AuthorTopic: BREXIT! The FUN Begins!  (Read 9925 times)

Offline Eddie

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Re: 🌍 Europe offers British lawmakers chance to delay Brexit
« Reply #90 on: March 22, 2019, 06:16:40 AM »
Theresa May increasingly looks to be completely out of her depth.

Her solution appears to be to keep scheduling votes until she gets the result she wants.  ::)

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https://www.npr.org/2019/03/24/706319859/british-prime-minister-theresa-may-faces-new-pressure-to-quit-as-brexit-deadline

Europe
British Prime Minister Theresa May Faces New Pressure To Quit As Brexit Deadline Looms

March 24, 201911:20 AM ET

Samantha Raphelson


British Prime Minister Theresa is reportedly facing pressure from within the Conservative Party to quit over her handling of the Brexit process. Here she attends a church service on Sunday in Aylesbury, England.
Jack Taylor/Getty Images

Updated at 1:38 p.m. ET

British Prime Minister Theresa May is facing new challenges to her leadership the day after protesters packed the streets of London to demand a second referendum on Britain's exit from the European Union.

A number of British parliamentarians, including senior members of May's own Conservative Party, have wanted her out for some time, NPR's Frank Langfitt tells Weekend Edition Sunday. British newspapers on Sunday reported that senior members of May's cabinet could resign to force her resignation.
March In London Demanding A Second Brexit Vote Draws Huge Crowds
Europe
March In London Demanding A Second Brexit Vote Draws Huge Crowds

If that were to happen, May would be replaced by an interim prime minister. But two cabinet ministers who were named by British media as possible replacements touted their support for May on Sunday.

David Lidington, the prime minister's de facto deputy, who voted to remain in the EU, denied rumors of a plot to oust May, telling reporters that he was "100 percent behind" her. Michael Gove, the secretary of state for environment, food and rural affairs, who was also named in the papers as a possible caretaker prime minister, said that it was "not the time to change the captain of the ship."

Another option for Parliament would be to ask May to commit to a date to step down in exchange for an approval of her Brexit deal, though that seems unlikely given the unpopularity of her plan, which has been soundly defeated in two votes.

May has not responded to the reports, but No. 10 Downing St. insists that she is going nowhere. Fellow Conservatives and pro-Brexit lawmakers, including Boris Johnson, met with May at her country residence, Chequers, on Sunday.
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Despite the pressure she is facing to step down, May has survived two no-confidence votes in Parliament, the most recent being in this January. She cannot face another leadership challenge from within her own party until December, according to party rules, but if several members of her cabinet resigned, she could be convinced to quit.

"Changing the players doesn't solve the problem," Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond told Sky News on Sunday morning. "The problem is that we as a nation have to decide how to deliver Brexit."

Still, May angered lawmakers last week when she delivered a speech blaming Parliament for the Brexit stalemate. And if Saturday's demonstrations are any indication, May is also losing support among voters. An Ipsos MORI poll released this past week shows that 86 percent of Britons are dissatisfied with her leadership.

Protesters told Langfitt that they want a second chance to vote on Brexit because they believe the vote in 2016 was flawed.
Petition To Cancel Brexit Breaks U.K. Government Website, Tops 1 Million Signatures
Europe
Petition To Cancel Brexit Breaks U.K. Government Website, Tops 1 Million Signatures

"This country's in grave danger of shooting itself in the foot," Tim Parsons, who works in finance in London, told Langfitt. "There was a vote. Nobody knew what they were voting for at the time, so I think it should be put back for another vote. At least it will have been an informed decision."

The chances of a second referendum are considered low because it would enrage the 52 percent of voters who supported Brexit. Even some who voted to remain in the European Union feel a second vote would be anti-democratic, Langfitt says.

The leadership drama comes as May is running out of time to get a new Brexit deal approved by Parliament. She has until the end of next week to secure an agreement, after winning an extension from EU leaders. Britain was originally scheduled to leave the EU on March 29.

May could present her Brexit plan for a third vote next week, but she has said she would do that only if she were certain it had enough support to win. If Parliament can agree on a plan next week, the United Kingdom will have until May 22 to leave the EU. But if Parliament can't get a deal done, it will have to devise a new plan or leave the EU with a "no-deal" Brexit on April 12, which most experts say would be a nightmare scenario.
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🌍 Theresa May: No third vote on Brexit deal yet - BBC News
« Reply #92 on: March 26, 2019, 12:07:13 AM »
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🌍 Nigel Farage Disagrees with New Brexit Survey Results
« Reply #93 on: March 27, 2019, 03:40:49 AM »
Nigel is BACK!



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🌍 Brexit: No majority for any options after MPs' votes
« Reply #94 on: March 28, 2019, 12:27:45 AM »
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-47728333

Brexit: No majority for any options after MPs' votes

    5 hours ago

    Brexit


Media captionSpeaker John Bercow announced the results of the eight Brexit indicative votes

None of MPs' eight proposed Brexit options have secured clear backing in a series of votes in the Commons.

The options - which included a customs union with the EU and a referendum on any deal - were supposed to help find a consensus over how to leave the EU.

Brexit Secretary Stephen Barclay said the results strengthened ministers' view their deal was "the best option".

The results capped a day of drama in which Theresa May promised to stand down as PM if her deal was passed.

The prime minister told a meeting of Tory MPs she would leave office earlier than planned if it guaranteed Parliament's backing for her withdrawal agreement with the EU.

Her announcement prompted a number of Tory opponents of her deal to signal their backing but the Democratic Unionists suggested they would continue to oppose the agreement.

    How did my MP vote on Brexit options?
    Brexit: What just happened?
    May vows to quit if Brexit deal passed
    Brexitcast: Come on Arlene

MPs hoped Wednesday's unprecedented series of "indicative votes" would help break the parliamentary deadlock over Brexit.

The failure to identify a clear way forward led to angry exchanges in the Commons with critics of the process saying it had been "an abject failure".
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How MPs voted

    Confirmatory referendum - For: 268 Against: 295
    Customs union - For: 264 Against: 272
    Labour's Brexit plan - For: 237 Against: 307
    Common Market 2.0 - For: 188 Against: 283
    Revoking Article 50 to avoid no deal - For: 184 Against: 293
    No-deal exit on 12 April - For: 160 Against: 400
    Malthouse Plan B - For: 139 Against: 422
    EFTA and EEA membership - For: 65 Against: 377

The proposal which came closest to commanding majority support was a cross-party plan - tabled by former Conservative chancellor Ken Clarke - for the whole of the UK to join a new customs union with the EU to ensure tariff-free trade after the UK's exit.

Its supporters included five Conservative ministers: Mark Field, Stephen Hammond, Margot James, Anne Milton and Rory Stewart.

All Conservative MPs - excluding cabinet ministers - were given a free vote, meaning they were not ordered to vote in a certain way.

Eight Conservatives voted for a referendum to endorse the deal, the proposal which secured the most affirmative votes. Labour controversially whipped its MPs to back the proposal but 10 shadow ministers abstained and Melanie Onn quit her job to vote against.

Labour's own alternative plan for Brexit - including "close alignment" with the single market and protections for workers' rights - was defeated by 307 votes to 237.

Five other propositions - including backing for a no-deal exit, the so-called Common Market 2.0 plan, a separate proposal to remain in the European Economic Area and one to stop the Brexit process by revoking Article 50 - all failed to secure the backing of a majority of MPs.
What's the reaction been?

Brexiteer Mark Francois said "this attempt to seize the order paper" by MPs had failed and the public would be looking on "with amazement".

But Conservative MP Sir Oliver Letwin, who oversaw the unprecedented process of indicative votes, said the lack of a majority for any proposition was "disappointing".

While he said he believed MPs should be allowed to have another go at reaching a consensus on Monday, he said this would not be needed if the PM's deal was approved before then.

Independent Group MP Anna Soubry said more people had voted for the idea of another referendum than voted for Mrs May's deal on the two times it had been put to Parliament.

And Labour MP Dame Margaret Beckett, who put forward the motion for a confirmatory referendum, said the objective had not been to identify a single proposition at this stage but to get a sense of where a compromise may lie by, in her words, "letting a thousand flowers bloom".

The prime minister offered to pay the ultimate price, and leave office - the grandest of gestures any leader ever really has.

For a moment it seemed it might work and line up the support she so desperately needs.

But within a couple of hours her allies in Northern Ireland were refusing to unblock the progress of Theresa May's main mission.

That might not be terminal - one cabinet minister told me the PM may yet have another go at pushing her deal through Parliament against the odds on Friday.

But if Plan A fails, Parliament is not ready with a clear Plan B that could yet succeed.

For our politics, for businesses trying to make decisions, for all of us, divisions and tensions between and inside our government - and our Parliament - are too profound to bring this limbo to an end.

    Read Laura's thoughts in full

Commons Speaker John Bercow said the process agreed by the House allowed for a second stage of debate on Monday and there was no reason this should not continue.

While it was up to MPs, he said there was an understanding Wednesday's objective was to "shortlist" a number of options before moving on to consider the "most popular".

Mr Barclay appealed to MPs to back the PM's deal "in the national interest" when it returns to the House for a third time - which could happen as soon as Friday.

"The House has considered a wide variety of options as a way forward," he said.

"And it demonstrates there are no easy options here. There is no simple way forward. The deal the government has negotiated is a compromise...That is the nature of complex negotiations.

"The results of the process this House has gone through today strengthens our view that the deal the government has negotiated is the best option."
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🌍 Brexit: MPs asked to vote on withdrawal agreement only
« Reply #96 on: March 29, 2019, 01:47:52 AM »
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-47740158

Brexit: MPs asked to vote on withdrawal agreement only

    28 minutes ago


Related Topics

    Brexit

Media captionAndrea Leadsom explains the timetable for Friday's Brexit vote

MPs will be asked to vote again on Brexit on Friday but only on part of the deal negotiated with the EU.

They will vote on the withdrawal agreement on the Irish "backstop", divorce bill and citizens' rights.

But it will not amount to a third "meaningful vote" on the deal, as it will not include a vote on the UK's future relationship with the EU.

Amid anger from MPs, Andrea Leadsom said it was "crucial" if the UK wanted to secure a Brexit delay until 22 May.

    Reaction as government plans fresh vote
    Brexit vote: What are MPs doing on Friday?
    How did my MP vote on Brexit options?

MPs will be debating the motion on the day the UK was supposed to leave the European Union - 29 March.

BBC political editor Laura Kuenssberg said Theresa May was essentially asking MPs to turn it into a game of two halves - just voting on the first part of the deal which sorts out the UK's departure and leaving the longer term part for the next few weeks.

But it is still not certain it will get through - both Labour and the Democratic Unionist Party say they will vote against the withdrawal agreement on Friday.
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Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the withdrawal agreement could not be separated from the political declaration "because otherwise you move into a blindfold Brexit".

The PM's deal includes a withdrawal agreement - setting out how much money the UK must pay to the EU as a settlement, details of the transition period, and the backstop arrangements - and a political declaration on the way the future EU-UK relationship will work.

Last week the European Council agreed to postpone Brexit beyond the expected date of 29 March - offering an extension until 22 May, if MPs approved the withdrawal agreement by the end of this week.

If not, it offered a shorter delay until 12 April - the date by which the UK would have to indicate whether it would stand candidates in the 2019 European Parliament elections - allowing the UK time to get the deal through or to "indicate a way forward".

BBC Brussels reporter Adam Fleming said the official conclusions from last week's summit only mention the need to pass the withdrawal agreement by Friday, not the political declaration.
Skip Twitter post by @adamfleming

    European Council conclusions say U.K. only has to pass Withdrawal Agreement by 29/3 to get extension to 22/5. No mention of Political Declaration. Hidden in plain sight yet again. pic.twitter.com/P3ooEeOzIs
    — Adam Fleming (@adamfleming) March 28, 2019

Report

End of Twitter post by @adamfleming

Leader of the Commons Mrs Leadsom told MPs that the European Council would only agree to the 22 May extension if MPs approved the withdrawal agreement by 23:00 GMT on Friday.

"It's crucial therefore that we make every effort to give effect to the council's decision and tomorrow's motion gives Parliament the opportunity to secure that extension," she said.

"I think we can all agree that we don't want to be in the situation of asking for another extension and facing the potential requirement of participating in European Parliament elections."

But she faced anger from some MPs. Labour's Mary Creagh described it as an "extraordinary and unprecedented reverse ferret of the commitments that have been made... that we should have our say on both items together".

Friday's vote would not allow Parliament to ratify the withdrawal package, because Brexit legislation allows this only after the passage of a "meaningful vote" on both the Withdrawal Agreement and a Political Declaration on the future relationship.

    What do voters make of Brexit now?

The government would either have to pass part two of the deal - the political declaration on the future relationship - at a later date, or change the law so that it is not needed to ratify the treaty.

Some MPs questioned the government's motion, with Labour's Valerie Vaz saying "on the face of it breaks the law".

"This is no way to run a government," she told MPs.

And the Labour chairman of the Brexit select committee, Hilary Benn, asked if Brexit was delayed to 22 May, whether at that point it would "no longer be possible" to apply for a further extension beyond that - because it would be too late to take part in the European Parliamentary elections.

Attorney General Geoffrey Cox said he would address this point on Friday.

Commons Speaker John Bercow said the government's "new" motion complied with his ruling that he would not allow a third "meaningful vote" on the motion MPs have already rejected twice by large margins.

On Wednesday, the Commons failed to find a majority for a way forward after voting for eight different options to take Brexit forward - including leaving without a deal, creating a customs union and backing a confirmatory referendum on any deal.

Brexit votes: What happens next?

Mrs May told a meeting of Conservative backbenchers on Wednesday that she would not lead the talks with Brussels over the future relationship between the UK and EU and would resign as party leader after 22 May if her deal was passed, but stay on as PM until a new leader is elected.

While she has won over some, including former foreign secretary Boris Johnson, a number of Brexiteers are still refusing to vote for the deal. She needs to win over 75 rebels to overturn the 149-vote rejection of her deal when it was last voted on, on 13 March.

Meanwhile a petition calling for Brexit to be halted by revoking Article 50, which has attracted nearly six million signatures - is to be debated by MPs on Monday.

They will also debate a petition calling for another EU referendum, which has more than 160,000 signatures, and another - with 165,000 signatures - demanding that "Parliament must honour the referendum result".
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💩 MPs debate May's final deal on original leave day | Brexit LIVE
« Reply #97 on: March 29, 2019, 04:23:27 AM »
LIVE Brexit Bullshit for Breakfast! 💩

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💩 No-deal Brexit fears rise as parliament sinks May's deal
« Reply #98 on: March 29, 2019, 03:18:17 PM »
Big fucking surprise here!  ::)

Anybody else watch the livestream?  HILARIOUS! 🤣

Don't miss the Sunday Morning Collapse Wake-Up Call.  Here's the Coming Attractions:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/dDU-Hqm3atY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/dDU-Hqm3atY</a>


RE

World News
March 29, 2019 / 12:56 AM / Updated an hour ago
No-deal Brexit fears rise as parliament sinks May's deal
William James, Kylie MacLellan, Elizabeth Piper

6 Min Read

LONDON (Reuters) - Lawmakers rejected Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal for a third time on Friday, sounding its probable death knell and leaving Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union in turmoil on the very day it was supposed to quit the bloc.

The decision to reject a stripped-down version of May’s divorce deal has left it totally unclear how, when or even whether Britain will leave the EU, and plunges the three-year Brexit crisis to a deeper level of uncertainty.

“I fear we are reaching the limits of this process in this House,” May told parliament after the defeat. “The implications of the House’s decision are grave.”

Within minutes of the vote, European Council President and summit chair Donald Tusk said EU leaders would meet on April 10 to discuss Britain’s departure from the bloc.
Related Coverage

    Chance of UK 'no-deal' Brexit has risen 'sharply', says France
    Chance of UK 'no-deal' Brexit has risen 'sharply', says France
    EU Commission says no-deal Brexit on April 12 'likely'
    EU Commission says no-deal Brexit on April 12 'likely'
    Risk of no deal Brexit 'very real': Dutch PM Rutte
    Risk of no deal Brexit 'very real': Dutch PM Rutte

A succession of European leaders said there was a very real chance Britain would now leave without a deal, a scenario that businesses fear would cause chaos for the world’s fifth-biggest economy.

May had framed the vote as the last opportunity to ensure Britain actually left the EU, making a passionate plea to lawmakers to put aside party differences and strongly-held beliefs.

But in a special sitting of parliament, they voted 344-286 against the EU Withdrawal Agreement, agreed after two years of tortuous negotiations with the bloc.

“The legal default now is that the United Kingdom is due to leave the European Union on April 12,” May said.

She cautioned that any further delay to Brexit would probably be a long one beyond the current deadline, and would mean Britain holding elections to the European Parliament.

The British pound, which has been buoyed in recent weeks by hopes that the likelihood of an abrupt ‘no-deal’ Brexit is receding, fell half a percent after May lost, to as low as $1.2977, but then recovered some of its losses.

“If the deadline is extended longer, we will re-engage with sterling because that will be the start of the slow death of Brexit,” said Salman Ahmed, global investment strategist at Lombard Odier Investment Managers.

May's rejected Brexit deal: tmsnrt.rs/2V4on0S
British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks at the House of Commons in London, Britain March 29, 2019. ©UK Parliament/Mark Duffy/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY
TALKS TO CONTINUE

May had offered on Wednesday to resign if the deal passed, in a bid to win over eurosceptic rebels in her Conservative Party who support a more decisive break with the EU than the divorce her deal offers.

The vote leaves her Brexit strategy in tatters. With no majority in parliament for any Brexit option so far, it is unclear what May will now do. Options include asking the EU for a long delay, parliament forcing an election, or a “no-deal” exit.

However, May’s spokesman said she would continue talks with opponents of the deal and some political correspondents said she could bring it back a fourth time, perhaps in a “run-off” against any alternative that parliament itself came up with.

Britain now has under two weeks to convince the 27 capitals of the EU that it has an alternative path out of the impasse, or see itself cast out of the bloc on April 12 with no deal on post-Brexit ties with its largest trading ally.

French President Emmanuel Macron, speaking as parliament voted, said the EU needed to accelerate no-deal planning and Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said that unless Britain came up with a plan, there would be a “hard” Brexit.

“The risk of a no-deal Brexit is very real,” Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte told reporters.

May’s deal had twice been rejected by huge margins this year and, although she was able to win over many Conservative rebels, a hard core of eurosceptics, who see “no-deal” as the best option, and the Northern Irish Democratic Unionist Party, which props up her minority government, refused to back it.
ANOTHER ELECTION?

On Monday, lawmakers who have tried to grab control of the process will attempt to agree on an alternative Brexit plan that could command majority cross-party support in parliament. The options that have so far gathered most support involve closer ties to the EU, and a second referendum.

A first attempt at non-binding “indicative votes” on Wednesday failed to produce a majority for any of the eight options on offer.
Slideshow (19 Images)

Many lawmakers believe the only way to solve the crisis will be a snap election - even though it would throw up a host of unknowns for the major parties.

“The last thing this country needs right now is a general election,” transport minister Chris Grayling told Sky News. “We’ve actually got to sort out the Brexit process, we can’t throw everything up in the air.”

The 2016 referendum vote to leave the EU revealed a United Kingdom divided over many more issues, and has provoked impassioned debate about everything from secession and immigration to capitalism, empire and what it means to be British.

Hundreds of thousands of Britons marched through London last Saturday demanding a second referendum, while on Friday thousands of angry Brexit supporters protested in the capital.

“What should have been a celebration is in fact a day of betrayal,” Nigel Farage, a leading Brexit campaigner, told Reuters.

The uncertainty around Brexit, the United Kingdom’s most significant political and economic move since World War Two, has left allies and investors aghast.

Opponents fear Brexit will make Britain poorer and divide the West as it grapples with both the unconventional U.S. presidency of Donald Trump and growing assertiveness from Russia and China.

Supporters say that, while the divorce might bring some short-term instability, in the longer term it will allow the United Kingdom to thrive if cut free from what they cast as a doomed project to forge European unity.

Writing by Michael Holden and Guy Faulconbridge; Additional reporting by Costas Pitas, Kate Holton, Alistair Smout, Andrew MacAskill, Andrew R.C. Marshall, Andy Bruce, William Schomberg, Tom Finn and Tommy Wilkes; Editing by Kevin Liffey
Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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https://www.reuters.com/article/us-britain-eu-may-cabinet-idUSKCN1RB0R4

World News
March 30, 2019 / 2:28 PM / Updated 11 hours ago
UK's May risks 'total collapse' of government in Brexit impasse: Sunday Times
William Schomberg, David Milliken

4 Min Read

LONDON (Reuters) - British Prime Minister Theresa May risks the “total collapse” of her government if she fails to get her battered Brexit deal through parliament, the Sunday Times newspaper said, amid growing speculation that she might call an early election.


Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May is seen in a car outside the Houses of Parliament as she faces a vote on alternative Brexit options in London, Britain, March 27, 2019. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez/File Photo

Underscoring the tough choices facing May to break the Brexit impasse, the newspaper said at least six pro-European Union senior ministers will resign if she opts for a potentially damaging no-deal departure from the EU.

But at the same time, rival ministers who support Brexit were threatening to quit if May decides to stay close to the EU with a customs union or if she sought a long delay to Brexit, the Sunday Times said.

May’s Brexit strategy is in tatters after the exit deal she hammered out with other EU leaders was rejected for a third time by the House of Commons on Friday, the day that Britain was supposed to leave the bloc.

Nearly three years after Britons voted by 52-48 percent to end the country’s EU membership after 46 years, what Brexit will look like or whether it will even happen remains up in the air.

May now has less than two weeks to convince the 27 other EU countries that she can break the deadlock. Otherwise she will have to ask the bloc for a long extension or take Britain out of the EU on April 12 with no deal to soften the economic shock.

May has said she will step down if her Brexit deal gets through parliament, offering her critics the chance of a different prime minister to lead the next round of negotiations with Brussels about Britain’s future ties to the bloc.

But that last-gasp offer has failed to break the impasse, leading to talk of an election.

The Mail on Sunday newspaper said May’s advisors were divided over whether she should call an early election if she fails to win support for her Brexit deal from parliament in the coming week.

The newspaper said a possible “run-off” vote could take place on Tuesday in parliament between May’s deal and whatever alternative emerges as the most popular from voting by lawmakers on Monday.

That meant an election could be called as early as Wednesday, the newspaper said, without citing sources.

An early election would need the support of two thirds of members of parliament, and the Observer newspaper said Conservative lawmakers were reluctant to let May lead them into another election after she lost their majority in 2017.

The Sunday Telegraph said senior members of the Conservative Party did not want May to lead them into a snap election, fearing the party would be “annihilated” at the polls if she faced down parliament over Brexit in the coming months.

An opinion poll in the Mail on Sunday gave the opposition Labour Party a lead of five percentage points over the Conservatives. That lead fell to three points if voters were offered the chance to vote for a new group of independent lawmakers who have not yet created an official party.

One of the most popular alternatives among lawmakers, including Labour members, is Britain staying in a customs union with the EU, an option also favored by many business leaders.

Brexit supporters say a customs union would deny Britain the opportunity to strike trade deals around the world.

Earlier on Saturday, one lawmaker said Conservative members of parliament had written to May telling her to lead Britain out of the EU in the coming months, even if it means a potentially damaging no-deal Brexit.

The Sun newspaper said the letter was signed by 170 of the 314 Conservative lawmakers in parliament, including 10 cabinet ministers.

Reporting by William Schomberg and David Milliken; Editing by Daniel Wallis
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💩 Brexit in meltdown - May under pressure to forge softer divorce deal
« Reply #100 on: April 01, 2019, 01:17:54 AM »
https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-britain-eu/brexit-in-meltdown-may-under-pressure-to-forge-softer-divorce-deal-idUSKCN1RC0EE

March 31, 2019 / 3:38 AM / Updated 5 hours ago
Brexit in meltdown - May under pressure to forge softer divorce deal
Kylie MacLellan, Guy Faulconbridge

4 Min Read

LONDON (Reuters) - Britain’s exit from the European Union was in disarray after the implosion of Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit strategy left her under pressure from rival factions to leave without a deal, go for an election or forge a much softer divorce.


Small toy figures are seen in front of a Brexit logo in this illustration picture, March 30, 2019. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration

After one of the most tumultuous weeks in British politics since the 2016 referendum, it was still uncertain how, when or even if the United Kingdom will ever leave the bloc it first joined 46 years ago.

A third defeat of May’s divorce deal, after her pledge to quit if it was passed, left one of the weakest leaders in a generation grappling with a perilous crisis over Brexit, the United Kingdom’s most significant move since World War Two.
Related Coverage

    EU has been patient over Brexit but patience runs out - Juncker
    EU has been patient over Brexit but patience runs out - Juncker
    Germany to let Britons stay if UK leaves EU without deal - report
    Explainer - Breaking the deadlock over Brexit: Is Britain heading for a general election?
    Explainer - Breaking the deadlock over Brexit: Is Britain heading for a general election?

Parliament will vote on different Brexit options on Monday and then May could try one last roll of the dice by bringing her deal back to a vote in parliament as soon as Tuesday.

“There are no ideal choices available and there are very good arguments against any possible outcome at the moment but we are going to have to do something,” said Justice Secretary David Gauke, who voted in the 2016 referendum to stay in the EU.

“The prime minister is reflecting on what the options are, and is considering what may happen but I don’t think any decisions have been made,” he told BBC TV.

Many in May’s party, though, have lost patience. The Sun newspaper reported that 170 of her 314 Conservative lawmakers had sent her a letter demanding that Brexit take place in the next few months - deal or no deal.

The United Kingdom was due to leave the EU on March 29 but the political deadlock in London forced May to ask the bloc for a delay. Currently, Brexit is due to take place at 2200 GMT on April 12 unless May comes up with another option.
“IT IS A MESS”

The labyrinthine Brexit crisis has left the United Kingdom divided: supporters of both Brexit and EU membership marched through London last week. Many on both sides feel betrayed by a political elite that has failed to show leadership.

Parliament is due to vote at around 1900 GMT on Monday on a range of alternative Brexit options selected by Speaker John Bercow from nine proposals put forward by lawmakers, including a no-deal exit, preventing a no-deal exit, a customs union, or a second referendum.

“We are clearly going to have to consider very carefully the will of parliament,” Gauke said.

With no majority yet in the House of Commons for any of the Brexit options, there was speculation that an election could be called, though such a vote would be unpredictable and it is unclear who would lead the Conservatives into it.

The Sunday Times said May’s media chief, Robbie Gibb, and her political aide Stephen Parkinson were pushing for an election against the will of her chief enforcer in parliament, Julian Smith.
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The Conservative Party’s deputy chair, James Cleverly, said it was not planning for an election. But the deputy leader of the opposition Labour Party, Tom Watson, said his party was on election footing.

Labour’s foreign affairs spokeswoman, Emily Thornberry, said it could try to call a vote of no confidence in May’s government.

“We don’t know if she is going to remain prime minister, if we are going to get somebody else, who that other person is going to be - it is a mess,” Thornberry said.

Opponents of Brexit fear it will make Britain poorer and divide the West as it grapples with both the unconventional U.S. presidency of Donald Trump and growing assertiveness from Russia and China.

Supporters of Brexit say while the divorce might bring some short-term instability, in the longer term it will allow the United Kingdom to thrive if cut free from what they cast as a doomed attempt in European unity.

Reporting by Kylie MacLellan and Guy Faulconbridge; Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky
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💩 MOAR Brexit Kabuki Theater LIVE from Parliament!
« Reply #101 on: April 01, 2019, 11:11:47 AM »
Your Collapse Laugh of the Day.

Note how few MPs are on the benches.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/qPiSOu9OvcA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/qPiSOu9OvcA</a>
« Last Edit: April 01, 2019, 11:16:35 AM by RE »
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💩 Brexit: What just happened?
« Reply #102 on: April 02, 2019, 02:32:39 AM »
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-47776512

Brexit: What just happened?

    4 hours ago


The votes on the four alternatives came after hours of debate

Members of Parliament have again rejected all the options placed before them, as they tried to find a compromise that would help end the Brexit impasse.

The rejections came during a second round of votes in the House of Commons on alternative proposals to Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit deal.

Mrs May's deal has been rejected on three separate occasions so far and the Commons has been attempting to find a strategy that can gain majority support.

    A really simple guide to Brexit

What did MPs reject?

The second series of votes on Brexit options - known as "indicative" votes, designed to see what MPs might support amid the deadlock - were held on Monday evening in the House of Commons, the main decision-making body of the UK Parliament, following hours of debate.

MPs rejected all four votes committing the government to:

    negotiating "a permanent and comprehensive UK-wide customs union with the EU" as part of any Brexit deal
    joining the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and remaining in the European Economic Area (EEA)
    giving the public a vote to approve any Brexit deal passed by Parliament before it could be implemented
    a series of steps to prevent the UK leaving the EU without a deal, including a final vote on whether to scrap Brexit altogether

The option that came closest to being passed, which was defeated by just three votes, was remaining in a customs union with the EU - a key plank of the so-called "soft Brexit" option, under which the UK would leave the EU but retain very close trading links with the bloc.
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Its supporters say it would mitigate the damage caused to the British economy by Brexit, particularly if combined with staying in the EU's single market.

Detractors say such an option in effect means not really leaving at all, as the UK would be subject to EU rules and regulations it had no say over - and would have no right to strike its own trade deals with non-EU countries.

Nick Boles, the Conservative MP who proposed the EFTA/EEA motion - the so-called "Common Market 2.0" option - resigned from the party immediately after the vote results were announced.

    Full details of what MPs voted on

Mrs May and her government would not have been obliged to act on any of the MPs' decisions - even if they were passed by a majority - as they do not have the force of law.

However, the prime minister is under pressure to chart a new course after failing to get the withdrawal agreement her government has negotiated with the EU passed by the Commons on three separate occasions.

She has gone so far as to say she will step down if her deal gets through the Commons.

Her Cabinet is scheduled to hold a mammoth five-hour meeting on Tuesday.
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https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2019/04/today-in-brexit-may-extension-corbyn.html

Today in Brexit: Seems Like Theresa May Really, Really, Really, Really Doesn’t Want to Do a No-Deal Brexit

By Joshua Keating
April 02, 20195:15 PM


British Prime Minister Theresa May gives a press conference inside Downing Street on Tuesday in London.
Animation by Lisa Larson-Walker. Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images.

Today in Brexit is a daily feature that will attempt to keep track of the chaotic mess playing out in the U.K. If you’re just tuning in, here’s a brief explainer on what you’ve been missing.
More on Brexit

    Today in Brexit: Parliament Couldn’t Decide on a New Brexit Plan, but They Did Get to See Some Naked Butts
    How Brexit Descended Into Chaos: a Brief Guide for the Perplexed
    Theresa May Offers to Resign in Last-Ditch Effort to Save Her Brexit Deal
    Theresa May Says Parliament Has No Choice but to Approve Her Brexit Deal. Why Should It Believe Her Now?

After Parliament again failed to approve any of a wide variety of Brexit options in a series of votes Monday, Prime Minister Theresa May held seven hours of meetings with her Cabinet on Tuesday to try to figure out a way forward. May emerged from the meetings to make a public statement, in which she said, “This debate, this division, cannot drag on much longer. It is putting members of Parliament and everyone else under immense pressure and it is doing damage to our politics.”

The statement contained two major pieces of concrete news. Let’s take them separately.

Today’s extension: May said that the U.K. would “need a further extension of Article 50,” the legal mechanism under which countries exit the EU. As you may recall, the original two-year Article 50 deadline was March 29—Friday—but was then extended to April 12. As it stands now, if no deal is in place by the end of next week, Britain will exit the EU with no agreement on future economic relations with Europe.

May said that the extension should be “one that is as short as possible and which ends when we pass a deal.” She is still resisting calls to ask for a longer extension, which would require Britain to take part in European Union elections in May.

The U.K. doesn’t get an extension just by asking for one, though. EU leaders would still have to approve the request, and their patience is running thin. The last time the U.K. asked for an extension was in mid-March, when May requested three more months. The EU said it would only grant the extension if Parliament passed May’s withdrawal agreement, which did not happen. Given the deadlock in London, European leaders don’t want to keep granting new extensions and allow this to drag on forever.

In a statement this morning, the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, said that if Parliament won’t pass May’s deal, the only other options are a no-deal Brexit or a longer delay that would require Britain to take part in European Parliament elections. In a meeting with Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, French President Emmanuel Macron suggested that there’s no guarantee the EU would even grant the longer delay. (Macron has taken to the role of Brexit Bad Cop with an impressive level of gusto.)
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Still, in a tweet following May’s statement, European Commission President Donald Tusk seemed to suggest the EU would cooperate:

Today’s bipartisanship:

May also said in her statement that she was offering to “sit down with the leader of the opposition”—that would be Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn—“to try to agree a plan that we would both stick to.” The two of them could then present this plan to Parliament together. She said this plan would have to include the now-thrice-rejected withdrawal agreement she negotiated with the EU.

Is there any chance Labour would agree to this after voting against May’s deal three times? It’s possible.

Remember that the withdrawal agreement doesn’t actually define the future relationship between Britain and Europe—it sets out the terms under which that relationship will be negotiated. Corbyn has previously suggested that Labour might be willing to support the agreement if it included a permanent customs union between Britain and the EU to allow frictionless trade and avoid a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. He also wants to see Britain stay in alignment with EU rules, which would likely include the freedom of movement for EU citizens into the U.K. May has previously ruled out these options, but all indications are that she’s now coming around to the idea of a much softer Brexit.

Hard-line Brexiteers will lose their minds if this turns out to be the deal: Shedding EU rules and regaining control of immigration were the big reasons for doing Brexit in the first place. Already, there are complaints that May has “handed the future decisions over Brexit to the Labour Party” and that the people didn’t vote for a “May-Corbyn coalition government.” Former Foreign Minister Boris Johnson said Brexit is now becoming “soft to the point of disintegration.”
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Corbyn, who has agreed to the talks, will be under pressure as well, from the growing ranks of voters and politicians demanding a “people’s vote” on whatever arrangement they work out. This offer could also be a way for May to shift some of the blame for a no-deal Brexit onto Labour if they can’t work anything out by April 12.

Today in ominous warnings: Barnier said in his speech Tuesday that a no-deal scenario is becoming more likely by the day. May, whose Cabinet is divided on whether to accept no-deal, said that “we could make a success of no-deal in the long term,” but she appears to be doing everything in her power to avoid that scenario.

The Spectator’s Katy Balls reports that ministers were given background reading for Tuesday’s Cabinet meeting that included “decisions that need to be taken soon regarding no-deal preparations.” These included the possibility of London reasserting direct rule over Northern Ireland, as was the case during the late-20th century Troubles, and potentially recalling troops from overseas to prepare for the possibility of unrest. Perhaps, as May suggests, the long term would work out, but the short term sounds pretty scary.

Today’s reality check: The New York Times’ Peter Goodman writes that “for much of the business world, Britain’s departure from the European Union has effectively happened,” noting that multinational financial services companies and auto manufacturers have already cut back on investment in the country, in anticipation of it losing its status as a hub for trade with Europe. The article cites estimates that the British economy is now 1 percent to 2.5 percent smaller than it would have been without Brexit and that the pound has lost more than 10 percent of its value against the dollar since the referendum.

Ironically, the impact of this lost investment could fall most heavily on the manufacturing-dependent communities that voted in high numbers for Brexit.

Today’s quip:

Days left until next deadline: 10   
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💩 What would a No Deal Brexit Look Like?
« Reply #104 on: April 03, 2019, 12:51:57 AM »
It would look likeCOLLAPSE!

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/02/world/europe/brexit-no-deal-outcomes.html

What Would a No-Deal Brexit Look Like?

What Would a No-Deal Brexit Look Like?

A lorry is driven past dozens of others parked after traveling by ferry between Britain and France at the Port of Dover, Britain, in February.CreditToby Melville/Reuters
Image
A lorry is driven past dozens of others parked after traveling by ferry between Britain and France at the Port of Dover, Britain, in February.CreditCreditToby Melville/Reuters
  • April 2, 2019

Michel Barnier, the European Union’s chief Brexit negotiator, warned on Tuesday that Britain’s seeming inability to decide on an orderly departure agreement has made a so-called no-deal Brexit more likely with less than two weeks until April 12, the latest deadline.

While a further extension of the deadline was possible, nothing was certain. Here’s what could happen if Britain leaves the bloc without a deal.

Ferries and trains zip back and forth between southeast England and Calais in France carrying food, goods and people between Britain and the rest of the European Union. If Britain leaves without a divorce agreement, many worry that issues with new customs arrangements could lead to miles of traffic jams, forcing trucks to sit for hours on highways as food rots and manufacturing processes grind to a halt.

“I expect to see long queues at the ports because traders, importers and exporters and the logistics supply chain are not prepared for the new customs arrangements here or in the E.U.,” said Duncan Buchanan, the policy director at Britain’s Road Haulage Association. “We will get a massive slowdown in the supply chain.”

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Britain has said that it will allow trucks to drive off ferries and trains without extra checks and declarations, but other European Union countries have not said the same about traffic from Britain. British haulers arriving at ports could find themselves turned away if they have not completed correct paperwork.

Buffalo making their way to the milking parlor at Laverstoke Park Farm near Overton, Hampshire, in February.CreditAdrian Dennis/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
Image
Buffalo making their way to the milking parlor at Laverstoke Park Farm near Overton, Hampshire, in February.CreditAdrian Dennis/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Farmers and food producers have warned that supplies could dwindle.

Nearly a third of the food consumed in Britain comes from the European Union, but if the trucks bringing that food in are stuck, consumers might find it harder to purchase perishables like lettuce and tomatoes.

Food producers also have warned that the extra paperwork, a weaker British currency and tariffs on food could increase prices. Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of England, said that food prices could rise as much as 10 percent.

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A no-deal Brexit could also lead to company closings in the food industry. One in four food exporters could be out of business in six weeks, according to the Food and Drink Federation.

Minis pass along a robotic assembly line at the BMW Mini plant in Oxford, west of London. BMW said it was shutting down the factory for maintenance during the month of April in case a no-deal Brexit outcome disrupts production.CreditGeoff Caddick/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
Image
Minis pass along a robotic assembly line at the BMW Mini plant in Oxford, west of London. BMW said it was shutting down the factory for maintenance during the month of April in case a no-deal Brexit outcome disrupts production.CreditGeoff Caddick/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

A large part of Britain’s manufacturing industry relies on just-in-time manufacturing, which means that parts travel between Britain and Europe constantly and arrive within minutes of being used in factories.

This process could collapse if traffic comes to a standstill at Dover or Calais, and the parts that manufacturers need are stuck in transit. Several auto manufacturers said they would shut down factories temporarily to adjust to such disruptions.

Some manufacturers halted work temporarily after March 29, the original deadline for Britain to depart, fearful of a no-deal Brexit. But the idling of their plants had been planned months in advance. If Britain departs on April 12 without a deal, factories that have reopened could still be hit by disruptions.

The pharmaceutical industry has expressed concern that a no-deal Brexit, which could cause the British pound to plunge, could in turn make medicine supplies in Britain far more valuable — and profitable — to sell overseas, leading to severe shortages in the country. Manufacturers have called on the government to impose a temporary export ban on vital medicines to protect against that possibility.

“We’ve built all these stockpiles. Now we need to make sure that if in the next month the pound should collapse, that middle men don’t sell those stockpiles to people in the E.U. in order to make money,” Mike Thompson, the chief executive of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, said in a statement.

The European Commission has urged E.U. member states to ensure that British citizens living within their boundaries can continue to be legal residents, but this depends on each nation.

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The British residents of other European Union countries may also find themselves ineligible for health care, and the government has advised them to take out separate health insurance until they have residency permits.

Theresa May, Britain’s prime minister, has said that European Union citizens in Britain will be able to stay even if the country leaves without a deal, and that she has a settlement proposal for them. But a parliamentary human rights committee has questioned whether the government has adequately protected their rights.

Traffic signs at the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.CreditNeil Hall/EPA, via Shutterstock
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Traffic signs at the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.CreditNeil Hall/EPA, via Shutterstock

Ireland, a European Union member, wants to avoid a physical border with Northern Ireland, which is part of Britain, because such a barrier could undermine the 1998 Good Friday agreement that helped end sectarian violence. But a no-deal Brexit could abruptly impose restrictions on the people, goods and services crossing between Ireland and Northern Ireland.

The Irish government has proposed allowing people and services to move across the border in the event of a no-deal Brexit, but not goods.

The financial sector has been preparing for a no-deal Brexit since shortly after Britain voted to leave the European Union in 2016, so few expect a visible effect on the sector in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

Many banks have set up offices in cities like Frankfurt, Paris and Dublin, so that they can continue to provide the same services seamlessly.

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