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Offline Golden Oxen

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Re: Diner Book Reviews A Case for Climate Engineering - Keith
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2013, 12:40:27 PM »
 
                                                A Case for Climate Engineering
David Keith
October 01, 2013
                                                   
KEITH BReventposter
KEITH BReventposter

 Overview

Climate engineering—which could slow the pace of global warming by injecting reflective particles into the upper atmosphere—has emerged in recent years as an extremely controversial technology. And for good reason: it carries unknown risks and it may undermine commitments to conserving energy. Some critics also view it as an immoral human breach of the natural world. The latter objection, David Keith argues in A Scientist’s Case for Climate Engineering, is groundless; we have been using technology to alter our environment for years. But he agrees that there are large issues at stake.

A leading scientist long concerned about climate change, Keith offers no naíve proposal for an easy fix to what is perhaps the most challenging question of our time; climate engineering is no silver bullet. But he argues that after decades during which very little progress has been made in reducing carbon emissions we must put this technology on the table and consider it responsibly. That doesn’t mean we will deploy it, and it doesn’t mean that we can abandon efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But we must understand fully what research needs to be done and how the technology might be designed and used. This book provides a clear and accessible overview of what the costs and risks might be, and how climate engineering might fit into a larger program for managing climate change.

http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/case-climate-engineering  :icon_study:

Offline Golden Oxen

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Re:Jimmy Carter's Next Project: Speaking up for the World's Women
« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2014, 03:46:37 AM »
Good ol Jimmy, how I miss him.  :(

Jimmy Carter's next project: Speaking up for the world's women

Jimmy Carter's next book will defend women's rights and challenge the use of religion to deny equality, reports Simon & Shuster, who have published several of Jimmy Carter's books.

                                                             
0128 jimmy carter full 600
0128 jimmy carter full 600

 By Associated Press / January 28, 2014 at 9:00 pm EST
NEW YORK

Jimmy Carter's next book will be a defense of women's rights and an attack against those who use religion to deny equality.

Simon & Shuster announced Tuesday that the former president's "A Call To Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power" will be published March 25.

The publisher says Carter will draw upon personal observations from his worldwide travels as he condemns abuses of women and girls and the alleged distortions of religious texts cited as justification.

The 89-year-old has written a wide range of books since leaving office in 1981, from memoirs and poetry to a controversial work on the Middle East, "Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid."

Other books he has written include "An Hour Before Daylight: Memories of a Rural Boyhood," "Our Endangered Values: America's Moral Crisis," "Through the Year with Jimmy Carter: 366 Daily Meditations from the 39th President," and "We Can Have Peace in the Holy Land: A Plan That Will Work."

http://www.csmonitor.com/Books/Latest-News-Wires/2014/0128/Jimmy-Carter-s-next-project-Speaking-up-for-the-world-s-women  :icon_study:


Offline Surly1

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Re:Jimmy Carter's Next Project: Speaking up for the World's Women
« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2014, 04:49:12 AM »
Good ol Jimmy, how I miss him.  :(

Jimmy Carter's next project: Speaking up for the world's women

Jimmy Carter's next book will defend women's rights and challenge the use of religion to deny equality, reports Simon & Shuster, who have published several of Jimmy Carter's books.

Excellent news.
The image of Carter in the public mind has been shaped by the war profiteers, Reaganauts and other assorted traitors who worked tirelessly to impose the Cold War revanchist regime of Ms. "Morning in America." Those taking the long view of history were not deceived. Morris Berman always got Carter right, IMO:

Quote
The Carter presidency is so anomalous, particularly in terms of the postwar pattern of U.S. foreign policy, that it is initially hard to conceive how it ever happened. Timing accounts for much of it. America had just suffered an ignominious defeat in Vietnam, and the morality of the entire venture looked shabby in the extreme. The Church Committee had conducted a congressional investigation into the dirty tricks of the CIA, focusing especially on the overthrow of Salvador Allende. Gerald Ford had pardoned Richard Nixon immediately after the latter resigned, thus making the squalor of Watergate even more squalid. All in all, U.S. government morality and image were at ebb tide; it was a confused and demoralized time. Enter, in 1976, Jimmy Carter, a "Christian" candidate, low-key and self-effacing, who spoke to the need for some national soul searching. "We're ashamed of what our government is as we deal with other nations around the world," he announced on the campaign trail - astonishing rhetoric, really. "What we seek is ... a foreign policy that reflects the decency and generosity and common sense of our own people." Over and over, in hundreds of speeches and interviews, Carter reiterated that the United States had gone through a loss of spirit and morality. A foreign policy dominated by rivalry with the USSR, he maintained, was an obsession whose logic led directly to Vietnam (the latter, in short, was no "detour").The time was over for blaming an enemy for our own problems, he declared; rather, the time had come to look within ourselves, to put our own moral house in order. Carter attacked the realpolitik of Henry Kissinger and the U.S. role in Chile; the time had come, he maintained (this in 1977), to move beyond "that inordinate fear of communism which once led us to embrace any dictator who joined us in that fear.'

For a brief moment in American postwar history, the position of sanity found an echo, The moment, was, however, long enough for the president to suggest a different direction in our international agenda: obsession with communism would not shape every policy; we would work for a more humane world order in our international relations, not seek merely to defeat one adversary; military solutions would not come first; efforts would be made to reduce the sale of arms to developing countries (by 1975 we had become the world's largest arms exporter - $15 billion in sales as compared with $2 billion in 1970); and so on. These were, quite clearly, exceptional times .

But the exception was of short duration; the Carter morality was, within two years, heavily out of step with the return to the usual public demand for a more muscular and military foreign policy. In addition, out-of-office cold warriors closed ranks, forming organizations such as the Committee on the Present Danger, which included Paul Nitze. Their goal-to revive the Cold War-was ultimately successful; Ronald Reagan and CIA-assisted torture in Central America were the inevitable results. And in the course of all this, a picture was formed of Jimmy Carter as weak, bungling, inept, and out of his depth; an ad hoc president who had no coherent conceptual outlook or foreign policy at all. It seems to me that some of this was true, but a genuinely alternative foreign policy simply could not "scan" in the mind-set still with us ...


Pax Americana, The Roads Not Taken excerpted from Dark Ages America
by Morris Berman


Quote
One can point to Jimmy Carter's mistakes in office... But the overall impulse ... of trying to get us off the path of lurching blindly ahead with the logic that took us into Vietnam, and of trying to get us to see ourselves as others see us, was fundamentally sound. e did not, as it turns out, have the "nerve to fail"; the window shut, and we chose "self-righteous crusades up to or past the edge of violence." The blowback from this is going to be the theme of the twenty-first century, as we continue to weaken ourselves through endless war and oppositional logic, and the attempt to project our military into every corner of the globe. "The traditional effort to sustain democracy by expansion," wrote Williams at the conclusion of his book, "will lead to the destruction of democracy." This is, by now, our imperial destiny, and there does not seem to be any way to alter it.


Indeed.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

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