AuthorTopic: A Demon Haunted World  (Read 12928 times)

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A Demon Haunted World
« on: April 04, 2016, 02:13:37 AM »


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Published on Pray for Calamity on March 31, 2016



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Discuss this article at the Psychology Table inside the Diner



Earth_Goddess_by_stolen_designsShe picks up a stick. Her two year old hands are pristine, without callouses. Standing straight up she begins to walk forward on the path that leads along a ridge line deep into the forest. On uneven ground her steps still betray a clumsiness, but she overwhelms her lack of experience with exuberance and then turns to see me walking a few steps behind her.



“Dada get a big stick?”



She wants me to use a hiking stick as well. Last year I would carry her in a hiking pack, and I would use a large stick for support as I navigated slopes and downed tree trunks. Now she imitates the habit using the small bit of hickory in her hand, poking the ground with it as she walks, and she expects me to do so as well.



“You want me to find a hiking stick?”

“Uh huh.”

“How about this one?”



Leaning over I pick up a bowed piece of a fallen branch and proceed to snap off the twigs that jut from it in crooked tangles. It is a brittle piece of wood and suffices as more of an accessory than anything, but my daughter is happy that we are now both equipped for our walk. She turns once more down the path. A two year old girl takes confident steps with her hiking stick in one hand, and a plastic pink magic wand in the other. We are going out in search of fairies, and she flat refuses to embark on such an adventure without her wand.






Economic collapse finds itself a popular plot device across a broad spectrum of the internet. Those who anticipate such a collapse monitor the details of international trade, noting the ups and downs of stock and bond markets, currency values, volatility and shipping indices. Economic collapse is one of those concepts that is out the door and around the world generating hype, fear, and sales of pocket knives before anyone who would take the time to explore its value can even settle into an armchair. As with so many other premises and cliches we are bombarded with, most people take for granted that the economy is even a thing.



In 1776 Adam Smith published his magnum opus, “An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations,” in which Smith establishes the now firmly entrenched and wholly mythical notion that barter societies preceded the invention of money, which was an inevitable progression due to its efficiency at facilitating trade. In “Nations,” Smith also establishes the idea that the economy is even a thing that exists and that can be studied. Of course, it will be men like himself that are capable of doing the studying and imparting their wisdom onto the world. It is quite a ruse, if you think about it, inventing a specter and then inventing the business of studying it.



When we speak of “the economy,” what are we even talking about? The Dow Jones Industrial? The S&P 500? Or are we merely speaking of some amalgamation of the habits and behaviors of humans which combine to provide for our daily acquisition of needs? It may seem silly to question because it is such a prevalent notion in this culture, but for the majority of human existence, there was no economy. It was an idea that had to be invented, and now, there are whole academic wings dedicated to the maintenance of the idea, as well as sections in newspapers and channels on television focused solely on its changing winds. Those who lord over such institutions have their charts and maps and a host of methods for describing the economy to everyone else. At times, they speak of their trade as a science, which would lead one to believe that the thing which they observe is predictable, that they could establish some level of capable control over it. At other times, the economy is a wild thing, and it moves and thrashes of its own chaotic will like a storm squall.



So people watch the signs. They generate charts. They consult the experts. Some believe that the economy, despite its tantrums, is an all loving God that will always rise again, and so they tithe. Others believe the economy is a false idol set to feast on the souls of the avaricious or the merely ignorant, and so they prepare.






As someone who long ago came to the conclusion that the civilized method of human organization is one that is always bound to fail, I have many times put forth the suggestion that we need to transition into living arrangements that do not rely on the creation of cities. This is all to say, I have an anti-civilzation philosophy, which to the uninitiated perhaps seems extreme or absurd. Consider quickly, this definition of civilization offered by wikipedia:



A civilization is any complex society characterized by urban development, social stratification, symbolic communication forms (typically, writing systems), and a perceived separation from and domination over the natural environment by a cultural elite. Civilizations are intimately associated with and often further defined by other socio-politico-economic characteristics, including centralization, the domestication of both humans and other organisms, specialization of labor, culturally ingrained ideologies of progress and supremacism, monumental architecture, taxation, societal dependence upon farming as an agricultural practice, and expansionism.



To be against civilization is not to be in favor of some inhumanity towards others, but simply to believe that urban development, infinite growth, ecological destruction, social stratification, agriculture, etc. are ultimately unsustainable pursuits that are dooming our possibility of existing very far into the future. Further, the anthropocentrism inherent in such societies results in the widespread extirpation of the other beings with whom we share this planet.



Suggesting that we abandon, once and for all, the project of civilization is often met with a buffet of criticisms. That civilization gave us the sciences, and the sciences – usually now expressed simply as Science! – gave us a candle in an otherwise dark, demon haunted world, is usually proffered as reason enough for humanity to continue on a civilized trajectory. Critics of anti-civ ideas would have us believe that as primitive people we lived in constant fear of disembodied spirits that stalked and haunted us, manifesting as sickness and death that we could not otherwise explain. Science! they claim, was a great demon slayer that has brought illumination in the form of germ theory and biology, and thanks to optics of all kinds, both micro and telescope, we can see that the universe both minute and macro is not subject to god or djinn, not spirit or elemental but merely to the wind of a grand mechanical clock of subatomic particles and fundamental forces.



What light! It bathes us in such cleansing luminance! Fear not as you walk through the world sons of Ptolemy and daughters of Hypatia!



Now check your stocks. There are movements in the markets. How is your 401K?






More is happening in the space around you than you can possibly imagine. Your body is equipped with various sensory abilities that allow you to gather information about the world around you, and this information is used to generate a picture of existence that you as a biological entity can use to go forth and attain your survival. This picture exists in your mind only, and it is further shaped and formed by your particular biological makeup, as well as the cultural programming that you have been inculcated with since birth.



The world you see is not the world I see, let alone, is not the world an owl, or a butterfly, or a snap pea sees. Human societies have a habit of claiming that through their sciences that have been able to package and interpret reality as it is. The fun sets in when we notice that each of these societies that has claimed such a handle on reality have all, in fact, had different descriptions of reality.



Again, more is happening around us than we could know. We are filtering. We are constructing from the pieces we capture. We are naming and simplifying and manufacturing volumes of symbols. In a sense, we must do so so as not to be crippled by the overwhelming weight of all that we experience. But ultimately, more is not included in our picture of the world than is included. The cutting room floor actually contains more reality than the final film playing out in our heads.



It is this understanding that stays my hand when others might wave theirs in dismissal of the disembodied phenomena that live outside of the lens we in the modern industrial world currently use to view our surroundings. Those who fear the crumbling of the city walls for what hordes of demons might come rushing in like a torrent to corrupt our understandings so finely crafted over centuries of weighing and measuring might do well to look around and see which demons already stalk the streets and halls. We have traded one set of lesser gods for another. You many not make offerings to the spirits of rain after holding the dry dirt in your fingers, but your faith in tomorrow’s full stomach might have you watching for a little green triangle to come drifting across a stock ticker. Where a few centuries ago a geomancer may have cast a chart that relied on the anima mundi – or soul of the Earth – for its answers, today’s economists are numerologists drawing meaning from the staggered lines that connect disparate values of commodities and currencies, hoping to tease from it all some prediction about future well being.



Am I attempting to claim that germs do not exist? Of course not. Am I attempting to claim that science has produced nothing of value? Of course not. I am simply suggesting that civilized life has not rid the world of demons, but merely shifted the demons we concern ourselves with. Priests have not gone out of fashion, to be sure, they just wear a different costume and spin incantations of a new variety. This class of priests extends far beyond the realm of economics, and the demons they promise to exorcise can be found anywhere uncertainty and fear have taken root. The simple fact is that life is a dangerous pursuit, and we all enter into it with a debt. We owe our lives and will all be held to account sooner or later. If we do not create cultures capable of accepting this most basic truth, we will invariably create cultures that attempt to mitigate our fear of death with palliatives. The palliative du jour in our particular civilization is technological domination of the ecological systems of the Earth, and it is this behavior that is responsible for the variety of cataclysms now unfolding globally. Sea ice melt, top soil loss, forest die offs, oceanic dead zones, mass extinction of species, climatic disruption; all have now long passed the formative stage and are well underway.



But so afraid of the dark beyond the city gates, the civilized world clings to their neon gods. They pray to markets and justice, progress and innovation. The Maya may have found it prudent to sacrifice some humans, perhaps by throwing them into a cenote or by letting the blood of a Pok-ta-tok victor to replenish the vigor of the tree of life. We modern civilized are far more sophisticated, and instead sacrifice the salamander, the Ash tree, the island chain, the clean flowing river, the indigenous tribe, or the global poor.



If we refuse to defecate in the river because we consider the water sacred and believe it contains within it a spirit of its own, does it matter? The water runs clean. If we continue to clear cut jungles so as to mine for rare Earth metals using diesel fuel and laborers fed mono-crops all because we believe that technology will somehow repair the wounds we have inflicted on the living planet, can we really claim that our demon free world is now safer?






She kicks up leaves as she walks.



“Shh!” I crouch low, squatting on my hams and I tap my ear with a forefinger. “Listen.” My daughter emulates my posture and I cannot help but smile. She looks out into the mass of trees before us. I whisper when I ask her if she sees any fairies, and she whispers her replies.



“Yes.”

“How many?”

“Two fairies.”

“What color are they?”

“Blue.”



The afternoon sunlight is gold as it falls all around us. We stay there a while and I tell her that we must not disturb the fairies. We tell them that we are not there to do them any harm. We are nice people, we assure them. We hope that they are safe in the forest and we wish them well in their endeavors. After all, the forest can also be home to goblins, which is why I am glad my daughter had the foresight to bring her wand.



Offline RE

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What is an "Economy"?
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2016, 05:05:14 AM »
td0s and me are having a debate over what an "Economy" is over on Pray for Calamity.

I thought I would paste it here to see if the Diners have their own ideas on what an Economy is and what it means.  ???

RE

  • In the purest sense, economics tracks energy flows and relationships in an environment. All ecosystems have some balance of energy flows ongoing, how many predator to how many prey, oscillating fairly regularly in a balanced and successful ecosystem. Homo Sap economics got transformed by the development of Ag and then numerical counting systems to account for production, and then monetary systems to distribute the resources. It’s still about energy flow and relationships though.

    RE

    • Applying this definition, it becomes meaningless. If you and I share a bag of chips, is that “the economy?” What about two buddies fishing, is that “the economy?” If anyone doing anything is “the economy,” then it can be diluted into nothingness.

      • No, sharing a bag of chips is not the economy, and neither is 2 people fishing.

        The economy we live in is all the things we depend on to share the chips or go fishing. To share the chips we need money to buy them from a store that sells them after getting them off a truck that delivered them from a factory that produced them. To go fishing we ride in the car that we fill with gas that was delivered to the convenience store from the refinery which got the oil from a well that was fracked in Williston, ND.

        The fish lives in its own economy, depending on the smaller fish it eats which live off the bugs they catch which were hatched from eggs in a pile of manure from a goat on your farm.

        When you catch the fish, it leaves it’s economy and becomes part of yours when you eat it.

        RE

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Offline Eddie

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Re: A Demon Haunted World
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2016, 08:43:47 AM »
An economy has two facets. On the one hand it is source of the GDP, the gross monetary value of finished goods and services per unit of time. It is the engine of commerce that produces those goods and services.

On the other hand it is also the job source for all the working age people who need to find a way to get some income to buy all those goods and services.

A high GDP economy that produces fewer and fewer opportunities for those who desire work, to find work, therefore, cannot be a healthy economy even if it is growing year over year. Not in a society that requires people to pay their own way.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline RE

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Re: A Demon Haunted World
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2016, 09:19:33 AM »
An economy has two facets. On the one hand it is source of the GDP, the gross monetary value of finished goods and services per unit of time. It is the engine of commerce that produces those goods and services.

On the other hand it is also the job source for all the working age people who need to find a way to get some income to buy all those goods and services.

A high GDP economy that produces fewer and fewer opportunities for those who desire work, to find work, therefore, cannot be a healthy economy even if it is growing year over year. Not in a society that requires people to pay their own way.

That is a very narrow definition of an economy.  How would you describe the economy of a fish using this definition?  Fish don't have GDP nor do they have jobs or official "work".

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Offline Petty Tyrant

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Re: A Demon Haunted World
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2016, 11:46:10 AM »
What is the fish gdp? That cant be answered. Where in the human calculation of economy is the energy of eating chips factored.  If it is nowhere in the gdp then econonics does not track energy, only money involved, the giveaway is its expressed in units of currency not calories. The energy derived from fishing only shows up as economic contraction not contribution, less fi$h $old.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2016, 11:56:32 AM by Uncle Bob »
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Offline TD0S

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Re: A Demon Haunted World
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2016, 07:24:22 AM »
The fish has no economy.  Just like the fish has no politics.  Youre taking human tools - abstractions - and trying to naturalize them to reify their existence, to make them objective.

The fish exists in a world you cannot fathom, no pun intended.  When people generate abstractions in their minds out of symbols which they share with others in their society, it is an attempt to simplify and package their understanding of the world around them.  It is not the world itself. 

Fish, and people for that matter, have been interacting with their own kind, and numerous others for ages upon ages.  You cannot square the notion that these interactions are economic and a fear of economic collapse.  Fish have no economic collapse.  They will not stop interacting with others, passing nutrients and energy, living, eating, dying. 


Offline RE

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Re: A Demon Haunted World
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2016, 07:43:45 AM »
The fish has no economy. 

Of course the fish has an economy.  All living things have an economy.  The economy of the fish is all the things the fish needs to survive, good water well aerated at the right temperature and pH, food supply, some means to protect itself from predators (think shellfish or burrowing capability).  Economies define the relationship between all the things an organism depends on to live.


Homo Saps invented Money, which serves as a mediator in our economy nowadays, but money is not the economy.  Our economy is the food we eat, the housing we build to live in, the services we provide to each other, etcetera.  This in turn is all about energy flow.

I suggest you read up on biophysical economics & thermoeconomics.

Quote
Thermoeconomics
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Biophysical economics)
This article is about Biophysical economics. For the study of the dynamics of living resources using economic models, see Bioeconomics (fisheries).
Economics
World GDP (PPP) per capita by country
World GDP (PPP) per capita by country (2014)

    Index Outline Category

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Thermoconomics studies connections between economics and the physical world. Here the costs of heating (vertical axis) are compared with the exergy content of different energy carriers (horizontal axis). Red dots and trend line indicate energy prices for consumers, blue dots and trend line indicate total price for consumers including capital expenditure for the heating system. Energy carriers included are district heating (D), ground-source heat pump (G), exhaust air heat pump (A), bioenergy meaning firewood (B), heating oil (O) and direct electric heating (E). [1]

Thermoeconomics, also referred to as biophysical economics, is a school of heterodox economics that applies the laws of thermodynamics to economic theory.[2] The term "thermoeconomics" was coined in 1962 by American engineer Myron Tribus,[3][4][5] Thermoeconomics can be thought of as the statistical physics of economic value.[6]

Contents

    1 Basis
    2 Thermodynamics
    3 Economic systems
    4 See also
    5 References
    6 Further reading
    7 External links

Basis

Thermoeconomics is based on the proposition that the role of energy in biological evolution should be defined and understood not through the second law of thermodynamics but in terms of such economic criteria as productivity, efficiency, and especially the costs and benefits (or profitability) of the various mechanisms for capturing and utilizing available energy to build biomass and do work.[7][8]
Thermodynamics

Thermoeconomists maintain that human economic systems can be modeled as thermodynamic systems. Then, based on this premise, theoretical economic analogs of the first and second laws of thermodynamics are developed.[9] In addition, the thermodynamic quantity exergy, i.e. measure of the useful work energy of a system, is one measure of value.[citation needed].

Alternately, the existence of thermodynamic correspondences arises directly (i.e., is not a-priori constructed) in bounded-rational potential games in two different ways: from a dynamical equilibrium or from a constrained maximum information-entropy equilibrium,.[10][11]
Economic systems

Thermoeconomists argue that economic systems always involve matter, energy, entropy, and information.[12] Moreover, the aim of many economic activities is to achieve a certain structure. In this manner, thermoeconomics applies the theories in non-equilibrium thermodynamics, in which structure formations called dissipative structures form, and information theory, in which information entropy is a central construct, to the modeling of economic activities in which the natural flows of energy and materials function to create scarce resources.[2] In thermodynamic terminology, human economic activity may be described as a dissipative system, which flourishes by consuming free energy in transformations and exchange of resources, goods, and services.[13][14]

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Offline g

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Re: A Demon Haunted World
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2016, 08:24:42 AM »
The fish has no economy. 

Of course the fish has an economy.  All living things have an economy.  The economy of the fish is all the things the fish needs to survive, good water well aerated at the right temperature and pH, food supply, some means to protect itself from predators (think shellfish or burrowing capability).  Economies define the relationship between all the things an organism depends on to live.


Homo Saps invented Money, which serves as a mediator in our economy nowadays, but money is not the economy.  Our economy is the food we eat, the housing we build to live in, the services we provide to each other, etcetera.  This in turn is all about energy flow.


RE

Of course the fish doesn't, not in a human sense by any stretch.

You are mincing words RE and showing your propensity for senseless argument.

TDOS is correct in my view, don't compare a minnow to a human, it's Absurd.

Offline MKing

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Re: A Demon Haunted World
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2016, 11:17:03 AM »
TDOS is correct in my view, don't compare a minnow to a human, it's Absurd.

It is all about the scope of one's perspective GO. Of course you can compare minnows and man, in the scheme that is this universe, both are insignificant, and as easily wiped from existence by the normal processes of that same universe as an anthill is destroyed by a flood.
Sometimes one creates a dynamic impression by saying something, and sometimes one creates as significant an impression by remaining silent.
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Offline TD0S

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Re: A Demon Haunted World
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2016, 11:54:45 AM »
Youre just seeking recognizable patterns.  You see behaviors - of which you select only those you can perceive - and bundle them, then you paint a bullseye around them and give it a name, "economies."  You are trying to make the map more real than the territory, because the map you understand, the map is familiar and you are comfortable with it. 

But then an uncomfortable feeling rises, "What happens when the map is tattered, burns, blows away?" 
« Last Edit: April 11, 2016, 11:56:46 AM by TD0S »

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1000 Temples to Baal!
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2016, 01:05:50 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/hFN2QhhFjv4&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/hFN2QhhFjv4&fs=1</a>
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why youíre here. Youíre here because you know something. What you know you canít explain, but you feel it. Youíve felt it your entire life, that thereís something wrong with the world.
You donít know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline MKing

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Re: A Demon Haunted World
« Reply #11 on: April 11, 2016, 01:14:22 PM »
But then an uncomfortable feeling rises, "What happens when the map is tattered, burns, blows away?"

Uncomfortable feelings are just what happens when, for a split second, an insignificant being recognizes that they truly are insignificant, and scared of things they do not understand. And then they forget that they really understand nothing, and rather than always feel uncomfortable, they give up, and make up rationalizations, religions, us versus them memes and everything else, just so they can ignore these basic facts of their own existence.

Sometimes one creates a dynamic impression by saying something, and sometimes one creates as significant an impression by remaining silent.
-Dalai Lama

Offline RE

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Re: A Demon Haunted World
« Reply #12 on: April 11, 2016, 03:43:05 PM »
Youre just seeking recognizable patterns.  You see behaviors - of which you select only those you can perceive - and bundle them, then you paint a bullseye around them and give it a name, "economies."  You are trying to make the map more real than the territory, because the map you understand, the map is familiar and you are comfortable with it. 

But then an uncomfortable feeling rises, "What happens when the map is tattered, burns, blows away?"

The problem here is that you don't understand this type of thinking, or rather you don't want to understand it because it is antithetical to your personal philosophy.

Maps and models are never the real thing, paper charts for instance are 2D and the world is 4D that we can perceive, 3D of space and 1D of time.  While not complete though, maps are very helpful in navigating the world.  Palloy for instance could not have made his journey across the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans in his 30' sailboat without charting it by a map he knows, the map of the stars in the night sky.  Neither could the ancient Polynesians.  They didn't have paper, but they did have physical maps of the night sky.  They made them with coconut stick charts and cowrie shells.


Were these maps a complete map of all the stars in the universe?  Not by a long shot, they didn't have telescopes of course, but even the Hubble only gives you a snapshot of the stars in the universe, not all of them.  However these maps were good enough to allow stone age people to navigate the largest ocean on the planet they lived on and safely make landfall on microscopically small dots of land scattered around that ocean.  Without a map, they could not have done that.  They also mapped wave patterns and interactions that told them where home was.  A Polynesian navigator after sailing 1000s of miles could stand on the deck of his sailing canoe if you asked him to turn around and  point his finger and say "Fiji is there, 20 days away".

The greatest navigators didn't need the stick charts after years of experience, although their teachers used them to help them learn.  After years of experience though, you have another map which is not physical, although it is very real, more real than the stick chart and in a way more real than what you are mapping.  It exists in your mind, which is a lot more flexible than the 4D world you perceive with your senses.  There you can add the nth dimensions of your imagination.  You can only do that if you have an imagination though, and you must WANT to do it.  You don't want to do that, you're philosophically opposed to it.

The answer to your question of what I would do when the map burns should be obvious now.  I don't need the paper map, because the map is in my MIND. To bring it back round to biophysical & thermoeconomics, you don't have this map in your mind, so you don't understand it.  It's very helpful though in navigating the world we live in, although by no means is it a complete rendition of that world.  It's a model.  To go further than the model, use your imagination.  You do have one of those, as I can tell from your writing.


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Offline JRM

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Re: A Demon Haunted World
« Reply #13 on: April 11, 2016, 04:58:49 PM »
Maps and models are never the real thing, paper charts for instance are 2D and the world is 4D that we can perceive, 3D of space and 1D of time.

I'm not commenting on the larger (or other) topic here at this time, but I want to comment on just this portion I've quoted above.

As far as I know, before Euclid invented (if he was the original inventor) Euclidean space (which, I guess, Descartes elaborated upon in his invention of Cartesian space), space never occurred to anyone has having "three dimensions" (or four, with Einstein).  And I think any sincere, honest inquiry into this view of space with a rich historical and prehistorical perspective taken in would reveal that space itself is NOT three dimensional at all. Three dimensions of space are simply a useful geometric abstraction for locating things in three artificial and abstract dimensions.  These "three dimensions" appear in the territory but are not the territory itself; they are the map.  It is often an extremely useful map, of coufse, and archtecture and engineering may be all but impossible without it.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Map%E2%80%93territory_relation
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline JRM

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Re: A Demon Haunted World
« Reply #14 on: April 11, 2016, 05:17:33 PM »
The fish has no economy. 

Of course the fish has an economy.  All living things have an economy.  The economy of the fish is all the things the fish needs to survive, good water well aerated at the right temperature and pH, food supply, some means to protect itself from predators (think shellfish or burrowing capability).  Economies define the relationship between all the things an organism depends on to live.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=economy

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=ecology

Undoubtedly, both ecologists and economists will be divided on such questions of the policing of words.  Which is largely a shame, at least, because both fields -- and especially economics -- are way overdue for a Kuhnsian paradigm shift in the underlying concept structure and philosophy of their subject areas -- one which would necessitate cross-fertilization between both of these fields and many others besides, and an imaginative reframing of the whole enchilada.

In my view, theories are good when they are useful and become bad as the become increasingly useless -- but I guess that's because of the influence upon me of American pragmatism (philosophy).

Economics ensured its eventual death and rebirth when folks like Adam Smith reified "weath" as (essentially) property (goods, perhaps also services)..., instead of as well-being, such as the word's etymology would suggest for such a word.  Economics as anything other than a science of wealth as well-being is a complete and utter flop, and if there are people (or, rather, intellectuals) a hundred years from now they will nod in understanding and acceptance of what I just said.  If there are no such people, it may well be because the revolutionary paradigm shift in economic thinking never happened and the only survivors of the resultant catastrophe were those with less intellectual prowess than a Donald Trump.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2016, 05:19:09 PM by JRM »
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

 

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