AuthorTopic: Official Insect Thread  (Read 4992 times)

Offline azozeo

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Re: Official Insect Thread - GMO bugs !
« Reply #15 on: March 02, 2019, 12:52:24 PM »

GMO insects could soon convert into the world’s deadliest weapons

Posted by Erin Elizabeth | Dec 25, 2018

Genetic engineering (GE) is being used in myriad ways these days, despite the fact we know very little about the long-term ramifications of such meddling in the natural order.

For example, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), an arm of the U.S. Department of Defense, is now planning to use insects to deliver GE viruses to crops, with the aim of altering the plant’s genetic traits in the field.
RELATED STORY:

    Bill Gates-funded insect company set to release GMO moths in New York

The $27 million DARPA project, called “Insect Allies,” is basically trying to take advantage of insects’ natural ability to spread crop diseases, but instead of carrying disease-causing genes, they would carry plant-protective traits. As explained by The Washington Post:

https://www.healthnutnews.com/gmo-insects-could-soon-convert-into-the-worlds-deadliest-weapons/
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🐝 We’re Killing Off Our Vital Insects Too
« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2019, 12:42:02 AM »
https://www.greanvillepost.com/2019/03/03/were-killing-off-our-vital-insects-too/

We’re Killing Off Our Vital Insects Too
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BE SURE TO PASS OUR ARTICLES ON TO KIN, FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES


(Image by Spanish conservationist Javier Aznar)

Recent independent scientific studies indicate that we are threatening our vital global insect population, including of bees, with widespread extinction through massive deployment of agriculture pesticides. For most of us, insects such as flies or mosquitoes or wasps are nuisances to be avoided. Yet if the latest studies are any indication, we may be in danger of massive elimination of vital insects that maintain nature’s balance. The consequences to life on this planet are only now beginning to be seriously considered.

The first-ever worldwide study of declines of insect species and numbers has just been published by the journal, Biological Conservation. The conclusions are more than alarming. Among other conclusions the study found that over 40% of insect species are threatened with extinction.

The study found that habitat loss by the conversion to intensive agriculture is the main driver of the declines, as well as agrochemical pollutants such as glyphosate, neonicotinoids and other pesticides. The authors explain, “Here, we present a comprehensive review of 73 historical reports of insect declines from across the globe, and systematically assess the underlying drivers. Our work reveals dramatic rates of decline that may lead to the extinction of 40% of the world’s insect species over the next few decades.”

The study notes recent analyses that indicate that extensive usage of pesticides is the primary factor responsible for the decline of birds in grasslands and aquatic organisms such as fish or frogs in streams.

Among other things the study cites results of a 27-year study of insect populations in select German protected nature preserves that found a “shocking 76% decline in flying insect biomass at several of Germany’s protected areas…an average 2.8% loss in insect biomass per year in habitats subject to rather low levels of human disturbance. Worryingly, the study shows a steady declining trend over nearly three decades. A study in rain-forests of Puerto Rico has reported biomass losses between 98% and 78% for ground-foraging and canopy-dwelling arthropods over a 36-year period and parallel declines in birds, frogs and lizards at the same areas…”

Especially alarming were the declines in bee populations, especially bumblebees. Since 1980 they found that wild bee species in Britain declined by 52% and 67% in the Netherlands. In the United States, the country which pioneered intensive agribusiness and wide use of chemicals after World War II, they found that wild bees were declining in 23% of the country between 2008 and 2013, mainly in the Midwest, Great Plains and the Mississippi valley. These were the areas where grain production, particularly GMO corn for biofuel production using glyphosate and other chemicals was prevalent. Overall the USA went from a peak in 1947 of six million honey bee colonies, down to less than half or some 2.5 million colonies today. The decline began immediately as widespread agriculture use of the organochloride insecticide DDT was employed. Decline has continued unabated even after DDT was banned in 1972 in the United States as DDT was replaced by glyphosate-based alternatives and other chemical pesticides.

Irreversible decline?

What is poorly understood by the larger public is the essential role that insects play to the entire order of nature and species preservation. As the report notes, “shrews, moles, hedgehogs, anteaters, lizards, amphibians, most bats, many birds and fish feed on insects or depend on them for rearing their offspring. Even if some declining insects might be replaced with others, it is difficult to envision how a net drop in overall insect biomass could be countered.” The study concludes among other sobering points that “the application of herbicides to cropland has had more negative impacts on both terrestrial and aquatic plants and insect biodiversity than any other agronomic practice.” The far most widely used herbicide in the world today is glyphosate and Monsanto Roundup based on glyphosate.

Another recent study by the California Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation reported that California’s monarch butterfly population is at an all-time low. From the 1980s when monitoring began to 2017, some 97% of monarch butterflies had disappeared. Then from 2017 to today another 85% decline was registered. The scientists claim the intensive agriculture use of pesticides, herbicides is the main cause.

Scientists at the University of Texas have identified in experiments that glyphosate, the controversial herbicide in Monsanto Roundup, harms the microbiota needed by honeybees for growing and resisting pathogens. This, combined with earlier studies linking the group of neonicotinoid pesticides to bee deaths, suggest we need an urgent review of the toxins being widely applied to our agriculture crops. Notably, the world’s largest purveyor of both neonicotinoids and of glyphosate-based Roundup today is the merged giant Monsanto/Bayer.

These studies all are putting the focus on an aspect of agrochemical damage that until now has been largely ignored. But insects make up the structural and functional base of many of the world’s ecosystems. A world without birds and bees would be one of catastrophic damage to all life on our planet. Without insects, entire ecosystems collapse. Rather than solving world hunger as the agribusiness industry likes to claim, their promotion of select pesticides such as glyphosate threaten to destroy the food system. Nobody in their right mind would want to do that, would they?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
  Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States, Engdahl is the son of F. William Engdahl, Sr., and Ruth Aalund (b. Rishoff). Engdahl grew up in Texas and after earning a degree in engineering and jurisprudence from Princeton University in 1966 (BA) and graduate study in comparative economics at the University of Stockholm from 1969 to 1970, he worked as an economist and freelance journalist in New York and in Europe. Engdahl began writing about oil politics with the first oil shock in the early 1970s. His first book was called A Century of War: Anglo-American Oil Politics and the New World Order and discusses the alleged roles of Zbigniew Brzezinski and George Ball and of the USA in the 1979 overthrow of the Shah of Iran, which was meant to manipulate oil prices and to stop Soviet expansion. Engdahl claims that Brzezinski and Ball used the Islamic Balkanization model proposed by Bernard Lewis. In 2007, he completed Seeds of Destruction: The Hidden Agenda of Genetic Manipulation. Engdahl is also a contributor to the website of the anti-globalization Centre for Research on Globalization, the Russian website New Eastern Outlook,[2] and the Voltaire Network,[3] and a freelancer for varied newsmagazines such as the Asia Times. William Engdahl has been married since 1987 and has been living for more than two decades near Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
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The Benefits Of Manuka Honey And Why You Should Consider Storing Some!
« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2019, 12:42:34 PM »

For Our Brethren south of the Equator  :icon_sunny:


Manuka Honey is unique to New Zealand and to obtain pure Manuka Honey is a specialized task for beekeepers. It’s produced by bees who pollinate the flower Leptospermum scoparium, commonly known as the manuka bush, and its antibacterial properties are what set it apart from traditional honey, and why it might be a good item to store in your prepper pantry.

Manuka Honey is more difficult to extract and has a limited harvest period as it is only collected at certain times of the year. The therapeutic applications of Manuka Honey are well understood by consumers around the world, thereby creating a continually high level of demand.



https://www.shtfplan.com/headline-news/the-benefits-of-manuka-honey-and-why-you-should-consider-storing-some_05112019
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https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/environment/a26323324/insect-population-ecosystem-collapse/?utm_source=reddit.com

The Staggering Worldwide Decline of Insects Is a Warning of Ecosystem Collapse

Insect biomass is falling by 2.5 percent a year, eight times faster than the rate of decline for mammals, birds, or reptiles.
image
By Jill Kiedaisch   
Feb 13, 2019


REDA&COGetty Images   

Thirty years ago, in the book The End of Nature, Bill McKibben proposed the idea of nature—like a species—going extinct. “Our comforting sense of the permanence of our natural world, our confidence that it will change gradually and imperceptibly if at all, is the result of a subtly warped perspective,” McKibben wrote. “Changes that can affect us can happen in our lifetime in our world.”

One of those changes has been brought to the fore in an alarming study published in the journal Biological Conservation, which claims that more than 40 percent of the world’s insect species could go extinct in the next three decades. Scientists from the China Academy of Agricultural Sciences and the universities of Sydney and Queensland reviewed 73 existing reports of insect declines from around the world. They found that insect biomass is falling by 2.5 percent a year since McKibben published his seminal work, eight times faster than the rate of decline for mammals, birds, or reptiles.

The reasons for such a staggering rate of extinction will come as a surprise to no one. Loss of habitat (due to intensive agriculture, deforestation, and urbanization) takes the number one spot, with pollution from synthetic pesticides and fertilizers a close second. The new classes of insecticides introduced in the past 20 years (e.g., neonicotinoids and fipronil) have been especially damaging because they are used routinely and sterilize the soil, killing everything in it. The study also cites biological factors such as introduced species and disease-causing microorganisms. Climate change, which is naturally affected by all of the above, is also a cause.

While these practices have always been environmentally unfriendly, they have generally been pursued under the notion that nature is fundamentally and infinitely resilient. As McKibben puts it: “In the past, we spoiled and polluted parts of that nature, inflicted environmental ‘damage.’ But that was like stabbing a man with toothpicks: though it hurt, annoyed, degraded, it did not touch vital organs, block the path of lymph or blood. We never thought that we had wrecked nature. Deep down, we never really thought we could.”

But it turns out we can, and have. Lead author of the new study, Francisco Sánchez-Bayo, an honorary associate at the School of Life and Environmental Sciences at the University of Sydney, bluntly translates the findings in an interview with The Guardian: “In 10 years, you will have a quarter less, in 50 years only half left, and in 100 years, you will have none.”

Insects represent 70 percent of all animal species on the planet. They pollinate 75 percent of all the crops in the world, which of course become the food that fills up our grocery store shelves and our bodies and our children’s bodies. Insects comprise the base of many food chains and webs, without which countless other species can’t survive: birds, bats, fish, reptiles, and mammals of every size and description. It’s absurd to even attempt to catalog the cascading effects of catastrophic insect die-off here. Best to resort to the study’s “highlights” (an irony if there ever was one):

    In addition to the 40 percent threatened with extinction, one third are currently classed as Endangered.
    “Affected insect groups not only include specialists that occupy particular ecological niches, but also many common and generalist species.” We’re not talking about a rare moth with a crazy-long proboscis that pollinates some deep-jungle orchid. We’re talking about the insects in your backyard: Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths), Hymenoptera (bees, wasps, ants), and Coleoptera (beetles).
    “Four aquatic taxa are imperiled and have already lost a large proportion of species.” That’s four separate taxonomic groups either threatened or gone.
    Fast-breeding pests that are tolerant of pollutants, like flies and cockroaches, will likely fill the vacancies left behind and continue to thrive due to warmer global temperatures and the disappearance of their slow-to-breed predators. Entomologist Don Sands underscores the importance of “insects as moderators of other pest populations.” Without them, he told CNN, “we have insect populations that flare up and ruin crops.”

While the study presents a comprehensive and systematic look at the drivers behind these dramatic declines, it is based on reports primarily from North America and Europe. More research is needed in Africa, South America, and Asia to generate a truly accurate assessment of global insect populations.

Even without that data, however, Sánchez-Bayo doesn’t mince words about the implications of continued species losses: “This will have catastrophic consequences for both the planet’s ecosystems and for the survival of mankind.”

In other words, what we will experience in our lifetimes goes beyond McKibben’s idea of an end; it is the actual structural and functional collapse of the natural systems which have supported life on Earth for the last 400 million years.

The study urges the “rethinking of current agricultural practices” in favor of “sustainable, ecologically-based practices” to “safeguard the vital ecosystem services they provide.” Yes, even scientists feel compelled to refer to natural systems as “services.” A 2017 study reporting Germany's decline of total flying insect biomass went so far as to calculate that such “ecosystem services provided by wild insects have been estimated at $57 billion annually in the USA.”

Frame it as a get-and-spend scenario that threatens the long-term viability of human life, and maybe, just maybe, Monsanto will listen. But probably not. Time to convert your property to an insect-friendly island.
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Swarm of bees follows car for 2 days to rescue queen trapped in back
« Reply #19 on: May 23, 2019, 10:05:47 AM »



05/20/2019

A woman from Wales was recently shocked to discover a swarm of 20,000 bees attached to her car. Thankfully, she did the kind and responsible thing and called a beekeeper to come and remove them. However, the next day they were back.

   
That’s right, the swam was able to track Carol Howarth and her Mitsubishi back down and collect all over the back of her car again. Turns out, they were looking for their queen!

That’s right, the devoted bunch were trying to rescue her!

Roger Burns of Pembrokeshire Beekeepers said,

“We think the queen bee had been attracted to something in the car, perhaps something sweet, and had got into a gap on the boot’s wiper blade or perhaps the hinge. The swarm of around 20,000 had followed her and were sat around on the boot of the car.”1



https://www.healthnutnews.com/swarm-of-bees-follows-car-for-2-days-to-rescue-queen-trapped-in-back/
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Re: Official Insect Thread
« Reply #20 on: May 24, 2019, 06:40:55 AM »


Spider species discovered to use catapult technology to fling sticky webs at prey… previously scientists believed only humans possessed such weapons tech

Saturday, May 18, 2019 by: Ethan Huff

Scientists at The University of Akron in Ohio have made yet another remarkable discovery about the intricacies of the animal kingdom, which continue to amaze even the brightest minds.

Believe it or not, there’s actually a spider out there that’s not only able to spin its web in awe-inspiring wonder, but also pull this web back taut and sling it upon its prey like a slingshot – the first known animal to be able to perform this incredible feat.

While it was previously thought that only humans were smart enough to sling things at something they wanted to catch, the triangle-weaver spider also possesses this ability, which experts are calling “power amplification.”

Publishing a paper on the subject in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS), researchers in Ohio reveal how the triangle-weaver spider essentially catapults both itself and its web towards its prey, using this elastic energy to increase its odds of a successful catch.

Click on link for short vid of spidey in action. Cool stuff.



https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-05-18-spider-species-discovered-to-use-catapult-technology-to-fling-sticky-webs-at-prey.html
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Re: Official Insect Thread
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2019, 12:45:15 PM »







Study Shows Growing Hemp is a Powerful Tool to Fight Bee Population Decline

As the world population of honeybees continues to decline at a dangerous rate, a new study from Colorado State University purports to have found the answer to quell the decline—hemp. The reason hemp is such a boon to the bee population is simple, it is a great source of pollen.

Because the hemp plant provides such a massive amount of pollen, it will provide them with the resources they need to sustain and grow their populations.


https://www.wakingtimes.com/2019/06/18/study-shows-growing-hemp-is-a-powerful-tool-to-fight-bee-population-decline/
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Re: Official Insect Thread
« Reply #22 on: June 27, 2019, 11:39:20 AM »


6 Amazing Facts You Need to Know About Ants

The next time you see an ant, before you think to kill her, consider how fascinating she really is.

JUN 21, 2019

(CONVERSATION) — Have you have seen ants this year? In Britain, they were probably black garden ants, known as Lasius niger – Europe’s most common ant. One of somewhere between 12,000 and 20,000 species, they are the scourge of gardeners – but also fascinating.

The small, black, wingless workers run around the pavements, crawl up your plants tending aphids or collect tasty morsels from your kitchen. And the flying ants that occasionally appear on a warm summer’s evening are actually the reproductive siblings of these non-winged workers.

Here’s what else you need to know:
1. Most ants you see are female

Ants have a caste system, where responsibilities are divided. The queen is the founder of the colony, and her role is to lay eggs. Worker ants are all female, and this sisterhood is responsible for the harmonious operation of the colony.

Their tasks range from caring for the queen and the young, foraging, policing conflicts in the colony, and waste disposal. Workers will most likely never have their own offspring. The vast majority of eggs develop as workers, but once the colony is ready the queen produces the next generation of reproductives which will go on to start own colonies.

A female ant’s fate to become a worker or queen is mainly determined by diet, not genetics. Any female ant larva can become the queen – those that do receive diets richer in protein. The other larvae receive less protein, which causes them to develop as workers.
2. Male ants are pretty much just flying sperm

Unlike humans, with X and Y chromosomes, an ant’s sex is determined by the number of genome copies it possesses. Male ants develop from unfertilised eggs so receive no genome from a father. This means that male ants don’t have a father and cannot have sons, but they do have grandfathers and can have grandsons. Female ants, in comparison, develop from fertilised eggs and have two genome copies – one from their father and one from their mother.

Male ants function like flying sperm. Only having one genome copy means every one of their sperm is genetically identical to themselves. And their job is over quickly, dying soon after mating, although their sperm live on, perhaps for years. – essentially their only job is to reproduce.
3. After sex queens don’t eat for weeks

When the conditions are warm and humid, the winged virgin queens and males leave their nests in search of mates. This is the behaviour seen on “flying ant day”. In L. niger, mating takes place on the wing, often hundreds of meters up (hence the need for good weather). Afterwards, queens drop to the ground and shed their wings, while males quickly die. Mated queens choose a nest site and burrow into the soil, made softer from recent rain.

Once underground, the queens will not eat for weeks – until they have produced their own daughter workers. They use energy from their fat stores and redundant flight muscles to lay their first batch of eggs, which they fertilise using sperm stored from their nuptial flight. It is the same stock of sperm acquired from long dead males that allows a queen to continue laying fertilised eggs for her entire life. Queens never mate again.
4. Home-making the ant way: cooperation, death and slavery

Sometimes two L. niger queens unite to found a nest. This initially cooperative association – which increases the chance of establishing a colony – dissolves once new adult workers emerge and then the queens fight to the death. More sinister still, L. niger colonies sometimes steal brood from their neighbours, putting them to work as slaves.

Slave-making has evolved in a number of ant species, but they also display cooperation at extraordinary levels. An extreme example of this is a “supercolony” of Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) which extends over 6,000km of European coastline from Italy to north-west Spain, and is composed of literally billions of workers from millions of cooperating nests.
5. Queen ants can live for decades, males for a week

After establishing her colony, the queen’s work is not done and she has many years of egg-laying ahead of her. In the laboratory, L. niger queens have lived for nearly 30 years. Workers live for about a year, males little more than a week (although their sperm live longer). These extraordinary differences in longevity are purely due to the way their genes are switched on and off.
6. Ants can help humans and the environment

Ants have a major influence in ecosystems worldwide and their roles are diverse. While some ants are considered pests, others act as biological-control agents. Ants benefit ecosystems by dispersing seeds, pollinating plants and improving the quality of soil. Ants might also benefit our health, as a potential source of new medicines such as antibiotics.

So when you next see an ant, before you think to kill her, consider how fascinating she really is.

y CHARLIE DURANT, MAX JOHN, ROB HAMMOND | TheConversation.com

The views in this article may not reflect editorial policy of The Mind Unleashed.




https://themindunleashed.com/2019/06/ants-amazing-facts.html
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Insect Thread - Death by Earthquake for Honey Bees in Calif.
« Reply #23 on: July 09, 2019, 03:50:30 PM »

If the dwindling bee population across the US wasn't enough, new footage uploaded onto social media shows, in one instance, thousands of bees dropping dead upon a series of earthquakes that shook California last week, reported Sputnik.

Southern California was hit by two earthquakes late last week: a 6.4 magnitude quake on Thursday, accompanied by a 7.1 magnitude earthquake Friday evening, both with an epicenter near the Mojave Desert.



https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-07-09/caught-camera-honey-bees-drop-dead-following-california-earthquake
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A Plague of Locusts!

Do grasshoppers get Comp Cards for the Buffet?

RE

https://www.foxnews.com/us/hordes-of-grasshoppers-descend-upon-las-vegas-experts-blames-wet-weather

Hordes of grasshoppers descend upon Las Vegas, experts blame wet weather
By Lukas Mikelionis | Fox News


Raw video: Grasshoppers swarm Las Vegas strip

Experts say an invasion like this is tied to recent wet weather and has occurred five or six times over the past 30 years.

Wet weather is to blame for the hordes of grasshoppers that have descended upon Las Vegas this week.

A Nevada state entomologist told the media on Thursday that the scale of adult pallid-winged grasshoppers traveling north to central Nevada is rare, but reassured that it’s not unprecedented and residents shouldn’t be concerned

NEVADA ASSISTANT POLICE CHIEF RESIGNS AFTER ARREST ON DUI CHARGES, OFFICIALS SAY
This Thursday, July 25, 2019, photo shows grasshoppers on a sidewalk outside the Las Vegas Sun offices in Henderson, Nev. A migration of mild-mannered grasshoppers sweeping through the Las Vegas area is being attributed to wet weather several months ago.

This Thursday, July 25, 2019, photo shows grasshoppers on a sidewalk outside the Las Vegas Sun offices in Henderson, Nev. A migration of mild-mannered grasshoppers sweeping through the Las Vegas area is being attributed to wet weather several months ago. (Steve Marcus/Las Vegas Sun via AP)

“It appears through history that when we have a wet winter or spring, these things build up often down below Laughlin and even into Arizona,” Jeff Knight, an entomologist with the Nevada Department of Agriculture, said on Thursday.

“We'll have flights about this time of the year, migrations, and they'll move northward,” he added.

This year, the Las Vegas area recorded more rain in six months than the annual average of just under 4.2 inches per year.

CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS FLEEING TO NEVADA AND ARIZONA AS HIGH TAXES, HOME PRICES FORCE THEM OUT

Knight said the grasshoppers pose no danger as they don’t carry disease, don't bite, and probably won't damage anybody's property by the time they are gone. The insects usually attracted to ultraviolet light sources, he added, suggesting people can install low-UV lights to avoid the insects.

“They don't carry any diseases. They don't bite,” he said. “They're not even one of the species that we consider a problem. They probably won't cause much damage in the yard.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

He added that similar insect migrations happened during his more than 30-year career at the state Department of Agriculture. The most recent similar migration occurred six or seven years ago.

“We have records clear from the '60s of it happening, and I have seen it ... at least four or five times in my 30-plus years,” Knight said. “There are some special weather conditions that trigger the migration.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
Lukas Mikelionis is a reporter for FoxNews.com
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A Plague of Locusts!

Do grasshoppers get Comp Cards for the Buffet?

RE

https://www.foxnews.com/us/hordes-of-grasshoppers-descend-upon-las-vegas-experts-blames-wet-weather

Hordes of grasshoppers descend upon Las Vegas, experts blame wet weather
By Lukas Mikelionis | Fox News


Raw video: Grasshoppers swarm Las Vegas strip

Experts say an invasion like this is tied to recent wet weather and has occurred five or six times over the past 30 years.

Wet weather is to blame for the hordes of grasshoppers that have descended upon Las Vegas this week.

A Nevada state entomologist told the media on Thursday that the scale of adult pallid-winged grasshoppers traveling north to central Nevada is rare, but reassured that it’s not unprecedented and residents shouldn’t be concerned

NEVADA ASSISTANT POLICE CHIEF RESIGNS AFTER ARREST ON DUI CHARGES, OFFICIALS SAY
This Thursday, July 25, 2019, photo shows grasshoppers on a sidewalk outside the Las Vegas Sun offices in Henderson, Nev. A migration of mild-mannered grasshoppers sweeping through the Las Vegas area is being attributed to wet weather several months ago.

This Thursday, July 25, 2019, photo shows grasshoppers on a sidewalk outside the Las Vegas Sun offices in Henderson, Nev. A migration of mild-mannered grasshoppers sweeping through the Las Vegas area is being attributed to wet weather several months ago. (Steve Marcus/Las Vegas Sun via AP)

“It appears through history that when we have a wet winter or spring, these things build up often down below Laughlin and even into Arizona,” Jeff Knight, an entomologist with the Nevada Department of Agriculture, said on Thursday.

“We'll have flights about this time of the year, migrations, and they'll move northward,” he added.

This year, the Las Vegas area recorded more rain in six months than the annual average of just under 4.2 inches per year.

CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS FLEEING TO NEVADA AND ARIZONA AS HIGH TAXES, HOME PRICES FORCE THEM OUT

Knight said the grasshoppers pose no danger as they don’t carry disease, don't bite, and probably won't damage anybody's property by the time they are gone. The insects usually attracted to ultraviolet light sources, he added, suggesting people can install low-UV lights to avoid the insects.

“They don't carry any diseases. They don't bite,” he said. “They're not even one of the species that we consider a problem. They probably won't cause much damage in the yard.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

He added that similar insect migrations happened during his more than 30-year career at the state Department of Agriculture. The most recent similar migration occurred six or seven years ago.

“We have records clear from the '60s of it happening, and I have seen it ... at least four or five times in my 30-plus years,” Knight said. “There are some special weather conditions that trigger the migration.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
Lukas Mikelionis is a reporter for FoxNews.com

Boots on the ground report....

They fucking everywhere  :evil4:

The birds are no where to be found. Typically when this yearly event happens the birds feast. Maybe there so stuffed from grasshopper sushi that they've taken a smoke break.

The end is nearer than we think  :coffee:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Boots on the ground report....

They fucking everywhere  :evil4:

The birds are no where to be found. Typically when this yearly event happens the birds feast. Maybe there so stuffed from grasshopper sushi that they've taken a smoke break.

The end is nearer than we think  :coffee:

Get some pics!

RE
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Offline azozeo

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Boots on the ground report....

They fucking everywhere  :evil4:

The birds are no where to be found. Typically when this yearly event happens the birds feast. Maybe there so stuffed from grasshopper sushi that they've taken a smoke break.

The end is nearer than we think  :coffee:

Get some pics!

RE

The Sun  :icon_sunny: roasted em' all  :icon_mrgreen:

If there back tomorrow before sunrise, I will. They usually stick around a couple of days. Way early this year as well. Normally there seen in September.
Funny thing, there mostly down near the center of town by the stores. We live up in the foothills of a mountain range & the critters up here took care of business.
One here & there until eaten. Evidently from the local yokel reports there traveling up the Colorado to points north.

Maybe there enroute to Area 51 with the F/B flashmob  :icon_mrgreen:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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That's a lot of good food!  Maybe Grasshoppers will be on the buffets?

RE

https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/28/us/las-vegas-grasshopper-invasion-weather-radar-trnd/index.html

Las Vegas' grasshopper invasion is so big you can see it on weather radar

By Theresa Waldrop, CNN

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/qSk5BwaFPX4" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/qSk5BwaFPX4</a>

Updated 11:37 AM ET, Sun July 28, 2019
Millions of grasshoppers are invading Las Vegas


Millions of grasshoppers are invading Las Vegas 01:17

(CNN)A wet spring in Las Vegas has spawned hordes of grasshoppers so large, they're showing up on the weather radar.
In viewing the radar, CNN meteorologist Allison Chinchar said it looked like there were two storms over the Vegas area: one north of the city (that was actual rain) and another right over Las Vegas. But the second one wasn't moving as rain normally would, she said.
"It looked as though it should be torrentially downpouring in Las Vegas," said Chinchar.
By changing the settings on the radar, meteorologists could see that the other "storm" was actually the massive hordes of grasshoppers that have settled over the city in recent days, Chinchar said.

The National Weather Service office in Las Vegas said in a tweet Saturday that people have been asking about "the widespread radar returns" in the city over the past few nights.

    🤓 Some of you have been asking about the widespread radar returns the past few nights in #Vegas. Radar analysis suggests most of these echoes are biological targets. This typically includes birds, bats, and bugs, and most likely in our case--> Grasshoppers. 🦗 #VegasWeather pic.twitter.com/reQX7hJR7Y
    — NWS Las Vegas (@NWSVegas) July 27, 2019

Las Vegas, like all of Nevada, has had almost twice as much rain in 2019 than normal, Chinchar said. The city has had 4.63 inches of rain to date -- much more than its usual average of 2.38 inches in the same period.
"It appears through history that when we have a wet winter or spring, these things build up often down below Laughlin and even into Arizona," Jeff Knight, state entomologist with the Nevada Department of Agriculture, said. "We'll have flights (of grasshoppers) about this time of the year, migrations, and they'll move northward."

Knight said the swarms aren't terribly unusual given the amount of rain the state has had this year.
"We have records clear from the '60s of it happening, and I have seen it ... at least four or five times in my 30-plus years," he said. "There are some special weather conditions that trigger the migration."
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Offline azozeo

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Re: Official Insect Thread
« Reply #29 on: August 07, 2019, 01:12:44 PM »

This Voracious, Unstoppable Bug Is Killing Off Vineyards

This story originally appeared on Grist and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

In Amityville, Pennsylvania, 10 acres of grapevines sprawl across the family-owned Manatawny Creek Winery. Owner Darvin Levengood is no stranger to vineyard pests. But he was met with calamity in the fall of 2017 when grape pickers were bombarded by swarms of a new invasive insect, the spotted lanternfly. Winery guests couldn’t drink on the open porch without finding the bug, and its “honeydew,” in their glass.

“It’s a misnomer,” Levengood says of the sweet-sounding residue. “Honeydew is a perfectly good fruit. This is nothing more than poop.”

Since the bug was first identified in 2014, it has been deva­stating vineyards and orchards in the Northeast. Lycorma delicatula, named for the lantern-shaped body of the adult that appears to glow under its dull wings, is used in tradi­tional medicine in China, its native land. In the US, it has quickly become one of the most destructive invasive species in 150 years.



https://www.wired.com/story/this-voracious-unstoppable-bug-is-killing-off-vineyards/
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

 

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