AuthorTopic: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread  (Read 7180 times)

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38349
    • View Profile
☀️ Greenland is melting in a heatwave. That's everyone's problem
« Reply #45 on: July 31, 2019, 12:03:44 PM »
https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/31/europe/greenland-heatwave-climate-crisis-intl/index.html

Greenland is melting in a heatwave. That's everyone's problem

By Sheena McKenzie, CNN

Updated 5:51 AM ET, Wed July 31, 2019
Scientist captures melting ice sheet in viral photo

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/l4bTOLfXVaM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/l4bTOLfXVaM</a>

(CNN)Extreme heat bowled over Europe last week, smashing records in its wake. Now, the heatwave that started in the Sahara has rolled into Greenland -- where more records are expected to crumble in the coming days.
That means the heatwave is now Greenland's problem, right? Not quite. When records fall in Greenland, it's everyone's problem.
Greenland is home to the world's second-largest ice sheet. And when it melts significantly -- as it is expected to do this year -- there are knock-on effects for sea levels and weather across the globe.
A woman shields herself with a newspaper in Milan, Italy, on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A woman shields herself with a newspaper in Milan, Italy, on Thursday, July 25.
Hide Caption
6 of 10
People cool off with a water fight at a park in The Hague, Netherlands, on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People cool off with a water fight at a park in The Hague, Netherlands, on Wednesday, July 24.
Hide Caption
7 of 10
A polar bear named Nanook cools off at a zoo in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A polar bear named Nanook cools off at a zoo in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on Wednesday, July 24.
Hide Caption
8 of 10
People collect water from the public fountain in front of the Pantheon in Rome on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People collect water from the public fountain in front of the Pantheon in Rome on Thursday, July 25.
Hide Caption
9 of 10
People cool off and sunbathe next to the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People cool off and sunbathe next to the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
Hide Caption
10 of 10
People cool off next to the fountains at the Louvre Museum in Paris on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People cool off next to the fountains at the Louvre Museum in Paris on Wednesday, July 24.
Hide Caption
1 of 10
A man cools down at an outdoor pool&#39;s shower in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A man cools down at an outdoor pool's shower in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, on Thursday, July 25.
Hide Caption
2 of 10
A woman in Paris walks past a window reflecting a temperature of 41 degrees Celsius (105.8 degrees Fahrenheit) on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A woman in Paris walks past a window reflecting a temperature of 41 degrees Celsius (105.8 degrees Fahrenheit) on Thursday, July 25.
Hide Caption
3 of 10
A dry part of the Loire&#39;s river bed is seen in Montjean-sur-Loire, France, on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A dry part of the Loire's river bed is seen in Montjean-sur-Loire, France, on Wednesday, July 24.
Hide Caption
4 of 10
A boy cools off under a public water spray on the bank of the Seine river in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A boy cools off under a public water spray on the bank of the Seine river in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
Hide Caption
5 of 10
A woman shields herself with a newspaper in Milan, Italy, on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A woman shields herself with a newspaper in Milan, Italy, on Thursday, July 25.
Hide Caption
6 of 10
People cool off with a water fight at a park in The Hague, Netherlands, on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People cool off with a water fight at a park in The Hague, Netherlands, on Wednesday, July 24.
Hide Caption
7 of 10
A polar bear named Nanook cools off at a zoo in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A polar bear named Nanook cools off at a zoo in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, on Wednesday, July 24.
Hide Caption
8 of 10
People collect water from the public fountain in front of the Pantheon in Rome on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People collect water from the public fountain in front of the Pantheon in Rome on Thursday, July 25.
Hide Caption
9 of 10
People cool off and sunbathe next to the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People cool off and sunbathe next to the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
Hide Caption
10 of 10
People cool off next to the fountains at the Louvre Museum in Paris on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
People cool off next to the fountains at the Louvre Museum in Paris on Wednesday, July 24.
Hide Caption
1 of 10
A man cools down at an outdoor pool&#39;s shower in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A man cools down at an outdoor pool's shower in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, on Thursday, July 25.
Hide Caption
2 of 10
A woman in Paris walks past a window reflecting a temperature of 41 degrees Celsius (105.8 degrees Fahrenheit) on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A woman in Paris walks past a window reflecting a temperature of 41 degrees Celsius (105.8 degrees Fahrenheit) on Thursday, July 25.
Hide Caption
3 of 10
A dry part of the Loire&#39;s river bed is seen in Montjean-sur-Loire, France, on Wednesday, July 24.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A dry part of the Loire's river bed is seen in Montjean-sur-Loire, France, on Wednesday, July 24.
Hide Caption
4 of 10
A boy cools off under a public water spray on the bank of the Seine river in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
Photos: In pictures: Record-breaking heat wave in Europe
A boy cools off under a public water spray on the bank of the Seine river in Paris on Thursday, July 25.
Hide Caption
5 of 10
01 europe heat wave gallery
02 europe heat wave gallery RESTRICTED
03 europe heat wave gallery
01 europe heatwave 0723 France
04 europe heat wave gallery
05 europe heat wave gallery
01 europe heatwave 0725 Netherlands
07 europe heat wave gallery
06 europe heat wave gallery
08 europe heat wave gallery
Greenland's ice sheet usually melts during the summer. This year, it started melting earlier, in May, and this week's heatwave is expected to accelerate the melt.

The country's mammoth ice sheet rises 3,000 meters above sea level. Forecasters predict that its summit will be particularly warm this week, at just below zero degrees.
"It's a very warm temperature for that altitude," said Ruth Mottram, climate scientist at the Danish Meteorological Institute.
Now 2019 could come close to the record-setting year of 2012, said Jason Box, professor and ice climatologist at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland. During that "melty year," he said, Greenland's ice sheet lost 450 million metric tons -- the equivalent of more than 14,000 tons of ice lost per second.
Global effects
What happens in Greenland will be felt across the world.
Box said that this year's melt is flooding the North Atlantic with freshwater, which could affect the weather in northwestern Europe. The result could be stronger storms, he added, citing flooding in the UK in 2015 and 2016.
"Whatever happens in Greenland radiates its impact down," he said.
Vehicles in a flood caused by rising sea levels on a highway in Central Java, Indonesia on February 2.
Vehicles in a flood caused by rising sea levels on a highway in Central Java, Indonesia on February 2.
During a year like 2012 or 2019, water produced by Greenland's ice sheet adds more than one millimeter to global sea levels, according to Box. But countries in the tropics could see a rise of two millimeters or more, he said.
Extreme is the new norm
It will still be some time before the full "meltiness" of 2019 is measured. But it's already poised to rival the proportions of 2012 -- and we haven't even reached the end of summer.
In July alone, Greenland's ice sheet lost 160 billion tons of ice, according to Clare Nullis, spokeswoman for the UN World Meteorological Organization. That's roughly the equivalent of 64 million Olympic-sized swimming pools, she told reporters on Friday.
One of the most remarkable things about the 2019 heatwave is not just the number of records it broke across Europe -- but the margin by which it did so, she said.
"Normally when you get a temperature record broken, it's by a fraction of a degree," said Nullis. "What we saw yesterday was records being broken by two, three, four degrees -- it was absolutely incredible."
And it's not just the heat that's breaking records. Last year, Greenland experienced it's coldest year in decades, said Box.
Visitors interact with blocks of melting ice from an exhibit called &#39;Ice Watch&#39; in central London in December 2018.
Visitors interact with blocks of melting ice from an exhibit called 'Ice Watch' in central London in December 2018.
According to Nullis, intense heatwaves such as the one bringing up temperatures in Greenland "carry the signature of man-made climate change."

It's a view shared by a group of European scientists, including scholars at the University of Oxford, who earlier this month concluded in an analysis published in World Weather Attribution that recent French heatwaves had been made five times more likely because of climate change.
The researchers also said that the world is "very likely" to see more extreme heatwaves in the future due to climate change.

CNN's Isabelle Gerretsen contributed to this report.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38349
    • View Profile
☀️ Redneck BBQ in Alabama
« Reply #46 on: August 14, 2019, 02:23:21 AM »
The Rednecks are Baking.  There ARE some good outcomes from Climate Change!  :icon_sunny:

RE

https://www.al.com/news/2019/08/just-how-how-will-it-feel-in-alabama-today-excessive-heat-warnings-continue.html

Just how hot will it feel in Alabama today? Excessive heat warnings continue
Updated Aug 13, 5:00 PM;Posted Aug 13, 6:24 AM
Alabama heat index Tuesday 2 p.m.


Here's a look at how hot it could feel at 2 p.m. today. It's not pretty.
474 shares
By Leigh Morgan

Tuesday may end up being the hottest day of 2019 for parts of Alabama, with the heat index climbing as high as 115 degrees for some.

Even the meteorologists are sick of it.

The heat index is used to gauge how hot it feels when air temperatures and humidity are combined.

Itís just not going to be pleasant outside today wherever you are. Air temperatures are forecast to climb into the mid- to upper 90s statewide today, and some spots could even crack the triple digits.

Add to that dew points in the 70s and youíve got the recipe for oppressive and dangerous heat for those working outdoors.

Thatís caused the weather service to dust off its excessive heat warnings, which havenít been used by some offices in the state for more than seven years. Those warnings are shown below in pink:
Heat map

The Alabama counties in pink are under excessive heat warnings today. The rest of the state is under a heat advisory (in orange).

But there is at least a little relief in sight. A cold front will bring the chance for rain later today to north Alabama and tonight and Wednesday for south Alabama.

There could be a few storms as well. The Storm Prediction Center has expanded the area in north Alabama that has a slight risk of severe weather today, which means scattered severe storms will be possible. The rest of north Alabama and part of north-central Alabama have a marginal risk for severe storms today:
Alabama severe weather outlook Wednesday update

Scattered severe storms will be possible in north Alabama today. The areas in dark green could see isolated severe storms.

On Wednesday the threat of strong storms shifts south and covers most of south Alabama and some of south-central Alabama:
Wednesday severe weather outlook

Most of south and south-central Alabama will have a marginal risk for severe weather on Wednesday.

Hereís a look at todayís heat warnings and advisories:

NORTH ALABAMA

Itís going to be another stifling day across north Alabama, and an excessive heat warning has been issued for some northwest counties.

The warning was expanded and extended this afternoon to include Madison, Morgan and Limestone counties, according to the National Weather Service in Huntsville.

The excessive heat warning is now set to expire at 9 p.m. instead of the original 6 p.m.

The other counties in the excessive heat warning are Lauderdale, Colbert, Franklin and Lawrence.

The rest of the region is under a heat advisory until 6 p.m. today.

Those counties are Jackson, DeKalb, Marshall and Cullman.

The heat index could reach 109 degrees in those counties this afternoon, according to the weather service.

The heat index for some north Alabama locations climbed as high as 112 degrees on Monday, according to the National Weather Service.

See a list of north Alabama heat indices here.

CENTRAL ALABAMA

Several counties in central Alabama are under an excessive heat warning until 9 p.m. today, according to the National Weather Service in Birmingham.

The counties in the excessive heat warning are Marengo, Dallas, Autauga, Lowndes, Elmore, Montgomery, Macon, Bullock, Russell, Pike and Barbour.

All of the region will be under a heat advisory as well until 6 p.m. Wednesday, according to the weather service.

Highs are expected to climb into the mid- to upper 90s today, and that could send the heat index anywhere from 108 degrees to 113, forecasters said.

The heat index on Wednesday could range from 105 degrees to 108.

SOUTH ALABAMA

The National Weather Service in Mobile expects temperatures today to be a few degrees higher than what they have been, and a few areas could see the triple digits today.

Accordingly, forecasters have issued an excessive heat warning for all of southwest Alabama for today.

The excessive heat warning will be in effect until 7 p.m. today.

The counties affected are Choctaw, Washington, Clarke, Wilcox, Monroe, Conecuh, Butler, Crenshaw, Escambia, Covington, Mobile and Baldwin.

A heat advisory will also be in effect until 7 p.m. Wednesday, according to forecasters.

High temperatures today will range from the upper 90s to around 100 for most inland areas and the lower to middle 90s near the immediate coast, the weather service said.

The heat index today could range from 110 degrees to 115, with locally higher values possible, the weather service said.

On Wednesday the heat index could be as high as 106 to 112 degrees.

The weather service in Tallahassee, Fla., has also extended a heat advisory for its southeast Alabama counties, which are Coffee, Dale, Henry, Geneva and Houston.

It will run from 10 a.m. until 7 p.m. today.

The heat index is forecast to climb as high as 108 to 112 degrees, according to the weather service.
Save As Many As You Can

Offline John of Wallan

  • Waitstaff
  • ***
  • Posts: 267
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
« Reply #47 on: August 14, 2019, 02:55:32 PM »
This article is a little confusing talking of heat indexes. Need to keep an eye on wet bulb temperatures.
I have seen hotter than this in summer but with very low humidity you can cool off in shade. We usually have hot dry summers in sun-tropical Oz.
Talks about storms in some areas, and I bel;ieve there should be plenty of moisture around from recent floods?
I assume this means high humidity. High temp and high humidity = death. Your body cant cool itself by sweating.
Here is some info. From what I see there may be many areas with lethal wet bulb temperatures

http://web.science.unsw.edu.au/~stevensherwood/wetbulb.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wet-bulb_temperature#Heat_waves_with_high_humidity

JOW

Offline RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 38349
    • View Profile
Re: Official Death Valley Global Cooking Thread
« Reply #48 on: August 14, 2019, 03:29:17 PM »
This article is a little confusing talking of heat indexes. Need to keep an eye on wet bulb temperatures.
I have seen hotter than this in summer but with very low humidity you can cool off in shade. We usually have hot dry summers in sun-tropical Oz.
Talks about storms in some areas, and I bel;ieve there should be plenty of moisture around from recent floods?
I assume this means high humidity. High temp and high humidity = death. Your body cant cool itself by sweating.
Here is some info. From what I see there may be many areas with lethal wet bulb temperatures

http://web.science.unsw.edu.au/~stevensherwood/wetbulb.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wet-bulb_temperature#Heat_waves_with_high_humidity

JOW

The Wet Bulb issue I think will become a problem in the medium term for places like TX, LA and FL.  Southern FSoA locations.  In the near term, this can be compensated for by HVAC, as long as there is oil to run it and the grid stays up.

Midwest, probably not so much humidity or heat, should be bearable though sweaty.

Where I live, it's not an issue in the near term or even medium term.  A hot summer day here goes into the 80sF (about 28C), and those still are fairly rare. Midsummer, 65F is typical still. The Glaciers which surround the Matanuska-Susitna River Valley are going to take quite some time to melt off, even under the worst case scenario.  50 years at least.  I will be long dead before then.

North to Alaska.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/JSt0NEESrUA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/JSt0NEESrUA</a>

RE
Save As Many As You Can

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
1 Replies
1686 Views
Last post December 01, 2013, 11:40:59 PM
by RE
276 Replies
32402 Views
Last post August 15, 2019, 12:01:57 AM
by RE
1 Replies
525 Views
Last post May 15, 2018, 04:01:16 PM
by Palloy2