AuthorTopic: Election Errata  (Read 129231 times)

Offline Surly1

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Re: Killary sez... "God put her on Earth to be Da' Prez", BAHAHAHAHAH
« Reply #1140 on: October 30, 2019, 11:52:43 AM »
Hillary Clinton thinks ‘God put her on earth’ to be president, former Bill Clinton adviser says !

Dick Morris said that Hillary Clinton is likely eyeing up Joe Biden’s 2020 campaign, expecting the former vice president to drop out so she can take his place as the Democratic establishment’s chosen candidate.

“My feeling is that she wants to,” Morris said. “She feels entitled to do it. She feels compelled to do it. She feels that God put her on the Earth to do it. But she’s hesitant because she realizes the timing is bad.”

https://www.rt.com/usa/472060-hillary-clinton-god-president-adviser/

Dick Morris is a professional ratfucker of the highest order. A lifetime republican, he was the author of the third way policies of triangulation that combined traditional Republican and Democratic proposals, rhetoric, and issues that may have gained Clinton political gain and popularity, but at the cost of the D party's soul. Third Way bullshit cut the nutsack out of the party and made class-traitors of the Clintons. May they both rot in hell.

SO DICK MORRIS CAN KISS MY ASS.
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline RE

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🗳️ Bye, Bye Beto
« Reply #1141 on: November 01, 2019, 04:35:01 PM »
Good Timing.  Will he run for Senate again in TX?

RE

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🗳️ Warren Leads Tight Iowa Race as Biden Fades, Poll Finds
« Reply #1142 on: November 02, 2019, 12:20:23 AM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/01/us/politics/iowa-poll-warren-biden.html

Warren Leads Tight Iowa Race as Biden Fades, Poll Finds


Ms. Warren garnered 22 percent in a New York Times/Siena College poll, to 19 percent for Bernie Sanders. Pete Buttigieg has surged, while Mr. Biden’s travails have put the race in flux.
Which of these Democrats would be your first choice in the Iowa caucuses?
Warren
22%
Sanders
19%
Buttigieg
18%
Biden
17%
Klobuchar
4%
Harris
3%
Yang
3%
Source: New York Times Upshot/Siena College poll conducted Oct. 25-30. | Note: Candidates who received below 3 percent are not shown in this chart.
Alexander Burns

By Alexander Burns
Nov. 1, 2019

The top Democratic presidential candidates are locked in a close race in the 2020 Iowa caucuses, with Senator Elizabeth Warren slightly ahead of Senator Bernie Sanders, Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., according to a New York Times/Siena College poll of likely Democratic caucusgoers.

Ms. Warren appears to have solidified her gains in the first voting state while Mr. Buttigieg has climbed quickly to catch up with Mr. Sanders and overtake Mr. Biden, the onetime front-runner. Ms. Warren is drawing support from 22 percent of likely caucusgoers, while Mr. Sanders is at 19 percent, followed by Mr. Buttigieg at 18 percent and Mr. Biden at 17 percent.

The survey is full of alarming signs for Mr. Biden, who entered the race in April at the top of the polls in Iowa and nationally. He is still in the lead in most national polls, but his comparatively weak position in the earliest primary and caucus states now presents a serious threat to his candidacy. And Mr. Biden’s unsteadiness appears to have opened a path in the race for other Democrats closer to the political middle, particularly Mr. Buttigieg.
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Warren’s Plan
Elizabeth Warren released a $20.5 trillion plan to pay for “Medicare for all.”

The poll reveals a race in flux but not in disarray, framed by a stark debate about the direction of the Democratic Party and by a degree of fluidity arising from Mr. Biden’s travails. In the early states, at least, the former vice president appears to be buckling on one side to the expansive populism of Ms. Warren and Mr. Sanders, and on the other to Mr. Buttigieg’s calls for generational change.

While no single candidate has a decisive advantage, the strongest currents in the party appear to be swirling around candidates promising in different ways to challenge the existing political and economic order.

Several of them would also represent change by virtue of their identities, including Ms. Warren, who would be the first female president, and Mr. Buttigieg, who is gay. But despite the historic diversity of the field, all the top candidates are white. In Iowa, a state that helped vault Barack Obama into the presidency, the poll found a substantial bloc concerned that anyone other than a heterosexual white man might struggle to defeat President Trump.

The survey found Iowa Democrats in a divided and perhaps indecisive state about what the party must do in order to deny Mr. Trump a second term. They are an ideologically mixed group, with younger voters trending to the left and leaning strongly toward Ms. Warren and Mr. Sanders. Mr. Biden remains the favorite candidate of older voters, but only 2 percent of respondents under 45 years old said they currently plan to caucus for him.

In the poll, large majorities were supportive of ambitious liberal policy goals, like breaking up big banks, increasing Social Security benefits and implementing single-payer health care. But perhaps out of political caution, the poll also found that more Democrats would prefer to nominate someone who supports improving the private health insurance system rather than replacing it altogether. And most Democrats said they would favor a nominee willing to work with Republicans.

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Do you support or oppose the following positions?
Strongly support
Somewhat support
Somewhat oppose
Strongly oppose
Increasing Social Security benefits by $200 per month
57%
32%
Providing free college tuition to all Americans
34%
36%
19%
10%
A single-payer health care system, which would abolish private insurance and provide every American with a government health insurance plan
43%
30%
14%
13%
Breaking up the big banks and tech companies
43%
34%
12%
Creating a government health insurance plan available for any American to purchase
66%
25%
Source: New York Times Upshot/Siena College poll conducted Oct. 25-30. People who did not answer are not shown on the charts.

There is still plenty of room for shifts in political momentum: Two-thirds of likely caucusgoers in The Times poll said they could still be persuaded to change their minds.

Outside the top tier of four candidates, the best-performing Democrat was Senator Amy Klobuchar, supported by 4 percent of respondents, followed by Senator Kamala Harris and Andrew Yang, both at 3 percent, and Senator Cory Booker, Representative Tulsi Gabbard and Tom Steyer, all at 2 percent.

The Iowa caucuses are a fairly arcane institution that differs from a standard primary election. They traditionally require Democrats to gather at myriad locations around the state for a multiround process in which voters group themselves behind their first-choice candidate; if a candidate registers less than 15 percent support, their supporters can reallocate themselves to other candidates.

Factoring in voters’ second choices, Ms. Warren had the broadest appeal: She is the first or second preference of 47 percent of Iowa Democrats, with two-thirds of Sanders supporters naming her as their backup choice.

Mr. Sanders is the first or second choice of 34 percent of likely caucusgoers, followed by Mr. Buttigieg at 31 percent. Mr. Biden was in fourth place by this measure, at 28 percent; only 1 in 10 voters named him as their second choice.

The Times/Siena survey of 439 Iowa Democratic caucusgoers was conducted from Oct. 25-30 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.7 percentage points.

Here are the full results and the methodology for the poll.

One issue that occasions little division among Democrats is impeachment. Eighty-nine percent of people in the poll said they support impeaching Mr. Trump and removing him from office.

Most Iowa Democrats in the poll said they were somewhat or very confident that the party’s top candidates would beat Mr. Trump in the general election. There was no difference in how they assessed Mr. Biden and Ms. Warren on that measure, and Mr. Sanders and Mr. Buttigieg fared only slightly worse.
How confident are you that the following Democrats would beat President Trump?
Key
Very
Somewhat
Not very
Not at all
Biden
37%
43%
Warren
37%
44%
Sanders
34%
42%
15%
Buttigieg
23%
47%
17%
Source: New York Times Upshot/Siena College poll conducted Oct. 25-30.

The confidence Iowa Democrats expressed in Ms. Warren as a general-election candidate could represent something of a turning point for her candidacy, if she can extend the sentiment to other early states. For much of the race, even Democratic voters who have embraced her ideas and political persona have harbored reservations about her odds against Mr. Trump. In Iowa, that appears to have changed.

Jonathan Morrison, 45, of Mason City, said he was drawn to Ms. Warren because of her grasp of economic issues and believed she would “hold her own” against the president.

“I don’t think she’s going to allow herself to be pushed around or bullied by Trump,” he said. “She’s going to stick to the facts and call him out on his policies.”

Mr. Morrison, who said he is a drone pilot in the oil and gas industry, said he also liked Mr. Buttigieg, whom he described as having a “leadership aura about him.”

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“I think Pete Buttigieg is going to be president someday,” he said. “I’m not sure it’s this time around.”

Both Ms. Warren and Mr. Sanders appear to be tapping into a thirst among many primary voters for transformational policies rather than incremental improvements in governance. But the presence of two forceful, well-funded populists in the race may be preventing either Mr. Sanders or Ms. Warren from gaining a wide advantage.
Which of the two types of Democrats would you be likely to support? A Democrat who …
Is more moderate than most Democrats
Is more liberal than most Democrats
51%
41%
Promises to fight for a bold, progressive agenda
Promises to find common ground
43%
55%
Brings politics in Washington back to normal
Promises fundamental systematic change to American society
42%
54%
You agreed with most on the issues
Has the best chance to beat President Trump
51%
48%
Promises to replace the current health care system with Medicare for All
Promises to improve the existing health insurance system
42%
56%
Source: New York Times Upshot/Siena College poll conducted Oct. 25-30.

They have assembled somewhat different political coalitions: Ms. Warren is the top choice of younger voters, women and people with college degrees, while Mr. Sanders fares better with men and people with high school degrees or less. He also retains significant backing from young people, and his supporters are the least likely to say they might change their minds before February.

Though Mr. Buttigieg would be the youngest president ever, he is not exceptionally popular with his generational cohort. He fared somewhat better with older voters than younger ones; like Ms. Warren, he registered strongly among people with college and postgraduate degrees.

Mr. Biden’s support comes almost exclusively from older voters: Among people 65 years or older, he is still the front-runner, with backing from nearly a third of them. But he has negligible support among younger Iowans. With voters under 45, Mr. Biden is polling several points behind Mr. Yang, a former tech executive who has never run for office before.
Which of these Democrats would be your first choice in the Iowa caucuses?
Ages 18-29
30-44
45-64
65+
Warren
38%
Sanders
26%
Buttigieg
Biden
27%
31%
Klobuchar
Harris
Yang
Source: New York Times Upshot/Siena College poll conducted Oct. 25-30.

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An ideological gulf, running along generational lines, is a major feature of the Democratic race. Two-thirds of voters under 30 favored either Ms. Warren or Mr. Sanders, while a smaller majority of people over 65 favored either Mr. Biden or Mr. Buttigieg.

An overwhelming 85 percent of voters under 30 said they preferred a nominee promising fundamental change over one seeking to restore normalcy in Washington. Among voters more than 65 years old, 7 in 10 preferred a candidate who would bring back normalcy.

William Nix of Waterloo, Iowa, is among the young voters torn between several candidates promising large-scale change. He said he had long admired Mr. Sanders but worried that he might pull out of the race after his recent heart attack. Mr. Nix, who is 21 and works on an assembly line at John Deere, said he was considering Ms. Warren and Mr. Buttigieg, and wanted a nominee focused on economic inequality and access to education.

“I’m really all for making going to college more affordable,” Mr. Nix said. “That is my biggest thing, because I want to go to college myself.”

Most Iowa Democrats appear to believe it is easier for candidates who are heterosexual, white, male and ideologically moderate to win presidential races, though that assessment is not playing a decisive role in shaping their caucus preferences. Most poll respondents said they believed it would be harder to win the election with a nominee who is more liberal than most Democrats, or one who is gay. About half expressed those reservations about a female nominee, and 4 in 10 were pessimistic about an African-American candidate

These reservations about embracing the diversity of their presidential field have not translated into enthusiasm for Mr. Biden. One reason may be his age: A majority of respondents said they believed it would be harder to win the election with a candidate over the age of 75.
Do you think a candidate with these characteristics would have an easier or harder time beating President Trump?
Easier
No difference
Harder
A female candidate
11%
40%
48%
An African-American
49%
40%
A white male
53%
44%
A gay candidate
41%
55%
More moderate than most Democrats
45%
30%
20%
Farther to the left than most Democrats
17%
23%
57%
Over age 75
42%
53%
Source: New York Times Upshot/Siena College poll conducted Oct. 25-30.

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Both Mr. Biden and Mr. Sanders would turn 80 within a year or two of taking office.

Julia Roberts, a voter in Winterset, Iowa, is among those wary of nominating someone whose identity could unsettle rural conservatives. Ms. Roberts, 60, a retired state employee, favored Mr. Biden because she saw him as the strongest general-election candidate and valued his foreign policy experience.

“I think, really, he’s got the best chance of beating Trump,” Ms. Roberts said, adding that she also liked Ms. Warren and Mr. Buttigieg but feared there would be “prejudice in play” against them.

Tonda Hadden, 63, of Council Bluffs, Iowa, said she had originally favored Mr. Biden or Mr. Sanders. But she worried Mr. Sanders was “too old and too left.” With Mr. Biden, she had grown “a little worried about his gaffes.”

Ms. Hadden said she was now “still looking” over her options: She named Ms. Warren as her current favorite and Mr. Buttigieg as an intriguing alternative. And she said she hoped some others, like Mr. Booker, whom she saw interviewed Wednesday on “The View,” would get a closer look from voters.

“I really like him,” she said of Mr. Booker, “and I don’t understand why he’s not up in the polls.”

Charts by Lauren Leatherby.
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Offline RE

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🗳️ 7 takeaways from Iowa Democrats' biggest night of the year
« Reply #1143 on: November 02, 2019, 07:18:42 AM »
https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/02/politics/iowa-democratic-dinner-takeaways/index.html

7 takeaways from Iowa Democrats' biggest night of the year
Eric Bradner
CNN Digital Expansion 2017

By Eric Bradner and Dan Merica, CNN

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/h_gk3lEZcPI" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/h_gk3lEZcPI</a>

Updated 3:46 AM ET, Sat November 2, 2019
iowa dinner democratic candidates speeches cillizza saenz ctn vpx_00000000

bannon and cooper split
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President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Room of the White House in Washington, Sunday, Oct. 27, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
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Bash: Nancy Pelosi wanted to make a point
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Former Texas congressman Beto O&#39;Rourke looks on during a break at the Democratic Presidential Debate at Otterbein University on October 15, 2019 in Westerville, Ohio.
Beto O'Rourke drops out of 2020 presidential race
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WESTERVILLE, OHIO - OCTOBER 15: Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks during the Democratic Presidential Debate at Otterbein University on October 15, 2019 in Westerville, Ohio. A record 12 presidential hopefuls are participating in the debate hosted by CNN and The New York Times. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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See Katie Hill give her resignation speech on House floor
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President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Room of the White House in Washington, Sunday, Oct. 27, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
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Bash: Nancy Pelosi wanted to make a point
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 30: Rudy Giuliani, former New York City mayor and current lawyer for U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks to members of the media during a White House Sports and Fitness Day at the South Lawn of the White House May 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Trump hosted the event to encourage children to participate in sports and make youth sports more accessible to economically disadvantaged students. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
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Nancy Pelosi
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iowa dinner democratic candidates speeches cillizza saenz ctn vpx_00000000.jpg
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Former Texas congressman Beto O&#39;Rourke looks on during a break at the Democratic Presidential Debate at Otterbein University on October 15, 2019 in Westerville, Ohio.
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In this January 2016 file photo, U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump shows a sheet with poll numbers as he speaks at a rally at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.
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WESTERVILLE, OHIO - OCTOBER 15: Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks during the Democratic Presidential Debate at Otterbein University on October 15, 2019 in Westerville, Ohio. A record 12 presidential hopefuls are participating in the debate hosted by CNN and The New York Times. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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Des Moines (CNN)Ninety-four days from the Iowa caucuses, the Democratic presidential contenders each got 12 minutes to try to impress likely voters on the state party's biggest night of the year.
The Iowa Democratic Party's Liberty and Justice Celebration -- the renamed former Jefferson-Jackson Dinner -- once helped launch then-Sen. Barack Obama ahead of Hillary Clinton in the lead-up to the 2008 Iowa Democratic caucuses.
Now, 12 years later, candidates sought their own breakout moments. On Friday, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg showed why they've been steadily rising in the polls, bringing the most supporters and delivering the clearest arguments of the night.
Buttigieg offered an optimistic vision for a post-Trump America. He said he had "seen in the dust of a war zone Americans who have nothing in common besides the flags on our shoulders learn to trust each other with our lives" and "seen in the ruins of factories, my city answer those who said we were a dying community by rising up together to build a better future."

Warren, meanwhile, was the most aggressive in taking on other Democrats -- delivering perhaps the night's most memorable line.
"I'm not running some consultant-driven campaign with some vague ideas that are designed not to offend anyone," she said.
Friday also brought a dose of reality for candidates polling in the low single digits. Few of the attendees actually stuck around to hear from them, underscoring the reality that with such a crowded Democratic field, voters are eager to pare down their options.
Here are seven takeaways from the Liberty and Justice Celebration:
Flexing organizational muscle
With more than 13,000 tickets sold, Friday night was the biggest Democratic event of the year in Iowa.
That meant candidates didn't just need to deliver stirring speeches -- they needed to arrive with a show of force, too, to show caucus-goers that they have energy and momentum behind their campaigns.
Warren rolled into Des Moines escorted by a giant inflatable golden retriever. It was a nod to her dog Bailey, and it came with two pennies on its collar -- a reference to Warren's proposed 2% wealth tax.
Inside the arena, there was no doubt that -- much like the Polk County Steak Fry six weeks earlier -- Warren and Buttigieg had bought the most tickets and had the rowdiest supporters.
Here are the 17 Democrats who are running for president
Here are the 17 Democrats who are running for president
During their speeches, Buttigieg's supporters waved light-up thundersticks. Warren's backers unfurled a giant "Win with Warren" sign.
California Sen. Kamala Harris, who danced her way into the arena, also had a huge cheering section.
New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker's faithful brought giant light-up letters that spelled words like "Rise" that echo Booker's campaign themes.
Former Vice President Joe Biden had a smaller but still vocal backing.
Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders didn't bring supporters to the Liberty and Justice Celebration, keeping with his campaign's recent tradition of organizing an alternative event instead -- this time a "March to End Corporate Greed" early Friday evening. But Sanders, the only candidate to use a podium, arrived with an olive branch, saying his campaign had donated $20,000 to the Iowa Democratic Party.
Focus stays on Trump...
Nothing warms up a crowd of thousands of Democrats more than aggressively hitting President Donald Trump, and nearly every candidate on the stage used their platform to do just that.
Biden said he would beat the president "like a drum" and that Trump "knows it" because he has spent "a lot of money to make sure I'm not" the nominee.
"You give hate a little oxygen and it comes out from under the rocks," Biden said. "Well, he's breathed oxygen into hate."
Buttigieg labeled Trump a "divider-in-chief," arguing he is offering a White House "you can look at in the news and feel your blood pressure go down a little bit than up through the roof."
Pete Buttigieg touts rising organizing power in optimistic Iowa speech
Pete Buttigieg touts rising organizing power in optimistic Iowa speech
"This country cannot afford four more years of Donald Trump, we will not recognize it if he gets reelected," Buttigieg said, before adding he doesn't need "to throw myself a military parade to see what a convoy looks like. Because I was driving one in Afghanistan right around the time this president was taping season seven of the Apprentice."
Sanders labeled Trump a man "who does not understand the rule of law or our constitution."
Trump is "a man who will soon be impeached," he said.
These lines were clear crowd pleasers, winning polite applause from those in attendance supporting other candidates and raucous cheers from their respective supporters.
... But some Democrats focus on their opponents
The comments that got more attention, however, were the riskier lines where Democrats took on Democrats, some of whom shared the stage mere minutes apart.
Warren was the most direct in her critiques of her rivals, telling the audience that some "think that running some vague campaign that nibbles around the edges is somehow safe, but if the most we can promise is business as usual after Donald Trump, then Democrats will lose."
Warren then took a subtle dig at candidates like Biden, Buttigieg and others who are offering more incremental change.
"We win when we offer solutions big enough to touch the problems that are in people's lives. Fear and complacency does not win elections. Hope and courage wins elections," she said, adding, "I'm not running some consultant-driven campaign with some vague ideas that are designed not to offend anyone. I'm running a campaign based on a lifetime of fighting for working families."
"This is a time of crisis. And media pundits, Washington insiders, even some people in our own party don't want to admit it. They think that running some vague campaign that nibbles around the edges is somehow safe," she said.
But Warren, who has risen to front-runner status in recent months, also took some indirect criticism.
Harris highlighted her career as a prosecutor and then used that experience to subtly hit Warren.
"I have only had one client my entire life and that is the people. Unlike others, I have never represented a corporation," Harris said, a nod to Warren's previous work representing corporations.
Harris' high-pressure moment
Harris has had a very bad week.
Faced with struggling poll numbers and a cash crisis, Harris' campaign announced this week that the California Democrat was laying off staff at her Baltimore headquarters and all but shuttered her campaign in New Hampshire to fund a strategy that stakes her entire campaign on Iowa.
Harris stepped onto the stage here in Des Moines with more pressure than almost any of her speeches to date.
"This is a moment where we have to be prepared to fight for the best of our country," Harris said. "This is a moment where we need to fight for this country we love, for the rule of law, for our system of justice and for our very Democracy."
While thematically similar to the one she delivers on the campaign trail every day, her speech on Friday was more direct and pointed than her usual stump address.
The speech couldn't have come at a more important time for the senator, either. The audience at the Liberty and Justice Celebration on Friday night was -- by far -- the largest audience of Iowans Harris would address between now and the caucus.
Harries tried to seize on the Senate fights that initially helped propel her campaign.
Being a United States senator "meant taking on Jeff Sessions, taking on Bill Barr, taking on Brett Kavanaugh," Harris said, mentioning many of the Trump administration confirmation fights where she played a central role. "And Iowa, I stand before you today, for the people, fully prepared to take on Donald Trump."
The Andrew Yang Experience
Andrew Yang, who had never run for office before launching his 2020 Democratic presidential bid, joked during his speech that he is "barely a politician."
But that's not really true anymore.
The entrepreneur's campaign's animating cause is his "freedom dividend" -- a proposal to combat the threat automation poses to jobs by giving every American a universal basic income of $1,000 per month.
On Friday, Yang did what experienced politicians do: He told human stories. His campaign is running its own pilot program of sorts, and Yang talked about three people who are already receiving $1,000 per month. One man bought a guitar and is happier, playing shows for the first time in a long time. A woman paid for car repairs. A 68-year-old woman is going back to school. It was a deft touch for someone who early in his candidacy often looked out of place among the other Democratic presidential hopefuls.
The evening was a perfect window into what's become the Andrew Yang experience: Without fail, supporters of other candidates leave Democratic events saying that -- while they might not vote for him -- they liked hearing from Yang. Iowa's Democratic glitterati, the donors and officials seated around the stage, watched Yang's devoted following up in the stands stick with him through every word of a complicated call-and-response.
"I am running for president because, like so many of you in this room, I'm a parent and I'm a patriot," Yang said. "I have seen the future that lies ahead for our children, and it is not something I'm willing to accept."
Beto's exit
The most disappointed attendees Friday night were those who were there -- in some cases after traveling across the country -- to support Beto O'Rourke.
The former Texas congressman announced his departure from the 2020 race hours before the Liberty and Justice Celebration began. The news left supporters who had gathered just outside the Wells Fargo Arena for a pre-event rally crestfallen. Organizers quickly pulled up and stacked the black-and-white "Beto" signs that were mixed in with other candidates' throughout downtown Des Moines.
O'Rourke spoke to those supporters, and then Iowa Democratic Party Chairman Troy Price told the crowd inside the arena that the former lawmaker wouldn't be speaking Friday night.
Still, he did get some shout-outs from other candidates -- first Harris, then Sanders.
"I want to thank my good friend Beto O'Rourke for helping to lead the effort to end the horrific level of gun violence we see in this country," Sanders said.
Yang told reporters he was sad to see O'Rourke drop out because the El Pasoan "is someone I genuinely enjoyed spending time with."
The weak second half
The 13 Democratic candidates who spoke Friday were divided into two halves: The seven top-polling contenders, who spoke first, followed by an intermission in which several Iowa Democratic officeholders took the stage, and then the six lower-polling candidates to close out the night.
That set-up was bad news for the final six Democrats to speak.
More than half the crowd -- those who were there to hear from Buttigieg, Warren, Biden, Sanders, Harris or Tom Steyer -- headed for the exits at intermission. (Yang's supporters mostly stayed around.)
Booker and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar suffered the most.
Unlike the longest shots in the race, both are running campaigns with talented staff and organizational prowess. Both are polling in the low single digits, but have seen limited signs of momentum in recent weeks. And both delivered strong speeches that were heard in person by far fewer people than the top candidates reached.
Virtually no one stayed through the final two speakers of the night, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock. Wait staff were pulling tablecloths off tables while Delaney was still speaking. The announcer lost her place before Bullock spoke, wrongly telling the crowd to "please welcome to the stage Sen. Cory Booker" rather than introducing the Montana governor.

The most memorable portion of Klobuchar's speech was the consistent low roar of a horn a supporter had brought.
"I think that's a Viking horn," she said. "You're gonna piss off all the Packer fans."
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🗳️ Bloomberg taking steps to enter 2020 Democratic presidential race
« Reply #1144 on: November 09, 2019, 01:37:15 AM »
Just what we need!  Another Billionaire Crook running for POTUS!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/FBS880866kw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/FBS880866kw</a>

RE
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Re: 🗳️ Bloomberg taking steps to enter 2020 Democratic presidential race
« Reply #1145 on: November 09, 2019, 07:50:56 AM »
Just what we need!  Another Billionaire Crook running for POTUS!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/FBS880866kw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/FBS880866kw</a>

RE

“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

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Re: 🗳️ Bloomberg taking steps to enter 2020 Democratic presidential race
« Reply #1146 on: November 09, 2019, 08:50:24 AM »
Just what we need!  Another Billionaire Crook running for POTUS!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/FBS880866kw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/FBS880866kw</a>

RE



That resembles GO on the right. lol.

RE
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🗳️ The next three 2020 Democratic candidates who should drop out of the race
« Reply #1147 on: November 10, 2019, 02:40:13 AM »
https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/the-next-three-2020-democratic-candidates-who-should-drop-out-of-the-race

The next three 2020 Democratic candidates who should drop out of the race
by Becket Adams
 | November 08, 2019 03:05 PM


Let’s cut to the chase already.

The 2020 Democratic primary is still overcrowded with candidates who have not even a snowball’s chance in hell of becoming the nominee. The best thing that could happen now to move things along would be for at least two or three contestants to take a page from former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke’s book and bow out of the race.

It would save everyone a lot of time and effort.

The trick is winnowing the list down to those who ought to drop out now versus those who still have at least a small reason to hang around. To do that, we should look to the candidates who suffer not only abysmal polling numbers, and have nothing to offer that better polling candidates do not offer already, but who also risk doing considerable damage to their reputations by delaying the inevitable, fizzling out eventually with an embarrassing whimper.

To slink away from 2020 a total failure is to show flaws and weakness, opening oneself up to years of justified mockery and ridicule. The following individuals would, therefore, do well to suspend their campaigns immediately.

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-California: What happened? The senator came into the 2020 primary like a lion, and she is going to go out like a lamb. Harris’ polling numbers have cratered, dropping to just 4.5% in November, down from her all-time high of 15.2% in July, according to a RealClearPolitics polling average. That is a collapse of 10.7 percentage points in just a little more than three months.

Harris went from being a top-tier 2020 candidate, a no-nonsense former prosecutor, and a full-time #Resistance hero to becoming a hapless punching bag for Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii.

What happened? Voters got to know Harris, that’s what happened. The senator still cannot state whether she believes private health insurance should be eliminated. More recently, Harris tried to boycott a criminal justice forum because it honored the White House. She reversed her decision later, but the damage was done already. The episode served mostly to remind everyone of not just the senator's disturbing record as a corrupt prosecutor, but also that she is a flip-flopper.

Sen. Cory Booker, D-New Jersey: What even is his campaign message? At just 2.3% in the polls, the New Jersey lawmaker and his constituents would probably be better served were he to return to the Senate to “resist” the White House’s agenda full-time. Perhaps Booker is angling for a gig as vice president. If so, he can do so without also having to stay in the 2020 primary. It would save Booker’s supporters an enormous amount of cash and effort.

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg: Please, God, no. As a proud nanny-statist, Bloomberg offers nothing that Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont, and Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, don’t already offer more persuasively. Bloomberg enjoys all the trappings of the life of a billionaire with little of the scrutiny that usually comes with it, all thanks to his support for the “correct” political causes, including gun control. If Bloomberg actually launches a 2020 primary campaign, only to lose eventually to Biden, he would draw only scorn and condemnation from the same people with whom he has spent years ingratiating himself.

Things like Bloomberg’s recent remarks praising communist China would suddenly become very interesting to more than just conservatives and a handful of journalists, drawing the widespread criticism he deserves. He has nothing to gain from losing an expensive primary and everything to lose, including cash and the goodwill he has built up for himself on the Left in the past decade. Do the opposite of Nike, Bloomberg. Just don’t do it.
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https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/the-next-three-2020-democratic-candidates-who-should-drop-out-of-the-race

[size=128pt]The next three 2020 Democratic candidates who should drop out of the race[/size]
by Becket Adams
 | November 08, 2019 03:05 PM

Harris went from being a top-tier 2020 candidate, a no-nonsense former prosecutor, and a full-time #Resistance hero to becoming a hapless punching bag for Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii.
//
Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg: Please, God, no. As a proud nanny-statist, Bloomberg offers nothing that Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont, and Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, don’t already offer more persuasively.


The Washington "Examiner"is little more than another outlet for right wing gasbags. If a writer files to discern daylight between Sanders and Warren and Bloomberg, they are irretrievably in the tank for hard right interests, or are full-bore Trump dead-enders.

What's next? there were "good people on both sides" at Charlottesville?
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

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https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/the-next-three-2020-democratic-candidates-who-should-drop-out-of-the-race

[size=128pt]The next three 2020 Democratic candidates who should drop out of the race[/size]
by Becket Adams
 | November 08, 2019 03:05 PM

Harris went from being a top-tier 2020 candidate, a no-nonsense former prosecutor, and a full-time #Resistance hero to becoming a hapless punching bag for Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii.
//
Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg: Please, God, no. As a proud nanny-statist, Bloomberg offers nothing that Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont, and Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, don’t already offer more persuasively.


The Washington "Examiner"is little more than another outlet for right wing gasbags. If a writer files to discern daylight between Sanders and Warren and Bloomberg, they are irretrievably in the tank for hard right interests, or are full-bore Trump dead-enders.

What's next? there were "good people on both sides" at Charlottesville?

Well, regardless of the political spin of the Examiner, those 3 SHOULD drop out of the race.  They just clutter up the stage in the debates.  The field has got to be narrowed down to those who stand some chance of winning.  Cull the Herd, so to speak.

RE
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https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/the-next-three-2020-democratic-candidates-who-should-drop-out-of-the-race

[size=128pt]The next three 2020 Democratic candidates who should drop out of the race[/size]
by Becket Adams
 | November 08, 2019 03:05 PM

Harris went from being a top-tier 2020 candidate, a no-nonsense former prosecutor, and a full-time #Resistance hero to becoming a hapless punching bag for Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii.
//
Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg: Please, God, no. As a proud nanny-statist, Bloomberg offers nothing that Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont, and Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, don’t already offer more persuasively.


The Washington "Examiner"is little more than another outlet for right wing gasbags. If a writer files to discern daylight between Sanders and Warren and Bloomberg, they are irretrievably in the tank for hard right interests, or are full-bore Trump dead-enders.

What's next? there were "good people on both sides" at Charlottesville?

Well, regardless of the political spin of the Examiner, those 3 SHOULD drop out of the race.  They just clutter up the stage in the debates.  The field has got to be narrowed down to those who stand some chance of winning.  Cull the Herd, so to speak.

RE

I don't disagree. It's time to face reality for some of them, to be sure. I just vigorously object to the writer's characterizations as they emerge from his ass.
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

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Wait till the Receion sets in!

RE

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/11/11/not-economy-stupid-americans-to-vote-on-something-else-in-2020.html

‘Not the economy, stupid’: A majority of Americans say 2020 election will be about other issues
Published Mon, Nov 11 20196:00 AM ESTUpdated 3 hours ago
Eric Rosenbaum   @erprose
   
   
Key Points

    Only 34% of Americans say the next presidential election will be about the economy, according to a new CNBC and Acorns Invest In You survey conducted by SurveyMonkey released Monday.
    Only 21% of Americans say they are worse off today than they were in 2016 amid a historic low in unemployment, strong consumer spending and a record stock market.
    Even among Democratic voters, less than 50% believe a Biden, Warren or Sanders presidency would improve their personal financial situation.

watch now
VIDEO03:00
Economy outranks other issues among potential 2020 voters, according to new survey

No, “it’s not the economy, stupid.” At least, not as far as the way a majority of Americans are currently planning to cast their votes in the 2020 presidential election.

Near two-thirds of Americans (61%) say the 2020 election will be about issues other than the economy, according to a CNBC and Acorns Invest in You survey conducted by SurveyMonkey and released Monday.
GP: Voters Head To The Polls On Election Day
Residents arrive at their polling place to cast votes in Louisville, Kentucky. (Photo by by John Sommers II/Getty Images)
John Sommers II | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Amid historically low unemployment, strong consumer spending and a record stock market that President Donald J. Trump cites frequently, the financial security many Americans feel today is leading them to focus on other issues when it comes to the ballot box.

Thirty-four percent of Americans say they will vote on the economy, and that percentage rises with political party taken into account, but not even a majority of Republicans (42%) say the economy will be the main issue in 2020. That figure drops to 27% for Democrats.

At the same time, when asked what issue “matters the most to you right now,” jobs and the economy is cited by 24% of Americans, No. 1 among all responses, followed by health care (21%), immigration (15%) and the environment (13%). These are the only issues receiving double-digit percentage support.

The only age groups in which jobs and the economy was not the No. 1 issue was among the youngest Americans (24% of those age 18–24 cited the environment) and the oldest Americans (an equal 21% of Americans 65 and up cited either health care or immigration).

The focus on jobs and the economy right now, but not as an election issue, is not contradictory.

“We’ve had such a great economy, and it’s been great for a long time, so until it changes, people won’t have a reason to think or see things differently,” said Laura Wronski, senior research scientist at SurveyMonkey.

The findings also correspond to other recent surveys indicating that intense political partisanship has made economics a lesser issue, and that may be compounded by an escalating impeachment process that dominated headlines during the period when this survey was in the field.

More from Invest in You:
Many Americans are fighting the Fed. Good for them
Some people are afraid that recession fears can actually create one
7 tips to avoid overspending and going into debt this holiday season

“Jobs and the economy are the most relevant things for people at the end of the day,” said Paul West, managing director at Omaha, Nebraska-based Carson Wealth. “It puts food on the table and keeps the rent paid and lights on, but this is the most emotionally charged election that we maybe have ever seen,” he said.

The financial advisor, who says he is a big believer in behavior finance and behavioral thinking in general, said the combination of a strong economy and rising impeachment headlines contributes to the current view on the 2020 election.

“Wage growth is a little over 3%, and people are feeling better about that. Unemployment is low, and people feel good about the overall economy. ... One of the things I feel good about is that the personal savings rate is now up to 8.3%. People are feeling better, with more money in a 401(k) or bank accounts. ... They have less stress points in that part of their life.”

The survey, conducted Oct. 21–25 using SurveyMonkey’s U.S. Census Bureau data-based methodology and platform, examined the money attitudes of 2,776 Americans age 18 and up nationwide.
Partisan politics and pocketbooks

There is still a big partisan divide over the economy that cannot be ignored.

Republicans are two to three times more likely to say they are better off financially today than they were in 2016 — 66% of Republicans vs. 27% of Democrats. Forty-one percent of Democrats described their financial situation as “about the same.”

“If you take a GOP and Democratic respondent that is the same in every other sense — such as age, race, where they live — and the only difference is how they lean politically, that’s where partisanship comes in,” Wronski said.

She added that the survey question about the 2020 election — the exact wording was “As you may know, Bill Clinton won the presidency in 1992 running with the unofficial slogan ‘It’s the Economy, Stupid.’ For you, is the next election mainly about the economy or about other issues?” — presented a binary choice of the economy or everything else, and still 4 in 10 Republicans (42%) cited the economy, which is “a significant minority.”

Amber Wichowsky, a political science professor at Marquette University and director of its Democracy Lab, said Trump is underperforming the economy when looking at voters on a national basis. “Given where the economy is, we would expect his approval rating to be higher.”

She said the stark divide between Republicans and Democrats in the CNBC survey saying they’re “better off” is consistent with a trend political scientists have been trying to understand that shows the economy — historically one of the key drivers in election models — weakening as partisanship increases.

West, whose financial and investing planning is primarily on behalf of high-net-worth individual and families, and business owners and executives, said those who “are on the red side of the party divide” are more favorable on the economic outlook and those on “the blue side” more cautious at the moment.

Thirty-two percent of Democrats said they are worse off than in 2016, but looking ahead to the 2020 election, financial gain is not the main motivator for the majority of Democrats. When asked whether they would be more hopeful about their personal financial situation if a Democratic candidate wins the presidency in 2020, Warren had the most support among survey respondents, with 43%. Biden and Sanders were within the survey’s margin of error, with 42% of respondents. More Democrats (50%) say impeachment proceedings against the president would be a net positive for the economy.

Twenty percent of Democrats said they would be more fearful about their personal financial situation if Warren wins; 23% if the winner is Sanders.

That may be less an indicator of concern about the specific policies of the Democratic candidates and more a recognition of how strong the economy and market have been for such a long time already. “We’ve already jumped so high and done really well, so how much more can you get?” said West. “It’s like asking for a second dessert after a really good meal. Do you really want more dessert when you are full? How much fuller can you be?”

The survey was conducted before former New York City Mayor and billionaire businessman Michael Bloomberg announced his intentions to enter the Democratic Party contest.
VIDEO06:41
Josh Brown: What Trump’s tax bill means for your money
Women voters, rural voters and Independents

Wichowsky said this survey and other recent ones show that the 2020 election, at least at this point, does not look like it will be an up-or-down vote on the economy. However, there are key segments of the voting public where economic views, even filtered through partisanship, may prove key, including with rural voters and women voters.

The CNBC survey finds women less optimistic about their finances than men. Among male respondents, 51% said they and their families are better off today than they were in 2016. That figure drops to 38% for female survey respondents. Forty-eight percent of men say they and their families will be better off a year from now; that drops to 39% among women.

“We are seeing the gender gap in economic surveys with men more optimistic about the state of economy,” Wichowsky said. She added that women are more likely to be Democrats, but “partisanship does not fully explain it.”

In her home state of Wisconsin, a key battleground state for the Electoral College, current polling shows that the election will be tight. But where Trump is polling well is rural communities, which have been hit hard be the trade war and yet are still sticking with the president.

“His approval has not budged, and they are more likely to say tariffs are doing more to help than hurt the U.S. He needs rural voters to turn out for him,” Wichowsky said, to combat headwinds such as female voters.

Peter Enns, associate professor of government and executive director of the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research at Cornell University, said when thinking about the 2020 election those who identify as independent are particularly important because their vote choice is hardest to predict.

Independents were much closer to Republicans in terms of indicating “Jobs and the economy” as the issue that mattered most to them in the CNBC survey (Rep 29%, Ind 27%, Dem 17%). That could lead to a belief that it bodes well for Republicans in 2020, but the survey shows independents sending another message when asked to evaluate the economy. They are much closer to Democrats on the question of being better off today versus 2016 (66% percent of Republicans versus just 37% of Independents and 27% of Democrats.)

“It is interesting that Independents’ economic assessments appear closer to Democrats when we consider how respondents view their and their family’s financial situation compared with 2016,” said Enns, but he stressed that to have further confidence in these patterns, the data would need to hold up across multiple polls.

Sixty-two percent of Independents say the 2020 election will be mainly about issues other than the economy, putting them in between Republicans (57%) and Democrats (70%) on this question.
Recession fears and elections years

Even as Americans are showing their economic confidence, fears about a recession are high.

Sixty-five percent of Americans say a recession is likely in the next year — 84% of Democrats, 72% of Independents and 46% of Republicans.

“With markets hitting all-time highs, consumer confidence up ... things do look pretty good in the near term,” said Doug Boneparth, president of New York financial planning firm Bona Fide Wealth and a member of the CNBC Financial Advisor Council. “But the getting has been good for so long, everyone knows we’re in the 11th inning of an economic cycle. You don’t need expertise in finance to understand that. It’s been a decade or plus of no recession. So it’s not an issue until it is an issue,” he said.

Financial advisors said Americans are making the right decisions outside of politics to prepare for an economic downturn. The survey showed that 47% of Americans said they are paying down debt, 45% cutting household spending and 34% growing an emergency fund to prepare for a possible recession. Those numbers are consistent across political affiliations.
VIDEO01:54
Is There a Recession Coming? Keep an Eye on These Key Indicators

“I am happy to see these steps making it to the top of the list,” Boneparth said. He said growing the emergency fund should be No. 1 overall, because having liquidity in the event of a job loss or other economic headwind is more important than paying off debt like a mortgage or student loans ahead of schedule — double-digit revolving credit card debt would be the exception.

Carson said it was encouraging to see the youngest Americans — in the 18–24 and 25–34 age groups — focused on growing emergency funds, at 39% and 37%, respectively.

“It’s a time in life when responsibility has instantaneously jumped higher. The younger and older millennials amassing greater amounts of liquidity would really serve them well when avoiding the risks associated with an economic slowdown,” Boneparth said.

Younger Americans are the most concerned about a recession — most having never been an adult during one — with 71% of those age 18–24 and 73% of those age 25–34 saying a recession is likely in the next year.

West said the one politically motivated financial decision no American should make is pulling out of the stock market due to an election. “In client conversations I have had recently in several different cities, so many people are saying, ‘An election year is coming up. Should I take my money out of the market?’ They are letting behavioral biases win out, and of course my answer is, ‘If you have a long-term plan in place, you never want to take money out.’”
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Re: Cat Fight of the Decade ! Gabbard v. Clinton
« Reply #1152 on: November 12, 2019, 03:11:36 PM »


What else can be said about such a reprehensible public figure and serial loser as Hillary Rodham Clinton?

Really, has there ever been a more despicable and shamelessly malevolent individual in the U.S. political history?

The recent comments Clinton made about Tulsi Gabbard are just so foul and repugnant that it’s time for her to be removed from the American political scene for good.





http://stateofthenation2012.com/?p=130323


Lawyers for 2020 presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard on Monday fired off a letter to representatives of failed 2016 presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, demanding that the Chicago-born politician “verbally retract” recent statements that suggested Gabbard was being “groomed” as a third-party candidate by Russia.

The move by Gabbard’s lawyers was prompted by Clinton’s October appearance on David Plouffe’s podcast, “Campaign HQ.” During an hour-long segment, Clinton spoke on the current political climate, which included her making remarks which initially implied that Gabbard was a third-party “favorite” of Moscow, and that she was being “groomed” by the Russians.

https://sputniknews.com/us/201911111077282790-tulsi-gabbards-lawyers-demand-clinton-retract-russian-asset-podcast-claims/
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You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Re: Cat Fight of the Decade ! Gabbard v. Clinton
« Reply #1153 on: November 13, 2019, 01:01:22 AM »


What else can be said about such a reprehensible public figure and serial loser as Hillary Rodham Clinton?

Really, has there ever been a more despicable and shamelessly malevolent individual in the U.S. political history?

The recent comments Clinton made about Tulsi Gabbard are just so foul and repugnant that it’s time for her to be removed from the American political scene for good.

http://stateofthenation2012.com/?p=130323


Lawyers for 2020 presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard on Monday fired off a letter to representatives of failed 2016 presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, demanding that the Chicago-born politician “verbally retract” recent statements that suggested Gabbard was being “groomed” as a third-party candidate by Russia.

The move by Gabbard’s lawyers was prompted by Clinton’s October appearance on David Plouffe’s podcast, “Campaign HQ.” During an hour-long segment, Clinton spoke on the current political climate, which included her making remarks which initially implied that Gabbard was a third-party “favorite” of Moscow, and that she was being “groomed” by the Russians.

https://sputniknews.com/us/201911111077282790-tulsi-gabbards-lawyers-demand-clinton-retract-russian-asset-podcast-claims/

Let's be clear: Sputnik is a news agency, news website platform and radio broadcast service established by the Russian government-owned news agency Rossiya Segodnya. Headquartered in Moscow, Sputnik has regional editorial offices in Washington, Cairo, Beijing, Paris, Berlin, London and Edinburgh. So you are getting this from Russian state media.

Hre's what Media Bias fact Check has to say about Sputnik News:

Quote
QUESTIONABLE SOURCE

A questionable source exhibits one or more of the following: extreme bias, consistent promotion of propaganda/conspiracies, poor or no sourcing to credible information, a complete lack of transparency and/or is fake news. Fake News is the deliberate attempt to publish hoaxes and/or disinformation for the purpose of profit or influence (Learn More). Sources listed in the Questionable Category may be very untrustworthy and should be fact checked on a per article basis. Please note sources on this list are not considered fake news unless specifically written in the reasoning section for that source. See all Questionable sources.

Overall, we rate Sputnik Questionable based on frequent promotion of conspiracies and pro-Russian propaganda, as well as use of poor sources and numerous failed fact checks.

https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/sputnik-news/

Gabbard is this year's Jill Stein. I'll expect a full retraction when La Gabbard stands up her third party run. That'll be after she finishes chewing the dingleberries out of my ass.

I am NO fan of HRC, but she was absolutely right about trump, too. Russian puppet.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2019, 01:31:42 AM by Surly1 »
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Offline azozeo

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Re: Election Errata
« Reply #1154 on: November 13, 2019, 09:07:56 AM »
45 was bailed out by the French side of the Rothschild gang of thieves, when his Ivory Tower in Atlantic City went tits up. He also stiffed his employees
their final wages.

Mrs. 42 has her head shoved in a glue pot (or a facsimile) & gets mailbox money to do so.............


I don't deny 45, Vlad & Xi are in cahoots  :evil4:

We deserve way better than the used sanitary napkin of a mob rule political system that we endure day to day.

I post this pulp fiction for shits & giggles & DON'T get mailbox money for it either  :icon_mrgreen: If anyone buys into this swamp vomit, they may want
to consult their "Higher Self" for further direction in life rather than MSM.

Carry ON !
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

 

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