PE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> Diner Library

AuthorTopic: Diner Library  (Read 34146 times)

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15840
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library
« Reply #15 on: March 31, 2013, 10:32:55 AM »
Here's a poem that came to mind on this Easter Sunday.


Some keep the Sabbath going to Church – (236)


Some keep the Sabbath going to Church –
I keep it, staying at Home –
With a Bobolink for a Chorister –
And an Orchard, for a Dome –

Some keep the Sabbath in Surplice –
I, just wear my Wings –
And instead of tolling the Bell, for Church,
Our little Sexton – sings.

God preaches, a noted Clergyman –
And the sermon is never long,
So instead of getting to Heaven, at last –
I’m going, all along.

                 Emily Dickinson

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline reanteben

  • Global Moderator
  • Waitstaff
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library
« Reply #16 on: March 31, 2013, 11:46:13 AM »
extremely nice poem, GO. since we have a history of reading things differently i'm curious to hear what this poem is saying to you in general and also in relation, if any, to your feelings regarding the foxstead. TIA.

Yes, I was captured immediately by it's beauty and the visual images it produced from the recesses of my brain.

As far as interpretation and relation to the project, my desire is to pass.

Due to the responses of my prior posts on the topic, it is my intention to follow the wisdom of Surly in his apt example of his discourse with his daughter and refrain from commenting again on the topic.

Having seen the error of my trying to advise youth  to think like the old, an impossible task, my current status has changed to a reader only on the topic.

Glad you liked the poem Ben, so happy, and grateful,  it found it's way to me.

thanks GO. perhaps it was silly of me to ask you that. at any rate i do have a clear impression as to why this poem resonated with you at this time. feels like a window into your soul so thank you. likewise i expect it provided you with a window into the soul of the protagonist astride pegasus. the greatness in a poem lies in its ability to offer blind men brief glimpses of the elephant in its entirety.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2013, 11:55:18 AM by reanteben »

Offline Golden Oxen

  • Golden Oxen
  • Contrarian
  • Master Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 12062
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library
« Reply #17 on: March 31, 2013, 01:37:30 PM »
extremely nice poem, GO. since we have a history of reading things differently i'm curious to hear what this poem is saying to you in general and also in relation, if any, to your feelings regarding the foxstead. TIA.

Yes, I was captured immediately by it's beauty and the visual images it produced from the recesses of my brain.

As far as interpretation and relation to the project, my desire is to pass.

Due to the responses of my prior posts on the topic, it is my intention to follow the wisdom of Surly in his apt example of his discourse with his daughter and refrain from commenting again on the topic.

Having seen the error of my trying to advise youth  to think like the old, an impossible task, my current status has changed to a reader only on the topic.

Glad you liked the poem Ben, so happy, and grateful,  it found it's way to me.

thanks GO. perhaps it was silly of me to ask you that. at any rate i do have a clear impression as to why this poem resonated with you at this time. feels like a window into your soul so thank you. likewise i expect it provided you with a window into the soul of the protagonist astride pegasus. the greatness in a poem lies in its ability to offer blind men brief glimpses of the elephant in its entirety.

"There are none so blind as those that refuse to see"

                                             
35012 2 Pegasus Kamiya
35012 2 Pegasus Kamiya

Offline reanteben

  • Global Moderator
  • Waitstaff
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library
« Reply #18 on: April 01, 2013, 09:02:24 AM »
extremely nice poem, GO. since we have a history of reading things differently i'm curious to hear what this poem is saying to you in general and also in relation, if any, to your feelings regarding the foxstead. TIA.

Yes, I was captured immediately by it's beauty and the visual images it produced from the recesses of my brain.

As far as interpretation and relation to the project, my desire is to pass.

Due to the responses of my prior posts on the topic, it is my intention to follow the wisdom of Surly in his apt example of his discourse with his daughter and refrain from commenting again on the topic.

Having seen the error of my trying to advise youth  to think like the old, an impossible task, my current status has changed to a reader only on the topic.

Glad you liked the poem Ben, so happy, and grateful,  it found it's way to me.

thanks GO. perhaps it was silly of me to ask you that. at any rate i do have a clear impression as to why this poem resonated with you at this time. feels like a window into your soul so thank you. likewise i expect it provided you with a window into the soul of the protagonist astride pegasus. the greatness in a poem lies in its ability to offer blind men brief glimpses of the elephant in its entirety.

"There are none so blind as those that refuse to see"

                                             
35012 2 Pegasus Kamiya
35012 2 Pegasus Kamiya

my point was that blindness has nothing to do with refusal, but that seeing has to do with magic.

dickens' paternalistic character, Gradgrind, knew no magic, as seen here in his definition of a horse:  Quadruped. Graminivorous. Forty teeth, namely twenty-four grinders, four-eye teeth, and twelve incisive.

if a circus is insisted upon being viewed as an ideality, the least one can do is not be offended by one's own view of it.

« Last Edit: April 01, 2013, 09:17:49 AM by reanteben »

Offline Golden Oxen

  • Golden Oxen
  • Contrarian
  • Master Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 12062
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library
« Reply #19 on: April 01, 2013, 10:17:23 AM »
extremely nice poem, GO. since we have a history of reading things differently i'm curious to hear what this poem is saying to you in general and also in relation, if any, to your feelings regarding the foxstead. TIA.

Yes, I was captured immediately by it's beauty and the visual images it produced from the recesses of my brain.

As far as interpretation and relation to the project, my desire is to pass.

Due to the responses of my prior posts on the topic, it is my intention to follow the wisdom of Surly in his apt example of his discourse with his daughter and refrain from commenting again on the topic.

Having seen the error of my trying to advise youth  to think like the old, an impossible task, my current status has changed to a reader only on the topic.

Glad you liked the poem Ben, so happy, and grateful,  it found it's way to me.

thanks GO. perhaps it was silly of me to ask you that. at any rate i do have a clear impression as to why this poem resonated with you at this time. feels like a window into your soul so thank you. likewise i expect it provided you with a window into the soul of the protagonist astride pegasus. the greatness in a poem lies in its ability to offer blind men brief glimpses of the elephant in its entirety.

"There are none so blind as those that refuse to see"

                                             
35012 2 Pegasus Kamiya
35012 2 Pegasus Kamiya

my point was that blindness has nothing to do with refusal, but that seeing has to do with magic.

dickens' paternalistic character, Gradgrind, knew no magic, as seen here in his definition of a horse:  Quadruped. Graminivorous. Forty teeth, namely twenty-four grinders, four-eye teeth, and twelve incisive.

if a circus is insisted upon being viewed as an ideality, the least one can do is not be offended by one's own view of it.

I see, we are back to square 1 "Resources".  Thanks for "Your Perspective". Interesting and appreciated.

Offline reanteben

  • Global Moderator
  • Waitstaff
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library
« Reply #20 on: April 01, 2013, 10:37:43 AM »
no, GO, not resources, in the sense you are using it. (see GO's take on JMG's comment to william.)   it's almost as if you are conflating anarchism with ayn rand philosophy, which of course a common mistake in an operating system running on fear. it's not superhuman qualities that's required to achieve liberation but merely addition by subtraction.

Offline Golden Oxen

  • Golden Oxen
  • Contrarian
  • Master Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 12062
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library
« Reply #21 on: April 05, 2013, 05:00:12 AM »
Thought this poem might be inspirational for the authors of the purpose of the foxstead's creation.

                    A Nation's Strength
   
by Ralph Waldo Emerson   

What makes a nation's pillars high
And its foundations strong?
What makes it mighty to defy
The foes that round it throng?

It is not gold. Its kingdoms grand
Go down in battle shock;
Its shafts are laid on sinking sand,
Not on abiding rock.

Is it the sword? Ask the red dust
Of empires passed away;
The blood has turned their stones to rust,
Their glory to decay.

And is it pride? Ah, that bright crown
Has seemed to nations sweet;
But God has struck its luster down
In ashes at his feet.

Not gold but only men can make
A people great and strong;
Men who for truth and honor's sake
Stand fast and suffer long.

Brave men who work while others sleep,
Who dare while others fly...
They build a nation's pillars deep
And lift them to the sky.

Offline Golden Oxen

  • Golden Oxen
  • Contrarian
  • Master Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 12062
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library: Framing
« Reply #22 on: April 21, 2013, 11:08:33 AM »
For the Diner's poetry shelf.

                                                     Framing


The desert isn’t a creature. It doesn’t have eyes nor ears, nor hands and feet, nor does it have a language. Always, strangers define it. (Anyone who doesn’t speak will be defined by strangers.)

Picking up small rocks and large stones, my mind calling them “rocks” and “stones” but also wondering there you are, who are you, how would you like to be held, would you like to be held, thrown over there, left alone, stepped on, flipped over, taken from here and collected and put on some table in front of a television with maybe some music playing?

Bounded to the west by the San Francisco Peaks, to the north by Mt. Hesperus, to the south by Mt. Taylor and to the east by Mt. Blanca, you are __________.

The well-meaning stranger’s tongue was cut off in A Distant Episode because he believed his brain was enough to tell the desert what it is.

The cold of the desert evening reaches my hands first. My fingers curl like a petal of one of those flowers that sleep and wake in the course of a day, that I’ve never been able to name.

I accept the significant things told to me by the Irish nuns and Jesuit brothers and think it right that there are people who can, on my behalf, complete my sentences and even my thoughts.

Strangers carry the desert from one side of a highway and dump it on the other side; but in a sudden snowstorm, at twenty degrees below seasonal normals and in freezing high winds, the desert flurries in an icy mix of snow and sand, remaking its own partitions.


About The Author   
Josey Foo, an immigrant of peranakan descent from Malaysia, is Associate Attorney to the Chief Justice of the Navajo Nation. A poet and writer, she recently co-authored A Lily Lilies with Leah Stein and is a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship recipient.

Offline Golden Oxen

  • Golden Oxen
  • Contrarian
  • Master Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 12062
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library: Robert Frost on poet Amy Lowell
« Reply #23 on: April 30, 2013, 04:51:19 AM »
What a special person Robert Frost was, amazing gift with words. :icon_sunny:


In honor of National Poetry Month, here's an excerpt from the great US poet's salute, which he wrote for the Monitor. It ran on May 16, 1925.

Robert Frost on poet Amy Lowell

Frost penned a salute to his fellow poet for the Monitor in 1925.

By Robert Frost / April 30, 2013 at 5:00 am EDT

In honor of National Poetry Month, here's an excerpt from the great US poet's salute, which he wrote for the Monitor. It ran on May 16, 1925.

It is absurd to think that the only way to tell if a poem is lasting is to wait and see if it lasts. The right reader of a good poem can tell the moment it strikes him that he has taken an immortal wound – that he will never get over it. That is to say, permanence in poetry as in love is perceived instantly. It hasn't to await the test of time. The proof of a poem is not that we have never forgotten it, but that we knew at sight that we never could forget it. There was a barb to it and a tocsin that we owned to at once. How often I have heard it in the voice and seen it in the eyes of this generation that Amy Lowell had lodged poetry with them to stay.

The most exciting movement in nature is not progress, advance, but expansion and contraction, the opening and shutting of the eye, the hand, the heart, the mind. We throw our arms wide with a gesture of religion to the universe; we close them around a person. We explore and adventure for a while and then we draw in to consolidate our gains.... Amy Lowell was distinguished in a period of dilation when poetry, in the effort to include a larger material, stretched itself almost to the breaking of the verse. Little ones with no more apparatus than a tea-cup looked on with alarm. She helped make it stirring times for a decade to those immediately concerned with art and to many not so immediately.... Her poetry was forever a clear resonant calling off of things seen.

http://rss.csmonitor.com/~r/feeds/csm/~3/6EPBLMBU4k4/Robert-Frost-on-poet-Amy-Lowell  :icon_study: :icon_sunny:

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15840
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library
« Reply #24 on: April 30, 2013, 09:37:59 AM »
Robert Frost....I read somewhere that he was, in his time, one of the country's most loved performance artists...it's been a long time since written/spoken word artists were pop stars. Says something about the decline of American culture.

He had a lot of personal tragedy in his life. I don't think that's what made him a great poet, but it sure shaped his character. I think hardship builds enormous character in some people and destroys others.

This poem I'm posting is by an artist from here in Austin, who is part of that spoken word renaissance that's been going on the past few years. It's very raw, but I'm posting it anyway. When I read that Frost quote, The proof of a poem is not that we have never forgotten it, but that we knew at sight that we never could forget it. , I thought of this one immediately. I read it a couple of years ago, and it stuck with me. I think it's a remarkable poem, both in its rhyme and meter, and in its stark honesty.


The Men We Marry, the Men We Fuck

This one kissed me beneath the stars.
That one fondled me up the stairs.

This one confessed his sins but to God.
That one demanded his pity aloud.

This one drove me to the store.
That one drove me like a car.

This one gave me violets and asters.
That one brought me violence and disaster.

This one wed me in the chapel.
That one ate me like an apple,

And he was as handsome as he was doomed.
Lovely as lust, but fickle as the moon.

This one built a house to live in.
That one fed me glass and poison.

This one tended a kindled hearth.
That one threw me to the dirt

And by the greenbrier patch we tangled,
Hand to thigh and lip to nipple.

The men we marry, the men we fuck:
This one doubly filled my cup,

That one used me up.

-- Jill Alexander Essbaum
« Last Edit: April 30, 2013, 09:57:45 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15840
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library
« Reply #25 on: April 30, 2013, 09:51:11 AM »
I love the Beats. Kenneth Rexroth was an early Beat poet, older and maybe less well known than some of them. He used to sponsor other poets, paying for space for them to perform. He paid for the venue when Allen Ginsburg performed Howl for the first time. He was a big influence on a lot of younger poets, especially Gary Snyder.

This poem is about a hike in the high Sierras...but it's also about what was on the author's mind as he hiked...another infamous day in Boston. Rexroth thought it would be remembered. He was wrong. People always forget, and quickly.

Climbing Milestone Mountain, August 22, 1937

For a month now, wandering over the Sierras,
A poem had been gathering in my mind,
Details of significance and rhythm,
The way poems do, but still lacking a focus.
Last night I remembered the date and it all
Began to grow together and take on purpose.
We sat up late while Deneb moved over the zenith
And I told Marie all about Boston, how it looked
That last terrible week, how hundreds stood weeping
Impotent in the streets that last midnight.
I told her how those hours changed the lives of thousands,
How America was forever a different place
Afterwards for many.
In the morning
We swam in the cold transparent lake, the blue
Damsel flies on all the reeds like millions
Of narrow metallic flowers, and I thought
Of you behind the grille in Dedham, Vanzetti,
Saying, “Who would ever have thought we would make this history?”
Crossing the brilliant mile-square meadow
Illuminated with asters and cyclamen,
The pollen of the lodgepole pines drifting
With the shifting wind over it and the blue
And sulphur butterflies drifting with the wind,
I saw you in the sour prison light, saying,
“Goodbye comrade.”
In the basin under the crest
Where the pines end and the Sierra primrose begins,
A party of lawyers was shooting at a whiskey bottle.
The bottle stayed on its rock, nobody could hit it.
Looking back over the peaks and canyons from the last lake,
The pattern of human beings seemed simpler
Than the diagonals of water and stone.
Climbing the chute, up the melting snow and broken rock,
I remembered what you said about Sacco,
How it slipped your mind and you demanded it be read into the record.
Traversing below the ragged aręte,
One cheek pressed against the rock
The wind slapping the other,
I saw you both marching in an army
You with the red and black flag, Sacco with the rattlesnake banner.
I kicked steps up the last snow bank and came
To the indescribably blue and fragrant
Polemonium and the dead sky and the sterile
Crystalline granite and final monolith of the summit.
These are the things that will last a long time, Vanzetti,
I am glad that once on your day I have stood among them.
Some day mountains will be named after you and Sacco.
They will be here and your name with them,
“When these days are but a dim remembering of the time
When man was wolf to man.”
I think men will be remembering you a long time
Standing on the mountains
Many men, a long time, comrade.

Kenneth Rexroth




« Last Edit: April 30, 2013, 09:55:48 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Golden Oxen

  • Golden Oxen
  • Contrarian
  • Master Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 12062
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library
« Reply #26 on: May 01, 2013, 05:35:13 AM »
Doc, Thanks for bringing up the Beats, did a little reading last night on them, brought back some pleasant memories.  :icon_sunny:  :emthup:

                                                       A Supermarket in California

What thoughts I have of you tonight, Walt Whitman, for I walked down the
streets under the trees with a headache self-conscious looking at the full moon.

In my hungry fatigue, and shopping for images, I went into the neon fruit
supermarket, dreaming of your enumerations!
What peaches and what penumbras! Whole families shopping at night! Aisles
full of husbands! Wives in the avocados, babies in the tomatoes! --- and you,
Garcia Lorca, what were you doing down by the watermelons?
I saw you, Walt Whitman, childless, lonely old grubber, poking among the
meats in the refrigerator and eyeing the grocery boys.
I heard you asking questions of each: Who killed the pork chops? What price
bananas? Are you my Angel?
I wandered in and out of the brilliant stacks of cans following you, and
followed in my imagination by the store detective.
We strode down the open corridors together in our solitary fancy tasting
artichokes, possessing every frozen delicacy, and never passing the cashier.
Where are we going, Walt Whitman? The doors close in an hour. Which way does
your beard point tonight?
(I touch your book and dream of our odyssey in the supermarket and feel
absurd.)
Will we walk all night through solitary streets? The trees add shade to
shade, lights out in the houses, we'll both be lonely.
Will we stroll dreaming of the lost America of love past blue automobiles in
driveways, home to our silent cottage?
Ah, dear father, graybeard, lonely old courage-teacher, what America did you
have when Charon quit poling his ferry and you got out on a smoking bank and
stood watching the boat disappear on the black waters of Lethe?

  Allen Ginsberg : 3 / 50

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15840
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library
« Reply #27 on: May 01, 2013, 06:08:03 AM »
Makes me think of the Marina Safeway in San Fran...that most literary of grocery stores. But maybe the ghost of Whitman only shops in Chicago?

Maryanne meets Michael at the Marina Safeway...from Tales of the City. Great books, decent movie too.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/4J2XgzozoDc&fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/4J2XgzozoDc&fs=1</a>
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 06:38:07 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 14133
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: Diner Library
« Reply #28 on: May 01, 2013, 09:05:25 AM »
Friends,
FWIW, this is one spectacular thread. One that can be read and re-read and will repay the reader many times over.

In gratitude, I offer a favorite of my own--

In Place Of A Curse

By Ciardi, John

“At the next vacancy for God, if I am elected...”

At the next vacancy for God, if I am elected,
I shall forgive last the delicately wounded who,
having been slugged no harder than anyone else,
never got up again, neither to fight back,
nor to finger their jaws in painful admiration.

They who are wholly broken, and they in whom mercy is understanding,
I shall embrace at once and lead to pillows in heaven.
But they who are the meek by trade, baiting the best of their betters with extortions of a mock-helplessness,
I shall take last to love, and never wholly.

Let them all in Heaven - I abolish Hell -
but let it be read over them as they enter:
Beware the calculations of the meek, who gambled nothing
gave nothing, and could never receive enough.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Golden Oxen

  • Golden Oxen
  • Contrarian
  • Master Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 12062
    • View Profile
Re: Diner Library Poetry Shelf : The State Para-Military Force Speaks
« Reply #29 on: May 07, 2013, 10:17:02 PM »
  The State Para-Military Force Speaks
Raena Shirali



                        Bombay Riots, December, 1992

We stood by quietly as the mosque fell. Or was pulled.
The celebration turned riot and all the idols
lay decapitated at Nirmal Nagar. The elephant

god without an elephant head. Even without
the cold, we shivered. The buses around
us enshrined in flames. Who could tell

which temple was falling, and when? Of course,
we were in Jogeshwari when we found them.
The sickles. Iron rods flaking dark red chips

into the dirt. The Constable face-down
in the garbage. Seventy-two times
we intervened. Seventy-two times we killed

and were killed. Standing over us, the attackers
mocked. Where’s your army now, they said,
and we did not have an answer.

 
This young ladies poem was one of the winners of the Discovery 2013 Poetry contest.

 Raena Shirali’s work has appeared in Fogged Clarity and Four Way Review.

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
11 Replies
4227 Views
Last post November 29, 2014, 05:55:55 AM
by Surly1
0 Replies
436 Views
Last post March 30, 2017, 02:47:21 PM
by azozeo
0 Replies
59 Views
Last post July 25, 2018, 11:05:31 AM
by azozeo