AuthorTopic: Election Errata  (Read 126083 times)

Offline Surly1

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Re: 🗳️ Warren leads Democratic field by 3 points in new national poll
« Reply #1125 on: October 14, 2019, 04:43:47 PM »
https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/465727-warren-leads-democratic-field-by-3-in-new-national-poll

Warren leads Democratic field by 3 points in new national poll
By Max Greenwood - 10/14/19 03:49 PM EDT

Warren is coming to Norfolk on Friday!
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: 🗳️ Warren leads Democratic field by 3 points in new national poll
« Reply #1126 on: October 14, 2019, 04:45:38 PM »
https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/465727-warren-leads-democratic-field-by-3-in-new-national-poll

Warren leads Democratic field by 3 points in new national poll
By Max Greenwood - 10/14/19 03:49 PM EDT

Warren is coming to Norfolk on Friday!

Are you signing on to her campaign?  I personally think she can beat Trumpovetsky, even if he doesn't get impeached first.

RE
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Re: 🗳️ Warren leads Democratic field by 3 points in new national poll
« Reply #1127 on: October 14, 2019, 06:37:33 PM »
https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/465727-warren-leads-democratic-field-by-3-in-new-national-poll

Warren leads Democratic field by 3 points in new national poll
By Max Greenwood - 10/14/19 03:49 PM EDT

Warren is coming to Norfolk on Friday!

Are you signing on to her campaign?  I personally think she can beat Trumpovetsky, even if he doesn't get impeached first.

RE

I don't know the I'm "signing on," but she is my fave, and I plan to attend if I can.

She can definitely win, IMO.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: 🗳️ Warren leads Democratic field by 3 points in new national poll
« Reply #1128 on: October 14, 2019, 07:20:19 PM »
https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/465727-warren-leads-democratic-field-by-3-in-new-national-poll

Warren leads Democratic field by 3 points in new national poll
By Max Greenwood - 10/14/19 03:49 PM EDT

Warren is coming to Norfolk on Friday!

Are you signing on to her campaign?  I personally think she can beat Trumpovetsky, even if he doesn't get impeached first.

RE

I don't know the I'm "signing on," but she is my fave, and I plan to attend if I can.

She can definitely win, IMO.

Definitely the best candidate for the Demodopes.  With your experience in advertizing, you'd be a great addition to the Norfolk staff, and you're not working as much now anyhow.

Well, get some pics and vids at the rally anyhow.

RE
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🗳️ RE's Live Report on the Demodope Debate
« Reply #1129 on: October 15, 2019, 06:12:45 PM »
Been watching the latest Demodope debate, which first of all is terrifically unfair.  The top candidates are getting 95% of the questions and airtime from the mods.

Second observation, as the new front runner, Liz is getting hammered on by about everyone on her refusal to give a straight answer on taxes for the middle class.  She always responds evasively to this question saying the total cost will go down, but not that taxes will go up.  Because of course, admitting taxes will go up for anyone but the super rich is a death sentence at the polls.

Uncle Joe is looking pretty sad again in his performance, Bernie is doing OK but nothing new from him really.  Most of the rest of them have had so little airtime it's impossible to say how they are doing.  They'll probably drop out of the race for the most part before the November debate.

RE
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🗳️ Takeaways From the October Democratic Debate (NYT Version)
« Reply #1130 on: October 16, 2019, 12:00:44 AM »
Here's the take from the MSM, NYT version, which I generally agree with.

Mayor Pete definitely had his best appearance to date.  Still an open question how well a homosexual can reach anybody in the Repugnant Party, which is necessary for victory IMHO.  I remember when Ed Koch ran against Mario Cuomo for Gubernator of NYS.  One of the slogans for Cuomo was "Vote for Cuomo, not the Homo" (Koch was rumored to be gay), and not sure things have changed that much. Also, what will the "First Lady" be called?  "First Partner? "First Bottom"? Who goes on top?  Do they take turns?

Liz stood up quite well to the onslaught, and Bernie looked decently healthy.  However, the fact he is going to be endorsed by AOC may not be such a good thing.  Uncle Joe's poll numbers are likely to go down.  Beto looks like he should drop out now and run for TX Senate instead.

We'll see what happens in the November installment.

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/16/us/politics/democratic-debate.html

Politics|6 Takeaways From the October Democratic Debate



    Debate Takeaways
    Speaking Time
    Who’s Running
    State of the Race
    Politics Newsletter
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6 Takeaways From the October Democratic Debate

Warren was called out by rivals for a change while Biden failed to stand out, and Sanders calmed concerns about his health. Buttigieg had his biggest night yet. But no game-changing moments for other candidates.
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Twelve Democratic presidential candidates are on stage for this month’s debate in Westerville, Ohio. Here are the key moments from the first half of the evening.CreditCreditTamir Kalifa for The New York Times
Shane GoldmacherReid J. Epstein

By Shane Goldmacher and Reid J. Epstein

    Oct. 16, 2019
    Updated 2:12 a.m. ET

WESTERVILLE, Ohio — The CNN/New York Times debate on Tuesday night revealed new dynamics in the Democratic presidential race: Senator Elizabeth Warren took sustained fire from multiple rivals, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. struggled to make an impact and Mayor Pete Buttigieg and other candidates were newly aggressive in making their points.

Here are six takeaways from the debate:
Warren takes incoming, for a change
ImageSenator Kamala Harris challenges Senator Elizabeth Warren on whether Trump’s Twitter account should be shut down.
Senator Kamala Harris challenges Senator Elizabeth Warren on whether Trump’s Twitter account should be shut down.CreditHilary Swift for The New York Times

For the first time this year, Ms. Warren was frequently called out and criticized by her rivals:

    Mr. Biden called her health care plans “vague” and argued she had never accomplished anything big.

    Mr. Buttigieg implied she didn’t trust the American people to decide whether they wanted to remain on private health insurance plans.

    Senator Amy Klobuchar denounced Ms. Warren’s plans as a “pipe dream.”

    Senator Kamala Harris wanted to know why Ms. Warren didn’t join her call for Twitter to ban President Trump from its social media platform.

For a candidate who has risen in the polls based on her policy acumen and specifics, Ms. Warren’s unwillingness to address the question of whether her “Medicare for all” plan would require higher taxes on the middle class was striking. And her opponents put her on the defensive.

Ms. Warren in large part survived the attacks, though she never did answer questions about whether she’d raise those middle-class taxes. Nor did she explain to Ms. Harris why she thinks Mr. Trump should remain on Twitter. But she did present a concise counterargument, saying that only her ambitious ideas can produce an electoral mandate from disaffected Americans to defeat Mr. Trump.
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In all, the debate served as a certification of Ms. Warren’s status as one of two front-runners in the race, alongside Mr. Biden. It also crystallized much of the 19-way race as a contest to be the Biden alternative. The candidates sparring with Ms. Warren were auditioning to Democratic voters not just how they would go toe-to-toe with President Trump, but also how they would stack up against Ms. Warren as the campaign narrows to just a few candidates.
Biden shrinks
Image
Joseph R. Biden Jr. speaks about his accomplishments.
Joseph R. Biden Jr. speaks about his accomplishments.CreditTamir Kalifa for The New York Times

Unlike the previous three debates, nobody instigated a fight with Mr. Biden. It was a sign both of his diminished status in the race — he’s no longer the solo front-runner, having ceded ground to Ms. Warren — but also evidence that attacking Mr. Biden hasn’t served his rivals well when they’ve tried.

The toughest moment for Mr. Biden came when the moderators pressed him on his son Hunter Biden’s work in Ukraine. When no candidate pressed him on the topic, it faded from the discussion after Mr. Biden delivered a garbled and wobbly explanation.

Mr. Biden, as is his custom, at times wandered away from the question at hand. During a monologue about tax rates, he bemoaned the size of the field and the relatively brief amount of time allotted candidates to answer questions.

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He was strongest when on offense against Ms. Warren. But it was a telling sign that his rivals tried to present themselves as a Biden alternative by contrasting themselves with Ms. Warren instead of Mr. Biden. She. not the former vice president, looked like the candidate to beat on Tuesday night.
Sanders calms concerns post heart attack
Image
Senator Bernie Sanders addressed his health after a heart attack at the debate.
Senator Bernie Sanders addressed his health after a heart attack at the debate.CreditTamir Kalifa for The New York Times

He railed against billionaires. He pitched “Medicare for all.” He tossed out his campaign URL. He said “damn” — twice.

It was vintage Bernie Sanders on Tuesday — and that was a relief to his supporter and advisers two weeks after the 78-year-old suffered a heart attack.

“I’m healthy, I’m feeling great,” Mr. Sanders said as the debate approached the two-hour mark. But by then Mr. Sanders had made that case with his performance, dueling with Mr. Biden over their ideological differences and thrusting his arm into the arm to seek more airtime.

“We are going to be mounting a vigorous campaign all over this country. That is how I think I can reassure the American people,” Mr. Sanders said when asked about his health.

When Senator Cory Booker interjected with a joke that Mr. Sanders also supports medical marijuana, Mr. Sanders did not hesitate with the retort, “I’m not on it tonight.”
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He may not have won over new supporters, but he looked like the same old Bernie Sanders. For this debate, that was more than enough.
Buttigieg’s biggest night yet
Image
Mayor Pete Buttigieg addresses expanding the Supreme Court.
Mayor Pete Buttigieg addresses expanding the Supreme Court.CreditTamir Kalifa for The New York Times

For months, Mr. Buttigieg has been satisfied to make most of his points at the debates without scoring them at the expense of his rivals. That ended Tuesday.

Mr. Buttigieg sparred sharply with former Representative Beto O’Rourke on guns. He rebuked Representative Tulsi Gabbard on foreign policy. And, most notably, he engaged in the most substantive and sustained contrast of any candidate yet with Ms. Warren.

It was Mr. Buttigieg’s exchange with Ms. Warren over “Medicare for all” that was most memorable, pressing her as she declined to say, yet again, whether her plan would require a middle-class tax increase. (She says her plan would curb middle-class “costs.”)

“A yes or no question that did not get a yes or no answer,” Mr. Buttigieg said, adding, “Your signature, Senator, is to have a plan for everything. Except this.” He rattled off how her plan would “obliterate” the private health insurance of 150 million Americans while pitching his “Medicare for all who want it” alternative.

Mr. Buttigieg’s rebuke of Mr. O’Rourke — “I don’t need lessons from you on courage” — may lend itself more to a viral moment. But the bigger leap was to be seen as a foil to Ms. Warren.

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It felt at times on Tuesday as if the sprawling 12-person stage had actually narrowed to a four-person debate, with Ms. Warren and Mr. Sanders representing the left, and Mr. Biden and Mr. Buttigieg representing the center-left. The occasional television shot of just those four served to hammer home the point.
Booker and Harris settle for staying out of fray
Image
Senator Cory Booker and Senator Kamala Harris speak on women’s healthcare.
Senator Cory Booker and Senator Kamala Harris speak on women’s healthcare.CreditTamir Kalifa for The New York Times

Mr. Booker and Ms. Harris were not the main course on Tuesday. They were the palette cleansers. Mr. Booker and Ms. Harris both came into the debate struggling for support and attention. And it was apparent by the end of the first hour that they had adopted a similar game plan: seeking to rise about the fray and food fight unfolding around them while punching at President Trump.

“Tearing each other down because we have a different plan is unacceptable,” Mr. Booker said. He had been the first candidate to castigate the media for asking Mr. Biden questions about his son’s work in Ukraine.

At one point, Ms. Harris aired a complaint that women’s advocates have pressed for months: the lack of questions about abortion. “This is the sixth debate we have had in this presidential cycle. Not one word with all of these discussions about health care, on women’s access to health care. It’s outrageous,” Ms. Harris said.

On Tuesday, both Ms. Harris and Mr. Booker hit Mr. Trump harder on foreign affairs than any rivals onstage. This is not a new strategy. Ms. Harris focused on Mr. Trump during the last debate, too. And for two candidates who have punched their ticket to November, this was a bloodless way to sell themselves without much risk on a crowded stage.

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No game-changing moments for low-polling candidates
Image
The 12 candidates take the stage at the Democratic presidential debate.
The 12 candidates take the stage at the Democratic presidential debate.CreditTamir Kalifa for The New York Times

The sixth night of Democratic presidential debates delivered three hours of discussion but no signature moments and little likely to be remembered when the primaries and caucuses begin in February.

The most contentious exchanges — between Ms. Warren and Mr. Buttigieg, and then again between Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren — were intermittent, spaced throughout a debate that by obligation had to include seven candidates who haven’t sniffed 5 percent in a poll in months.

With so many low-polling candidates obligated to get speaking time too, the debate meandered through exchanges with Ms. Klobuchar, Mr. O’Rourke and Mr. Castro, each of whom faces long odds to appear at the party’s next debate on Nov. 20 in Atlanta. The billionaire investor Tom Steyer was there too, though, in his first debate appearance, spent more time introducing himself to Democratic voters than he did making a case why he’d be better than anyone else onstage.

While exposing the divisions between the party’s factions, the most taut moments of contrast served more as an example of what is to come once the field shrinks.

Shane Goldmacher is a national political reporter and was previously the chief political correspondent for the Metro Desk. Before joining The Times, he worked at Politico, where he covered national Republican politics and the 2016 presidential campaign. @ShaneGoldmacher
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Re: 🗳️ RE's Live Report on the Demodope Debate
« Reply #1131 on: October 16, 2019, 04:17:33 AM »
Been watching the latest Demodope debate, which first of all is terrifically unfair.  The top candidates are getting 95% of the questions and airtime from the mods.

Second observation, as the new front runner, Liz is getting hammered on by about everyone on her refusal to give a straight answer on taxes for the middle class.  She always responds evasively to this question saying the total cost will go down, but not that taxes will go up.  Because of course, admitting taxes will go up for anyone but the super rich is a death sentence at the polls.

Uncle Joe is looking pretty sad again in his performance, Bernie is doing OK but nothing new from him really.  Most of the rest of them have had so little airtime it's impossible to say how they are doing.  They'll probably drop out of the race for the most part before the November debate.

RE

I watched about half of it before giving up, for many of the same reasons. I thought Liz did OK in spite of the crab-pot mentality of the rest of the candidates.

Your observations about Mayor Pete are indistinguishable from those of a republican ratfucker. But given the lack of agency and personal fragility of most American males, you probably have it right. Imagine a Buttegieg campaign in a general election as a target for the spiritual heirs of Donald Segretti.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: 🗳️ RE's Live Report on the Demodope Debate
« Reply #1132 on: October 16, 2019, 04:27:44 AM »
Your observations about Mayor Pete are indistinguishable from those of a republican ratfucker. But given the lack of agency and personal fragility of most American males, you probably have it right. Imagine a Buttegieg campaign in a general election as a target for the spiritual heirs of Donald Segretti.

It's not that hard to think like a Repugnant.  It's not the most complicated brain to visualize.  They're not the brightest bulbs in the box.

RE
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🗳️ 'I am back': Sanders tops Warren with massive New York City rally
« Reply #1133 on: October 20, 2019, 12:49:06 AM »
https://thehill.com/homenews/administration/466539-white-house-staggers-after-tumultuous-48-hour-hours

2020 elections
'I am back': Sanders tops Warren with massive New York City rally
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez introduces Sen. Bernie Sanders at campaign rally

By HOLLY OTTERBEIN

10/19/2019 04:16 PM EDT


LONG ISLAND CITY, New York — Bernie Sanders one-upped Elizabeth Warren.

In his first rally since he suffered a heart attack, the Vermont senator delivered a speech Saturday to a crowd his campaign estimated at 26,000 people, the largest number any Democratic presidential candidate has drawn this year. And he was joined by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the star liberal congresswoman who made her endorsement official onstage.

Story Continued Below

It was a triumphant moment for Sanders, coming after his hospitalization triggered questions about his candidacy. The crowd apparently eclipsed the more than 20,000 people that Warren's team said attended her September rally a few miles away in Washington Square Park, as well as the estimated 20,000-plus at Kamala Harris' campaign kickoff in January.

Story Continued Below

Against the backdrop of the Queensbridge Houses, the largest public housing development in the nation, Sanders railed against President Donald Trump, income inequality, racial disparities, status quo politics and the economic elite.

“A few miles away from here, people on Wall Street make unbelievable amounts of money and live in incredible and ostentatious luxury,” he said, “while right here, across the street from us, people are struggling day after day just to survive.”

He also assured the crowd that he is equipped to be president despite his recent health setback.

“I am more than ready to take on the greed and corruption of the corporate elite and their apologists. And I am more ready than ever to create a government based on the principles of justice,” Sanders said.

“To put it bluntly," he added, "I am back.”

Ocasio-Cortez, his “special guest,” described Sanders as an iconoclast who has consistently fought for economic and social rights, especially when it was unpopular.

“When I was a child that relied on CHIP so that I could see a doctor, Bernie Sanders fought for a single-payer health care system,” she said. “When the federal government decided to discriminate and abandon my queer family and friends, Bernie Sanders was putting his career on the line for us.”

Ocasio-Cortez said Sanders’ 2016 presidential campaign “fundamentally changed politics,” and that he has pushed Democrats to embrace Medicare for All and reject corporate donations. Her appreciation for Sanders has only grown since she arrived in Congress: “Every trick in the book, psychological and otherwise, is used to get us to abandon the working class.”

Story Continued Below

Ocasio-Cortez’s endorsement delivered a much-needed jolt to Sanders’ campaign. Sanders had been eclipsed in national and early-state polls by Warren even before his heart attack, and his health scare brought unwanted attention to his age.

Even worse, Warren has cut into his support among young people and liberals, two key voting blocs in his coalition.

But Ocasio-Cortez’s nod has sent the unmistakable message that the battle for the left wing of the Democratic Party is not over. Both Sanders and Warren had been courting Ocasio-Cortez for months, meaning that his gain is indisputably her loss.

“There are few more notable endorsements on the Democratic side than AOC’s,” said Rebecca Katz, a progressive consultant who advised Cynthia Nixon’s left-wing gubernatorial campaign in New York. “This is a real shot in the arm for Bernie and helps energize the base.”

Sanders’ aides believe that Ocasio-Cortez’s endorsement will not only excite his current voters, but also broaden his appeal among young voters, people of color, and women who are not yet behind him. She is expected to campaign for him soon in the first-in-the-nation caucus state of Iowa.

“She has broad approval across the Democratic Party. People really find her very compelling in how she talks about the issues,” Faiz Shakir, Sanders’ campaign manager, told POLITICO. “She extends Bernie Sanders’ argument and reaches many of the same people with her core message, but her background and language may make her able to reach additional people.”

Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), another member of the so-called “Squad,” also said this week that she is endorsing him. A third member, Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.), is expected to back him soon as well, according to a source familiar with the situation.

Sanders’ advisers said Ocasio-Cortez and Tlaib’s endorsements demonstrate the multiracial working-class movement that he is building.

“They are the symbol of the diversity the senator has always had, but not gotten credit for,” said Nina Turner, Sanders’ campaign co-chair.

Though Ocasio-Cortez’s endorsement certainly prevented a raft of negative headlines that would have been written if he’d lost her support to Warren, political insiders and even some of Sanders’ allies are skeptical that it will help him pull in new voters.

Jonathan Tasini, the author of "The Essential Bernie Sanders and His Vision for America" and a national surrogate for Sanders in 2016, said the Ocasio-Cortez fans who weren’t already with Sanders “could fit into a booth at the local diner.” Omar’s nod, though, might have more clout, he said.

“I doubt any single endorsement ever changes the nature of a race,” he said. “I’d wager that Omar’s support, though less flashy in the media sphere, is more significant if one is thinking, ‘How does this expand Bernie’s voting base?’”

Sanders was off the campaign trail for nearly two weeks before returning to the stump on Tuesday for the Democratic debate. He delivered what was widely considered to be a strong performance in Ohio.
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Cat Fight of the Decade ! Gabbard v. Clinton
« Reply #1134 on: October 24, 2019, 11:07:04 AM »


What else can be said about such a reprehensible public figure and serial loser as Hillary Rodham Clinton?

Really, has there ever been a more despicable and shamelessly malevolent individual in the U.S. political history?

The recent comments Clinton made about Tulsi Gabbard are just so foul and repugnant that it’s time for her to be removed from the American political scene for good.





http://stateofthenation2012.com/?p=130323
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Re: Cat Fight of the Decade ! Gabbard v. Clinton
« Reply #1135 on: October 25, 2019, 02:25:13 AM »
What else can be said about such a reprehensible public figure and serial loser as Hillary Rodham Clinton?

Really, has there ever been a more despicable and shamelessly malevolent individual in the U.S. political history?

http://stateofthenation2012.com/?p=130323

Hell, yes. His name emerges from the lips of most Americans every day. I despise the Clintons, as my record here will indicate, but better a dozen Hillaries than one Dump.

And I have steadfastly refused to jump into the pile-on-Gabbard hobby of most of the left, but I have been doing my due diligence. the more I read the less I like her.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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https://www.politico.com/news/2019/10/25/warren-sanders-progressive-race-056903

2020 elections
Warren and Sanders race to out-left each other — and moderates are terrified

The two have mostly avoided direct conflict, but their one-upsmanship on a flurry of policies speaks to growing tensions between their campaigns.


Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. | Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

By HOLLY OTTERBEIN and ALEX THOMPSON

10/25/2019 05:08 AM EDT

Updated: 10/25/2019 07:43 AM EDT



When Bernie Sanders unveiled his education plan a few months ago, he proposed tripling so-called Title I funding for schools. No top Democrat offered anything more generous — until Elizabeth Warren this week called for quadrupling the spending.

That's just a taste of the tit-for-tat between the two: In August, Warren unveiled a plan calling for 40 percent of corporate board members to be elected by rank-and-file workers. Last week, Sanders raised her, saying it should be 45 percent.

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In February, Sanders reiterated his proposal to increase Social Security benefits by about $110 a month for low-income seniors and boost cost-of-living adjustments for all recipients. To which Warren countered: No, it should be $200 a month — for everyone. And after Warren unveiled her signature wealth tax for fortunes over $50 million and estimated it would raise $2.75 trillion over the next decade, Sanders, not to be outdone, proposed a wealth tax that he said would bring in $4.35 trillion partly by lowering the threshold to $32 million.

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If these seem like distinctions without much meaning to critics — since even the least ambitious of these plans would require liberal Democratic majorities in Congress to pass — they’re all part of the contest between Sanders and Warren to be recognized in the Democratic primary as the lead champion for progressives. At the same time, the war over white papers has terrified moderate Democrats, who worry that a race to the left will damage the party’s chances of defeating President Donald Trump — even as it electrifies the base.

"This is exactly the primary we should be having,” said Alex Lawson, executive director of the advocacy group Social Security Works. “When candidates compete to release the boldest policies, everyone wins — except the billionaires.”

But the escalating ambition and price tag of the proposals has also been turned into ammunition for Sanders and Warren’s more moderate opponents, such as former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

    “When candidates compete to release the boldest policies, everyone wins — except the billionaires.”

    - Alex Lawson, executive director of Social Security Works

“The stakes of defeating Donald Trump and the assaults on our values he commits daily are too great for our primary to devolve into who can sacrifice our policy advantages in a general election the fastest,” said Biden spokesman Andrew Bates.

Warren and Sanders regularly dismiss such criticism and argue that the dearth of big ideas is what caused the party to lose the White House to Trump in the first place.

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From criminal justice to campaign finance to foreign affairs, the policy skirmishes between Sanders and Warren have touched on nearly every big topic in the primary and broadened the debate among Democrats. For instance, along with Sanders, several candidates endorsed the idea of a wealth tax or said they were open to it after Warren rolled out hers.

Sanders and Warren have largely avoided direct conflict on the campaign trail, and neither campaign provided a comment for this story. But the policy feuds speak to growing tension between the two candidates below the surface.
Bernie Sanders

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. | Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AP Photo

Sanders and Warren have also used the liberal plans to elevate their candidacies at critical moments in their campaigns. Warren kicked off the tit-for-tat when pundits were writing her off for dead at the beginning of the primary. She outflanked Sanders in the spring by outlining her student loan debt proposal and wealth tax. At the time, Sanders had said he would “substantially lower” or “eliminate” student debt, but hadn’t revealed a specific proposal. Likewise, Sanders had suggested a wealth tax as a way to pay for “Medicare for All” in 2017 and expressed support for it in a 1997 book, but had no official plan.

Sanders, meanwhile, has used his plans to get to Warren’s left as she has slowly overtaken him in most national and early-state polls. For instance, he has cast himself as the candidate with the “most comprehensive” climate change plan. Warren rolled out a green manufacturing plan and other climate proposals that together total about $3 trillion. Sanders’ “Green New Deal,” released in August, would invest $16.3 trillion.

Sanders’ allies argue that he was the original candidate who transformed the debate in the Democratic Party by popularizing Medicare for All, free college education and a $15 minimum wage in his 2016 campaign.

Warren’s supporters similarly say that she shifted the Overton window on student loan debt cancellation by calling to eliminate $640 billion of debt in April. Sanders later put out a plan to get rid of all $1.6 trillion of it. He also proposed canceling all medical debt. Then this past week, after Sanders called for universal school meals, Warren proposed forgiving K-12 student breakfast and lunch debt.

Even when the one-upmanship has flown under the radar, it has addressed issues that could be important to activists, labor unions and elected officials being courted by the two candidates.
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Elizabeth Warren

Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren. | Scott Olson/Getty Images

In his criminal justice policy, Sanders proposed that mandatory minimum sentences should be scrapped, whereas Warren suggested Congress should “reduce or eliminate” them. Sanders would also ban the use of facial recognition technology in law enforcement and put an immediate moratorium on “algorithmic assessments” — controversial tools used to predict how likely a defendant or incarcerated person will reoffend — until an audit is conducted. Warren would establish a task force to examine facial recognition and algorithms.

Story Continued Below

Even as some of the more moderate candidates criticize Sanders and Warren’s proposals as unrealistic and politically damaging, the jockeying between the two shows how much the Democratic Party has changed since 2016, when Sanders was the sole unabashed progressive in the race. In fact, left-wing activists and insiders see 2020 as the first presidential race in years featuring two bona fide progressives, creating a competition the likes of which they’ve never seen.

“It’s pretty exciting,” said Rebecca Katz, a New York-based progressive consultant. “What their campaigns are doing is they’re allowing people to have real, substantive discussions about very detailed progressive policies and discuss the merits and really dream big.”

The wealth tax is a telling example, said Mike Konczal, a fellow at the Roosevelt Institute. There is no divide among progressive leaders over whether to establish it; the only disagreement between Warren and Sanders is over how much to tax.

“In every policy world, there is a much more progressive vision than the status quo before it,” he said. But in this primary, Konczal added, “It’s moved at such a rapid pace, it’s hard to keep track of. It’s sort of amazing."
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🗳️ Why the Democratic superdelegate whispers are starting again
« Reply #1137 on: October 28, 2019, 05:25:30 AM »
Should be the best Free-for-All since the '68 DNC.  ;D

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ddrKLqpH5AA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ddrKLqpH5AA</a>

RE

2020 Elections
Why the Democratic superdelegate whispers are starting again

The dynamics of the race could prevent any one candidate from seizing insurmountable momentum from the early nominating states.


Sen. Elizabeth Warren talks with potential voters in South Carolina on Saturday. | Sean Rayford/Getty Images

By DAVID SIDERS

10/28/2019 05:01 AM EDT


Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren are holding steady, Bernie Sanders is bouncing back from his heart attack and Pete Buttigieg is springing to life in Iowa.

After months of consolidation, there are signs the top tier of the Democratic presidential primary may be expanding, leaving Democrats to confront the prospect of a lasting, multi-candidate contest that could drag on long into next year.

Story Continued Below

“I think it will be a brokered convention,” said former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, who said he came to that view within the past month, after seeing “Warren’s rise, and Sanders staying where he’s always been … and, I think, Biden’s steadiness.”

Story Continued Below

Richardson’s outlook remains a minority view. But it highlights the implications of a field still stacked with a handful of highly organized, well-funded candidates — and a race that remains unsettled in ways that could prevent any one candidate from seizing insurmountable momentum from the first four nominating states.

Saturday marked 100 days until the Iowa caucuses, and still three candidates — Biden, Warren and Sanders — are polling above 15 percent in national surveys. Buttigieg, meanwhile, hit 10 percent in the latest Quinnipiac Poll — and 13 percent in Iowa, according to a Suffolk University/USA Today poll. And Amy Klobuchar, who is suddenly drawing new interest, on Thursday became the ninth candidate to qualify for the November debate.

James Zogby, a Democratic National Committee member and longtime president of the Arab American Institute, a Washington think tank, said, “I don’t see anyone emerging early or late with 50 [percent] plus.”

He said of the convention, “I think it will be [contested].”
Joe Biden

Polls show former Vice President Joe Biden is trouncing his competitors in South Carolina. | Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Conventions are contested far less frequently than the quadrennial ventilations about them would suggest. But the Democratic primary field this year is historically large, and the race is unsettled in ways that could diffuse momentum any one candidate might gain from an early state victory.

Story Continued Below

Warren eclipsed Biden in some polls in Iowa and has an advantage in New Hampshire, while Biden is trouncing his competitors in South Carolina. Buttigieg’s prodigious fundraising is allowing him to make a late push in Iowa. Nevada remains wide open, and Sanders’ competitors believe he has a floor of 15 percent — enough to secure delegates — in nearly every state.

Even the two-person contest in 2016 between Sanders and Hillary Clinton was not called until June, and the conclusion of that race was aided by early superdelegate commitments to Clinton — the endorsements from members of Congress, DNC members and other top party officials who made up about 15 percent of delegates to the national convention that year.

In 2016, the effort to sign on party leaders was a major feature of Clinton’s early campaign, in which she pressed superdelegates to pledge support to her — and announced support from hundreds of superdelegates — as early as summer 2015. By November of the year before the election, the Associated Press was tabulating that Clinton had secured more than 350 pledges of support from superdelegates, a number that carried into the primaries and colored news coverage the race.

This year, superdelegates have been relegated to a backwater. The Democratic National Committee elected to strip superdelegates of much of their power, but just as important, the idea of influential party insiders playing a significant role in the nomination carries a negative connotation among the grassroots . And with Biden and several senators running, many superdelegates have been more hesitant this year to commit.

If the nomination is contested at the convention, their ballots could become critical. Superdelegates are allowed to vote on the second ballot at a contested national convention.

Biden, the former vice president, appears to carry the most establishment support, leading in endorsements among governors and members of Congress. But the differences between candidates' high profile endorsements are measured this year not in hundreds, but in dozens or fewer. And superdelegates can freely switch their allegiances.

William Owen, a Democratic National Committee member and Biden supporter from Tennessee, said he fears that if the nomination remains unsettled by the time of the national convention, “we will look like a dystopian Hunger Games auction,” with delegates trading support for appointments and other political favors.

Owen said the current primary “would certainly lend itself to not having a clear nominee by June of next year.”

“It just looks to me like relatively stable polling,” he said, adding that in addition to Biden and Warren, “Mayor Pete is picking up some speed … and now Bernie’s back and he has plenty of money.”

Owen said he urged Biden’s advisers this summer to begin developing a second-ballot strategy for the convention. But while most major candidates have said they are cognizant of or are tracking superdelegates, the effort is nowhere near as prominent as it was in 2016.

Zogby, a Sanders supporter, said, “We will at some point start talking to people, but it isn’t happening now.”
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Ed Rendell, a former Pennsylvania governor and one of Biden’s most vocal supporters, said he can run through any number of scenarios in which Biden, Sanders or Warren could reach 50 percent before the convention.

However, he said, “If you’re operating under the theory that Buttigieg could really become a factor, then there’s no chance — with four of them drawing significant number of delegates — there’d be no chance that there wouldn’t be a brokered convention.”

A plausible scenario, the former chairman of the Democratic National Committee said, is three or more candidates “splitting up the first 20 states or so, which means it’s going to be hard for any one of them to have 50 percent.”

Even lower tier candidates may upset the math, with proportional allocation of delegates in large Super Tuesday states encouraging some candidates to remain in the contest. Harris could win delegates in California that day, even if she does not carry the state. And former Rep. Beto O’Rourke’s campaign has repeatedly pointed to his prospects in his home state of Texas, despite his weak national polling and the fact he has yet to qualify for the November debate.
Pete Buttigieg

Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s prodigious fundraising is allowing him to make a late push in Iowa. | Sean Rayford/Getty Images

One DNC member who declined to be identified said that if the early states become a “hodgepodge” with different winners, “If I were one of those candidates, I would stay until the very end. If you’ve won one, and it doesn’t look decisive, why get out?”

Jeff Cohen, co-founder of RootsAction.org, an online activist group that supports Sanders, said he has been speaking with other progressives about the possibility that Warren or Sanders enters the convention ahead of “a more corporate candidate” such as Biden “and the superdelegates go behind the corporate-oriented candidate who is in second place.”

“I don’t think it could stand,” he said.

“It’s likely that no one candidate will get 50 percent pre-convention,” Cohen said. “But I think it is likely that Bernie and Warren together will be over 50 percent, and that’s the goal of many progressive Democrats.”

The uncertainty surrounding the primary — and the various flaws of all of its candidates — has resulted in a sense of uneasiness throughout the party in recent weeks. Intraparty sniping can wound a nominee, and an elongated contest would delay Democrats’ ability to turn resources to the general election.

But Kelly Dietrich, founder of the National Democratic Training Committee, which trains candidates across the country, said a longer primary could also prevent Republicans “from trying to pigeonhole or define the opponent early.”

He suggested an extended primary, meanwhile, could bolster Democratic engagement in later-voting states, and he said it is a “distinct possibility that we have three or even four different winners in the first four primary states.”

“I think chances are it’s going to be a long primary,” Dietrich said.
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🗳️ Court throws out North Carolina's congressional district maps
« Reply #1138 on: October 29, 2019, 12:40:04 AM »
https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/elections/court-throws-out-north-carolina-s-congressional-district-maps-n1073081

Court throws out North Carolina's congressional district maps
The ruling said that the maps were "drawn in violation of our North Carolina Constitution."


Demonstrators protest against gerrymandering at the Supreme Court on March 26, 2019/Evelyn Hockstein / The Washington Post via Getty Images file

Oct. 28, 2019, 2:46 PM AKDT
By Pete Williams

North Carolina cannot use the existing maps for its congressional districts in next year's elections, a state court ruled late Monday, declaring them to be invalid partisan gerrymanders.

The ruling was a victory for state Democrats who lost a battle when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled earlier this year that such challenges were beyond the authority of federal courts to referee. So the fight resumed in state court, citing violations of North Carolina's constitution.

A three-judge panel of state judges issued an order Monday barring state officials from using the current map for the coming elections, including the March presidential primary. The panel stopped short of ordering the legislature to draw new maps but said disruptions could be avoided "should the General Assembly, on its own initiative, act immediately and will all due haste to enact new congressional districts."

The ruling said delaying the primary could reduce voter turnout and increase the cost of the election. But it said, "those consequences pale in comparison to voters of our state proceeding to vote, yet again, in congressional elections administered pursuant to maps drawn in violation of our North Carolina Constitution."

The legislature designed the current maps in 2016 after a court declared the congressional district boundaries to be an unconstitutional racial gerrymander. But the new maps were drawn to ensure the partisan breakdown of the state's congressional delegation⁠: Ten Republicans and three Democrats.
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In 2016, a Republican state legislator involved in the process, Rep. David Lewis, said "I think electing Republicans is better than electing Democrats," adding at the time that he drew the map "to help foster what I think is better for the country."

In their lawsuit, the challengers said the map may be "the most extreme and brazen partisan gerrymander in American history." The legislature limited the ability of Democrats to elect the candidates of their choosing by concentrating them into just three districts and diluting their voting strength in the remaining ones, the court concluded.

The state court earlier this year struck down the boundary lines for state house and senate districts on similar grounds. The legislature declined to appeal and instead redrew the maps in time to meet the court's two-week deadline.

The Supreme Court's ruling in June declared that partisan gerrymandering cases were off limits for the federal courts. But it nonetheless said state courts could consider such challenges. Some justices were stinging in their criticism of North Carolina's map and a similar gerrymander in Maryland. Such blatantly partisan moves, said Elena Kagan, "debased and dishonored our democracy, turning upside-down the core American idea that all governmental power derives from the people."
Pete Williams

Pete Williams is an NBC News correspondent who covers the Justice Department and the Supreme Court, based in Washington.
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Killary sez... "God put her on Earth to be Da' Prez", BAHAHAHAHAH
« Reply #1139 on: October 30, 2019, 10:01:39 AM »
Hillary Clinton thinks ‘God put her on earth’ to be president, former Bill Clinton adviser says !



 Despite a failed run at the presidency in 2016, one former adviser to Bill Clinton reckons Hillary is waiting in the wings for another try in 2020, claiming “She feels like God put her on the earth to do it.”

Speaking to New York talk radio host John Catsimatidis on Sunday, Dick Morris said that Hillary Clinton is likely eyeing up Joe Biden’s 2020 campaign, expecting the former vice president to drop out so she can take his place as the Democratic establishment’s chosen candidate.

“My feeling is that she wants to,” Morris said. “She feels entitled to do it. She feels compelled to do it. She feels that God put her on the Earth to do it. But she’s hesitant because she realizes the timing is bad.”

https://www.rt.com/usa/472060-hillary-clinton-god-president-adviser/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

 

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