Murray, a political scientist at the University of Houston, was also impressed. He emailed:

    His appeal in Texas is a combination of an attractive persona with animated mannerisms that come across as cool and authentic to many (especially those under 35); boundless energy plus exceptional verbal skills that enable him to weave stories from folks he’s encountered on the campaign trail into compelling narratives (a rare skill) — displayed in an environment where voters in our very diverse and fast growing metropolitan areas have soured on the far right turn of Texas GOP leaders like Ted Cruz and Dan Patrick.

How about a national campaign?

    Will this combination work in a national primary featuring the most diverse set of competitors in the nation’s history? I do not know, nor does anyone else. But the retail politics states of Iowa and New Hampshire are great places to test his road show outside the Lone Star State.

Murray’s son, Keir Murray, a Democratic political consultant in Texas, added more praise:

    My own sense is his appeal was based, in part, on being a natural foil to Cruz (who is pretty much loathed by all but true conservatives in Texas) and by extension to Trump. O’Rourke is self-effacing, low-key guy, who comes across as fundamentally decent. I don’t think most Democrats, liberals or everyday Texans knew much about his policy positions, or cared much. They liked him. People sensed he was being himself — not perfect, not having all the answers — but honest and good-hearted.

Robert Stein, a political scientist at Rice, is upbeat on O’Rourke’s prospects. He wrote me:

    Shortly after the November election progressives hit him hard for not backing their issue positions on guns and energy. My sense is that he is looking to avoid being defined on a left/right dimension/continuum. It seems like he is trying to define his candidacy as humane, pragmatic and capable of beating Trump.

Stein argues that

    he is sufficiently retail for places like Iowa and New Hampshire and if he can survive the rush before Super Tuesday, he should come out of the March primaries in the upper echelon of remaining candidates.

Although O’Rourke lost the Texas Senate race to Cruz by just under 3 percent, exit polls show that he won among women, 54-46; among voters under 45, 59-40; minorities, 69-31; college graduates, 51-48; moderates, 65-34; and voters who say they are not white born-again or evangelical Christians, 61-38.

While suffering from some hostile media impressions, O’Rourke has gotten his share, if not more so, of favorable press:

He’s authentic, full of energy, and stripped of consultant-driven sterility (Vanity Fair). Will Beto O’Rourke Become President? (Texas Monthly). Beto O’Rourke Rivals Trump on Social Media (Newsweek). Beto O’Rourke could lead a blue wave in Texas (Vox). Beto O’Rourke blows up the 2020 Democratic primary (Politico).

At the same time, some of the strongest opposition to O’Rourke — reflecting schisms within the Democratic Party — has come from women’s rights advocates, many of whom took offense at a comment he made to Vanity Fair: “Man, I’m just born to be in it.”

Natasha Korecki, a Politico reporter, captured the feminist opposition to O’Rourke in her March 15 story, “‘Not one woman got that kind of coverage’: Beto backlash begins.”

Korecki wrote:

    The breathless, sweeps-like cable television coverage that greeted the former Texas congressman’s first campaign events stunned and frustrated many Democratic operatives — particularly women — who viewed it as an example of the double standard at work in the historically diverse presidential field. To them, O’Rourke, a white, male candidate had already been anointed the next sensation, his entry into the race greased by live television shots and O’Rourke-centric panels.

Celinda Lake, a Democratic pollster, told Politico, “I think if you look at the pattern, there is a real distinction between the way men were covered and the way the women were covered. There’s a huge double standard,” before adding:

    With women, many, many more negatives were raised and the men were treated like the Second Coming. I’m surprised that this is continuing in 2019, after the year of the woman.

In response to the animosity, O’Rourke indicated that he would pick a woman as his vice-presidential running mate. On March 15, he told reporters: “It would be very difficult not to select a woman with so many extraordinary women who are running right now.”

O’Rourke appears to be acutely sensitive to this issue. He told Vanity Fair, before he announced his bid, that “the government at all levels is overly represented by white men,” and he didn’t leave it there:

    That’s part of the problem, and I’m a white man. So if I were to run, I think it’s just so important that those who would comprise my team looked like this country. If I were to run, if I were to win, that my administration looks like this country. It’s the only way I know to meet that challenge.

It’s not altogether clear, however, that women currently seeking the top job would be thrilled by O’Rourke’s offer of the number two spot.

Washington political professionals are also going to be a hard sell.

John Lawrence, former chief of staff for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, questions whether O’Rourke is up to the challenge. Lawrence says he finds it difficult

    to see a white male emerging from the multicandidate pack. True, all the women/minorities could divide up the other voters, but with proportionate allocation of delegates, it’s hard to see a white male moderate emerging with a majority.

“Freshness only goes so far,” Lawrence pointed out:

    After a year of being beat up by competitors, the press, Trump, grass roots, etc., he might not look or sound so “fresh.” He strikes me as somewhat superficial, very much a personality; I am not convinced the act sells on a national basis.

Isaac Hale, a political scientist at the University of California, notes that

    Beto doesn’t have the luxury of running in the Democratic presidential primary as “not Ted Cruz.” which is certainly a large part of what endeared him to Democratic voters around the country in 2018.

O’Rourke, Hale observes, “is something of a blank slate that voters and party elites can project their own policy preferences onto,” a characteristic that can work to his advantage or disadvantage.

Lynn Vavreck, a political scientist at U.C.L.A., looked at the same issue from a different angle:

    The ways these races get framed depends a lot on who the candidates are and what their constraints are — if O’Rourke finds himself in a race against another young white male who is inspiring, these things won’t be a strength of his; but if he finds himself running against an older person who isn’t inspiring, they could be.

Vavreck added:

    Your constraints are only constraints if your opponent doesn’t share them; and your strengths are only strengths if your opponent doesn’t share them. When there are 16 people vying for the nomination you have to winnow the field to be able to talk sensibly about who has advantages beyond just fund-raising and organization. Are there no other candidates who have “capacity to inspire,” “policy centrism”?

In the current contest, Vavreck declared, “There are. This makes me think that these may not be unique strengths of this candidate!”

Suzanne Model, a sociologist at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst who has written extensively on race and immigration, argues that O’Rourke faces an uphill battle for the nomination:

    O’Rourke will do well in the primaries but it is unlikely that he will win. Young, handsome and self-effacing, his charismatic manner will appeal to “non-policy wonks.” This includes traditionally-oriented women, young adults, and political moderates. In addition, his recent pro-immigrant stance, Hispanic sounding name and Texas roots should garner him support among Latinos.

But, Model continued,

    O’Rourke’s problem is that he has little appeal to left-leaning voters or African-Americans. They watched the G.O.P. destroy a Democratic president who expressed a willingness to work with Republicans; hence, they seek a candidate who is more experienced, sophisticated and aggressive.

In order to beat Trump, Model contends,

    The Democratic standard-bearer must carry a significant proportion of two constituencies: African Americans and working class white males. Under an O’Rourke candidacy, too many African Americans will stay home and too many working class white males will vote for Trump. Perhaps no Democratic candidate is capable of succeeding simultaneously with these two heterogeneous groups, but that is the most plausible route to a Trump defeat.

Which brings us back to the existential question I raised at the beginning of this column: Can Beto O’Rourke beat Donald Trump?

O’Rourke’s fund-raising success will keep him in the contest longer than less fortunate competitors, and the volume of media coverage he elicits is boosting his name recognition, a crucial first step.

G. Elliott Morris, a political data reporter for the Economist, noted on Twitter that O’Rourke has received more cable news coverage in the five days since his announcement than any other candidate during the full post-announcement week. O’Rourke is on a path to get 180 percent of the coverage received by Bernie Sanders, the previous leader on this measure.
Sign Up for Paul Krugman's Newsletter

Paul Krugman did explanatory journalism before it was cool, moving from a career as a world-class economist to writing hard-hitting opinion columns.

While head-to-head polls are still in a larval stage, they do signal the demographic sources of support for the candidates.

The most recent CNN poll, released on Tuesday, shows, for example, that the leader, Joe Biden, at 28 percent overall, gets more support from moderates than from liberals, more from older voters than young voters, more from men than women and more from whites than from minorities. Bernie Sanders, at 20 percent, is just the opposite, stronger among liberals, young voters, minorities and women.

O’Rourke, at 11 percent, has a long way to go to catch up with either Biden or Sanders. But the CNN poll shows that O’Rourke’s supporters tend to be slightly more liberal than moderate, young rather than old, female rather than male, and O’Rourke gets more support from African-Americans and Hispanics than from whites.

In other words, O’Rourke’s backing is tilted to constituencies that are not normally associated with a moderate white Democratic politician whose voting record, by party standards, is on the center-right.

If these demographic patterns hold, O’Rourke is competing more directly with Sanders (and Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren) than with Biden.

The Sanders-O’Rourke battle has already begun. Bernie Sanders loyalists have been challenging O’Rourke’s credentials for the past three months as both men seek support from younger voters.

“Forces loyal to Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders are waging an increasingly public war against Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, the new darling of Democratic activists,” Jonathan Allen and Alex Seitz-Wald of NBC News wrote in December. “O’Rourke’s ability to connect with younger and progressive white voters,” they continued, “puts him in direct competition with the Vermont senator.”

On Tuesday, Sanders announced that he has hired David Sirota, one of O’Rourke’s harshest critics, as a senior adviser and speechwriter. On Dec. 22, Sirota published a 1,700 word denunciation of O’Rourke in The Guardian that concluded,

    Another blank-slate Democrat who pretends there is a unifying third way between the 99 percent and the 1 percent and who refuses to take sides in big fights against corporate power — that may excite Betomaniacs, establishment Democrats and those with stakes in the status quo, but it won’t rescue our country and it won’t save the planet.

For a candidate with only a modest record in national politics, O’Rourke faces a daunting but not necessarily insuperable challenge in securing the nomination. His candidacy will be a test of his charisma and “spark,” as Don Fowler put it — of the “decency” and “integrity” that a fair number of voters and observers have commented on — against the more substantial and detailed progressivism of his adversaries, the moderation of still others — and all the things we don’t know about him yet.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37718
    • View Profile
🗳️ Your Daily Dose of Beto
« Reply #937 on: March 21, 2019, 02:18:19 AM »
I wonder how much money he will rake in the first week?  Getting lots of free publicity these days too.  Neam Recognition is skyrocketing.

RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/03/20/orourke-campaign-pace-1230485


Beto O'Rourke's lightning speed campaign leaves staffers for some of his fellow Democratic hopefuls miffed. | Charles Krupa/AP Photo

2020 Elections
O’Rourke’s sprint out of the gate leaves Democratic field gasping

With no day job, the Texas Democrat's breakneck pace of campaign stops is driving some of his competitors nuts.

By DAVID SIDERS and CHRISTOPHER CADELAGO

03/20/2019 05:39 PM EDT
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter

PLYMOUTH, N.H. — By Thursday afternoon, Beto O’Rourke will have campaigned in all 10 counties in New Hampshire — a sprint that will take him all of 48 hours. Last week he was all over Iowa, and in between, he traversed the upper Midwest.

With no job tying him to Washington or a state capital — and a genuine zeal for the open road — O’Rourke is rallying college students, bounding onto café countertops and pressing himself into the news cycle in different media markets by the hour.

“We’re setting the pace,” O’Rourke said in Iowa over the weekend, after running a 5K race at the start of a frenzied day of campaigning in the first-in-the-nation caucus state. He then traveled to Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania, before driving his rented Dodge Grand Caravan more than 430 miles east to New Hampshire.

In less than a week since announcing his campaign, the Texas Democrat has singlehandedly quickened the clip of the early presidential primary, annoying some of his competitors — and driving others nuts.
COUNTDOWN TO 2020

The race for 2020 starts now. Stay in the know. Follow our presidential election coverage.
Email

By signing up you agree to receive email newsletters or alerts from POLITICO. You can unsubscribe at any time.

O’Rourke is hardly the first presidential candidate this year to arrive in Iowa or New Hampshire, states that presidential contenders have been visiting since the midterm elections last year. But O’Rourke is benefitting from large crowds and a protracted run of media attention following the announcement of his campaign last week.

His first-day fundraising of $6.1 million, which he reported Monday, surpassed all of his competitors. And by waiting until Wednesday to announce his average donation of $47, O’Rourke generated another batch of stories. Later, as O’Rourke dashed from an event in Plymouth, an elderly woman craning her neck to see him climbed shakily onto a bench.

“Hey,” she said, “he stands on furniture.”

Aides to other top Democrats running for president granted in recent days they’ve inescapably been pulled into the “Beto Show,” texting quips about his wild arm gestures and his table-top campaigning — while acknowledging he’s giving voters and reporters an up-close view that they, by and large, are not.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, for one, gives nearly the same speech at every event. He eschews coffee counters for his podium and rarely takes questions from the audience, let alone the news media.

Rival aides have used Twitter as a kind of tracking device, privately taking shots at O’Rourke’s thin operation and noting though wry retorts each time he stumbles or borrows a policy or talking point from their candidate.

With O’Rourke unemployed and free to roam the country in his minivan, other campaigns have begun discussing how to maximize their exposure when they travel.
Beto O'Rourke

2020 Elections
O'Rourke says 128,000 donors gave to his campaign in first day

By DAVID SIDERS

Yet none of the advisers to other Democrats said they’re planning wholesale changes to their approaches, with each insisting they are going to run their own races and one predicting O’Rourke will eventually fade.

As one senior official for a 2020 Democrat put it to POLITICO, “When you’re in a race of 20 people, you can’t change everything for one person.”

“He could still be in Congress, but he quit,” another senior official said of O’Rourke. “He’s decided that this is his big adventure now, and he’s going to do what he’s going to do.”

Eventually, however, some who work for those with day jobs concede, they’ll have to amend their work schedules to accommodate the anticipated faster pace of the campaign.

O’Rourke’s frenetic pace is largely an effort to replicate the closer-than-expected Texas Senate campaign he ran against Ted Cruz, when he visited all 254 counties in the Republican-heavy state.

When asked about his strategy, he says repeatedly, “You’ve got to show up.”

For O’Rourke’s supporters, the candidate’s efforts to get there are half the appeal. When several hundred students awaiting O’Rourke at Keene State College on Tuesday night heard that he would be late, they emitted a low groan, but recovered when organizers told them to turn on Facebook, where O’Rourke was streaming himself live from the car. When he arrived, he lingered long after the event to pose for photographs with anyone who wanted.

But O’Rourke is also attempting in his go-everywhere-fast campaign to establish himself as a course-correction from Hillary Clinton’s losing effort in 2016. Many Democrats remain bitter that Clinton did not campaign at all in Wisconsin in the general election — a critical state ultimately carried by President Donald Trump. Asked recently to assess the Democratic Party’s failure in the last presidential election, O’Rourke said, “You’ve got to show up, and you’ve got to come back.”
Nevada State Democratic Party Chairman and Nevada State Assemblyman William McCurdy I

2020 Elections
Nevada Dems revamp caucuses after 2016 clashes

By ELENA SCHNEIDER

Robert Wolf, a venture capitalist who raised money for and advised former President Barack Obama, said, “If someone told me that their first stop was going to be Iowa and their second stop was going to be a road trip through the Blue Wall, considering our last candidate missed badly on the Blue Wall, I would say that’s a pretty thoughtful strategy.”

He said, “From what I am watching and hearing, the excitement around Beto is real and the grass roots following is growing exponentially on each and every stop. We have learned from the past that instead of a candidate who’s behind rope lines all the time, those who are taking selfies, shaking hands and kissing babies draw bigger crowds and support.”

Despite his fundraising and crowd-drawing ability, O’Rourke is still running far behind Sanders and former Vice President Joe Biden and about even with Sen. Kamala Harris of California in the latest CNN poll, released Tuesday. O'Rourke will travel to South Carolina after New Hampshire, and he will draw another media convulsion on March 30, when he holds a campaign kickoff in his hometown of El Paso.

In his typical fashion, O’Rourke announced Wednesday that he will not only hold an event in El Paso that day, but also in Houston and Austin.

Still, it is so early in the year that O’Rourke almost certainly cannot maintain the constant crush of media attention that has accompanied his first week. Sitting lawmakers running for president can — and do — drive coverage by introducing bills, and debates starting this summer will offer abundant break-out opportunities. Biden, who is widely expected to run, will likely draw significant attention from O’Rourke following any announcement of a campaign.

Asked if he could maintain his own pace, O’Rourke said, “We’ll see. It is extraordinarily energizing to be doing this … It’s thrilling to me.”

For Jeff Roe, who was Cruz’s chief strategist, O’Rourke’s early run is familiar. He said that if O’Rourke remains tied to the road, it will prevent him from advancing any public storyline other than that he is a road warrior — a narrative that will eventually grow old.

“Coming out of the gate, for the first couple weeks, it’s probably OK,” Roe said. “But this is all he has … he’s in a constant sprint to find himself.”
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37718
    • View Profile
🗳️ Kamala puts Beto on notice
« Reply #938 on: March 22, 2019, 01:10:21 AM »
https://www.politico.com/story/2019/03/21/kamala-rides-into-betos-texas-1227893


Presidential candidate Kamala Harris plans to court delegates in Texas, stepping on the turf of fellow Democratic hopeful Beto O'Rourke. | Charlie Neibergall/AP Photo

2020 Elections
Kamala puts Beto on notice

The California Democrat is making a concerted play for delegates in O'Rourke's home state of Texas, starting with a visit this weekend.

By CHRISTOPHER CADELAGO and DAVID SIDERS

03/21/2019 05:03 AM EDT
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter

Kamala is coming after Beto — in his own backyard.

Hours before the former El Paso congressman unveiled his presidential bid, Harris announced she was heading to Texas — an unmistakable warning shot at a fellow upstart competing to capture the imagination of Democratic voters.

She’ll meet Friday outside Dallas with Tarrant County Democrats, then it’s on to Houston Saturday for a big rally at Texas Southern University in Houston. It’s the start of a sustained, delegate-focused strategy that aims to take advantage of the front-loaded primary calendar in which Texas and California will significantly shape the race on March 3.

Harris has already reached out to Congressional Black Caucus members from Texas, including Reps. Eddie Bernice Johnson, Sheila Jackson Lee, Al Green, Colin Allred and Marc Veasey, according to a Democrat familiar with the calls.

The aggressive maneuvering is the surest sign yet that for all of O’Rourke’s appeal at home — owing to his tantalizingly close loss to Republican Sen. Ted Cruz last fall — Harris isn’t ceding Texas to O’Rourke or his fellow Texan Julián Castro, the former Obama-era Housing and Urban Development secretary from San Antonio. If anything, it’s the opposite: She wants to make clear that she’s willing to go toe-to-toe with O’Rourke, the charismatic Gen-Xer who starts the race with more money and a similar knack for drawing media and exciting audiences.

"There is no state in America we will cede to anyone," a senior Harris campaign official told POLITICO. "We see a lot of opportunity to deepen support with African American and Latino communities and to expand into suburban areas where Democrats are resurgent."
COUNTDOWN TO 2020

The race for 2020 starts now. Stay in the know. Follow our presidential election coverage.
Email

By signing up you agree to receive email newsletters or alerts from POLITICO. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Harris and her team think they can win a significant share of Texas delegates by focusing on the Houston and Dallas areas. They pointed to Harris' advocacy for Dreamers in the Senate as an advantage with Latino voters and noted that she will hold her first campaign rally in Texas at one of the nation's largest historically black colleges, a choice reflecting her priorities as a candidate.

More than half of the delegates up for grabs in the Democratic nomination contest will be decided by Super Tuesday states. That makes Texas a must stop for serious contenders. At the same time, like California, the sheer size of the state requires major resources and a creative approach to compete.

“There’s a certain type of cruelty involved in having both Texas and California on the same day because they both are large, populous, diverse states with more than a dozen media markets that are quite frankly hard to get around,” said Colin Strother, a veteran Texas Democratic strategist. “Candidates have to start this process early to have any chance of success.”

Finding top campaign talent in the GOP-dominated state isn’t a given, but Harris’ campaign is well situated on that front. Ace Smith, a Harris senior strategist, ran Hillary Clinton’s campaigns in Texas and California in 2008. Senior strategist Emmy Ruiz, who served as Clinton’s state director in Nevada and Colorado in 2016, is from Texas, where she ran the field program for the Democratic National Committee from 2009 to 2011, and worked for Annie's List, which helps elect pro-choice women in Texas. And Harris’ communications director, Lily Adams, is a granddaughter of former Texas Gov. Ann Richards.

Shelby Cole, a key player in O’Rourke’s record-breaking Senate fundraising effort and a Houston native, moved to Authentic Campaigns, where she is the digital fundraising director for Harris' presidential campaign. And Jose Nunez, Harris' online organizing director, is from San Antonio, and worked for former Rep. Leticia Van de Putte of Texas.

Asked about rivals starting to campaign in Texas — and about his own hold on the state — O’Rourke said Tuesday, “I take no one for granted, and that includes the people of Texas.”

“Every one of them deserves to be able to see every Democratic candidate for the nomination, to listen to us all, myself included,” O’Rourke told reporters after rallying several hundred students at Penn State University. “Texas is going to be central to our strategy. But this is going to be a true national campaign for everyone everywhere, and that’s got to include Texas.”
Beto O'Rourke

2020 elections
‘Not one woman got that kind of coverage’: Beto backlash begins

By NATASHA KORECKI

When a student asked O’Rourke during the event about “a lot of really qualified female candidates running this year” and what he would do to “empower women in Congress,” O’Rourke responded, “One hundred percent agree — count myself lucky to be in this field, remind myself constantly that come summer of 2020, we are all going to be on the same team behind the same nominee. And whoever she or he happens to be, we want them to be successful in the November election against Donald Trump.”

O’Rourke, after his Senate race, has a huge edge starting out: A University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll last year put his favorability among Democrats at 93 percent.

But Democrats in the expansive state will have plenty of alternatives in the presidential race. In 2008, Texas Democrats divided so sharply between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton that the former won the state’s caucuses and the latter its primary. O’Rourke in 2020 will be contending not only with a large field of candidates from out of state, but also Castro, who could draw home-state support.

Strother put the feeling among Texans in universal terms: “We’re the best at everything, just ask us,” he said. “Our music is the best. Our food is the best. Our women are the prettiest, and beer even tastes better this side of the Red River.

“Texans,” he added, “are going to stick with a Texan — to a large degree.”

Yet he and other Democrats in the state still see an opening for non-Texans to win a significant share of the state’s 228 pledged delegates, particular for a candidate with Harris' profile. He said she can appeal to African American and Latino voters, attract media attention across the state and highlight her career in law enforcement in a part of the country where law-and-order candidates run strong.

“She gives a heck of a speech. She’s inspiring. She has an interesting story,” Strother said. “The fact she’s put some bad people behind bars is not going to cut against her here. We want bad people behind bars. I think she’ll do well. She’ll get a lot of support.”

Strategist Harold Cook, former executive director of the Democratic Party of Texas, compares the tactic of camping out in key areas to “duck hunting 101." "If you’re competing in a big state with proportional vote, you don’t need to get the most ducks to get a whole bunch of ducks."

Of Texas’ 228 pledged delegates, 149 will be allocated to Texas' 31 state Senate districts — a difference from most other states that distribute their delegates by congressional district. Those districts have been packed with Democrats to allow Republicans to control more legislative seats, thereby decreasing the number of truly blue districts.
Joe Biden

2020 Elections
World leaders tell Biden: We need you

By DANIEL LIPPMAN

But with neighboring seats covering the suburbs turning away from Republicans, Democrats will have a chance to campaign in more places that hug the borders of Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, said Texas Democratic strategist Matt Angle of the Lone Star Project.

The remaining 79 delegates are statewide, and candidates will need to meet a 15 percent threshold to secure them both statewide and at the district level.

To give a sense of the scale, O’Rourke’s former 16th congressional district includes just one state Senate district. In 2016, Clinton won three of its four delegates, with Bernie Sanders taking one.

With a crowded 2020 field, Angle said Democrats can’t appeal to only one part of the state — or one constituency.

“It’s really easy to overlook the African American vote in Texas, and that’s a big mistake,” he said, noting the black population has grown at about five times the rate of whites.

The hometown candidates could be a blessing for others, too. Castro’s run brings added attention to the Latino population, which is growing at an even faster rate than the black population — from El Paso to San Antonio to Corpus Christi, but also in Houston. O’Rourke, meanwhile, demonstrated in his Senate campaign that there’s a strong appetite for change in places where Democrats had lost faith and barely organized in years, said Henry R. Muñoz III, a Texas Democratic leader, philanthropist and major donor.

“People in Texas are enjoying the fact that all of these candidates are calling, that they are coming to the state; that they are taking the voice of the people of Texas very seriously,” said Muñoz, co-founder of the Latino Victory Project and DNC national finance chair. “Certainly, the ‘Beto factor’ plays a role in that, but I think when you look at the diversity of Texas, and you look at the diversity of the candidates who are running for the Democratic nomination in 2020, there’s a great match-up.

“So,” Muñoz added, “people are looking forward to Kamala coming to Texas.”
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Eddie

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 17439
    • View Profile
Re: 🗳️ Kamala puts Beto on notice
« Reply #939 on: March 22, 2019, 05:38:44 AM »
https://www.politico.com/story/2019/03/21/kamala-rides-into-betos-texas-1227893


Presidential candidate Kamala Harris plans to court delegates in Texas, stepping on the turf of fellow Democratic hopeful Beto O'Rourke. | Charlie Neibergall/AP Photo

2020 Elections
Kamala puts Beto on notice

The California Democrat is making a concerted play for delegates in O'Rourke's home state of Texas, starting with a visit this weekend.

By CHRISTOPHER CADELAGO and DAVID SIDERS

03/21/2019 05:03 AM EDT
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter

Kamala is coming after Beto — in his own backyard.

Hours before the former El Paso congressman unveiled his presidential bid, Harris announced she was heading to Texas — an unmistakable warning shot at a fellow upstart competing to capture the imagination of Democratic voters.

She’ll meet Friday outside Dallas with Tarrant County Democrats, then it’s on to Houston Saturday for a big rally at Texas Southern University in Houston. It’s the start of a sustained, delegate-focused strategy that aims to take advantage of the front-loaded primary calendar in which Texas and California will significantly shape the race on March 3.

Harris has already reached out to Congressional Black Caucus members from Texas, including Reps. Eddie Bernice Johnson, Sheila Jackson Lee, Al Green, Colin Allred and Marc Veasey, according to a Democrat familiar with the calls.

The aggressive maneuvering is the surest sign yet that for all of O’Rourke’s appeal at home — owing to his tantalizingly close loss to Republican Sen. Ted Cruz last fall — Harris isn’t ceding Texas to O’Rourke or his fellow Texan Julián Castro, the former Obama-era Housing and Urban Development secretary from San Antonio. If anything, it’s the opposite: She wants to make clear that she’s willing to go toe-to-toe with O’Rourke, the charismatic Gen-Xer who starts the race with more money and a similar knack for drawing media and exciting audiences.

"There is no state in America we will cede to anyone," a senior Harris campaign official told POLITICO. "We see a lot of opportunity to deepen support with African American and Latino communities and to expand into suburban areas where Democrats are resurgent."
COUNTDOWN TO 2020

The race for 2020 starts now. Stay in the know. Follow our presidential election coverage.
Email

By signing up you agree to receive email newsletters or alerts from POLITICO. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Harris and her team think they can win a significant share of Texas delegates by focusing on the Houston and Dallas areas. They pointed to Harris' advocacy for Dreamers in the Senate as an advantage with Latino voters and noted that she will hold her first campaign rally in Texas at one of the nation's largest historically black colleges, a choice reflecting her priorities as a candidate.

More than half of the delegates up for grabs in the Democratic nomination contest will be decided by Super Tuesday states. That makes Texas a must stop for serious contenders. At the same time, like California, the sheer size of the state requires major resources and a creative approach to compete.

“There’s a certain type of cruelty involved in having both Texas and California on the same day because they both are large, populous, diverse states with more than a dozen media markets that are quite frankly hard to get around,” said Colin Strother, a veteran Texas Democratic strategist. “Candidates have to start this process early to have any chance of success.”

Finding top campaign talent in the GOP-dominated state isn’t a given, but Harris’ campaign is well situated on that front. Ace Smith, a Harris senior strategist, ran Hillary Clinton’s campaigns in Texas and California in 2008. Senior strategist Emmy Ruiz, who served as Clinton’s state director in Nevada and Colorado in 2016, is from Texas, where she ran the field program for the Democratic National Committee from 2009 to 2011, and worked for Annie's List, which helps elect pro-choice women in Texas. And Harris’ communications director, Lily Adams, is a granddaughter of former Texas Gov. Ann Richards.

Shelby Cole, a key player in O’Rourke’s record-breaking Senate fundraising effort and a Houston native, moved to Authentic Campaigns, where she is the digital fundraising director for Harris' presidential campaign. And Jose Nunez, Harris' online organizing director, is from San Antonio, and worked for former Rep. Leticia Van de Putte of Texas.

Asked about rivals starting to campaign in Texas — and about his own hold on the state — O’Rourke said Tuesday, “I take no one for granted, and that includes the people of Texas.”

“Every one of them deserves to be able to see every Democratic candidate for the nomination, to listen to us all, myself included,” O’Rourke told reporters after rallying several hundred students at Penn State University. “Texas is going to be central to our strategy. But this is going to be a true national campaign for everyone everywhere, and that’s got to include Texas.”
Beto O'Rourke

2020 elections
‘Not one woman got that kind of coverage’: Beto backlash begins

By NATASHA KORECKI

When a student asked O’Rourke during the event about “a lot of really qualified female candidates running this year” and what he would do to “empower women in Congress,” O’Rourke responded, “One hundred percent agree — count myself lucky to be in this field, remind myself constantly that come summer of 2020, we are all going to be on the same team behind the same nominee. And whoever she or he happens to be, we want them to be successful in the November election against Donald Trump.”

O’Rourke, after his Senate race, has a huge edge starting out: A University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll last year put his favorability among Democrats at 93 percent.

But Democrats in the expansive state will have plenty of alternatives in the presidential race. In 2008, Texas Democrats divided so sharply between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton that the former won the state’s caucuses and the latter its primary. O’Rourke in 2020 will be contending not only with a large field of candidates from out of state, but also Castro, who could draw home-state support.

Strother put the feeling among Texans in universal terms: “We’re the best at everything, just ask us,” he said. “Our music is the best. Our food is the best. Our women are the prettiest, and beer even tastes better this side of the Red River.

“Texans,” he added, “are going to stick with a Texan — to a large degree.”

Yet he and other Democrats in the state still see an opening for non-Texans to win a significant share of the state’s 228 pledged delegates, particular for a candidate with Harris' profile. He said she can appeal to African American and Latino voters, attract media attention across the state and highlight her career in law enforcement in a part of the country where law-and-order candidates run strong.

“She gives a heck of a speech. She’s inspiring. She has an interesting story,” Strother said. “The fact she’s put some bad people behind bars is not going to cut against her here. We want bad people behind bars. I think she’ll do well. She’ll get a lot of support.”

Strategist Harold Cook, former executive director of the Democratic Party of Texas, compares the tactic of camping out in key areas to “duck hunting 101." "If you’re competing in a big state with proportional vote, you don’t need to get the most ducks to get a whole bunch of ducks."

Of Texas’ 228 pledged delegates, 149 will be allocated to Texas' 31 state Senate districts — a difference from most other states that distribute their delegates by congressional district. Those districts have been packed with Democrats to allow Republicans to control more legislative seats, thereby decreasing the number of truly blue districts.
Joe Biden

2020 Elections
World leaders tell Biden: We need you

By DANIEL LIPPMAN

But with neighboring seats covering the suburbs turning away from Republicans, Democrats will have a chance to campaign in more places that hug the borders of Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, said Texas Democratic strategist Matt Angle of the Lone Star Project.

The remaining 79 delegates are statewide, and candidates will need to meet a 15 percent threshold to secure them both statewide and at the district level.

To give a sense of the scale, O’Rourke’s former 16th congressional district includes just one state Senate district. In 2016, Clinton won three of its four delegates, with Bernie Sanders taking one.

With a crowded 2020 field, Angle said Democrats can’t appeal to only one part of the state — or one constituency.

“It’s really easy to overlook the African American vote in Texas, and that’s a big mistake,” he said, noting the black population has grown at about five times the rate of whites.

The hometown candidates could be a blessing for others, too. Castro’s run brings added attention to the Latino population, which is growing at an even faster rate than the black population — from El Paso to San Antonio to Corpus Christi, but also in Houston. O’Rourke, meanwhile, demonstrated in his Senate campaign that there’s a strong appetite for change in places where Democrats had lost faith and barely organized in years, said Henry R. Muñoz III, a Texas Democratic leader, philanthropist and major donor.

“People in Texas are enjoying the fact that all of these candidates are calling, that they are coming to the state; that they are taking the voice of the people of Texas very seriously,” said Muñoz, co-founder of the Latino Victory Project and DNC national finance chair. “Certainly, the ‘Beto factor’ plays a role in that, but I think when you look at the diversity of Texas, and you look at the diversity of the candidates who are running for the Democratic nomination in 2020, there’s a great match-up.

“So,” Muñoz added, “people are looking forward to Kamala coming to Texas.”

Harris and her team think they can win a significant share of Texas delegates by focusing on the Houston and Dallas areas.

Translation: Beto is too white and too male to beat me. The "persons of color" vote is mine.

They will cannibalize each other. It will be interesting to see if Julian Castro (Mr. Reparations) can get any traction. I'm guessing not that much. At least Harris is smart enough to not use the R word in public,
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37718
    • View Profile
Re: 🗳️ Kamala puts Beto on notice
« Reply #940 on: March 22, 2019, 05:54:48 AM »

Harris and her team think they can win a significant share of Texas delegates by focusing on the Houston and Dallas areas.

Translation: Beto is too white and too male to beat me. The "persons of color" vote is mine.

They will cannibalize each other. It will be interesting to see if Julian Castro (Mr. Reparations) can get any traction. I'm guessing not that much. At least Harris is smart enough to not use the R word in public,

I think Beto Beatos her in the TX primaries.  First of all, regardless of color people tend to vote for the Local Boy.  2nd, Beto speaks fluent Spanish and can give his speeches in Soanish.  Kamala can't do that.  He'll take the Hispanic community that way.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Eddie

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 17439
    • View Profile
Re: 🗳️ Kamala puts Beto on notice
« Reply #941 on: March 22, 2019, 06:19:40 AM »

Harris and her team think they can win a significant share of Texas delegates by focusing on the Houston and Dallas areas.

Translation: Beto is too white and too male to beat me. The "persons of color" vote is mine.

They will cannibalize each other. It will be interesting to see if Julian Castro (Mr. Reparations) can get any traction. I'm guessing not that much. At least Harris is smart enough to not use the R word in public,

I think Beto Beatos her in the TX primaries.  First of all, regardless of color people tend to vote for the Local Boy.  2nd, Beto speaks fluent Spanish and can give his speeches in Soanish.  Kamala can't do that.  He'll take the Hispanic community that way.

RE

Castro is local and very socialist and has a real Texas political family pedigree (San Antonio royalty). If anyone can get the Hispanic vote out it would be him.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37718
    • View Profile
Re: 🗳️ Kamala puts Beto on notice
« Reply #942 on: March 22, 2019, 06:23:13 AM »

Harris and her team think they can win a significant share of Texas delegates by focusing on the Houston and Dallas areas.

Translation: Beto is too white and too male to beat me. The "persons of color" vote is mine.

They will cannibalize each other. It will be interesting to see if Julian Castro (Mr. Reparations) can get any traction. I'm guessing not that much. At least Harris is smart enough to not use the R word in public,


This was just a Head-to-Head Beto-Kamala battle.  I agree, Castro get the majority of Hispanic votes.  It will be an interesting primary regardless.

RE
I think Beto Beatos her in the TX primaries.  First of all, regardless of color people tend to vote for the Local Boy.  2nd, Beto speaks fluent Spanish and can give his speeches in Soanish.  Kamala can't do that.  He'll take the Hispanic community that way.

RE

Castro is local and very socialist and has a real Texas political family pedigree (San Antonio royalty). If anyone can get the Hispanic vote out it would be him.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Eddie

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 17439
    • View Profile
Re: Election Errata
« Reply #943 on: March 22, 2019, 08:02:43 AM »
Beto's hacker past won't help him in Texas, I don't think.

They should avoid any "Elect Psychedelic Warlord" posters.

Hell, I might vote for him just because of that great internet persona.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 37718
    • View Profile
Re: Election Errata
« Reply #944 on: March 22, 2019, 09:09:02 AM »
Beto's hacker past won't help him in Texas, I don't think.

They should avoid any "Elect Psychedelic Warlord" posters.

Hell, I might vote for him just because of that great internet persona.

In terms of this field of Demodope candidates, if I did vote, right now I would vote Beto.  The coffee table performances and hand waving sold me.  ;D  Also the fact he is doing his campaign tour in a rented Stealth Van a big selling point for me.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
Errata

Started by Guest The Kitchen Sink

0 Replies
431 Views
Last post October 13, 2016, 02:05:21 AM
by Guest
3 Replies
1128 Views
Last post November 08, 2016, 02:26:52 PM
by monsta666
24 Replies
3676 Views
Last post February 28, 2017, 06:54:54 AM
by RE