AuthorTopic: Brazil is Feijoada  (Read 5603 times)

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Eike Batista takes the Perp Walk
« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2017, 12:46:35 AM »
Another Pigman bite the dust.  :emthup: :emthup: :icon_sunny:

I wonder why he didn't run for Germany?  ???  :icon_scratch:

RE

http://time.com/4654713/brazil-eike-batista-arrested-corruption/


Businessman Eike Batista disembarks from a vehicle as he arrives to the Ary Franco prison, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, Jan 30, 2017.  Jose Lucena—AP

brazil
This Man Was Once Brazil's Richest. He's Now in Jail on Bribery Charges
Feliz Solomon
6:35 AM Alaskan

A Brazilian oil and mining tycoon has been jailed in Rio de Janeiro after turning himself over to police on corruption charges. Eike Batista, who was once the country's richest man, is accused of paying millions of dollars worth of bribes to officials for government contracts.

The BBC reports that Batista, who denies all allegations of wrongdoing, was arrested in Rio upon his arrival from New York on Monday morning.

The network cited Brazilian newspaper O Globo, which quoted Batista as saying he was now “at the disposal of the courts,” and that despite his denial of the charges, "As a Brazilian, I am doing my duty."

Batista reportedly said he was returning to his home to clear his name and help the Brazilian government tackle what he said is widespread corruption. The BBC reports he will be held at Bangu penitentiary, a high security facility on the outskirts of Rio. He was originally taken to Ary Franco prison, but was transferred shortly after his arrival.

Read More: A Key Judge in Brazil's Graft Scandal Just Died in a Plane Crash. Few Think It's an Accident.

Batista’s surrender to authorities follows his sudden departure last week, when he fled to New York just hours before a police raid on his Rio home and was declared a fugitive, according to the BBC. Many initially assumed that Batista would flee to Europe using his German passport, a BBC South America correspondent said.

The resource mogul is accused of shelling out some $16.5 million to then-governor of Rio Sergio Cabral, who was also arrested for alleged corruption last year during an investigation called Operation Car Wash.

The BBC says the expansive probe has resulted in more than 100 convictions for crimes including money laundering and bribery, and has landed powerful figures, such as construction magnate Marcelo Odebrecht, behind bars.

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Brazil in Chaos: Children of Men-Life Imitates Art
« Reply #31 on: February 06, 2017, 06:56:08 PM »
Now we are talking real Children of Men scenario!  :o

Sounds worse than what Ferfal went through during the Argentinian collapse in 2001.

Lots of graphic pics and vids at the link.

RE

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4195318/Thugs-randomly-shooting-passes.html

'Thugs are randomly shooting at anyone who passes': Looting, rape and murder break out on the streets of Brazil after military police go on strike in the state of Espírito Santo


    WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT
    Chaos on the streets of Espírito Santo has been compared to the film The Purge
    Officers have staged a mass walkout in a row over their working conditions
    People are running around with guns and machetes causing panic in Brazil
    Brazilian troops have now been deployed to restore order in city of Vitoria
    Fresh negotiations planned for later today on the proviso officers return to work


By Gareth Davies and Chris Summers For Mailonline

Published: 05:17 EST, 6 February 2017 | Updated: 19:48 EST, 6 February 2017



Brazilian troops are being deployed in the state of Espírito Santo after looting, rape and murders broke out after military police went on strike.

The chaos has been compared to the 2014 thriller film The Purge, where people take advantage of the absence of law and order to carry out horrific crimes.

With officers staging a walk-out over conditions, thugs are running riot, with people running rampant with guns and machetes, shops being robbed, buses set on fire and dead bodies are left lying in the street.

Scroll down for videos
A bus burns violently after it was torched on the street during the chaos in Brazil
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A bus burns violently after it was torched on the street during the chaos in Brazil

The Brazilian federal government today ordered troops into the city of Vitoria, north east of Rio de Janeiro, which has been left at the mercy of criminals.

The defence ministry said soldiers were being sent in 'due to the serious public safety situation'.

Brazil's Defence Minister Raul Jungmann visited Vitoria today on a fact-finding mission.
A man is left bloody and battered amid the chaos caused by the military police strike
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A man is left bloody and battered amid the chaos caused by the military police strike

Police officers have been blockading police stations in protest against unpaid salaries since Saturday.

The acting governor of Espirito Santo state, Cesar Colnago, had earlier begged President Michel Temer 'to send the National Force and the army to safeguard the security of citizens'.

Local media said crime rates had quadrupled over the weekend.

Globo television broadcast cellphone footage of burned and smashed buses, looted shops, carjackings and a crowd running in panic from what appeared to be gunshots.

Students stayed at home and classrooms will remain shuttered 'depending on the security situation'.

State security chief Andre Garcia said the police chief had been replaced and the new commander had been tasked with 'restoring order and discipline'.

Talks are to take place with the disgruntled officers but they have been told they have to go back to work first.

Vitoria and its suburbs have a population of 1.8 million people, while a total of 3.9 million live in Espirito Santo state.   
A paramedic attends to a man who is left on his back in the riots in Espírito Santo
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A paramedic attends to a man who is left on his back in the riots in Espírito Santo
Thugs break into a shop and can be seen running out of the door with a handful of goods
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Thugs break into a shop and can be seen running out of the door with a handful of goods
Dramatic footage from the Purge-like chaos during which one person was shot
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Dramatic footage from the Purge-like chaos during which one person was shot
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Harrowing scenes were reported from all around the state, and one resident told Political Outsource: 'The thugs are randomly shooting at anyone who passes the street in Espírito Santo. My God what is happening.'

Schools have been closed and even football matches cancelled in the affected areas due to the lack of security, which has meant many people are refusing to even venture outdoors.

'I won't even leave my house today,' one Brazilian resident in Espirato Santo told Political Outsource.

'Things are absolutely crazy, there are people running around with guns in pretty populated areas, dozens of people stealing from malls, even dead bodies on streets.'
The chaos has been captured on camera by a number of worried residents as well as the thugs
+6

The chaos has been captured on camera by a number of worried residents as well as the thugs

Police, aided by relatives and sympathizers blockading police stations, have been protesting against unpaid salaries since early Saturday.

With no patrols on the streets over the weekend, assaults and other crime have multiplied, Brazilian media reported.

State security chief Andre Garcia said on his Facebook page that the police chief had been replaced and that the new commander was tasked with 'restoring order and discipline.'

Talks would take place with the disgruntled officers 'but with the fundamental condition that police are put on the streets,' he said.

'All possible means will be used to police the streets.'

State Secretary of Public Security André Garcia told Globo: 'The first step taken by the government to overthrow this movement was the filing of a lawsuit requiring the illegality of the movement to be enacted. 

'Our intention is to negotiate, always, but this negotiation must be based on mutual respect, and the condition for the police come to patrol the streets and answer the calls of the Capixabas citizens.'

The government has threatened to file a lawsuit against the force, claiming the strike is illegal.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4195318/Thugs-randomly-shooting-passes.html#ixzz4XxpiUom1
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Re: Brazil in Chaos: Children of Men-Life Imitates Art
« Reply #32 on: February 07, 2017, 12:25:56 AM »
Video in Portuguese.

I'll give you the gist of it.  The situation is a mess.  They don't have money to pay the cops, and El Presidente has dropped on a 20 Year Austerity program!  :o

Espirito Santo is the state right next to the State of Rio de Janeiro, where the city of Rio is located.  They are in just as bad shape economically as ES.  If this spreads to Rio, they're not gonna have enough military to go round to try and squash it.

Brasil is in Fast Collapse.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/EGb660xGUP4" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/EGb660xGUP4</a>
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Brazilian Army Called in to Protect Vitória in Espírito Santo
« Reply #33 on: February 07, 2017, 03:14:33 PM »
In most of the articles coming out on this topic, they say the cops are striking for better wages.  In fact, they're striking to get any wages at all!

The other interesting aspect is the cops are denying they are striking, it's their family members who are blockading the police stations and preventing the cops from going out on patrol.  You see, under Brasilian law Military Police are forbidden from striking.  So this is their work around to have plausible deniability.  Since they can't strike, the only option would be to quit once you're not getting paid, but since there probably aren't any jobs for them to take if they quit, they're trying as a group to force Da Goobermint to start paying them.  Which is hard for Da Goobermint to do unless they just start printing money, but then they'll just go through another round of hyperinflation.

Now, Da Federal Goobermint has sent in 200 of the Army to quell the violence, looting etc, but how well can 200 guys police a city of 2M?  One also figures these guys are still getting paid, but what happens when their wages start being cut or not showing up at all?

Canary in the Coal Mine.

RE

http://riotimesonline.com/brazil-news/rio-politics/brazilian-army-troops-called-in-to-safeguard-vitoria/


Brazilian Army Called in to Protect Vitória in Espírito Santo

Violence in the state capital of Vitória has skyrocketed since Friday after families of military police officers blocked police station entrances.
By
Lise Alves -
February 7, 2017

By Lise Alves, Senior Contributing Reporter


SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL – Two hundred federal army troops are patrolling the streets of Espírito Santo’s capital, Vitória, since Monday night after at least 65 violent deaths were reported over the weekend. The crime wave started on Friday after police stopped work because of a pay dispute.
Brazil,Federal troops ready to patrol streets of Vitoria, capital of Espirito Santo
Federal troops ready to patrol streets of Vitória, capital of Espírito Santo, photo internet reproduction.

Since Friday the families of military police officers have blocked police stations not allowing officers to leave for patrol. The families are protesting for better wages and since by law the military cannot strike, their families are acting on their behalf. Without police presence on the streets, violence in the metropolitan region of Vitória has skyrocketed.

According to Defense Minister, Raul Jungmann, federal troops will remain until the situation is normalized. “Our commitment is to be adamant and determined to restore normalcy, order, peace and tranquility in Vitoria and where else necessary. President Temer determined our presence here and that we would remain as long as necessary for the order to be recovered,” said the official after visiting parts of the city on Monday.

Fearing further violence, the city government announced that the city administrative offices, public health clinics and schools, which were supposed to start on Monday, would be closed until the situation was resolved.

“The suspension of activities in the municipal administration is due to the protest of family members of the state military police and aims to ensure the safety and integrity of servants and citizens,” said the note released to the press on Monday.

“There is no way we can accept this attitude, leaving the population deprived of an essential service like public security,” Cesar Colnago, the state’s governor, told reporters after announcing the federal aid.

Since Friday local media have been receiving cellphone videos from city residents showing scenes of rampant crimes in the streets, vandalism and destruction. Reports of muggings, auto theft, burglaries and ransacking of stores have been common in the past three days.
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: Brazil is Feijoada
« Reply #34 on: February 07, 2017, 08:13:32 PM »


Brazil sent 200 federal troops into the state of Espírito Santo, in southeastern Brazil, on Monday in an attempt to curb a surge in violence with dozens reported dead following a police strike over pay disputes.

Brazil’s President Michel Temer ordered the federal troops to be sent to restore law and order in the state north of Rio de Janeiro.

On Friday, police in the state stopped working over a pay dispute. As military police cannot formally go on strike, families of officers have instead protested for better wages and prevented officers going on patrol by blocking police stations.

The state government, however, says that it does not have the funds to raise wages and will not go back to the negotiating table until police return to work.

In a state already hit hard by budget cuts and the country’s worst ever economic recession, a wave of crime and violence then rocked the state, with scenes of riots and anarchy, particularly in the capital Vitória.

Over the weekend, up to 52 people were thought to have been killed, according to Reuters. The Rio Times put the death toll as high as 65, but a security spokesman from the state said that the government does not have an official tally.

Out of concern for public security, essential services such as schools and public health clinics were shut down. Videos captured by residents have shown muggings, car thefts, looting, vandalism and general destruction.

Espírito Santo’s governor, Cesar Colnago, who made the request for federal troops, commented on the strike: “There is no way we can accept this attitude, leaving the population deprived of an essential service like public security.”

“President Temer determined our presence here and that we would remain as long as necessary for the order to be recovered,” Defense Minister, Raul Jungmann, said.

Espírito Santo’s head of public security, Andre Garcia, said that the protests have “paralyzed the military police service, not just in the capital but also in the entire state. Movements of this nature hold society hostage.”

Other states and municipalities throughout Brazil have also been hit hard by a struggling economy, making it difficult to pay for basic services and wages.

While the Temer government has brought in harsh austerity measures, Brazil continues to be plagued by high rates of violence, police killings as well as continued prison riots.

http://brazzil.com/hit-by-a-police-strike-looting-dozens-of-dead-brazil-city-begs-for-the-feds/
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Offline Palloy2

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Re: Brazil is Feijoada
« Reply #35 on: February 08, 2017, 06:05:32 PM »
Aw, come on - it's just a few hoodlums having fun while the cops are "on strike", to help make the point that the cops are needed.   ::)  They did worse than that when Brazil got knocked out of the World Cup.

What's wrong with printing the money to pay cops' wages? - a little inflation never hurt anyone.
"The State is a body of armed men."

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Brazil authorities request troops as violence continues amid police strike
« Reply #36 on: February 08, 2017, 07:24:29 PM »
There has been a remarkable dearth of information coming out in the MSM about the situation in Espirito Santo, although this article does indicate the 200 soldiers sent in to replace the striking cops have not been enough.  Normally, they have 1800 cops patrolling.  200 soldiers in a population of 2M in Vitoria alone amounts to 1 per 10,000 people.  They will not be able to do much.

Death Toll now reported as "more than 80", but I am betting it's a lot higher than that.

RE

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/feb/08/brazil-violence-police-strike-espirito-santo-deaths

 Brazil authorities request troops as violence continues amid police strike

After state police began striking in a pay dispute last weekend, there have been more than 80 reported deaths in the small coastal state of Espírito Santo


Protesters burn tires during a violent protest against the police in Vitória, Espírito Santo, Brazil, on Tuesday. Photograph: Gabriel Lordello/EPA

Reuters in Vitória

Wednesday 8 February 2017 11.20 EST
Last modified on Wednesday 8 February 2017 11.45 EST

Authorities in the Brazilian state of Espírito Santo have requested more federal troops to stem a crime wave, amid an ongoing police strike that in five days has led to more than 80 reported deaths.

The death toll, if confirmed, would be roughly six times the state’s comparable homicide rate from last year.

Despite the pending mobilization of 1,000 soldiers, and a contingent of 200 federal police officers who arrived in the south-eastern state on Tuesday, violence continues its grip after state police began striking in a pay dispute last weekend.

Confronting the wave of assaults, looting and murders, local officials said they would need hundreds more troops to help make up for an average deployment of 1,800 officers who normally patrol the small coastal state north of Rio de Janeiro.

The stoppage, assisted by family and friends of officers who have blocked access to barracks and police stations, comes as Espírito Santo, like many states racked by Brazil’s worst recession on record, struggles to ensure even basic health, education and security services.
Brazil grapples with lynch mob epidemic: 'A good criminal is a dead criminal'
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Governor Paulo Hartung on Wednesday called the strike, which prompted officials to close schools and clinics and has led fearful residents to stay home, “blackmail”. He compared it to “kidnapping the liberty of citizens and charging a ransom”.

Federal officials did not immediately respond to the request for more troops but earlier in the week said they would take whatever steps were needed to restore order.

State officials have not confirmed the rising death toll from the violence, but local media have reported that more than 80 people have been killed since Saturday.

In addition to television footage and cellphone videos of assaults and looting in broad daylight, reports from the local morgue showed bodies on floors and in hallways of the overburdened facility.

Most of the violence has been centered in Vitória and its suburbs, a metropolitan region of about 2 million people.
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Buses torched, roads blocked, clashes during Brazil strike
« Reply #37 on: April 29, 2017, 12:08:17 AM »
https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/buses-torched-roads-blocked-clashes-during-brazil-strike/2017/04/28/45bc2624-2c76-11e7-9081-f5405f56d3e4_story.html?utm_term=.a34dc032ee56

Business
Buses torched, roads blocked, clashes during Brazil strike


Seen through a shattered bus window, another bus burns after it was set fire by protesters during a general strike in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, April 28, 2017. Public transport largely came to a halt across much of Brazil on Friday and protesters blocked roads and scuffled with police as part of a general strike to protest proposed changes to labor laws and the pension system. (Leo Correa/Associated Press)
By Mauricio Savarese and Peter Prengaman | AP April 28 at 8:53 PM

RIO DE JANEIRO — Protesters lit buses on fire, blocked roads and clashed with police on Friday during a general strike that brought transportation to a halt in many cities across Latin America’s largest nation.

The strike was to protest major changes to labor law and the pension system being considered by Congress, but it was also a raw display of anger by many Brazilians fed up with corruption and worried about the future amid a deep recession and rising unemployment.

In Rio de Janeiro, after hours of clashes with police in front of the legislative building, several buses were torched. In Sao Paulo, thousands marched toward the home of President Michel Temer, throwing rocks at police who shot stun grenades when protesters tried to go beyond barriers set up.

Millions stayed home, either in support of the strike or simply because they were unable to get to work. The tens of thousands who took to the street raised questions about whether Temer will be able to push his proposals through Congress, where they had previously looked likely to pass.

Temer’s administration argues that more flexible labor rules will revive a moribund economy and warns the pension system will go bankrupt without changes. Unions and other groups called for the strike, saying the changes before Congress will make workers too vulnerable and strip away too many benefits.

In a statement Friday night, Temer characterized the protesters as “small groups” that blocked the roads and streets. He said his administration was working to help Brazilians workers overcome the country’s economic malaise.

Earlier in the day, most commuter trains and metro lines were stopped in Sao Paulo during the height of morning commute, and all buses stayed off the roads. Buses ran partial service during the morning in Rio but later began returning to normal. The metro was closed for the day in the capital of Brasilia.

Some protesters also set up barricades and started fires in the streets, including on roads heading to the main airports in Sao Paulo. In Rio, protesters created confusion by running through Santos Dumont Airport, and others blocked a major road.
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Some plane mechanics joined the strike, according to the National Aeronautic Union, but the impact was minimal, with only a handful of flights canceled or delayed at the two cities’ airports.

“We are demanding our rights, as workers, because the president of the country proposed a law for people to work more and live less, so you will only receive your pension when you die,” said Edgar Fernandes, a dock worker who was protesting in Rio.

The CUT union said around 35 million Brazilians didn’t show up for work on Friday, more than one-third of the working population. But government officials downplayed the strike, insisting that many Brazilians were still at work.

“We don’t have a strike, we have widespread riots,” Justice Minister Osmar Serraglio said on Joven Pam radio.

Brazil’s economy is in a deep recession, and many Brazilians are frustrated with Temer’s government. Temer, whose approval ratings are hovering around 10 percent, has argued the proposed changes will benefit Brazilians in the long run. But with so many out of work, many feel they can ill afford any cuts to their benefits.

Meanwhile, the country is mired in a colossal scandal involving billions of dollars in kickbacks to politicians and other public officials. Over the last three years, dozens of top politicians and businessmen have been jailed in the so-called Car Wash investigation that has produced near daily revelations of wrongdoing.

Scores of sitting politicians, including Temer himself and several of his ministers, have been implicated. Temer denies wrongdoing.

In one the largest demonstrations Friday, thousands of protesters gathered in front Rio de Janeiro’s state assembly in the afternoon and were fighting pitched battles with police who tried to remove them. Police fired tear gas while protesters threw stones and lit small fires in the middle of streets.

In Sao Paulo, police told downtown shopkeepers to close early, apparently out of concern that protesters might head there. Throughout the day, 21 people were arrested in Sao Paulo, according to military police.
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Underscoring the economic malaise, the IBGE statistics agency announced on Friday that unemployment had jumped to 13.7 percent in the first quarter of the year, up from 12 percent.

The anger over the proposed changes to benefits shows that Temer’s government has failed to convince the people that the moves are necessary, said Oliver Stuenkel, who teaches international relations at the Fundacao Getulio Vargas university in Sao Paulo. And yet, the proposed laws have been moving fairly easily through Congress, and had been expected to eventually pass.

“This is a peculiar government that has low approval and still gets work done in Congress,” he said. “But lawmakers also think of their re-elections next year. After today, there could be a bigger risk for Temer in getting any meaningful bills passed.”
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Brazil's president accused of bribery
« Reply #38 on: May 18, 2017, 02:38:27 AM »
http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/18/americas/brazil-temer-bribery-allegations/


Brazil's president accused of bribery

CNN Digital Expansion 2016 Flora Charner

By Euan McKirdy and Flora Charner, CNN

Updated 3:13 AM ET, Thu May 18, 2017


Brazilian president Michel Temer takes part in a "Year of Achievements" meeting to mark of the first year of his presidency on May 12, 2017.

    Brazilian newspaper: President paid jailed politician to keep quiet
    Ongoing corruption investigation has implicated dozens of politicians and business leaders

Rio de Janeiro (CNN)Brazil's leadership lurched into another bribery scandal Wednesday, as one of the country's biggest newspapers accused President Michel Temer of paying a former senate colleague hush money.
Temer's office released a statement denying that he had authorized any bribes to be paid to imprisoned former house speaker Eduardo Cunha in exchange for his silence regarding a long-running corruption investigation.
The prominent daily newspaper O Globo reported earlier in the day that a meat producer had recorded the President giving the go-ahead to bribe Cunha to "keep quiet" while he was in jail.

According to the report, the information was revealed when the owners of the meat and chicken conglomerate JBS testified before the Supreme Court behind closed doors as part of a massive corruption investigation, dubbed "Operation Car Wash," which implicates former and current politicians.
The corruption probe has led to the imprisonment of some of Brazil's most prominent politicians and business owners. More than 80 people have been charged with bribery and money laundering during Operation Car Wash.
Brazil judge overseeing corruption probe dies in plane crash
Highest reaches of power implicated
Former President Dilma Rousseff was impeached last year after the Senate found her guilty of breaking budgetary laws amid the swirling corruption investigation -- though she herself was not accused of corruption.
Temer was Rousseff's former vice president and has been serving as interim President since her suspension in May 2016.
The wide-ranging corruption investigation began three years ago with the arrest of an executive at Petrobras, Brazil's government-run oil company.
Petrobras and Odebrecht, Latin America's largest construction firm, played leading roles in the bribery ring.
The scandal is a central reason why Brazil is in its worst recession in history.
In addition to implicating Temer in the exchange with Cunha, Joesley Batista, the owner of JBS, reportedly testified that he had paid Cunha R$5 million since his imprisonment as part of an ongoing financial agreement, and still owed him R$20 million, in an agreement made after the politician exempted the poultry industry from certain taxes.
brazil free fall watson pkg_00001805

Brazil struggling with political and economic crises 03:16
This company created the world's biggest bribery ring
Plea deal
O Globo reported that Batista, his brother Wesley and five JBS employees testified as part of a plea bargain.
The statement from Temer's office acknowledges a meeting took place between Temer and Batista, adding "there was no dialogue that could compromise the President of the Republic's conduct."
The O Globo report also details other improprieties by Brazilian businessmen and politicians. As part of the investigation, "controlled actions" -- recorded conversations and exchanges of money which were tracked by federal police -- were carried out.
The testimony states that a congressman, Rodrigo Rocha Lourdes, was sent by Temer to "resolve a matter" concerning a JBS subsidiary. The lawmaker was later filmed receiving a bag containing R$500,000 ($159,000).
According to the report, Batista also testified that former finance minister Guido Mantega was his point of contact at the former ruling Worker's Party, the party of former leaders Lula and Dilma Rousseff, and said that Mantega would distribute bribes to Worker's Party members.
Rocha Lourdes' press secretary said he will "clarify all of the divulged facts" from the testimony.

CNN's Lonzo Cook and Elwyn Lopez contributed to this report.
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Offline Palloy2

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Re: Brazil is Feijoada
« Reply #39 on: May 24, 2017, 08:08:57 PM »
https://www.rt.com/news/389622-police-use-tear-gas-brazil-evacuated-ministry/
Troops deployed, ministries evacuated as violent protesters smash govt buildings in Brazil
24 May, 2017

Brazilian government ministries have been evacuated amid massive protests in the country’s capital, Brasilia. Demonstrators reportedly attacked and even “plundered” some ministerial buildings. Police responded with tear gas and stun grenades.

Some 35,000 people have taken to the streets of Brasilia to express their discontent with the current Brazilian leadership and to demand early presidential elections, Globo reported.

Protesters are marching to the presidential palace to demand an end to austerity reforms, AFP reports, with chants of "Out with Temer!” filling the air.

Police stopped their advance by using tear gas but the protesters retaliated by throwing stones at the officers.

    Pessoa ferida pela ação da PM em Brasília; manifestantes denunciam forte repressão da PM #diretaspordireitoshttps://t.co/kNVyvBEKU2pic.twitter.com/t4NXRy96JZ
    — Brasil de Fato (@Brasil_de_Fato) May 24, 2017

"Four people were detained by police,” Brazil’s Globo broadcaster reports, citing a police statement that also said three of the arrested had drugs on them and another a melee weapon.

One protester allegedly suffered a gunshot wound, organizers said. However, there has been no official confirmation of that incident.

Six officers have been injured in the clashes, police said later as cited by Brazilian media. Medical authorities say a “large number of demonstrators” were also injured during the protests without providing exact figures. Local hospitals have urged people to donate blood for the injured, Globo reports.

The protesters have “occupied” the Ministries Esplanade which is surrounded by the ministerial buildings.

The protesters reportedly set the Agricultural Ministry’s building on fire and smashed windows at several other ministerial buildings, Brazilian media report. The affected ministries have been evacuated.

    Ministério da Agricultura pegando fogo em Brasília #diretaspordireitoshttps://t.co/kNVyvBEKU2pic.twitter.com/OjBFt7BYSi
    — Brasil de Fato (@Brasil_de_Fato) May 24, 2017

The protesters are erecting barricades on the streets using “sofas, chairs and tables” from nearby buildings and are burning litter.

The demonstrators burnt public bicycles and “plundered” the Ministry of Planning, according to some reports.

    Temer decretou "ação de garantia da lei e da ordem" (GLO) na Esplanada dos Ministérios https://t.co/A26Mz4pWCapic.twitter.com/dYKPV4g4jm
    — G1 (@g1) May 24, 2017

The demonstrators also “did some damage” to the Brasilia Metropolitan Cathedral and the Museum of the Republic, according to Globo.

The Military Police of Brasilia were deployed to disperse demonstrators.
"The State is a body of armed men."

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Re: Brazil is Feijoada
« Reply #40 on: May 24, 2017, 08:22:24 PM »
Can U Spell F-A-I-L-E-D  S-T-A-T-E?

Venezuela is there, Brazil to shortly follow.

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Six die, thousands forced out in Brazil floods
« Reply #41 on: May 30, 2017, 03:48:23 AM »
http://www.news24.com/World/News/six-die-thousands-forced-out-in-brazil-floods-20170529

Six die, thousands forced out in Brazil floods
2017-05-29 22:45


Sao Paulo - At least six people were killed and tens of thousands more fled their homes in flooding in the north-east of Brazil over the weekend, regional authorities said.
Rain-swollen rivers, mud slides and falling trees in Pernambuco state drove out at least 30 000 residents, with another 3 000 families forced out in neighbouring Alagoas, the governments of the two states said.

Both states declared emergencies after the flooding, which left two dead in Pernambuco and four dead in Alagoas.

President Michel Temer, who is fighting for his political future amid a corruption crisis, briefly abandoned the capital Brasilia to fly over the disaster zone on Sunday.

Temer also used the visit in Pernambuco to authorize a $184m loan from the BNDES state development bank for the completion of four dams that had been announced back in 2010, state-owned Agencia Brasil reported.
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In Brazil, Lula conviction opens field for 2018 presidential race
« Reply #42 on: July 13, 2017, 12:08:36 AM »
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-brazil-politics-lula-analysis-idUSKBN19Y0CM?il=0

In Brazil, Lula conviction opens field for 2018 presidential race

Brad Brooks



BRASILIA (Reuters) - The graft conviction Wednesday of former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, a front-runner for next year's presidential election, opens the door for an outsider to take power in Latin America's largest country, political experts said.

Lula, a giant on the Brazilian political scene who led Brazil from 2003 to 2011, has said he wants to run for president again next year. But if his nearly 10-year sentence is upheld on appeal, Lula, a founder of the leftist Workers Party, would be barred from seeking office again for eight years, beginning after any jail time is complete.

Lula, 71, is among a raft of Brazilian elites toppled by an epic corruption scandal that has battered the nation's economy, engulfed every major party and deepened public cynicism about politics. It's a toxic mix that has enraged voters, who are searching for someone to lead them out of the political and economic wilderness.

"Brazil is now as polarized as the U.S., it really has been for years," said Carlos Melo, a political scientist with Insper, a Sao Paulo business school. "But if Lula is absent it would unquestionably open the space for an outside, very emotional leader, a bit like U.S. President Trump."

Lula was convicted on Wednesday by Judge Sergio Moro, who found Lula guilty of accepting 3.7 million reais ($1.15 million) worth of bribes from engineering firm OAS SA [OAS.UL]. That is the amount prosecutors said the company spent refurbishing a beach apartment for Lula in return for his help winning contracts with state oil company Petroleo Brasileiro.

OAS was part of a supplier cartel that prosecutors said fleeced billions of dollars from Petrobras through inflated contracts, funneling some of the ill-gotten gains to politicians and political parties. Several OAS executives were jailed by Moro, the hard-charging judge overseeing the so-called Car Wash investigation, the largest-ever corruption probe in Brazil’s history.

Lula' lawyers said he is innocent. He will remain free while his attorneys appeal the ruling, which they have characterized as a political witch hunt. The appeals court is expected to take at least eight months to rule.

"This politically motivated judgment attacks Brazil's rule of law, democracy and Lula's basic human rights," Lula's defense team wrote in an emailed statement. "It is of immense concern to the Brazilian people and to the international community."
The Race

Despite his legal woes, the charismatic Lula remains Brazil's best-known politician and has retained a base of loyal supporters. As president, he channeled resources from a commodities boom into social programs that helped lift millions from poverty.

Recent surveys from the respected Datafolha polling institute show that in a second-round runoff next year, Lula would beat all contenders with the exception of the environmentalist and two-time presidential candidate Marina Silva, with whom he is in a technical tie.

But if Lula cannot run, and with roughly 20 percent of the electorate undecided on any candidate, the election is up for grabs.

While Silva has polled well, Melo and other political watchers doubt that the soft-spoken, environmental expert could win, in part because her campaigns have lacked the fiery speeches and dramatic flair needed to engage many voters.

The public's thirst for showmanship and anti-establishment candidates, Melo said, could give a boost to two outsiders: Ciro Gomes, a tough-talking former governor, federal minister and congressmen who is now with the Democratic Workers Party; and Joao Doria, a millionaire media mogul and former star of Brazil's version of "The Apprentice."

Gomes, despite his long career in politics, is a rough-and-tumble politician who could easily position himself as an anti-government candidate. Loud and politically incorrect, Gomes called unpopular President Michel Temer, himself facing a corruption charge, the "captain of the coup" that led to the impeachment of former President Dilma Rousseff last year.

Doria, who had never held elected office before, stunned the political establishment last year when he won the mayorship of South America's largest city in the first round, capturing 53 percent of the vote. A member of the centrist Brazilian Social Democracy Party, he is loved by the business community for his pro-market stance. And he has caught the public's attention with stunts such as donning a street sweeper's uniform and spending days cleaning roadways.

Shortly after the Lula verdict was made public Wednesday, Doria posted on Twitter that "Justice has been done."

"The most shameless man in Brazil was condemned to nine and a half years in prison," Doria continued. "Long live Brazil."

The latest Datafolha polls shows Gomes and Doria in a technical tie in a second-round presidential vote next year.

A right-wing, law-and-order candidate, congressman Jair Bolsonaro, of the Social Christian Party, also has polled well, taking 15 percent of a simulated first-round vote in the Datafolha survey, putting him behind only Lula.

But political watchers caution his appeal is likely to wane as opponents dig into his trove of anti-gay, pro-dictatorship utterances. Bolsonaro is facing a trial before Brazil's Supreme Court for inciting violence after he told a female congresswoman on the floor of the lower house that he "would not rape her because she would not be worthy of it."

Sergio Praca, a political scientist at the Getulio Vargas Foundation, a leading Brazilian University, said he sees the Lula conviction as giving all politicians a deep scare rather than any one candidate a bounce.

"This conviction is a black mark on Brazil's history. But it is a great moment in the fight against impunity," Praca said.

"The Brazilian voter will no longer accept a presidential candidate who is not clean, and that is a real evolution in our democracy," he added. "In this trying moment, that is the positive outlook we have to hold onto."
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📺 Temer signed a decree for police militarization of Rio de Janeiro
« Reply #43 on: February 17, 2018, 01:55:09 AM »
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Politics and sequins collide as Rio Carnival laments a country in crisis
« Reply #44 on: February 17, 2018, 03:51:13 AM »
Carnival looks to be very exciting this year!  :o

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/south-america/brazil/rio-de-janeiro/articles/anger-and-hope-collide-as-rio-carnival-laments-a-city-in-crisis/

Politics and sequins collide as Rio Carnival laments a country in crisis

Politics and sequins collide as Rio Carnival laments a country in crisis

This year's Rio Carnival has seen Brazil depicted as a monster, where crime and corruption is rife This year's Rio Carnival has seen Brazil depicted as a monster, where crime and corruption is rife Credit: AFP or licensors/MAURO PIMENTEL

 

It’s the Friday before the carnival parades begin in Oscar Niemeyer’s monumental 700 metre long Sambódromo stadium. This is the heart of Brazil. Samba itself was born a stone’s throw from the vast arena - between the shadow of the Christ statue and the spray of the Atlantic on the Pedra do Sal – or Salt Steps. This is where Africa arrived in greater numbers than anywhere else in the Americas.

Hidden in a cavernous warehouse near the Pedra do Sal, Afro-Brazilian workers from the Mangueira samba school are putting the finishing touches to their costumes and floats. There are giant painted heads, with tongues sticking out, a cartoon replica of the city’s striking Candelária church, and the familiar assemblage of glitz and glittering platforms.

Workers from the Mangueira samba school
Workers from the Mangueira samba school Credit: Alex Robinson Photography ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2018/Alex Robinson Photography
The floats went political this year
The floats went political this year Credit: Alex Robinson Photography ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2018/Alex Robinson Photography

At first glance it looks as familiar as football – no more than that seductive sparkle you see in every other image of Rio. But this year Carnival has changed. For the first time since Brazil became a democracy it’s gone political.

Crowning one of the floats is a Judas effigy, with the daubed-on face of the city’s mayor Marcelo Crivella, a dyed-in-the-wool evangelical Christian. Mangueira’s president, Chiquinho expects it to create a shock.

“Brazil is passing through a very difficult moment and there’s nowhere this is more obvious than Rio,” he says. “We have a mayor whose job is to promote the biggest street festival in the world. Yet he hates Carnival and all things Afro-Brazilian. He’s cut our budget. He’s trying to ban Afro-Brazilian troupes, to destroy the culture that defines us.”

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The following Saturday night the parades begin. The whistles, the roar and the foot stamps  are deafening. At least until the thunder of samba drums begin. Then a three-storey high float - built around a giant armadillo with a swinging head - wheels into the arena, surrounded by hundreds of costumed dancers. Behind them is a huge woman, muscular as a weightlifter, wearing little more than sweat and sequins. She’s dancing wildly, floating over the ground in a skip and whirl of samba steps.

The sequins and sparkles remain
The sequins and sparkles remain Credit: Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved./Leo Correa
But there's a strong political message too
But there's a strong political message too Credit: AFP or licensors/MAURO PIMENTEL

More floats follow. Many are little more than colourful pageantry. But like Mangueira a few schools have broken with tradition. Their allegories have real social bite. The Salgueiro samba school celebrate African women as the womb of the world: pregnant dancers swing around poles on a three-storey float topped with giant African heads. Paraíso do Tuiuti depict Brazil’s President Michel Temer as a giant vampire. Beija Flor imagine Brazil as Frankenstein’s monster, created by Petrobrás – the company at the heart of the money laundering scandal which brought Dilma Rousseff’s government down in 2016.

Paraíso do Tuiuti depict Brazil’s President Michel Temer as a giant vampire
Paraíso do Tuiuti depict Brazil’s President Michel Temer as a giant vampire Credit: AFP or licensors/MAURO PIMENTEL
Beija Flor imagine Brazil as Frankenstein’s monster
Beija Flor imagine Brazil as Frankenstein’s monster Credit: PILAR OLIVARES
Gang violence is a recurring theme
Gang violence is a recurring theme Credit: AFP or licensors/MAURO PIMENTEL

Over the following three days the parades continue, culminating on Shrove Tuesday – Mardi Gras itself. You need a ticket to attend. But not everyone pays to celebrate. Out in the streets there are hundreds of free blocos (troupes). Some announce their routes only days before, and only in Portuguese. To find them you need to know someone who knows - like Rodrigo Vieira who specialises in underground Carnival tours.

“To really experience Carnival you’ve got to get beyond the Sambódromo. What makes the festival special is that it’s a huge democratic party where some 4 million people of all social backgrounds meet on the streets to dance, sing and have fun.”

To really experience Carnival you’ve got to get beyond the Sambódromo
To really experience Carnival you’ve got to get beyond the Sambódromo Credit: 2018 Getty Images/Mario Tama
Out in the streets there are hundreds of free blocos (troupes)
Out in the streets there are hundreds of free blocos (troupes) Credit: Alex Robinson Photography ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2018/Alex Robinson Photography

But this year even the blocos are political. Banda da Conceição process over the Pedra do Sal steps bearing yet another effigy of Crivella with demonic red eyes scrawled-in. Beneath the skyscrapers in Rio’s commercial centre, bloco Cacique de Ramos champion indigenous Brazil, and in Copacabana revellers gather around the drums of Afoxé Filhos de Ghandy – the most African of all the blocos.

Revellers at the Afoxé Filhos de Ghandy bloco
Revellers at the Afoxé Filhos de Ghandy bloco Credit: Alex Robinson Photography ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2018/Alex Robinson Photography
The packed streets of Ipanema
The packed streets of Ipanema Credit: Alex Robinson Photography ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2018/Alex Robinson Photography

“There’s a general sense of dissatisfaction with the way politics and economics are conducted here in Brazil,” says Barbara França dos Anjos, a strikingly elegant young fashion designer in the crowd, “and this goes hand-in-hand with the rise of a new middle-class made-up in great part of Afro-Brazilians like me who are looking to push against the racial divide that limits us.”

It’s a huge democratic party where some 4 million people of all social backgrounds meet on the streets
It’s a huge democratic party where some 4 million people of all social backgrounds meet on the streets Credit: 2018 Getty Images/Mario Tama
It's worth hiring a guide to find the best blocos
It's worth hiring a guide to find the best blocos Credit: 2018 Getty Images/Mario Tama

Only the carnival balls seem free of politics. The biggest and most lavish of all is in the Copacabana Palace ball. This is where Rio’s great, good and surgically-enhanced elite come to dance samba – in art deco ballrooms hung with glittering crystal chandeliers. Black waiters in black tie offer champagne and tables burst with sumptuous tiger prawns, steaming feijoada stews and tropical fruits.

Only the carnival balls seem free of politics
Only the carnival balls seem free of politics Credit: Alex Robinson Photography ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2018/Alex Robinson Photography

By Ash Wednesday Carnival is over – but for one crucial event – apuração. This is where the winners of the Sambódromo parades are announced: for Carnival is not merely a show. It’s a competition. Each samba school is part of a league, with the Grupo Especial (who parade on Sunday and Monday) comprising the Premier league. The stakes are high. Carnival in Brazil generates somewhere between £700 million to 2.5 billion pounds for the national economy, employing more than 24 thousand people. Hundreds of workers migrate south from the distant Amazon every year just to build the moving parts on the floats. Relegation from the Premier League a Mangueira supporter informs me, is like losing a beach front apartment in Ipanema for a flat in the city’s impoverished northern suburbs.

 

The atmosphere at apuração is fervid – wild cheering, pounding drums, firecrackers. Women in wigs, kilts and glitter-paint jeer and hurl insults at supporters from other schools. Huge shirtless men in pink Speedos and angel wings size each other up. Banners flutter, samba school flags wave. And then all goes silent as the judges announce their decisions. You could hear a sequin drop.

Everyone expects the schools with a strong political message to be ignored. Even relegated. But they triumph. Beija Flor are the winners, Paraíso do Tuiuti come second, Mangueira fifth. Carnival as politics has arrived with a beating. They rat-a-tat again with a wave of whoops, whistles and roaring cheers. A huge African-Brazilian wearing sunglasses grabs the carnival trophy and holds it aloft on bull-like shoulders. Everyone is a friend once again. And the cynicism and bitterness evaporate into that most Brazilian of all emotions. Hope.

The carnival trophy is held aloft
The carnival trophy is held aloft Credit: Alex Robinson Photography ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2018/Alex Robinson Photography

In the cab on the way back to Copacabana even the driver is overwhelmed. “It’s the right decision he tells me, “the people’s choice. Now there is hope.”

Maybe. But “to hope” in Brazilian Portuguese is the same verb as “to wait”. And Brazilians have been waiting for a long time.

The winning samba schools parade at the Champions Parade on Saturday February 17

Behind the Scenes Carnival tours with Bravietour, bravietour.com.br

Revealed Travel can organise trips to Rio during Carnival including Sambódromo tickets and flights from London Heathrow. See its website for full details.

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