AuthorTopic: Standoff at Standing Rock  (Read 62114 times)

Offline JRM

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #345 on: February 24, 2017, 07:33:52 AM »
It's a runaway truck, and there is no stopping it now.

Which is to say, "Resistance is futile; you will be assimilated."

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This has long been your mantra, RE.  And that this is so is why I know you are not of the resistance.  If one is of the resistance one would never repeat the Borg mantra, as you do day in and day out -- because it is demoralizing.   There IS a resistance.  And you are a wet blanket to them, to us, with your mantra / words.

If you were with the resistance, you might say, "The odds are against us, and while we may have only the slimmest chance of success, we MUST resist."  That would be a responsible way to share your doubt and skepticism.  At least it leaves it open to discussion.  That discussion isn't open with you. You're absolutely certain that ... Doom! Doom! Doom! -- and "nothing can be done."

So I will continue to embody the resistance in this forum. I will be among the voices of the resistance here.

Yes, the odds of our success are not good.  All the more reason to jump in and embody the resistance. 

I am here to unplug the Borg. 

My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline RE

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #346 on: February 24, 2017, 08:07:01 AM »
It's a runaway truck, and there is no stopping it now.

Which is to say, "Resistance is futile; you will be assimilated."

Not at all.  I fund the SUN☼ project to begin with, and besides that I perpetually write about what is necessary to be done here to achieve a Better Tomorrow.  So your criticism is completely unfounded and baseless.

The difference between you and I is not that we don't agree that a better tomorrow is achievable, we both believe that.  IMHO, I am just more realistic than you are in terms of what it will take to get there.  I don't think the Better Tomorrow can be achieved without a complete crash of the Industrial Civilization, along with a concomitant die off of extraordinary proportions.  You think it can be achieved without such a die off.

In advance, no way to absolutely predict who is correct, anymore than you can absolutely predict whether Guy McPherson is correct with all Dead People by 2025, or I am correct saying some Homo Saps will still walk the earth In The Year 2525.  Basically, I stand in the middle between you and Guy.  You believe the situation is salvageable if everybody just CARES.  Sort of the Rodney King philosophy on the grand scale.  Guy believes absolutely nothing can be done to salvage anyone.  I believe something can be done to SAVE AS MANY AS I CAN.

Who will be proven correct here?  Only time will tell.

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RE
« Last Edit: February 24, 2017, 08:14:29 AM by RE »
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #347 on: February 24, 2017, 01:16:37 PM »
And Kelsy Warren sees the world as he wishes too and thinks everyone else is deluded.
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline luciddreams

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #348 on: February 24, 2017, 04:25:36 PM »
RE and I agree about the future mostly.  I'm sure there are some things we disagree on, and if there aren't then I'm sure we can come up with some shit to disagree about with regards to the future.  But all and all I think his assessment if pretty right on.

JRM, I appreciate your optimism.  Somebodies got to be optimistic.  I've long called myself an "optimistic pessimist."  If you are a Diner regular than I have no idea how you can be on the optimistic side of things.  I think the best we can do here is optimistic pessimism.  That being the case, I would put you, JRM, on the far optimistic side of that pessimistic place.  One more click and you'd click over to pessimistic optimism. 

The truth is that there is not a whole lot to be optimistic about with regards to a lower energy per capita future.  I see solar panels popping up like mushrooms.  Duke has partnered with some company locally, and if you have Duke power than you can get your house outfitted with solar panels at no cost to you.  You then pay the solar panel company for your power.  Solar panels require a lot of infrastructure, and never mind that they are servicing a retarded way of inhabiting the landscape to being with.  Modern stick built housing requires fossil fuels...period.  No way around it.  I mean you slap solar panels on top of asphalt shingles?  Are you kidding me?  How fucking stupid is that? 

Anyways, this is the Standing Rock thread, and I don't want to drift to far away from the topic.  I've said from the beginning that the Black Snake was going to cross the Missouri no matter what.  Well...I was right. 

Keep being the most optimistic Diner JRM.  Somebodies got to do it.  It is an important function that you play...lest we be accused of the accursed "group think." 

Offline JRM

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #349 on: February 24, 2017, 06:14:16 PM »
RE and I agree about the future mostly.  I'm sure there are some things we disagree on, and if there aren't then I'm sure we can come up with some shit to disagree about with regards to the future.  But all and all I think his assessment if pretty right on.

JRM, I appreciate your optimism.  Somebodies got to be optimistic.  I've long called myself an "optimistic pessimist."  If you are a Diner regular than I have no idea how you can be on the optimistic side of things.  I think the best we can do here is optimistic pessimism.  That being the case, I would put you, JRM, on the far optimistic side of that pessimistic place.  One more click and you'd click over to pessimistic optimism. 

The truth is that there is not a whole lot to be optimistic about with regards to a lower energy per capita future.  I see solar panels popping up like mushrooms.  Duke has partnered with some company locally, and if you have Duke power than you can get your house outfitted with solar panels at no cost to you.  You then pay the solar panel company for your power.  Solar panels require a lot of infrastructure, and never mind that they are servicing a retarded way of inhabiting the landscape to being with.  Modern stick built housing requires fossil fuels...period.  No way around it.  I mean you slap solar panels on top of asphalt shingles?  Are you kidding me?  How fucking stupid is that? 

Anyways, this is the Standing Rock thread, and I don't want to drift to far away from the topic.  I've said from the beginning that the Black Snake was going to cross the Missouri no matter what.  Well...I was right. 

Keep being the most optimistic Diner JRM.  Somebodies got to do it.  It is an important function that you play...lest we be accused of the accursed "group think."

optimism

noun

1. a disposition or tendency to look on the more favorable side of events or conditions and to expect the most favorable outcome.

2. the belief that good ultimately predominates over evil in the world.

3. the belief that goodness pervades reality.

4. the doctrine that the existing world is the best of all possible worlds.



As I keep saying, over and over through the years, I'm no optimist.

If "opportunist" wasn't defined as "a person who exploits circumstances to gain immediate advantage rather than being guided by consistent principles or plans," I might be one of those.  I'm interested in opportunity, "a set of circumstances that makes it possible to do something."

That is, I'm interested in possibilities.

If "impossibilist" was a word, I'd not be one of those.  But The Diner is populated mostly with impossiblists.
My "avatar" graphic is Japanese calligraphy (shodō) forming the word shoshin, meaning "beginner's mind". --  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin -- It is with shoshin that I am now and always "meeting my breath" for the first time. Try it!

Offline RE

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Re: Standoff at Standing Rock
« Reply #350 on: February 24, 2017, 06:40:56 PM »
If "impossibilist" was a word, I'd not be one of those.  But The Diner is populated mostly with impossiblists.

I'm not an impossibilist.  As I said, I fund the SUN☼ Project and I write all the time about how to survive collapse, including the latest Chapter 16 of How I Survived Collapse:icon_sunny:

You just don't like the possibilities I offer up.

RE
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Offline RE

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Meet the youth at the heart of the Standing Rock protests against DAPL
« Reply #351 on: February 25, 2017, 04:37:28 AM »
MARCH ON WASHINGTON MARCH 10TH

Meet the youth at the heart of the Standing Rock protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline

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Meet the youth at the heart of the Standing Rock protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline

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WatchMeet the youth at the heart of the Standing Rock protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline
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Opposition against the Dakota Access Pipeline shifted into a new phase this week after law enforcement in full riot gear evicted several protest camps that had captivated the nation for nearly a year.

The clearing of the Oceti Sakowin and Rosebud camps marked a somber moment of reflection for members of the International Indigenous Youth Council, a little known group of indigenous youth that has helped steer the movement from the very beginning. Their remarkable story is now told in the ABC News Digital documentary: "The Seventh Generation."

“Watching the eviction was difficult for us,” Thomas Lopez, an IIYC Member, wrote to ABC News.

“On one hand, you’re seeing a very important chapter in our lives coming to a close and it's painful. On the other hand, I’m determined to rise from the ashes of that pain,” Lopez said.

 

PHOTO: Thomas Lopez, 24, International Indigenous Youth Council MemberEvan Simon/ABC News

Thomas Lopez, 24, International Indigenous Youth Council Member

 

Indigenous youth were among the first to publicly oppose the pipeline, citing concerns over their drinking water and sacred sites, when they organized a series of relay "prayer" runs in the spring of 2016.

The youth groups first ran from Cannon Ball, North Dakota, to the Army Corps of Engineers Omaha District branch in Nebraska, then on to the agency’s Washington, D.C., headquarters to hand deliver a petition against the pipeline.

Danny Grassrope of the Lower Brule Sioux and a 25-year-old member of the International Indigenous Youth Council was among them.

“I didn’t know [it] would lead to a massive ceremony that involved prayer and it’s really amazing how that happened,” Grassrope told ABC News in November.

 

PHOTO: Danny Grassrope, 25, Lower Brule Sioux, International Indigenous Youth Council MemberEvan Simon/ABC News

Danny Grassrope, 25, Lower Brule Sioux, International Indigenous Youth Council Member

 

Shortly after the runs, the first "prayer camps" were established just south of pipeline construction sites, drawing most of the original occupants from the relays.

So began a nearly year-long standoff, as thousands of self-described "water protectors" descended on the high plains, attempting to halt construction of the pipeline before it reached the Missouri River, the primary source of drinking water for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, along with millions of other Americans living downstream.

 

PHOTO: The International Indigenous Youth Council in December 2016.Evan Simon/ABC News

The International Indigenous Youth Council in December 2016.

 

After an early proposal for the Dakota Access Pipeline route that would have crossed the Missouri River north of Bismarck was abandoned due to a variety of reasons, including concerns over contaminating that city’s municipal water supply, the project was re-routed to cross the river 1,500 feet upstream of the current Standing Rock reservation, through ancestral lands granted to them in the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1851. A subsequent treaty in 1868, followed by a series of congressional acts, resulted in the Sioux losing most of the land originally set aside for them.

Energy Transfer Partners, the company building the Dakota Access Pipeline, wrote in a statement provided to ABC News that the company is “committed to the safe construction and operation of all its pipelines throughout the country. Dakota Access is a state-of-the-art underground pipeline with advanced safety technology and construction methods that exceed state and federal standards where possible.”

Kelcy Warren, CEO of Energy Transfer Partners, the Texas-based developer behind the project, has said that “concerns about the pipeline’s impact on local water supply are unfounded” and “multiple archaeological studies conducted with state historic preservation offices found no sacred items along the route.”

Sunoco Logistics, the future operator of the Dakota Access Pipeline, spills more crude oil than any of its competitors, with “more than 200 leaks since 2010,” according to a Reuters analysis of government data. Sunoco said that since 2012, it has "enhanced and improved our integrity management program," according to Reuters.

 

PHOTO: Alex Howland, 21, Apache/Navajo, International Indigenous Youth Council Co-FounderEvan Simon/ABC News

Alex Howland, 21, Apache/Navajo, International Indigenous Youth Council Co-Founder

 

“It’s not if it breaks, it’s when it breaks,” Alex Howland, a 21-year-old co-founder of the International Indigenous Youth Council, told ABC News.

“Our ancestors thought seven generations ahead and so we have to do the same,” Howland said.

Many at camp believe they are fulfilling the "last vision" of Crazy Horse, the famed Oglala Sioux leader who made a prophesy shortly before his death that the seventh generation would bring about the rise of indigenous people.

“We’re the answers to our ancestor’s prayers,” said Terrell Iron Shell, a 23-year-old descendant of the famed Sioux chief, Iron Shell, who was among the signatories of the 1851 Fort Laramie Treaty.

 

PHOTO: Danny Grassrope, a member of the International Indigenous Youth Council, urges protesters to remain in prayer during a confrontation with law enforcement.Evan Simon/ABC News

Danny Grassrope, a member of the International Indigenous Youth Council, urges protesters to remain in prayer during a confrontation with law enforcement.more

 

The International Indigenous Youth Council has been at the heart of nearly every direct action since the movement began, often urging their fellow activists to stay in prayer during heated confrontations with law enforcement.

“If we see people getting worked up or they look like they are having a hard time, we pull them aside and we talk to them,” Iron Shell said before adding, “because that’s kind of the role that we’ve placed ourselves in, the de-escalators.”

“The youth council has always been and will always continue to be about prayer and peace,” said Lauren Howland, an IIYC co-founder, who along with other IIYC members, personally delivered supplies to the Morton County Sheriff’s Department after the sheriff's department put up a Facebook post asking for community donations.

 

PHOTO: Lauren Howland, 21, Apache/Navajo, International Indigenous Youth Council Co-FounderEvan Simon/ABC News

Lauren Howland, 21, Apache/Navajo, International Indigenous Youth Council Co-Founder

 

On Dec. 4, during the waning days of the Obama administration, then-assistant secretary of the Army for civil works, Jo-Ellen Darcy, announced that an easement would not be granted for the pipeline to cross under the Missouri River. Darcy said at the time of the decision that the Army Corps would engage in additional review and analysis, including a “robust consideration and discussion of alternative locations for the pipeline crossing the Missouri River,” a process that could have taken years.

The Army published its intent to prepare a full environmental impact statement in the Federal Registry.

But the victory, as many at the protesters' camp expected, was short lived.

Less than a week after taking office, President Trump’s signed a memorandum ordering the Army Corps of Engineers to “review and approve” the pipeline in an expedited manner “to the extent permitted by law.”

Two weeks later, the Corps issued the easement needed for the project to cross under the Missouri, reversing its previous pledge to consider alternative routes and conduct a full environmental impact statement. Two days before the dramatic reversal, the Department of the Interior withdrew a legal opinion that concluded there was “ample legal justification” to deny the easement, according to court documents filed this week. A spokeswoman for the department told ABC News that the opinion was suspended so that it could be reviewed by the department.

 

PHOTO: The International Indigenous Youth Council inside their tent at Rosebud Camp.Evan Simon/ABC News

The International Indigenous Youth Council inside their tent at Rosebud Camp.

 

Prior to his election, Donald Trump had significant investments in the companies involved with the construction and operation of the Dakota Access Pipeline and his campaign received more than $100,000 in donations from Kelcy Warren, the CEO of Energy Transfer Partners, according to election finance documents.

Though Trump has since claimed to have since divested himself of such investments, he has offered no substantial proof of that claim, and in the meantime he selected former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who has sat on the Energy Transfer Partners board, to head the U.S. Department of Energy.

With the largest protest camps dispersed and construction resumed on the Missouri River crossing, opposition against the pipeline remains before the courts as the Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes continue their legal challenges to the pipeline. Indigenous activist groups are planning a march on Washington next month. The IIYC has established branches in Chicago and Denver and has already organized rallies and marches across the country.

“This isn’t over,” Thomas Lopez told ABC News.

“Because once you’re a water protector, you’re a water protector for life. This may be Trump’s America, but it's our revolution,” he said.

 

PHOTO: The International Indigenous Youth Council forms a prayer circle after delivering supplies to the Morton County Law Enforcement Center. Evan Simon/ABC News

The International Indigenous Youth Council forms a prayer circle after delivering supplies to the Morton County Law Enforcement Center. more

 

ABC News' James Hill and Morgan Winsor contributed to this report.

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Offline RE

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Standing Rock is Burning
« Reply #352 on: February 26, 2017, 12:59:37 AM »
MARCH ON WASHINGTON MARCH 10TH



REUTERS/Terray Sylvester

Standing Rock is burning.

About 150 people voluntarily left the last occupied resistance camp by Wednesday at 2:00 p.m., the state-issued deadline to clear camps built to oppose the Dakota Access Pipeline. The remaining water protectors joined members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in setting fire to tents according to tribal tradition — one last blaze of defiance against the pipeline.

Police likely arrested around 50 people, and around 25 to 50 water protectors still remained in the evacuation zone after the 2:00 p.m. deadline. North Dakota law enforcement entered the camps again this morning to clear out anyone who still remained. Ruth Hopkins, a journalist with Indian Country Media Network, reported law enforcement pointing rifles at people and knifing tipis.

On Feb. 20, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe asked all water protectors to peacefully vacate the camps by yesterday, maintaining that the battle is now in court and on the streets. On Feb. 15, the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes asked a court to reverse a final easement that would allow the disputed portion of the pipeline to be built. And on March 10, the tribes will rally for the Rise With Standing Rock Native Nations March on Washington.

When the 150 water protectors left camp on Wednesday, they marched out holding an American flag hung upside down.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2017, 01:11:02 AM by RE »
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Offline RE

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Standing Rock-#NoDAPL-Mni Wiconi-Water Protector
March on Washington 1 Week from Today!!!!
March 10, 2017

http://grist.org/climate-energy/the-standing-rock-sioux-could-still-beat-the-dakota-access-pipeline-in-court/

   
REUTERS/Terray Sylvester
dakota access
Here’s how the Standing Rock Sioux will keep fighting Dakota Access — in court
By Sabrina Imbler on Feb 28, 2017


By some accounts, the fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline now looks unwinnable. Standing Rock became a ghost town last week after police raided and razed the prayer camp that once hosted thousands of water protectors. Earlier this month, the Trump administration fast-tracked approval to build the final section of the pipeline and cancelled the environmental impact statement ordered by President Obama. Construction is nearing completion and oil could flow through the pipeline as early as March 6. For the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, time is running out — fast.

The Sioux’s best shot at stopping Dakota Access now lies in court. It may be a long shot, but a legal win is still possible, some advocates say.

A legal challenge filed by the tribe on Feb. 14 charges pipeline builder Dakota Access, LLC, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with a range of environmental, cultural, and treaty-based violations. It asks a federal judge to rule on whether the Army Corps broke laws and treaties by allowing construction of the last leg of the pipeline under Lake Oahe, a reservoir along the Missouri River in North Dakota.

“What you have is this well-supported decision from a past administration to do more and give a full consideration to treaty rights, and then the second administration throws it in the trash,” says Jan Hasselman of Earthjustice, who’s representing the tribe in its lawsuit. “That’s just not how it works.”

“It’s absolutely not over,” says Kyle Powys Whyte, a professor of philosophy and community sustainability and a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. He’s been closely tracking the battle against the Dakota Access Pipeline, and he thinks the tribes fighting the project have a good legal case. “Absolutely I think there’s a chance to stop this thing.”

One of the Sioux’s main legal complaints is that construction of the pipeline near its reservation and through sites it considers sacred would violate the tribe’s treaty rights — specifically, its rights under the 1851 and 1868 Fort Laramie treaties. At the heart of the matter is the Sioux’s right to self-determination and tribal sovereignty. Tribes like the Sioux are independent, self-governing nations like any other in the world. And the sovereignty of tribal nations preexists the United States, just like the nations themselves.

Many Native Americans believe that this sovereignty is now under extreme threat. The administration of Donald Trump may be the most hostile to Indian tribes since that of Andrew Jackson, who caused the Trail of Tears in the 1830s, argues Matthew Fletcher, a professor of law at Michigan State University and a member of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians.

The tribe’s legal motion also charges that the Army Corps violated the National Environmental Policy Act by terminating an environmental review of the pipeline, and violated the Clean Water Act as well.

The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe has joined the Standing Rock Sioux in its legal challenge, and on Feb. 22, the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe filed its own motion in the case, calling on the court to reject the Army Corps’ permit for pipeline construction. Several other allies, such as the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, have filed amicus briefs supporting the Standing Rock Sioux’s legal case.

Hasselman believes the Sioux have strong legal claims that could lead to the pipeline’s approval being overturned. If the current legal motion fails, he says the tribe will appeal in federal circuit court. Even if oil starts flowing in the pipeline in the interim, it could still be shut off down the line, Hasselman told the Bismarck Tribune.

And tribes are waging other legal battles against the pipeline too. On Feb. 9, the Cheyenne River Sioux filed a motion to temporarily halt construction on the grounds that the pipeline would violate their right to religious freedom by desecrating the sacred waters of Lake Oahe.

“I really hope that the case for religious freedom works,” Powys Whyte says. “This can’t possibly be a country where someone’s business idea can trample someone’s constitutional right to practice their religion.”

The Oglala Sioux Tribe joined the fray on Feb. 13 with its own lawsuit claiming that the pipeline threatened its treaty rights to safe drinking water.

The Cheyenne River Sioux’s religious claim was heard on Feb. 28, and a judge intends to rule on it by March 7. Other motions should be considered in the coming weeks. Still, it could take months, if not years, for all of these cases to move through the courts.

Even if pipeline opponents’ lawsuits are not successful in stopping the pipeline, Powys Whyte sees other gains that have come from the #NoDAPL fight. Standing Rock has provided a template for an indigenous-led movement against projects that pose threats to the environment and to tribes’ sovereignty — a template that could prove crucial to activists over the next four years. He points to two other battles for indigenous rights that will be heating up in coming months: the resistance against the Keystone XL Pipeline and the Tohono O’odham Nation’s staunch opposition to Trump building a border wall on their reservation in Arizona.

Powys Whyte urges non-indigenous environmentalists to get educated about Native American history and tribal rights, and to consult with tribes and incorporate their concerns into campaigns. “Part of the reason why non-indigenous activists are coming late to the Dakota Access fight is because they weren’t aware of the vulnerability and susceptibility Native tribes have,” Powys Whyte says. To learn more, he recommends reading the Native Appropriations blog and the Standing Rock syllabus.

“Literally, if more people supported democratic tribal sovereignty, we wouldn’t have something like the Dakota Access Pipeline happening,” Powys Whyte says.
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Offline RE

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Min Wiconi March on Washington this Weekend!
« Reply #354 on: March 06, 2017, 08:06:49 PM »
MARCH ON WASHINGTON MARCH 10TH!
MNI WICONI!


http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/american-indians-gather-d-c-four-day-protest-trump-dakota-access-pipeline/

American Indians gather in D.C. for four-day protest against Trump, Dakota Access pipeline


BY Blake Nicholson, Associated Press  March 6, 2017 at 3:28 PM EST


Opponents of the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines hold a rally as they protest President Donald Trump's executive orders advancing their construction, at Lafayette Park next to the White House in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 24, 2017. Photo by Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

BISMARCK, N.D. — Members of American Indian tribes from around the country are gathering in Washington for four days of protests against the Trump administration and the Dakota Access oil pipeline that will culminate with a Friday march on the White House.

Starting Tuesday, tribal members and supporters plan to camp each day on the National Mall, with teepees, a ceremonial fire, cultural workshops and speakers. Native American leaders also plan to lobby lawmakers to protect tribal rights.
RELATED LINKS

    Despite protests, Dakota Access Pipeline nears completion
    Pipeline executive compares Dakota protesters to terrorists
    How will Native tribes fight the Dakota Access Pipeline in court?

On Friday, a march of about 2 miles is planned from the Army Corps of Engineers office to the White House, where a rally is scheduled. Organizers on Monday didn’t immediately know how many people or tribes planned to take part.

“We are calling on all our Native relatives and allies to rise with us,” said Dave Archambault, the chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe. “We must march against injustice. Native nations cannot continue to be pushed aside to benefit corporate interests and government whim.”

The White House didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment Monday.

The protest comes as a federal judge in Washington is weighing a request by the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes to halt construction of the last section of the Dakota Access pipeline pending the outcomes of their lawsuit seeking to stop the project. The tribes say that section of the pipeline, which will pass under Lake Oahe, a large Missouri River reservoir, will threaten their water supply, sacred sites and religious rights. The judge is expected to rule this week.

The Friday march will begin at the Corps of Engineers office because the agency manages the Missouri River and last month gave the pipeline developer, Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners, permission to finish the project. The company expects to wrap up the work and have oil flowing this month.

The two tribes feel they weren’t properly consulted about the pipeline route, which the government disputes. They also they maintain their treaty rights were violated when the government changed its mind about doing further environmental study of the Lake Oahe crossing after President Donald Trump took office in January.

“This fight against the Dakota Access pipeline has been the tip of the spear of a powerful global movement calling for the United States government and Donald Trump to respect indigenous nations and people in our right to water, land, sovereignty, and culture,” said Dallas Goldtooth, an organizer with the Indigenous Environmental Network.
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Offline RE

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Mni Wiconi March on Washington Over-Under Betting
« Reply #355 on: March 07, 2017, 12:24:48 AM »
So, how many people do you think this Week's demonstration against His Dumpness will draw for the march?

i will go with 100K as an average between what the MSM reports and what the alt-newz lefty web reports.

More?  Less?

RE
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Standing Rock March on Washington Tomorrow: Musings
« Reply #356 on: March 09, 2017, 07:17:10 PM »
The Mni Wiconi March on Washington goes off tomorrow.

Very little in the MSM on estimates of how many people have so far showed up for this action.  It's actually supposed to be the culmination of a 5 day event which began on March 6th.  So most of the people who are going to March should already be there.

Now, I would think that all the people who would brave the ND cold for so many months would show up at least.  Although perhaps many do not have means to get across country for this iteration of the protest.  But on the other hand, the east coast has a much larger population, and there are some indigenous people in this neighborhood too, as well as numerous Greenies from the NE quadrant in the "Blue" states for whom this trip is not too long.

How good a networking job on Social Media did the organizers do in getting people to attend?  Since the MSM is for the most part ignoring this now since there are bigger fish to fry these days and there aren't all those dramatic images like Indians on Horseback facing down National Guard Armored Personnel Carriers, social media is the only way they can draw a crowd there.

Of course, any crowd size below a million doesn't do anything, just look at the Women's March which drew 1/2M females.  Complete waste of time, as was the "Day Without Women" so-called General Strike.  A few kids in a few school districts got a day off from school as female teachers (and maybe some sympathizing males) took the day off, but in the clinic I went to which was staffed by all females, they were all working and not a single one was even wearing so much as a red skirt or blouse, or even a scarf!  Definitely had no impact whatsoever on the National Economy or GDP.

One thing you can be sure of, which is unless this march either gets a huge turnout, or some Anarchists burn a few Gestapomobiles, there will be little to no coverage in the MSM.  A huge turnout seems unlikely at the moment, leaving Door #2 as the only possibility they might get some publicity on this action.

Basically, we just have to wait until the system collapse under its own weight before any meaningful change might take place, and then trying to implement any kind of reasonable changes in a time of collapse will be exceedingly difficult to do, if not impossible.  So it's another Predicament.   ::)

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Native communities look toward the next battleground after the DAPL
« Reply #357 on: March 16, 2017, 03:30:22 AM »
http://www.vox.com/identities/2017/3/15/14727490/native-activism-standing-rock-dakota-access-pipeline-protests

Native communities look toward the next battleground after the Dakota Access pipeline
“Native people will be able to find support within our communities and from allies in the future.”
Updated by John Paul Brammer Mar 15, 2017, 9:00am EDT


Photo by Stephen Yang/Getty Images

The last hundred people camped out for several months in protest of the Dakota Access pipeline’s construction marched out of the campground last month. A few dozen more stayed behind and were arrested for blocking continuation of the project.

The Army Corps of Engineers told water protectors (or demonstrators) they had until February 22 to leave the Cannon Ball, North Dakota, camp. It’s where President Donald Trump approved Energy Transfer Partners to resume construction for the pipeline shortly after he took office.

The Standing Rock Sioux had protested the Obama administration for months to halt the construction of the oil pipeline, fearing that a leak could contaminate the tribe’s main source of drinking water, Lake Oahe, and wreak havoc on sacred lands. While President Obama halted the project in December, Trump cleared Energy Transfer Partners to resume construction shortly after he took office the following month.

The move did not come as a surprise to those who have been fighting to have the pipeline stopped or diverted away from the lake. Few expected the Obama administration’s reprieve would last. Trump had made it clear that he supported both the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines. So now that the camp has cleared, what will come next for the Standing Rock Sioux, and Native Americans as a whole, with President Trump now in office?

Related
The big, nearly 200-year-old legal issue at the heart of the Dakota Access pipeline fight

Rosalyn LaPier is a visiting assistant professor of women’s studies and environmental studies and Native American religion at Harvard Divinity School. She is an enrolled member of the Blackfeet Tribe in Montana and is also Red River Métis.

“There has continually been a contentious relationship between tribal communities and the US government,” LaPier said of Trump’s presidency. “This is part of a long history that stretches all the way back to the 18th century.”

LaPier spoke to Vox about what the future of the struggle against the Dakota Access pipeline will look like under Trump, his potential impact on the environment, and what non-Natives can do to help.

This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity.
John Paul Brammer

Protests began under President Obama. What is the biggest thing that protectors think will change under Trump?
Rosalyn LaPier

I think it’s the ability to change federal laws. Mostly, it’s his Supreme Court. They have the ability to make decisions and change previous decisions that will deeply impact tribal communities.
John Paul Brammer

So what do you think the biggest difference will be between them?
Rosalyn LaPier

It’s hard to say. The only time that Trump has dealt with Natives before was when he tried to open a casino in New Jersey, in Atlantic City. He fought with a few tribes in the northeast area over casinos. He saw them as business adversaries.

During that time, he used the same rhetoric he uses today, the way he talks about people who are different. He fought very hard to stop tribes from being able to operate casinos, which he lost.
John Paul Brammer

What are water protectors and Native communities concerned about right now?
Rosalyn LaPier

One is change of regulations. We don’t know what he’s going to change in the next four years. That’s a big concern. We don’t know about funding, another huge issue. Is he really going to dramatically cut back funding on the Environmental Protection Agency? Is he going to defund science and scientists?

It’s through science that we’re able to learn about the natural world, and they are the ones who support, for example, quality environmental impact statements, which we rely on.

Are those going to be defunded? We don’t know yet. But those are major concerns.
John Paul Brammer

What is the future of Native sovereignty under Trump?
Rosalyn LaPier

He hasn’t changed any laws yet. But historically, the way it’s worked is Congress is the entity that sets up the relationship between tribal communities and the government. They have plenary power over tribal communities.

Usually Congress is creating laws and enacting laws, and then there’s the Supreme Court that addresses legal actions and impacts Native communities.

It’s pretty rare for a president to step in there, so the future depends on Trump’s relationship with Congress. We’ve seen executive orders coming from Trump, so I’m not sure where we’re headed.
John Paul Brammer

Where is Standing Rock finding hope right now?
Rosalyn LaPier

Hope has been evident in this entire last year with the protesting that’s been going on.

It’s shown that people will support you, and Native people will come together and support each other, and you can actually bring together a large number of allies to address these concerns.

That makes people feel much more hopeful about the ability to move forward. It tells us that Native people will be able to find support within our communities and from allies in the future.
John Paul Brammer

You are a visiting professor at Harvard Divinity School. What role has spirituality played in these protests?
Rosalyn LaPier

One thing we’re seeing more and more of, especially with the younger generation, is viewing this type of action, viewing protest, as spiritual.

They call themselves protectors. There’s an effort to see addressing the environment and harm to it as part of a spiritual practice.

Standing Rock initially started as a camp that people viewed as ceremonial, a place with daily prayers. Most of the young people doing these protests see it as participating in a process where they are protecting sacred land.
John Paul Brammer

In that context, there’s a draft for a religious freedom executive order floating around. Does that have any impact on Standing Rock?
Rosalyn LaPier

Yes. For one, people in the US have a hard time wrapping their heads around the fact that different Native communities have different traditions and religions.

But what we’ve seen [in the past month or so] is a push in the cultural idea that America is a Christian nation, that Christianity is our heritage and culture.

For those of us who are not Christian, and those of us who are historians, we know that’s simply not true.

When we have these kinds of conflicts over land and landscape in Standing Rock, the major reason is because there’s a conflict in religious ideas about the use of land. This will continue to be a conflict between Natives and the US.

[Trump] hasn’t signed the order yet, so it’s hard to react ahead of time. But the whole subtext of “religious freedom” in the US is Christianity. The subtext is not minority religions in America or Native religion or Islam or Buddhism. They’re saying Christianity.

So, yes. Religion will be wrapped up in the Dakota Access Pipeline and in the Trump presidency.
John Paul Brammer

In the fight ahead, what can non-Natives do to help?
Rosalyn LaPier

Continue to be an ally. Educate yourself about what is going on. The president has stepped into the process by having two separate executive orders. He did one on DAPL, but he did another on environmental impact statements.

As long as allies stay educated, maybe even learning what an environmental impact statement is and why they matter, and then speaking to their local legislators about them.

Speak to the people making decisions and be watchful. Be out there on social media and make sure people know that when a process is supposed to occur, like an EIS, make sure it actually occurs. When needed, push back.

Finally, make sure to not speak on behalf of Native people. Allow Natives to be on the forefront on their issues and make sure they’re the ones who are being heard.

You can stand side by side with people without being the one who is speaking out.
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THE BLACK SNAKE LIVES! Oil now flowing through #DAPL
« Reply #358 on: March 28, 2017, 02:41:03 PM »


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http://www.businessinsider.com/ap-what-completed-dakota-access-pipeline-means-for-key-players-2017-3/#the-opposition-2

Oil has begun flowing through the Dakota Access pipeline — here's what that means for the key players
Associated Press

    Blake Nicholson, Associated Press



Dakota Access PipelineDakota Access Pipeline protesters square off against police on October 5, 2016.Reuters/Terray Sylvester

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Oil has begun flowing through the Dakota Access pipeline after months of delays caused by protests and Native American tribes' efforts to stop the project.

The 1,200-mile pipeline is capable of moving half of the oil produced in North Dakota to a distribution point in Illinois. It will be fully operational in about three weeks.

Here's a look at how the saga has affected the major players:

 
View As: One Page Slides

THE COMPANY


In this May 9, 2015 file photo, pipes for the proposed Dakota Access oil pipeline that will stretch from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to Illinois are stacked at a staging area in Worthing, S.D.Associated Press/Nati Harnik

For Texas-based pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners, the start of operations means money.

The company had hoped the pipeline would be operational late last year, but resistance from Sioux tribes and a favorable order under the Obama administration blocked final construction until President Donald Trump took office in January and pushed federal officials to approve the final stage of construction.

The company says in court documents that it has long-term transportation contracts with nine companies to ship oil through the pipeline. Based on information supplied by ETP in court documents, delays have cost it more than half-a-billion dollars.

THE OPPOSITION


Native American and other activists celebrate after learning an easement had been denied for the Dakota Access Pipeline at Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 4, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota.Getty/Scott Olson

The fight over the pipeline drew widespread attention and at one point attracted thousands of protesters to an encampment near the small town of Cannon Ball.

For opponents, the flow of oil is a setback but not necessarily a defeat. Four Sioux tribes — the Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Yankton and Oglala — have a lawsuit pending in federal court and hope to persuade a judge to shut down the pipeline to protect Lake Oahe, a Missouri River reservoir and their water source.

Opponents say they also have succeeded on a larger scale by raising awareness about clean water issues and sparking protests at other pipeline projects across the nation, as well as at banks that have supported Dakota Access.

"The resistance is growing," protest leader Joye Braun said. "Water protectors have spread out around the country."
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Dakota Access fight provides blueprint for pipeline protests
« Reply #359 on: April 03, 2017, 12:07:17 AM »
http://www.kcci.com/article/dakota-access-fight-provides-blueprint-for-pipeline-protests/9220604

Dakota Access fight provides blueprint for pipeline protests
AP  |  Updated: 3:32 PM CDT Apr 2, 2017


By Blake Nicholson
BISMARCK, N.D. —

Prolonged protests in North Dakota have failed to stop the flow of oil through the Dakota Access pipeline, but they've provided inspiration for protests against pipelines around the country.

Tactics used in North Dakota such as resistance camps, social media and online fundraising are now being used against pipeline projects in nearly a dozen states.

Dallas Goldtooth with the Indigenous Environmental Network says organizers want to use the momentum of the anti-Dakota Access movement to further the cause for cleaner energy and greater respect for the rights of indigenous people.

Some people don't think that will pan out under the Trump administration, which has taken steps favorable to the fossil fuel industry. Congressman Kevin Cramer thinks the anti-pipeline movement will fade if protesters don't achieve their goals and get discouraged.
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