AuthorTopic: BREXIT! The FUN Begins!  (Read 15688 times)

Offline Surly1

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Re: 💩 Farage: 'You patronising stuck up snob!'
« Reply #195 on: October 13, 2019, 04:52:46 AM »
Nigel is BACK! (again  ::) )

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Just fuck this clown with a claw hammer.
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💩 Stick Save for BoJo?
« Reply #196 on: October 17, 2019, 05:43:35 AM »
No idea what the details of this agreement are, but it takes the onus off BoJo for now and throws it into Parliament.  Will they ratify the agreement?

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UK and EU strike new Brexit deal in last-ditch talks
Published 3 hours agoUpdated 35 min ago
Holly Ellyatt   @HollyEllyatt
   
   
Key Points

    Sterling rises on news after the U.K. made concessions over the Irish border, an issue that had proven to be the biggest obstacle to a deal up to that point.
    The pound is 0.8% higher against the dollar, at $1.2929, reaching a five-month high.

watch now
VIDEO03:58
European Commission and the United Kingdom reach a draft Brexit deal

Negotiators from the U.K. and EU reached a draft Brexit deal in 11th-hour talks Thursday, although there are serious doubts that the agreement will be approved by U.K. lawmakers back in Westminster.

Sterling rose on news after the U.K. made concessions over the Irish border, an issue that had proven to be the biggest obstacle to a deal. The pound was 0.8% higher against the dollar, at $1.2929, reaching a five-month high.

“We have a great new Brexit deal,” U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson tweeted. He called on British lawmakers to back the deal when it’s put before Parliament on Saturday.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker called the deal “fair and balanced.”

The “Withdrawal Agreement” will now be put before EU leaders at their summit on Thursday and Friday, and then U.K. lawmakers at the weekend. Negotiations had continued late into the night Tuesday and into Wednesday. The EU Parliament will also have to ratify the deal at an as yet unspecified date.

Speaking after the deal was announced, Michel Barnier, the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, said the deal was the result of intense work from both negotiating teams. “We have delivered together,” he said.

Giving further details on the deal, Barnier said that Northern Ireland will remain part of the U.K.’s customs territory and would be the entry point into the EU’s single market. He said there would be no regulatory or customs checks at the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland (a part of the U.K.). That removed what had been a key issue for both sides. He added that Northern Ireland would remain aligned to some EU rules, notably related to goods.

The deal also covers the protection of citizens’ rights and a transition period that will last until the end of 2020. Barnier also said the EU and U.K. would work toward an “ambitious free trade deal with zero tariffs and quotas.”

Johnson faced a Saturday deadline by law to request an extension to the current Brexit departure date of Oct. 31 had no deal been reached.

Whether the deal will be approved in Westminster is in doubt, however, with opposition parties already criticizing it.

While details of the new deal remain scant, the U.K. opposition Labour party said in a statement that “from what we know, it seems the Prime Minister has negotiated an even worse deal than Theresa May’s, which was overwhelmingly rejected.” The pro-Remain Liberal Democrats also said they were determined to stop Brexit altogether and still advocated a second referendum. The leader of the Brexit Party, Nigel Farage, said the deal should not be supported. The Scottish National Party (SNP) has also said it will not vote for the deal.

A key ally of the government, the Northern Irish Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), has already responded by saying that it cannot support the deal.

The U.K. government, which does not have a majority in the British Parliament, needs the DUP’s votes to approve the deal.
European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker (R) poses with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson prior to a meeting at a restaurant on September 16, 2019 in Luxembourg.
Pool | Getty Images News | Getty Images

The DUP said in a statement earlier Thursday that it was unhappy with the proposed customs and consent arrangements, which were designed to give Northern Ireland a say over its relationship with the EU post-Brexit. The DUP has repeatedly opposed any plans that would see it treated differently from the U.K. after Brexit.

British MPs had rejected a Brexit deal reached by Johnson’s predecessor, Theresa May, three times because of objections to the Irish “backstop” issue. This was designed to prevent a hard border on the island of Ireland if the U.K. and EU couldn’t agree on a trade deal in a post-Brexit transition.
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💩 Here’s how Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal differs from Theresa May’s
« Reply #197 on: October 18, 2019, 02:28:35 AM »
Should be fodder for some GREAT Kabuki in the House of Commons tomorrow!  ;D

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Here’s how Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal differs from Theresa May’s
Published 2 hours agoUpdated 23 min ago
Silvia Amaro  @Silvia_Amaro
   

Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May (L) sits with Britain’s Former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson.
LEON NEAL | AFP | Getty Images
   
   
Key Points

    Under the revised deal, Northern Ireland will be part of the U.K. customs territory.
    Not the European customs region.
    Some U.K. lawmakers had rejected the previous deal because Northern Ireland would have been in a separate customs area from the rest of the United Kingdom.


BRUSSELS — The European Union and the United Kingdom announced a new deal that will allow the latter to leave the political and trading union, provided that the U.K. Parliament approves it.

This is the second Withdrawal Agreement that both sides have put together, after the first was rejected three times by U.K. lawmakers.

CNBC takes a look at what has changed in the deal.

    Under the revised deal, Northern Ireland will be part of the U.K. customs territory – not the European customs region. Some U.K. lawmakers had rejected the previous deal because Northern Ireland would have been in a separate customs area from the rest of the United Kingdom.
    Nonetheless, under the new deal, Northern Ireland will still have to apply certain EU rules, including on agricultural products.
    Northern Ireland will have to provide “democratic consent” in order for this agreement to continue to apply in the future. Specifically, the Northern Ireland assembly (the devolved legislature in the country) will be able to vote on whether to continue with this arrangement four years after the transition period ends in December 2020. According to Michel Barnier, the EU’s Brexit negotiator, this democratic vote is “a cornerstone” of the newly agreed approach. Often, throughout the Brexit process, lawmakers from Northern Ireland, had insisted they should have a say on its post-Brexit future.

watch now
VIDEO05:13
Brexit deal agreed based on four key elements, EU’s Barnier says

Other points included in the new agreement include:

    Products from Northern Ireland can be branded “from the United Kingdom.”
    The U.K. will collect VAT (valued-added tax) from Northern Ireland, meaning revenues that result from transactions that are taxable in Northern Ireland shall not be remitted to the EU.
    There will be a new working group to oversee application of this protocol, meeting once a month and co-chaired by the EU and the U.K.

At a press conference, earlier on Thursday, Barnier explained that this was a brand-new deal that avoided the need for a previous insurance policy developed in case trade talks failed in the future, the controversial so-called called “Irish backstop”. However, there are still doubts as to whether this revised agreement will get approved by U.K. lawmakers, when they gather Saturday.
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💩 LIVE FROM PARLIAMENT! Brexit Super Saturday
« Reply #198 on: October 19, 2019, 03:23:56 AM »
The Great Kabuki across the Pond is ON!  ;D

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Offline RE

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Peaceful Protests, no matter how big just don't cut the mustard.

I see Yellow Vests and Black Pajamas in the future for Jolly Old England.

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Offline RE

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BoJo still claims he won't write a letter to the Eurocrats requesting an extension (aka kick-the-can).  So what will happen on All Hallows Eve?

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https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/brexit-deal-vote-latest-boris-johnson-letwin-amendment-mps-a9162686.html

As MPs finally hear what Brexit really means, Boris Johnson's deal is unravelling fast


The Johnson deal, it is increasingly clear, means everything and nothing. It is promising too many things to many people that cannot be simultaneously true

    Sean O'Grady
    @_seanogrady
    1 hour ago
    26 comments

Boris Johnson must always have known that his best tactic to get his Brexit deal through Parliament was to bounce the Commons into accepting it. It is a bad deal and does not survive close scrutiny. The Commons is proving it so, as the prime minister tries and fails to convince his critics this morning.

The Johnson deal, it is increasingly clear, means everything and nothing – especially the parts about worker, consumer and environmental protection, now in the woolly Political Declaration, which is about as legally binding as the sincere personal pledge by Johnson never to put an economic border down the Irish Sea.

Johnson, the “greased piglet”, the most shameless snake oil salesman in political history, a man this title has described as boasting the “morals of an alley cat“, should not be taken at his word by any Labour or Liberal Democrat (or, for that, matter Tory) MP.
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Mo Mowlam: Fury after Stephen Barclay uses
late Labour MP to urge Commons to 'come together' and support Brexit deal

Hence the PM’s attempt to pull off the “Boris bounce” and hoodwink the Commons with a rushed vote. Hence too the dramatic urgency of a Saturday sitting. Hence dishing out a thick 500-plus page legal text on the very morning of the “meaningful vote”, and when there ought to be complex arguments about its terms. Hence the whipping. Hence the bogus promises given to all sides.
Boris Johnson and Brexit merchandise for sale at the Tory conference
Show all 10

As Tony Blair says, if Johnson has been promising to liberalise labour markets to his Thatcherite European Research Group mates as well as pledging to protect workers rights to Labour backbenchers, both cannot be right. Johnson will most likely follow his own Thatcherite instincts and not those of the Labour old left. Hence, too, the refusal to publish the accompanying legal advice and a fresh economic assessment of the damage his deal will do, though the country deserves to know how many jobs will be lost under the Johnson plan, cooked up a bunch of ideologues who want to relive the 1980s.
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Investigation into Hillary Clinton emails finds no
deliberate mishandling of classified information

The Johnson deal can morph (indeed, is designed to evolve) quite easily into no deal when the transition period ends in 2020, or 2021. That needs to be outlawed via a new Benn Act. The arrangements for Northern Ireland need to be tested legally against the Belfast Good Friday Agreement. The deal needs to be put to the people for a Final Say. The Johnson deal will soon unravel.
Watch more

    If Brexit was a drug trial, scientists like me would have stopped it

The holes and contradictions and obfuscations in the Johnson deal represent the seeds of its own destruction. It is promising too many things to many people that cannot be simultaneously true. The Letwin amendment gives parliament and people the time and space to look through the Johnson deal and discover its true and often horrifying nature. It puts into slow motion the conjuror Johnson’s sleight of hand. It will make ministers account for their policy before granting the deal parliamentary approval.

Above all it will give the voters the ability to fully understand – for the first time in fact – what Brexit really means, to make their own judgement and to choose their destiny in the final say referendum which remains the only way out of the Brexit crisis.
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💩 Brexit vote postponed: Here’s what could happen now
« Reply #201 on: October 20, 2019, 03:34:25 AM »
Here's what WILL happen:



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Brexit vote postponed: Here’s what could happen now
Published 2 hours agoUpdated an hour ago
Matt Clinch @mattclinch81
   
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/64ODDs386QA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/64ODDs386QA</a>
   
Key Points

    U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson was thwarted by a cross-party group of politicians.
    They voted to postpone the “meaningful vote” on his new divorce deal.
    They also forced him to ask Brussels for an extension to the current Oct. 31 Brexit deadline.

watch now
VIDEO02:30
Boris Johnson speaks after UK lawmakers delay Brexit vote

Despite being billed as “Super Saturday,” a special parliamentary session in the House of Commons offered little detail on when, or even if, Britain will finally exit the European Union.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson was thwarted by a cross-party group of politicians who voted to postpone the “meaningful vote” on his new divorce deal and force him to ask Brussels for an extension to the current Oct. 31 Brexit deadline.

The developments in Parliament set up a complicated week with just 11 days left until the U.K. is still due to leave the world’s largest trading bloc.
Will there be a deadline delay?

Johnson grudgingly asked for an extension to the deadline late on Saturday night, but EU leaders don’t necessarily have to accept it. Some have ruled out giving Britain more time, piling pressure on U.K. lawmakers to accept the current deal. But it’s unlikely they would want a no-deal scenario and the potential economic hit it could mean for both sides of the English Channel.

Brussels could offer a technical extension of a few weeks in the hope of passing the agreement they recently thrashed out with Johnson. Or they could accept what Johnson was obliged to ask for on Saturday night and push the date back to January 31, opening the door to a U.K. general election — which itself could lead to a renegotiation or a second referendum.

They could also push it out until June 2020 when the next cycle of EU budgets begins, but this is seen as unlikely with the Brexit fatigue that has set in across the whole of Europe.

EU leaders are expected to take their time with a response, but it could come as early as Monday.
watch now
VIDEO05:14
Where did Brexit come from?
When will the vote now happen?

The U.K. government is keen to have its “meaningful vote” on Monday, but this could be rejected by the house speaker as it’s not parliamentary convention to repeatedly ask the same questions to politicians.

Instead, the government could present the full Withdrawal Agreement Bill early this week and slowly to try to pass it through both chambers — the House of Commons and the House of Lords. This will involve days of debate, many attempts to amend the bill and a selection of different votes as the week progresses. A crunch, decisive question to lawmakers would then come later in the week or be pushed back even further.
Could we still have no deal?

Yes. The cross-party amendment that was backed on Saturday tried to reduce the odds of a no deal, but it could still happen. The EU could say no to an extension. The passage of the bill could also be held up and not make it through Parliament in the time available.
Could there still be a second referendum?

Yes. Some MPs (Members of Parliament) will likely try to amend the bill this week to make sure there is a “confirmatory” referendum. If a lengthy extension is granted by the EU then nothing is ruled out. Several opposition parties would campaign to offer a so-called People’s Vote in the event of a general election, or could promise to abandon Brexit altogether.
Premium: Brexit EU 170804 EU
JUSTIN TALLIS | AFP | Getty Images
What are the experts saying?

Capital Economics called Saturday’s vote “a decent result for the economy and the pound as it makes a no deal Brexit on 31st October even less likely.” But it added that “it does extend the uncertainty that has been hampering growth for a least a bit longer.”

Analysts at Deutsche Bank said “the outlook for a Brexit resolution remains constructive,” explaining that the makeup of the voting on Saturday actually meant that Johnson could receive enough backing for his deal at a later date.

The bank also said it would “retain our constructive outlook on the U.K., and long sterling and short U.K. real yield recommendations.”

If Brexit already seems complicated, it might be about to get a whole lot more so.
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Offline RE

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💩 British lawmakers vote to delay Boris Johnson's Brexit deal
« Reply #202 on: October 21, 2019, 12:58:36 AM »
https://nypost.com/2019/10/20/brexit-will-happen-on-oct-31-despite-pms-unsigned-delay-request-uk-says/

British lawmakers vote to delay Boris Johnson's Brexit deal


Parliament debates Brexit deal as protesters demand new referendum
Anti-Brexit campaigners plow giant message into field
Brexit costing UK scientists nearly half a billion in funding

LONDON – The British government insisted on Sunday the country will leave the European Union on Oct. 31 despite a letter that Prime Minister Boris Johnson was forced by parliament to send to the bloc requesting a Brexit delay.

The Brexit maelstrom has spun wildly in the past week between the possibility of an orderly exit on Oct. 31 with a deal that Johnson struck on Thursday and a delay after he was forced to ask for an extension late on Saturday.

Johnson’s defeat in the British parliament over the sequencing of the ratification of his deal exposed the prime minister to a law passed by those opposed to a no deal departure, demanding he request a delay until Jan. 31.

Johnson sent the request note as required, but unsigned, and added another signed letter arguing against what he cast as a deeply corrosive delay. One of his most senior ministers said Britain would still leave the bloc on Oct. 31.

“We are going to leave by October 31. We have the means and the ability to do so,” Michael Gove, the minister in charge of no-deal Brexit preparations, told Sky News.

“That letter was sent because parliament required it to be sent … but parliament can’t change the prime minister’s mind, parliament can’t change the government’s policy or determination.”t

In yet another twist to the running Brexit drama, Johnson sent three letters to Donald Tusk, the president of the European Council.

First, a brief cover note from Britain’s EU envoy explaining that the government was simply complying with the law; second, an unsigned copy of the text that the law, known as the Benn Act, forced him to write; and a third letter in which Johnson said he did not want an extension.

“I have made clear since becoming Prime Minister and made clear to parliament again today, my view, and the Government’s position, that a further extension would damage the interests of the UK and our EU partners, and the relationship between us,” Johnson said in the third letter, signed “Boris Johnson.”
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British lawmakers vote to delay Boris Johnson's Brexit deal

The EU, which has grappled with the tortuous Brexit crisis since Britons voted 52%-48% to leave in a 2016 referendum, was clearly bewildered by the contradictory signals from London.

Tusk said he had received the request from Johnson and would start consulting EU leaders on how to react.

French President Emmanuel Macron told Johnson that Paris needed swift clarification on the situation after Saturday’s vote, an official at the French presidency told Reuters.

“He (Macron) signaled a delay would be in no one’s interest,” the official said.

It was unlikely that the EU’s 27 remaining member states would refuse Britain’s request, given the impact on all parties of a no-deal Brexit. Diplomats said on Sunday the bloc would play for time rather than rush to decide, waiting to see how things developed in London.

Gove said the risk of no deal had increased and the government would step up preparations for it, including triggering its “Operation Yellowhammer” contingency plans.

“We cannot guarantee that the European Council will grant an extension,” he said, adding that he would chair a meeting on Sunday “to ensure that the next stage of our exit preparations, our preparedness for a no deal, is accelerated”.
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💩 Speaker refuses vote on Boris Johnson's Brexit deal
« Reply #203 on: October 22, 2019, 12:08:07 AM »
This would be a good week for BoJo to start snorting Meth.

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💩 Brexit Bill paused after Commons rejects timetable
« Reply #204 on: October 23, 2019, 12:02:36 AM »
As Nostradamus RE PREDICTED, CAN KICK!  LOL

:hi: to the Hotel California UK.

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...and the beat goes on...

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https://www.businessinsider.com/uk-christmas-election-why-boris-johnson-taking-a-huge-gamble-2019-10

Boris Johnson is taking a huge election gamble which could trigger the end for Brexit
Thomas Colson


LONDON — Boris Johnson's call for a Christmas election has finally been granted, with opposition parties agreeing to his demand for a new vote on December 12.

 On paper, it might look like the Conservatives will comfortably win the next election, putting them into power for another five years, and giving Johnson the numbers he needs to force Brexit through parliament.

A recent Opinium survey, for example, put the Conservatives on 40%, 16 points ahead of Labour on 24%, with the Liberal Democrats on 15% and the Brexit Party on 10%. That indicates enough support, in theory, for the Conservatives to win a comfortable majority.

However, in reality, Boris Johnson has taken a huge gamble by calling an election which could end either in triumph or disaster for both his government and the entire Brexit project.

That's because the Conservatives are almost certain to lose multiple seats as Remain voters who backed them at the last election abandon them and move to support anti-Brexit parties instead. To compensate for those losses, the Conservatives are confident they Labour-held seats where the Conservatives have never won before.

If he fails then Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn will become prime minister and the UK will head for a second referendum which most polls suggest Remain will win.

So can Johnson's strategy work or will it all go badly wrong? Here's everything you need to know about the key battlegrounds and how they will decide the next election.
Where are the key battlegrounds?
boris johnson general election
Getty

Scotland

There are 13 Tory MPs in Scotland, but the Conservatives could lose all of those seats.

A YouGov survey in September, which was conducted across the 13 constituencies, indicated a 14% drop in the party's vote share in those seats, from 44% to 30%.

The Scottish National Party's vote share, meanwhile, was predicted to rise from 34% to 42%.

That's because the majority of Scottish voters voted to Remain in the EU and are increasingly disillusioned with the Conservative Party's push for a hard Brexit.

The Conservative vote share will also be damaged by the departure of Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson, a popular figure who softened the party's image and was credited with the party's unexpected success north of the border in 2017.

The South-West of England & ultra-Remain seats

The Conservatives are likely to lose seats to the ultra-Remain Liberal Democrats and Labour, who have called for a second EU referendum.

The Lib Dems plan to campaign relentlessly on Brexit and have even pledged to revoke Article 50 altogether if they win a majority. They don't expect to win a majority but hope the message will help them pick up Remain-voting Conservative seats, as well as traditional strongholds in the southwest which they lost to David Cameron in 2015.

The party also hopes to win ultra Remain-voting seats in urban areas, particularly in London. That is why they have picked high-profile MPs who defected to the party from Labour and the Conservatives this year to run in Conservative-held London seats which voted to Remain. That includes Labour defectors Chuka Umunna running for the City of Westminster seat and Luciana Berger running for Golders Green & Finchley.

Johnson also faces a squeeze on the other side of the political spectrum. Nigel Farage's Brexit Party, which advocates a no-deal Brexit, is currently polling on as much as 10%.

While Britain's first-past-the-post system means Farage's Brexiteers are unlikely to pick up many seats, they could steal enough Conservative votes to deprive the Tories of a majority in seats where they otherwise might have won.
What is Boris Johnson's strategy?
Dominic Cummings
Boris Johnson's chief strategist Dominic Cummings Getty
Johnson wants to run a "people vs. parliament" campaign arguing that the current crop of MPs has done everything it can to block Brexit.

He will insist he has negotiated a good Brexit deal while Jeremy Corbyn has delayed and pushed for a second referendum. He is relying on polling that Labour voters who backed Leave could be tempted to back a Conservative leader.

The Conservatives hope that strategy will pay off and have identified between 30 and 40 marginal seats which they believe are key to winning a snap election, the Telegraph reported.

Most of those seats are Leave-voting areas in northeast England and the Midlands. They include Bishop Auckland in County Durham, where Labour has a majority of 502, and Stockton South, where Labour's majority is 888, as well as Barrow & Furness, Dewsbury, and Wakefield.

Conservative strategists believe that potential gains made in those areas could offset their losses in Scotland and the south.

A split Remain vote between Labour and the Lib Dems could also help them win ultra-marginal seats.

James Johnson, who was a pollster for Johnson's predecessor Theresa May, told the Sunday Telegraph: "These are seats that look hopeless on paper for the Conservatives but that they could win with a split Remain vote - even if the Tories lost votes."
What is Labour's strategy?
Jeremy Corbyn
Getty
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn needs to hold onto a fragile coalition of Leave and Remain voters to repeat the party's performance at the last general election, when it gained 30 seats and secured 40% of the vote share but won fewer seats than the Conservatives.

The party will accordingly try to shift the debate beyond Brexit, to areas where Labour is more comfortable, pledging to reverse austerity and restore funding to public services. This strategy will be especially important in Leave-voting Labour heartlands, where Labour knows it will lose the debate if it is focused on Brexit.

The strategy could work. A poll conducted in August found that traditional low-income Leave voters who Johnson is targeting care more about the cost of living, crime, and housing than Brexit. That is why Johnson has spent so much time visiting hospitals and pledging to boost police numbers in recent weeks.

But voters motivated by such issues may be reluctant to back the Conservatives, who have made big spending cuts since they took office in 2010. Historically, Labour have been more trusted on areas like the NHS and the cost of living.
Why could Johnson's strategy backfire?

Boris Johnson
Getty
Boris Johnson could be Theresa May 2.0

There are a number of reasons why Johnson's election bid may backfire, as Business Insider recently reported.

First and foremost, the Conservatives will be worried about a repeat of the 2017 general election in which a disastrous campaign saw the party lose their majority.

When Theresa May called the election, she had very high approval ratings and big opinion poll leads. But the prime minister's awkward media performances — which saw her s and a disastrous manifesto meant the party's poll ratings plummeted during the campaign. Labour, which ran a tightly messaged campaign, ended up neck and neck with the Conservatives in the polls, and they ultimately made a net loss of 13 seats.

The Conservatives will hope that Johnson is not a repeat of Theresa May, but it is far from guaranteed. He has already had several awkward run-ins with hostile members of the public, and even small slip-ups have proved damaging for prime ministers on the campaign trail.

Another huge problem is the fact that Johnson will need to win a lot of seats just to make up for the loss of Remain-voting ones.

His strategy to win Leave-voting seats which have been held by Labour for decades might ultimately work, but there is very little margin for error for the prime minister.

Failure on any part of his strategy risks an early end to his premiership and possibly even to Brexit itself.
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💩 Last Orderrrrs! Speaker John Bercow's career in numbers
« Reply #206 on: October 31, 2019, 03:36:01 PM »
Defiinitely more entertaining than Pelosicrat.  :icon_mrgreen:

I don't know how many Diners watch the Parliamentary debates, but this guy was the real show.

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Last Orderrrrs! Speaker John Bercow's career in numbers
By Ed Lowther & Will Dahlgreen BBC Data Journalists

    31 October 2019


Related Topics

    Commons speaker contest 2019

John Bercow is standing down as Commons Speaker on Thursday after 10 years in the job.

His idiosyncratic turn of phrase and distinctive bellow - as he tries to silence the wall of sound emanating from MPs - has made him something of a cult figure on social media.

His catchphrase, in fact the traditional cry of Commons speakers through the centuries, is "Order!", often elongated and twisted into an extraordinary sound that is all his own.

To mark his retirement, the BBC has analysed 100 years of Hansard - the official Parliamentary record - to discover just how different he was to any previous occupant of the chair.

The first thing we discovered is that he has said "Order!" nearly 14,000 times. But that is just the beginning of the Bercow story in statistics.
Media captionJohn Bercow's most memorable moments as Speaker of the House
He's not called the Speaker for nothing

We know John Bercow enjoys a rhetorical flourish, and often intervenes in rowdy Commons debates to deliver withering put-downs to backbench barrackers.

But measuring the number of words spoken by the Speaker compared with all words spoken in Commons debates shows an extraordinary willingness to enter the Parliamentary fray compared with his predecessors.

It is hard to know for sure whether this is because he has presided over more debates, taking - and providing detailed responses to - more points of order, or because he has a particularly unruly gaggle of MPs to keep in check, or whether he simply likes to talk, but the difference is striking.
'Chuntering from a sedentary position'


Not only does Mr Bercow speak more than previous Commons Speakers, his choice of words often stands out.

One MP, quoted by the New York Times, said: "It's as if he goes to bed every night, reads a thesaurus, inwardly digests it and then spews it out the next day."

There are many words the Speaker used that have not been uttered by any of his predecessors, certainly since 1916 - the earliest date that transcripts of debates are available on the House of Commons website. Excluding words that make up the names of people or government departments, these are the ones he said most frequently.


Other words Mr Bercow has used that other MPs have said extremely rarely, or never, include: "Demosthenian", "Einsteinian", "Flaubert", "Heidegger", "irascibility", "jackanapes", "rhapsodise", "susurrations" and "testicle".

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Brexit, Brexit, Brexit

In policy terms, Mr Bercow's time in office was defined by one issue.

Counting the number of times particular words are used in Commons debates shows how this is true.


His interventions on procedure during Brexit debates were both controversial and pivotal, and are likely to be the most important part of his legacy.

Allowing backbench MPs to take control of debate, in order to pass Labour MP Hillary Benn's bill to take no-deal off the table, was just one example.
A big hand

It might seem like a small thing, but a noticeable shift in tone occurred under Mr Bercow's watch.

Applauding other MPs in Commons debates used to be strictly forbidden, and there are no recorded instances of applause in the Commons until the then-Speaker Betty (later Baroness) Boothroyd announced her decision to stand down in 2000.

Even as recently as 2015, Mr Bercow told SNP MPs, many of whom were new to the Commons, to "show some respect" for the convention forbidding applause.

A year later, he said: "If, spontaneously, a large group of Members bursts into applause, sometimes the most prudent approach is to let it take its course. However, I would much prefer it if it did not happen."


MPs took note of the first part of the ruling, at least.
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💩 Europe|Trump Wades Into British Election, and an Insurgent Might Benefit
« Reply #207 on: November 01, 2019, 01:38:05 AM »
Across the Pond, an endorsement from Trumpofsky is the Kiss of Death.

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/31/world/europe/trump-brexit-johnson.html

Europe
Europe|Trump Wades Into British Election, and an Insurgent Might Benefit


President Trump and Prime Minister Boris Johnson at the United Nations in September.Credit...Doug Mills/The New York Times

By Mark Landler

    Oct. 31, 2019

LONDON — For Americans, there was nothing particularly unusual about President Trump calling in to a London radio show on Thursday for a freewheeling conversation about British politics, Queen Elizabeth II and impeachment. Mr. Trump does that kind of thing regularly on “Fox & Friends.”

But when the president did it on the second day of campaigning for Britain’s general election, and the radio show in question is hosted by Nigel Farage, an insurgent political figure who is seeking to be a major player in that election, his intervention was bound to raise hackles in Britain’s political establishment.

“Donald Trump is trying to interfere in Britain’s election to get his friend Boris Johnson elected,” the Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, said on Twitter.

Mr. Trump heaped praise on Mr. Johnson, the prime minister, while disparaging Mr. Corbyn. Yet the biggest beneficiary was Mr. Farage, who has been uncharacteristically quiet during the recent weeks of upheaval in British politics and abruptly inserted himself back in the national conversation.
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An experienced talk-show host, Mr. Farage managed to draw out Mr. Trump on his meeting with the queen in London in June (“I don’t think she’s ever in anything that’s bad,” he said), and his efforts to broker a White House meeting between the parents of a British teenager killed in a crash and the American woman who drove the car.

He did all this on the same day Mr. Trump was confronted with a House of Representatives vote in Washington authorizing an impeachment inquiry. Mr. Trump’s comment on that? “The Democrats are desperate,” he said.

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Mr. Trump’s remarks were arguably a boon to Mr. Corbyn. He has set out to portray Mr. Johnson as a handmaiden of the American president. Even Mr. Trump’s praise for the prime minister came with a stinging caveat.

While Mr. Trump called Mr. Johnson a “fantastic guy,” with whom he had a “great friendship,” the president claimed that the agreement Mr. Johnson recently negotiated with the European Union for Britain to depart the bloc could hamper a future trade agreement between the United States and Britain.

“We want to do trade with the U.K. but to be honest with you, this deal, under certain aspects of the deal, you can’t do it.” Mr. Trump said to Mr. Farage, who is also the leader of the Brexit Party and favors leaving the European Union without any deal. “You can’t trade. We can’t make a trade deal with the U.K.”
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Mr. Johnson has promoted Brexit by saying it would open the door to a lucrative new deal with the United States — one that he would be well-placed to negotiate because of his warm relationship with Mr. Trump.

The president did not explain why Mr. Johnson’s deal with Brussels would hinder one with Washington. It apparently has to do with technical provisions known as Geographical Indications. Trade experts split on how much of a hurdle they pose, but the details mattered less than the theatrics.

As Mr. Johnson and Mr. Corbyn took to the campaign trail to begin framing their messages, Mr. Trump threw the spotlight on Mr. Farage, whose party could inflict damage on both Labour and Mr. Johnson’s Conservatives.

“I’d like to see you and Boris get together because you would have some real numbers,” Mr. Trump said to Mr. Farage, who has proposed aligning with the Conservatives but has been rebuffed by Mr. Johnson.

“I have enough to do over here without having to worry about the psychology of two brilliant people over there, frankly,” Mr. Trump added. “I wish you two guys could get together. I think it would be a great thing.”

Mr. Trump saved most of his vitriol for Mr. Corbyn, who has painted the president as a predatory rival, eager to use trade negotiations to gain access for American companies to Britain’s National Health Service.

“He’d be so bad, he’d take you in such a bad way,” Mr. Trump said, “He’d take you into such bad places.” Noting that he had never met Mr. Corbyn, he added, “I’m sure he’s a lovely man, but he’s of a different persuasion.”

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Mr. Corbyn said Mr. Trump has long had designs on the National Health Service and “knows if Labour wins, U.S. corporations won’t get their hands on it.”

Mr. Trump was generous to Mr. Johnson, praising his efforts to take Britain out of the European Union as quickly as possible. “He’s willing to do what no one else would do,” the president said.

Still his biggest gift was to Mr. Farage, whose Brexit party has been casting around for ways to influence the election. Mr. Johnson had hoped to neutralize the party by negotiating Britain’s departure from the European Union by Oct. 31.

When he failed to win approval in Parliament for the deal with Brussels, he was forced to ask European leaders for a three-month extension, which has exposed him to attacks from Mr. Farage.

Mr. Johnson plans to campaign on that deal as the swiftest route to Brexit. Mr. Farage has called on the prime minister to drop the deal and leave the European Union with what he calls a “clean break.” The Brexit Party is debating how many candidates to field and how aggressively to go after Conservative-held seats.

Mark Landler is the London bureau chief. In 27 years at The Times, he has been bureau chief in Hong Kong and Frankfurt, White House correspondent, diplomatic correspondent, European economic correspondent, and a business reporter in New York. @MarkLandler
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💩 John Bercow on his different styles of 'order'
« Reply #208 on: November 01, 2019, 02:12:12 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/yHE1uM_NF4Y" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/yHE1uM_NF4Y</a>
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💩 RE: Speaker of the Diner House
« Reply #209 on: November 02, 2019, 02:25:44 AM »
Reminds me of the Diner Forum in the Old Days.  I wish I had followed Berkow back then.  I would have glommed his signature ORRDERRRR!  lol.

I am proclaiming myself Speaker of the Diner House. I like this better than Dictator for Life of the Diner;D  Of course, like the Queen of England, I have many Titles, including also Chief Justice & Grand Inquisitor of the SCOTDD & Chief Cook & Bottle Washer as well.  If we ever get the Napalm Contests here going again,  as Speaker of the Diner House I'm going to use this Title.  ;D

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<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/6xJlPO5jqE8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/6xJlPO5jqE8</a>
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