AuthorTopic: Homeless: There But for Fortune...  (Read 8119 times)

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 33219
    • View Profile
Homeless: There But for Fortune...
« on: May 15, 2016, 12:42:31 AM »
This is one of the most uplifting stories I have read in a long time WRT the Homeless Poor.  It is further evidence how wrong the Nouveau Riche Social Climbers are about the poor in our society.  They are poor, but they are HONORABLE, and they know the importance of COMMUNITY.

There But for Fortune, go you, go I...

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/QpU5A4WZc-M" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/QpU5A4WZc-M</a>

RE

http://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2016/02/americas-tent-cities-for-the-homeless/462450/

America’s Tent Cities for the Homeless

Though the overall number of homeless people in the United States has been in a slow decline in recent years, homelessness has risen sharply in larger cities. More than 500,000 people were homeless in the United States at the end of last year, according to a report by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Many who find themselves living on the streets find a level of community and security in homeless encampments—whether the tent cities are sanctioned or unofficial. Gathered here are images of some of these tent cities, from Seattle, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., St. Louis, Las Cruces, and Honolulu. Though residents say they enjoy the stability of the camps, they still live in uncertainty, as many cities have clamped down in recent years, carrying out evictions and tearing down the tents.

Hints: View this page full screen. Skip to the next and previous photo by typing j/k or ←/→.
  • Stacie McDonough, 51, poses for a portrait by her tent at a homeless motorhome and tent encampment near LAX airport in Los Angeles, California, on October 26, 2015. McDonough is an army veteran with a college degree who was recently made homeless. While Los Angeles is grappling with a massive homelessness problem, Mayor Eric Garcetti has proposed spending $100 million to combat the problem in the sprawling metropolis but stopped short of declaring a state of emergency.

    Lucy Nicholson / Reuters
  • A general view of the unsanctioned homeless tent encampment Nickelsville (lower left) in Seattle, Washington, on October 8, 2015.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Matt Hannahs, 32, with his son Devin, outside their tent by a wood fire in Nickelsville homeless tent encampment in Seattle on October 13, 2015. “Devin doesn't view this as a negative thing, I mean being a little boy and resilient he looks at it as an adventure. Just meeting new people and seeing new things its basically like camping. I've always been really grateful that there is some place where you can come and go as you choose and there is safety in numbers. It's like a big family and we look out for each other,” Hannahs said.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • In Washington, D.C., Owen Makel, 65, who has been homeless for nearly 14 years and has lived at this camp for four months, sits by his tent between the Watergate and Whitehurst Freeway on November 16, 2015. “You have to understand this: We people as homeless have lives, just like you all have lives. We don't want to be out on the street but we don't have an alternative. People have no other place to go,” Makel said. On November 20, 2015, the residents were evicted from the area, according to local reports.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Lovenia Evans, who is pregnant, smokes a cigarette by her tent between the Watergate and Whitehurst Freeway in Washington, D.C. on November 16, 2015. “This is my second week in this tent, it's better to be here than laying on the street or sidewalk. I'm pregnant and they would like to me to come off the street,” Evans said.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Clyde Burgit and his wife Helen, who had been at this camp for two weeks, sit on a mattress near their tent by the Watergate and Whitehurst Freeway in Washington, D.C. on November 16, 2015. “Everybody looks out for everybody, this was great, and everybody gets along,” Clyde said.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Terry, a homeless man who only gave his first name, stands outside his tent at a large homeless encampment on January 27, 2015, near downtown St. Louis. The city planned to tear down the camp down due to health and safety concerns, but Human Services director Eddie Roth says officials would work with those living in tents to help them find better alternatives.

    Jeff Roberson / AP
  • Stephan Schleicher, 31, poses in front of his tent at SHARE/WHEEL Tent City 4 outside Seattle, Washington, on October 9, 2015. “There is a community here and a sense of people being held accountable to each other,” Schleicher said. SHARE and WHEEL describe themselves as self-organised, democratic organizations of homeless and formally homeless people that run several self-managed tent cities.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Tents are seen at SHARE/WHEEL Tent City 4 around 35 miles outside Seattle, Washington, on October 9, 2015.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • A Bible and ashtray filled with cigarettes at SHARE/WHEEL Tent City 4 outside Seattle, on October 9, 2015.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Buzz Chevara, 56, poses in front of his tent at SHARE/WHEEL Tent City 4 outside Seattle on October 9, 2015. “The concept of tent city means community, safety, and a place to be where nobody is going to harass or hurt you in the middle of the night,” Chevara said.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Lohe Akau, a 55-year-old homeless construction worker, carries his bodyboard through a homeless encampment in the Kakaako district of Honolulu, Hawaii, on August 24, 2015. There are estimated 7,620 homeless people living on the streets in Hawaii.

    Jae C. Hong / AP
  • Deja-Lynn Rombawa-Quarles, a 24-year-old woman who works part time at an elementary school as a group leader, sits in her tent at a homeless encampment in the Kakaako district of Honolulu on August 26, 2015. Rombawa-Quarles is one of a growing number of working poor in Honolulu who, through a combination of high housing costs, a dearth of affordable housing, and bad circumstances, wound up living on the street.

    Jae C. Hong / AP
  • Clouds pass above Camp Hope in Las Cruces, New Mexico, on October 6, 2015. Camp Hope describe themselves as “alternative transitional living project for the homeless.” Around 50 people live at the camp.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Daniel J. Wabsey, a 58-year-old war veteran, sits outside his tent at Camp Hope in Las Cruces, New Mexico, on October 6, 2015. “I've been traveling for 35 or 38 years. Getting inside would take a while to get used to. I just want to be able to eat, sleep, and be safe. We all get along and understand in Camp Hope. We've all been there. With common sense you can survive out here,” Wabsey said.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Matt Mercer, a one-time resident of Camp Hope, poses among tents in Las Cruces, New Mexico, on October 6, 2015. “The most unique thing about the camp is the sense of the community,” said Mercer, a former tent city dweller who now volunteers at Camp Hope. “When you are in the shelter system you don't see community, people are all just in survival mode.”

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Richey Luper, from Newport Beach, California, sits outside his tent at Camp Hope in Las Cruces on October 7, 2015. “This is good ...The tent city gives a sense of safety. No doubt about it,” Luper said.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Emma Savage, 6, opens a birthday card given to her by her dad Robert Rowe, 42, a day laborer who had just returned from a 12-hour working day to SHARE/WHEEL Tent City 3 outside Seattle, Washington, on October 12, 2015.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Tents stand at SHARE/WHEEL Tent City 3 outside of Seattle on October 12, 2015.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Lantz Rowland, 59, poses in front of his tent at SHARE/WHEEL Tent City 3 near Seattle on October 8, 2015. “Homeless people aren't drunken bums with needles shoved in their arms slobbering in a corner. We got people working graveyard shifts, we got kids here, we got families. People go to work not having to carry their stuff on their backs like they do in the indoor shelter system. Tent cities run circles around the traditional shelter system.”

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Kalaniopua Young, 32, originally from Hawaii, poses outside her tent at SHARE/WHEEL Tent City 3 near Seattle on October 12, 2015. “This is a choice I made to live here. I was lonely and depressed living in an apartment. I feel much better here with the social interaction and friendships. There is a direct democracy here with immediate results that differ from traditional bureaucracy.”

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Tent city residents watch an NFL football game in their communal television area at SHARE/WHEEL Tent City 3 on October 8, 2015.

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Aaron Ervin, 50, in front of his tent at SHARE/WHEEL Tent City 3 near Seattle on October 8, 2015. “Tent City has been a saving grace for me, a place for me to refresh and gather my thoughts. While I'm here I want to lead by example and be (a) positive influence on camp. People feel safe here, they are tense from being wrongfully judged from carrying all their bags as being homeless and the camp makes you feel comfortable knowing you have a safe place for your belongings, which does a lot for people making them more relaxed.”

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Kadee Ingram, 28, holds her son Sean, 2, at SHARE/WHEEL Tent City 3 outside Seattle on October 13, 2015. Ingram lost her job, and soon afterwards her partner Renee lost her job. “It got (to) the point where we couldn't get a job fast enough and we lost our apartment,” Ingram said. “Coming here, we really like it, being outside especially, we feel safe. We wish we would have known about it sooner.”

    Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
  • Tents from a homeless encampment line a street in downtown Los Angeles on January 26, 2016. Some 7,000 volunteers will fan out as part of a three-night effort to count homeless people in most of Los Angeles County. Naomi Goldman, a spokeswoman of the organizer the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority, said the goal is to “paint a picture about the state of homelessness.”

« Last Edit: October 25, 2016, 02:22:55 PM by RE »
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Golden Oxen

  • Golden Oxen
  • Contrarian
  • Master Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 11995
    • View Profile
Re: Homeless Tent Cities in the FSoA: There But for Fortune...
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2016, 04:22:09 AM »
What a posting! What Photos!

RE this is one great find and a Diner Classic IMO

Cannot post on The DD Favorite Photo thread today after contemplating this top notch photo essay. It would be like bringing hot dogs to a Prime Rib & Lobster Fest.

Thanks for allowing me to think about how fortunate I am to be in my beautiful home, next to my computer and coffee pot, this Sunday morning.

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 13882
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: Homeless Tent Cities in the FSoA: There But for Fortune...
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2016, 07:46:39 AM »
What a posting! What Photos!

RE this is one great find and a Diner Classic IMO

Cannot post on The DD Favorite Photo thread today after contemplating this top notch photo essay. It would be like bringing hot dogs to a Prime Rib & Lobster Fest.

Thanks for allowing me to think about how fortunate I am to be in my beautiful home, next to my computer and coffee pot, this Sunday morning.

Indeed. Really exceptional. Note the sense of mutuality and community these people report sharing in the tent cities v. the shelter system.
A real eye-opener.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 33219
    • View Profile
Re: Homeless Tent Cities in the FSoA: There But for Fortune...
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2016, 09:35:46 AM »
It was ranked #1 on r/collapse last night.  Dropped to #4 now with 47 up votes.

You occassionally find real gems on r/collapse.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 33219
    • View Profile
Homeless EXPLOSION in the UK
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2016, 02:17:44 PM »
I'm going to sticky this thread as the official Homeless thread.

RE

http://dissidentvoice.org/2016/10/homelessness-a-case-for-preventative-action/

Homelessness: A Case for Preventative Action

by Bruno De Oliveira / October 22nd, 2016

In January 2016, a medical doctor noted his surgery, the Brighton Homeless Healthcare centre, had seen 21 deaths last year alone. His figures also include 15 deaths in 2013 and 15 in 2014. Winter is fast approaching and preventive actions need to be explored. In July 2016, doctors have claimed the state of emergency accommodation in the city could contribute to a rise in homeless deaths. The doctor noted all the deaths were preventable.

The doctor said: “It’s a tragedy really that we have people dying on our streets. It’s looking like homelessness is only going to get worse over the next few years and because of that, due to cuts, there will be more deaths too.”

It has been noted that “council budgets are being cut, more than 20,000 people on the waiting list for housing and no easy answers.”

Needless to say, homelessness certainly involves more the narrow and farcical narrative of people without a home or an accommodation. It involves the intersection of visibility, oppression, domination, poor public policies and also a political decision of neglecting basic rights. Homeless people are under an oppressive and disempowering political discourse passive to punishment.

hlHomelessness in the UK is sometimes directly linked to people sleeping rough. However, those people sleeping rough, as the evidence suggests, are only a partial representation of the problem of those without secure accommodation. There are also some people that are staying in emergency hostels, there are refugees and there are people that are not sleeping rough but do not have any permanent accommodation, such as people staying temporarily with friends, squatting or as part of a travellers’ community. Homelessness is a common story in the UK’s current society. In 2013, 112,070 people declared themselves homeless in England. This is a 26% increase in four years. The number of people sleeping rough in London grew by 75% to a 6,437 in 2013.

There is a wide variety of reasons why people become homeless such as, relationship breakdown, domestic violence and substance misuse, people that are released from prison, people that are released from psychiatric institutions, people in debt, children that are institutionalised as asylum seekers and refugees.

Homelessness: An increasing still an acceptable social problem

Homelessness is increasing contemporary issue that can be linked with austerity measures whereby statutory homelessness services are in declining. For example, according to the neighbourhoods, communities and equalities committee (NCEC, 2015) homelessness in Brighton and Hove has increased in 2014 and the committee has expressed concerns that it might also increase next year. Furthermore, the Committee the city’s street services work with around 1,000 homeless people each year, 20 new homeless people every week. In March 2014 there were an estimated 132 rough sleepers in Brighton and Hove. It has been noted that homeless people are among the most marginalised, underpowered, and voiceless group in the west.

The administration of the marginalisation of homelessness people includes the “Public Space Protection Orders” (PSPOs). The PSPOs proposal pretended to give police and council officers the power to ban “anti-social” activities such as sleeping rough or begging. Those who breached an order could be issued with a Ł100 fixed penalty notice or a fine of Ł1,000. The PSPOs seems to be the visible hand of political administrations, the cold monster of the state, to oppress those left out of social security net because of the invisible hand of the market. There has been also posters reprimanding homeless beggars as frauds. Nottingham city council’s poster campaign on homeless begging that suggested that money to beggars goes to booze, drugs, and fraud. Are there no alternatives instead this merely punishable individualization of a serious social issue?

The impact of welfare reforms

The impact of austerity policies could have a detrimental effect on people that depend on welfare for housing. For example, The ‘Removal of the Spare Room Subsidy’ (known as the ‘bedroom tax’) in 2013’, affected an estimated 660 000 working age social housing tenants in the UK, reducing annual incomes by Ł624–Ł1144. A negative impact on mental health, family relationships, and community networks can be linked with the removal of the bedroom tax. It has been suggested that the removal of the bedroom tax has increased poverty and homelessness, and has had broad-ranging adverse effects on health, wellbeing and social relationships within this community. The public administration of welfare reforms under the politics of austerity requires the support of public opinion. It has been suggested that the bedroom tax is an ideological device which operates to increase inequality whilst deploying rhetoric of fairness.

The number of people homeless on London’s streets has more than doubled in five years and there is a link between the increase in the numbers of homeless people and punitive austerity measures. The Welfare Reform Act (2012) legislated a substantial extension and intensification of welfare conditionality, including the eventual sanction of three years without benefits. The Welfare Reform Act cut the relevance of some benefits, reducing the amount of rent that is covered for housing benefit tenants.

The former Coalition Government’s economic policy and related austerity measures have been termed “radical fiscal retrenchment”, whereby housing and welfare spending has fallen to its lowest level in over 60 years with a significant impact on vulnerable people that depend on them such as low-income families and young people under the age of 25. According to the Rough Sleeping Statistics England – Autumn (2015), in Autumn 2015 there was a total of 3,569 rough sleepers estimated in England. This is up 825 (30%) from the autumn 2014 total of 2,744. London had 940 rough sleepers in autumn 2015, which is 26% of the national figure. The number of rough sleepers has increased by 27% in London and 31% in the rest of England since autumn 2014 (The Rough Sleeping Statistics England – Autumn 2015).

The number of households placed in temporary accommodation by local authorities in England in September 2014 was the highest it had been in the last five years. It is estimated that 60,940 households had been placed in temporary accommodation by local authorities in England. The number of families with dependent children placed in bed and breakfast style accommodation increased from 630 at the end of March 2010 to 2,080 at the end of September 2014. It could also be argued that recent governmental UK welfare reforms, as currently conceptualised, fail to reflect lived reality, instead of serving to stigmatise and arguably (de)moralise vulnerable groups that depend on social welfare for survival, such as homeless people.

What can be done

First of all, on a personal level, there is a need to understand that homelessness is an issue is complex with many layers. Some people may end up homelessness as a consequence of their choices but some may end up homeless not due to that.

Social circumstances

Social factors can include poverty, inequality, housing supply and affordability, unemployment, welfare and income policies. One of the key causes of homelessness for young people is relationship breakdown. This can have an impact on the young people completing their education, getting a job and establishing a stable and secure life for themselves. Young people in this situation feel let down, rejected and lost. Some don’t know where or how to start building a new life. Many people are at significant risk of a homelessness situation occurring through losing their accommodation. This can be for a number of different reasons such as rent arrears, illness or unemployment.

Individual circumstances

Some factors and experiences can make people more vulnerable to became homeless such as poor physical health, mental health problems, alcohol and drugs issues, bereavement and experience of the criminal justice system.

What can be done?

We can also support local organisations that do a great deal of support as an emergency drop-in service for people that are homeless such as the Clock Tower Sanctuary and Turning point to name a couple.

In a broader level, there is a need for more transitional accommodations where people can live in a house or a flat on a temporary basis such as Emmaus, a homeless organisation based in Portslade. People are supported to deal with homeless linked issues such as incidence of family violence, relationship breakdown, drug and alcohol abuse etc. There are some mediation services that aim to prevent homelessness by working with families to resolve their problems such as the YMCA. The Unemployed Family Centre provides support to people that are unemployed helping people to maintain their accommodation, avoiding future homelessness.

From middle to long term, to reduce homelessness significantly there needs to be a robust discussion and a plan including a diverse range of stakeholders. Firstly, there needs to be a restructure of a strong social housing system. Social housing is also evidence based preventative measure to reduce homelessness. For example, Finland is the only European country where homelessness has decreased. The Y-Foundation is an organisation which offers rental accommodation to people who are having difficulties in finding a home for themselves. The model aim is to reduce long-term homelessness by giving people a secure accommodation. It also provides on-site personnel to help tackle risk factors such as joblessness or addiction. Secondly, there needs to be a clear policy capping private renting based on RPI (Retail price index). Finally, policy makers need to explore the idea of introducing a Universal Basic Income (UBI). A basic income is an income unconditionally granted to all on an individual basis and the UBI would provide financial security.

Bruno De Oliveira is a MPhil/Ph.D. Researcher at the University of Brighton - School of Applied Social Sciences. He is also a M.A. in Community Psychology and a coffee drinker. Read other articles by Bruno.

This article was posted on Saturday, October 22nd, 2016 at 3:46am and is filed under Health/Medical, Housing/Homelessness, Human Rights, United Kingdom.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Palloy

  • Sous Chef
  • ****
  • Posts: 3754
    • View Profile
    • https://palloy.wordpress.com
Re: Homeless: There But for Fortune...
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2016, 08:02:29 PM »
What I don't understand is why people choose the side of a busy road to camp, or between two motorways, when there are so many much nicer places to be out of the city.  Personally, I would always go for the solitary campsite, like you get at National Park entrances, alongside bridges over rivers, or local Show Grounds, but I know other people prefer "community".

To illustrate this I went to http://images.google.com and searched "minimalist house".  Ooops! - they must mean minimal time spent on architectural design of MacMansion.
"minimalist camp" is what I mean:

Step 1: The ubiquitous blue tarp, two trees, some bits of rope, and a blanket.  Good night.



2: Bigger tarp, making dry floor with turned up edges, and more overhang. Tension ridge-line rope with luggage ratchet strap.

3: Rain catcher into a funnel into plastic jerry-can with tap.  You can buy them already full of water for $5.

4: Firepit with cooking grill.  Bear Grylls' flint striker, tobacco tin with kero-soaked wadding, tomahawk/parang.

5: Folding shovel to dig a hole/trench in the ground to shit in.  Backfill soil, ashes and fresh bracken to keep flies out.

6: Inflatable air bed.

Sheer bloody luxury!
The State is a body of armed men

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 33219
    • View Profile
Re: Homeless: There But for Fortune...
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2016, 11:45:56 PM »
What I don't understand is why people choose the side of a busy road to camp, or between two motorways, when there are so many much nicer places to be out of the city.

First off, because most of them were born in the city, and have no clue how to live anywhere else.

Next, because if they are this far off the cliff, they probably have no means of transportation to get them to some lovely Rainforest.

Next, because in the city they can Dumpster Dive for food, and there are some Food Banks dishing out food as well, and they have stores to buy food with their SNAP cards they can get to on foot.

Insofar as minimalist shelters go, a tarp over a ridge line rope may be ok in warm weather or light rain, it's not too good in cold weather or a T-storm.  When I see a bucolic picture like this, it reminds me of videos I've watched of Primitive Skills guys making a fire with a bow drill or even by hand..  Seems to work GREAT until you realize they always make these vids in ideal weather! Fuck the bow drill, have you ever tried to make a fire with matches or a lighter in a driving rainstorm with even just 20 mph winds?  Well, I am sure you have and will tell us all about it, but my experience with that is it is fucking impossible until the weather calms a bit.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 33219
    • View Profile
Homeless in Amerika
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2017, 06:24:22 PM »
New Official thread for homeless stories.

RE

L.A. controller says city should open emergency homeless campgrounds and shelters


Skid row storage facility for homeless people

L.A. City Controller Ron Galperin is calling for the city to open campgrounds and shelters for homeless people and expand storage for their belongings. This 1,461-bin storage facility on skid row is full every day, operators say. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Gale HollandGale HollandContact Reporter

The Los Angeles city controller recommended Wednesday that the city open emergency campgrounds and shelters to curtail the ragged shantytowns that have plagued neighborhoods from Boyle Heights to Wilmington in the current homelessness crisis.

In a 37-page report, City Controller Ron Galperin also recommended tougher policing, streamlined cleanup protocols, showers and bathrooms for homeless people and expanded storage, including mobile bins, for their belongings.

He said the city should investigate enforcing a 24-hour ban on sleeping on city sidewalks. Under a 10-year-old court agreement, homeless people are allowed to stay overnight in public spaces.

“Without creative solutions to address homeless encampments … the city will merely transfer the issue from one constituency to the next without finding a way to mitigate public health and safety risks for everyone,” Galperin’s report said.

Whether you love their convenience or consider them a necessary evil, soundbars are here to stay.

Sponsored Content by Samsung | Originally on AVS Forum

Galperin said he was not offering solutions to homelessness, but rather trying to curb the continued spread of camps, even after the city’s ambitious 10-year, $1.2-billion homeless housing construction program approved last fall is well underway.

“I wish we could give everybody who wants one a house,” he said in a phone interview. “Ten thousand units, as significant as that is, is barely going to keep up with what the demand is, or with the numbers of people experiencing homelessness on our streets now.”

Both Seattle and Portland have experimented recently with allowing homeless camps on vacant land, only to sweep the settlements away months later as they descended into chaos or scattered violence.

Mayor Tom Bradley’s “urban campground” opened in June 1987 in what is now downtown L.A.’s Arts District and closed three months later, after being declared on all sides an abject failure.

“We should not be in the shelter business,” then-Deputy Mayor Grace Davis said after 103 days and $397,000 in city costs devoted to the camp experiment.

Galperin said he recognized the challenge of city-run homeless campgrounds and shelters.

But with nearly three-quarters of the city’s 34,000 homeless people living in cars, parks,he Los Angeles city controller recommended Wednesday that the city open emergency campgrounds and shelters to curtail the ragged shantytowns that have plagued neighborhoods from Boyle Heights to Wilmington in the current homelessness crisis.

In a 37-page report, City Controller Ron Galperin also recommended tougher policing, streamlined cleanup protocols, showers and bathrooms for homeless people and expanded storage, including mobile bins, for their belongings.

He said the city should investigate enforcing a 24-hour ban on sleeping on city sidewalks. Under a 10-year-old court agreement, homeless people are allowed to stay overnight in public spaces.

“Without creative solutions to address homeless encampments … the city will merely transfer the issue from one constituency to the next without finding a way to mitigate public health and safety risks for everyone,” Galperin’s report said.

Whether you love their convenience or consider them a necessary evil, soundbars are here to stay.

Galperin said he was not offering solutions to homelessness, but rather trying to curb the continued spread of camps, even after the city’s ambitious 10-year, $1.2-billion homeless housing construction program approved last fall is well underway.

“I wish we could give everybody who wants one a house,” he said in a phone interview. “Ten thousand units, as significant as that is, is barely going to keep up with what the demand is, or with the numbers of people experiencing homelessness on our streets now.”

Both Seattle and Portland have experimented recently with allowing homeless camps on vacant land, only to sweep the settlements away months later as they descended into chaos or scattered violence.

Mayor Tom Bradley’s “urban campground” opened in June 1987 in what is now downtown L.A.’s Arts District and closed three months later, after being declared on all sides an abject failure.

“We should not be in the shelter business,” then-Deputy Mayor Grace Davis said after 103 days and $397,000 in city costs devoted to the camp experiment.

Galperin said he recognized the challenge of city-run homeless campgrounds and shelters.

But with nearly three-quarters of the city’s 34,000 homeless people living in cars, parks, sidewalks, underpasses and abandoned buildings — the highest proportion of unsheltered homeless people in the U.S., the report noted — “the current state of affairs is no better,” he said. “The status quo is not acceptable.”


People carry their belongings in and out of a storage facility for the homeless population on skid row. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Galperin said the city needs more resources and staff and better coordination devoted to cleanups. Los Angeles public works crews have cleaned 16,500 homeless encampments since 2015. But the $14-million citywide effort has made only a marginal difference in tent cities along alleys, riverbanks and sidewalks, a Times review found earlier this year.

Stricter policing of limits on homeless belongings, early intervention and additional storage facilities could make a difference, Galperin said.

“I drive by a site on Beverly Boulevard every day,” he said. “It began with a box and grew to a half the block being occupied over a month.”

L.A. provides 1,461 voluntary storage bins on skid row, as well as five shipping containers around town for property seized during cleanups and stored for 90 days.

James Winfrey III, operations manager for Chrysalis Enterprises, which operates the facility, said that bin workers “turn people away everyday.” A homeless client who was picking up sneakers at the facility Wednesday said secure storage was especially important to homeless people, who’ve lost nearly everything.

“When people lose their stuff, they lose hopefulness and stay homeless,” said the man, who gave his name as Mr. Maxwell.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 33219
    • View Profile
Dorothy Edwards: From the streets to a home
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2017, 07:20:19 PM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/53ajDrUznfw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/53ajDrUznfw</a>
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 33219
    • View Profile
San Diego to Open Camp for Homeless After Hepatitis Outbreak
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2017, 02:03:12 AM »
https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/california/articles/2017-10-04/san-diego-to-open-camp-for-homeless-after-hepatitis-outbreak

San Diego to Open Camp for Homeless After Hepatitis Outbreak
The city of San Diego is opening an encampment meant to address its homeless problem and a recent hepatitis outbreak.


Oct. 4, 2017, at 9:50 p.m.

San Diego to Open Camp for Homeless After Hepatitis Outbreak

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The city of San Diego is opening an encampment for the homeless.

The move announced Wednesday is meant to address both the city's homeless problem overall and a recent outbreak of hepatitis A that has hit the homeless especially hard.

The camp, in a public works yard near Balboa Park, will be equipped with tents, showers, restrooms, food security and social services.

Mayor Kevin Faulconer says it's a temporary solution while the city builds a larger, more durable area featuring large industrial tents later this year.

The camp is scheduled to open on Monday.

San Diego County is battling an epidemic of hepatitis A, a contagious liver disease that has killed 17 people and infected 461 people, including more than 300 who had to be hospitalized.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 33219
    • View Profile
Homeless explosion on West Coast pushing cities to the brink
« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2017, 03:59:53 PM »
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/higher-education/homeless-explosion-on-west-coast-pushing-cities-to-the-brink/2017/11/06/ae0e5274-c2b2-11e7-9922-4151f5ca6168_story.html?utm_term=.8ea0e345d30e

Homeless explosion on West Coast pushing cities to the brink



In this Oct. 30, 2017 photo, Dave Chung, who says he has been homeless for five years on the streets of California and Washington state, eats a meal before bedding down in a bus shelter in view of the Space Needle in Seattle. Chung says he has been offered shelter many times, but chooses to remain outside due to the living conditions in homeless shelters and conflicts he has with other people. (Ted S. Warren/Associated Press)

By Gillian Flaccus and Geoff Mulvihill | AP November 6 at 12:23 AM

SEATTLE — In a park in the middle of a leafy, bohemian neighborhood where homes list for close to $1 million, a tractor’s massive claw scooped up the refuse of the homeless - mattresses, tents, wooden frames, a wicker chair, an outdoor propane heater. Workers in masks and steel-shanked boots plucked used needles and mounds of waste from the underbrush.

Just a day before, this corner of Ravenna Park was an illegal home for the down and out, one of 400 such encampments that have popped up in Seattle’s parks, under bridges, on freeway medians and along busy sidewalks. Now, as police and social workers approached, some of the dispossessed scurried away, vanishing into a metropolis that is struggling to cope with an enormous wave of homelessness.

That struggle is not Seattle’s alone. A homeless crisis of unprecedented proportions is rocking the West Coast, and its victims are being left behind by the very things that mark the region’s success: soaring housing costs, rock-bottom vacancy rates and a roaring economy that waits for no one. All along the coast, elected officials are scrambling for solutions.

“I’ve got economically zero unemployment in my city, and I’ve got thousands of homeless people that actually are working and just can’t afford housing,” said Seattle City Councilman Mike O’Brien. “There’s nowhere for these folks to move to. Every time we open up a new place, it fills up.”

The rising numbers of homeless people have pushed abject poverty into the open like never before and have overwhelmed cities and nonprofits. The surge in people living on the streets has put public health at risk, led several cities to declare states of emergency and forced cities and counties to spend millions - in some cases billions - in a search for solutions.

San Diego now scrubs its sidewalks with bleach to counter a deadly hepatitis A outbreak that has spread to other cities and forced California to declare a state of emergency last month. In Anaheim, home to Disneyland, 400 people sleep along a bike path in the shadow of Angel Stadium. Organizers in Portland lit incense at a recent outdoor food festival to cover up the stench of urine in a parking lot where vendors set up shop.

Homelessness is not new on the West Coast. But interviews with local officials and those who serve the homeless in California, Oregon and Washington — coupled with an Associated Press review of preliminary homeless data — confirm it’s getting worse. People who were once able to get by, even if they suffered a setback, are now pushed to the streets because housing has become so expensive.

All it takes is a prolonged illness, a lost job, a broken limb, a family crisis. What was once a blip in fortunes now seems a life sentence.

“Most homeless people I know aren’t homeless because they’re addicts,” said Tammy Stephen, 54, who lives at a homeless encampment in Seattle. “Most people are homeless because they can’t afford a place to live.”

Among the AP’s findings:

— Official counts taken earlier this year in California, Oregon and Washington show 168,000 homeless people in the three states, according to an AP tally of every jurisdiction in those states that reports homeless numbers to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. That is 19,000 more than were counted two years ago, although the numbers may not be directly comparable because of factors ranging from the weather to new counting methods.

— During the same period, the number of unsheltered people in the three states - defined as someone sleeping outside, in a bus or train station, abandoned building or vehicle - has climbed 18 percent to 105,000.

— Rising rents are the main culprit. The median one-bedroom apartment in the San Francisco Bay Area is significantly more expensive than it is in the New York City metro area, and apartments in San Francisco are listed at a higher price than those in Manhattan.

— Since 2015, at least 10 cities or municipal regions in California, Oregon and Washington - and Honolulu, as well - have declared states of emergency due to the rise of homelessness, a designation usually reserved for natural disasters.

“What do we want as a city to look like? That’s what the citizens here need to decide,” said Gordon Walker, head of the regional task force for the homeless in San Diego, where the unsheltered homeless population has spiked by 18 percent in the past year. “What are we going to allow? Are we willing to have people die on the streets?”

___

With alarming frequency, the West Coast’s newly homeless are people who were able to survive on the margins - until those margins moved.

For years, Stanley Timmings, 62, and his 61-year-old girlfriend, Linda Catlin, were able to rent a room in a friend’s house on their combined disability payments.

Last spring, that friend died of colon cancer and the couple was thrust on Seattle’s streets.

Timmings used their last savings to buy a used RV for $300 and spent another $300 to register it. They bought a car from a junk yard for $275.

Now, the couple parks the RV near a small regional airport and uses the car to get around.

They have no running water and no propane for the cook stove. They go to the bathroom in a bucket and dump it behind a nearby business. They shower and do laundry at a nonprofit and buy water at a grocery depot. After four months, the stench of human waste inside the RV is overwhelming. Every inch of space is crammed with their belongings: jugs of laundry detergent, stacks of clothes, pots and pans, and tattered paperback novels. They are exhausted, scared and defeated, with no solution in sight.

“Between the two of us a month, we get $1,440 in disability. We can’t find a place for that,” he said. “Our income is (about) $17,000 ... a year. That puts us way out of the ballpark, not even close. It might have been enough but anymore, no. It’s not.”

A new study funded by the real estate information firm Zillow and conducted by the University of Washington found a strong link between rising housing prices and rising homelessness numbers. A 5 percent rent increase in Los Angeles, for example, would mean about 2,000 more homeless people there, the authors said.

Nationally, homelessness has been trending down, partly because governments and nonprofit groups have gotten better at moving people into housing. That’s true in many West Coast cities, too, but the flow the other direction is even faster. And on the West Coast, shelter systems are smaller.

“If you have a disability income, you make about $9,000 a year and renting a studio in Seattle is about $1,800 a month and so that’s twice your income,” said Margaret King, director of housing programs for DESC, a nonprofit that works with Seattle’s homeless.

“So everybody who was just hanging on because they had cheap rent, they’re losing that ... and they wind up outside. It’s just exploded.”

Nowhere is that more evident than California’s Silicon Valley, where high salaries and a tight housing market have pushed rent out of reach for thousands. In ever-shifting communities of the homeless, RVs and cars cluster by the dozens in the city where Google built its global headquarters and just blocks from Stanford University.

Ellen Tara James-Penney, a lecturer at San Jose State University, has been sleeping out of a car for about a decade, ever since she lost her housing while an undergraduate at the school where she now teaches four English courses, a job that pays $28,000 a year. Home is an old Volvo.

“I’ve basically been homeless since 2007, and I’m really tired,” she said. “Really tired.”

She actually got her start in the high tech industry, before being laid off during the tech meltdown of the early 2000s. Like many who couldn’t find work, she went to college, accumulating tens of thousands of dollars in student debt along the way.

Now 54, she grades papers and prepares lesson plans in her car. Among her few belongings is a pair of her grandmother’s fancy stiletto pumps, a reminder to herself that “it’s not going to be like this forever.”

Increased housing costs aren’t just sweeping up low-income workers: The numbers of homeless youth also is rising.

A recent count in Los Angeles, for example, found that those ages 18 to 24 were the fastest-growing homeless group by age, up 64 percent, followed by those under 18. Los Angeles and other cities have made a concerted effort to improve their tallies of homeless youth, which likely accounts for some of the increase.

One of the reasons is the combined cost of housing and tuition, said Will Lehman, policy supervisor at Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority. A recent study by the University of Wisconsin found that one in five Los Angeles Community College District students is homeless, he said.

“They can pay for books, for classes but just can’t afford an apartment. They’re choosing to prioritize going to school,” Lehman said. “They don’t choose their situation.”

___

Michael Madigan opened a new wine bar in Portland a few years ago overlooking a ribbon of parks not far from the city’s trendy Pearl District.

Business was good until, almost overnight, dozens of homeless people showed up on the sidewalk. A large encampment on the other side of the city had been shut down, and its residents moved to the park at his doorstep.

“We literally turned the corner one day . and there were 48 tents set up on this one block that hadn’t been there the day before,” he said.

Madigan’s business dropped 50 percent in four months and he closed his bar. There are fewer homeless people there now, but the campers have moved to a bike path that winds through residential neighborhoods in east Portland, prompting hundreds of complaints about trash, noise, drug use and illegal camping.

Rachel Sterry, a naturopathic doctor, lives near that path and sometimes doesn’t feel safe when she’s commuting by bike with her 1-year-old son. Dogs have rolled in human feces in a local park; recent improvements she’s made to her small home are overshadowed by the line of tents and tarps a few dozen yards from her front door, she said.

“I have to stop and get off my bike to ask people to move their card game or their lounge chairs or their trash out of the way when I’m just trying to get from point A to point B,” she said. “If I were to scream or get hurt, nobody would know.”

For Seattle resident Elisabeth James, the reality check came when a homeless man forced his way into a glass-enclosed ATM lobby with her after she swiped her card to open the door for after-hours access. After a few nerve-wracking minutes, the man left the lobby but stayed outside, banging on the glass. Police were too busy to respond so James called her husband, who scared the man away and walked her home. The man, she believes, just wanted to get out of the rain.

A neighborhood pocket park has become a flashpoint, too: When James took her 2-year-old grandchild there, she saw people injecting heroin.

“I’m not a NIMBY person, but I just think that we can do so much more,” said James, who founded an activist group called Speak Out Seattle last year. “I wanted to do something that was effective, that brought frustrated people together to find solutions. We’re spending a lot of money to house people and we’re getting a bigger problem.”

The crisis is not limited to large metropolises. In Oregon City, a suburban, working-class town of 36,000 people, the police department this summer added a full-time position for a homeless outreach officer after roughly half the calls concerned trash, trespassing, human waste and illegal encampments.

The city has no overnight shelters and never had a significant homeless population until about three years ago.

On a recent fall day, officer Mike Day tromped into a greenbelt across from a strip mall to check on a man he recently connected with a counselor, calmed an intoxicated man and arranged emergency care for a man who was suicidal.

“How many social workers have you met that go into the woods to follow up with the homeless population and to help with mental health? This is a bit of a hybrid position, certainly, and maybe it’s not exactly the role of a police officer - but it’s a creative approach to find a solution to the problem,” he said.

The question was, “What can we do differently? Because right now, it’s not working.”

___

All along the West Coast, local governments are scrambling to answer that question - and taxpayers are footing the bill.

Voters have approved more than $8 billion in spending since 2015 on affordable housing and other anti-homelessness programs, mostly as tax increases. Los Angeles voters, for example, approved $1.2 billion to build 10,000 units of affordable housing over a decade to address a ballooning homeless population that’s reached 34,000 people within city limits.

Seattle spent $61 million on homeless-related issues last year, and a recent budget proposal would increase that to $63 million. Four years ago, the city spent $39 million on homelessness. Sacramento has set a goal of moving 2,000 people off the streets in the next three years and may place a housing bond before voters in 2018.

Appeals for money have angered residents who see tent encampments growing in their cities despite more spending.

“Those are like whack-a-mole because they just sprout up and then they disappear and then they sprout up somewhere else,” said Gretchen Taylor, who helped found the Neighborhood Safety Alliance of Seattle in 2016.

Seattle is initiating competitive bidding among nonprofit organizations for city dollars going toward homelessness programs. It’s also pouring money into “rapid rehousing,” a strategy that houses people quickly and then provides rental assistance for up to 18 months.

Like San Francisco, Seattle has started opening 24-hour, “low-barrier” shelters that offer beds even if people are abusing drugs, have a pet or want to sleep together as a couple. But the city’s first 24-hour shelter has only 75 beds, and turnover is extremely low.

A team of specially trained police officers and social workers has also been visiting homeless camps to try to place people in shelter. After repeated visits - and with 72 hours of notice - the city cleans out the camps and hauls away abandoned belongings.

These efforts are starting to yield results, although the overall number of homeless people continues to swell.

Nearly 740 families moved into some type of shelter between October 2016 and August 2017, and 39 percent of the people contacted by the new police teams wind up sheltered, according a recent city homeless report. That’s an improvement from a 5 percent shelter rate 18 months ago, said Sgt. Eric Zerr, who leads that effort.

But the approach has its detractors. The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit alleging the sweeps violate the constitutional protections against unreasonable search and seizure. And a debate is raging about whether the sweeps are necessary “tough love” or a cruel policy that criminalizes poverty in a city with a reputation for liberalism.

“When a city can’t offer housing, they should not be able to sweep that spot unless it’s posing some sort of significant health and safety issue,” said Sara Rankin, a professor with the Homeless Rights Advocacy Project at the Seattle University School of Law.

“If someone doesn’t have a place to go, you can’t just continue to chase them from place to place.”

___

Above all, the West Coast lacks long-term, low-income housing for people like Ashley Dibble and her 3-year-old daughter.

Dibble, 29, says she has been homeless off and on for about a year, after her ex-boyfriend squandered money on his car and didn’t pay the rent for three months. Evicted, Dibble says she lived in the back of a moving truck and with several different friends around Seattle before winding up on the streets. She sent her toddler to live with the girl’s paternal grandparents in Florida.

She and her new boyfriend were sleeping under tarps near Safeco Field, home of the Seattle Mariners, when an outreach team referred them to a new shelter. Now, Dibble talks to her daughter daily by phone and is trying to find a way back into housing so she can bring her home.

With an eviction on her record and little income, no one will rent to her.

“I’ve had so many doors slammed in my face, it’s ridiculous,” Dibble said, wiping away tears.

Seattle’s DESC operates 1,200 so-called “permanent supportive housing units” -housing for the mentally ill or severely addicted who can’t stay housed without constant help from case managers, counselors and rehabilitation programs. The nonprofit completes a new building every 18 months and they immediately fill; at any given time, there are only about eight to 10 units free in the whole city - but 1,600 people qualify.

Among this population, “almost nobody’s going to get housing because there isn’t any,” DESC’s Margaret King said. “It doesn’t really matter.”

There is so little housing, and so much despair. Nonprofit workers with decades of experience are shocked by the surge in homeless people and in the banality of the ways they wound up on the streets.

“It’s a sea of humanity crashing against services, and services at this point are overwhelmed, literally overwhelmed. It’s catastrophic,” said Jeremy Lemoine, an outreach case manager with REACH, a Seattle homeless-assistance program. “It’s a refugee crisis right here in the States, right here under our noses.”

“I don’t mean to sound hopeless. I generate hope for a living for people - that there is a future for them - but we need to address it now.”
« Last Edit: November 06, 2017, 04:21:19 PM by RE »
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline azozeo

  • Sous Chef
  • ****
  • Posts: 6596
    • View Profile
Re: Homeless in Amerika
« Reply #11 on: November 06, 2017, 04:08:53 PM »
I wonder if Seattle has embraced the basic income principle yet ?
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 33219
    • View Profile
Re: Homeless in Amerika
« Reply #12 on: November 06, 2017, 04:48:53 PM »
I wonder if Seattle has embraced the basic income principle yet ?

I told you, this can only work with small populations.  This population is too large.  They will not be handing out free money to Seattle Homeless People.  Only to Seattle Banksters and TBTF IT Companies.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline luciddreams

  • Administrator
  • Sous Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 3304
    • View Profile
    • Epiphany Now
Re: Homeless in Amerika
« Reply #13 on: November 06, 2017, 05:50:19 PM »
A quick, cheap, simple solution would be setting up areas for these people to go in their tents.  Provide running water and port-a-potties...just to start.  Also maybe provide cheap tents. 

Next set up Grapes of Wrath depression era government camps with low wage jobs picking up trash and doing a variety of other public service jobs.  We could easily provide food for these people.  We provide food for millions of prisoners after all, and they broke the law and got locked up.  These people are just down on their luck and have done nothing wrong.  We should be feeding them before we are feeding prisoners. 

In the end this is a problem that's due to a collapsing civilization.  Too many people, too much automation, too much off-shoring...

The solutions are easy to come to.  We won't come to them though.  Our "leaders" are intellectually impotent.  They're bought off by the Corporatocracy who's prime directive is profit.  Homeless people do not generate profit.  Yet prisoners do!  Seems like there should be a viable way to have these homeless people generating profit seeing as how we're not even providing them with three hots and a cot, like we are the prisoners. 

Seems these homeless people would be better off breaking the law and securing their position in jail.  At least then they would have a roof over their head, a bed, and three meals a day.  Our so called society is providing motivation for these people to break the law in an attempt to better their plight. It's fucking ridiculous. 

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 33219
    • View Profile
Re: Homeless in Amerika
« Reply #14 on: November 06, 2017, 05:58:18 PM »
Seems these homeless people would be better off breaking the law and securing their position in jail.  At least then they would have a roof over their head, a bed, and three meals a day.  Our so called society is providing motivation for these people to break the law in an attempt to better their plight. It's fucking ridiculous.

"3 Hots & a Cot."   ::)

LA is supposedly going to set up such a Trumpville for tents with sanitation facilities etc.  However, for the people who live in standard housing, having one of these encampments lowers their property values and makes the neighborhood more dangerous.  Think the Jungle Refugee Camp in Calais for this.  Nobody wants 1000 (10,000?) Homeless people camped out in their back yard.  So there is a lot of political pressure to keep them out of the neighborhood.

Prisons round them up and keep them isolated from the population at large.  As long as they don't see the problem, it's not their problem.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
5 Replies
1228 Views
Last post December 20, 2012, 09:00:58 PM
by Snowleopard
1 Replies
521 Views
Last post October 02, 2015, 05:50:05 AM
by MKing
0 Replies
29 Views
Last post September 01, 2018, 04:41:50 AM
by Surly1