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Offline Surly1

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ANOTHER AMAZING COINCIDENCE: MAN TRAINED TO MASS MURDER COMMITS MASS MURDER
« Reply #3510 on: November 10, 2018, 07:24:45 AM »
ANOTHER AMAZING COINCIDENCE: MAN TRAINED TO MASS MURDER COMMITS MASS MURDER-




Above Photo: Crosstrippin/Flickr

The suspect in today’s mass shooting (well, the biggest one I’ve heard of thus far this morning; the day is young) is aveteranof the U.S. Marine Corps.

Another mass shooter in Florida last week justhappens to have been in the military.

The man who killed with a van in Toronto this year had been briefly in the Canadian military andpromotedhis crime on Facebook beforehand as a military operation.

The mass-killing in a Florida High School earlier this year was also promoted by the killer as a military operation, in the sense that he wore his JROTC (Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps) shirt and killed in the same school where the U.S. Army had trained him to shoot and instructed him in war-supporting views of the world and its history.

Obviously having been a member of the U.S. military can’t have any causal connection to mass shootings, and that’s why it makes the most amazing coincidence over and over again that so many individuals who’ve been trained to kill lots of people bizarrely end up killing lots of people.

Looking ata long listof mass shootings in the United States, almost all of the shooters are men, and almost all of them are between ages 18 and 59. Above age 59, the percentage of men in the general U.S. population who are veterans leaps up dramatically. Between 18 and 59 — by averaging the percentages for each age year — about 14.76 percent of U.S. men are veterans, butat least 35%of these shooters were veterans. I determined that by quickly reading available news reports online about each shooting, so the percentage is likely to be significantly higher. I found no news reports that stated that any of the shooters hadnotbeen in the military.

In U.S. mass shootings, military veterans are over twice as likely to be mass shooters, and probably more likely than that. Needless to say, this is a statistic about a large population, not information about any particular individual. Needless to say, profiling and discrimination are counterproductive. But here’s what else might be counterproductive: Training people in the arts of mass murder, launching wars, and dropping people trained for wars and having suffered through wars into a heavily armed society taught by schools and entertainment systems that mass-killing is the way to solve problems. Mass killing in the United States gets you on the news, and if you happen to be a president bombing a distant land it gets you widely praised and labeled as “finally presidential.”

Of course it’s possible that people inclined toward mass shootings are also inclined to join the military, that the relationship is a correlation and not a cause. In fact, I would be shocked if there wasn’tsometruth to that. But it’s also possible that being trained and conditioned and given a familiarity with mass shootings — and in some cases no doubt an experience of engaging in mass shooting and having it deemed acceptable — makes one more likely to mass shoot. I cannot imagine there isn’t truth in that.

The most killing Western societies do is done abroad by their militaries. In the United States, hundreds of deadly shootings every year are committed by police officers — disproportionately military veterans. Suicides, as well, are disproportionately committed by veterans. And not because we are untactful in pointing to problems, but because we generally fail to admit to and deal with problems. Veteran suicides aredriven byguilt over having participated in killing. That guilt is the top factor in predicting suicide, according to the U.S. Veterans Administration, and the very least likely piece of information in the entire world to be mentioned in a celebration of Veterans Day.

Consider this. If over 35% of U.S. mass shooters were Muslim or foreign or black or gay or socialist or red-haired or any of millions of other things likely actually coincidental, it would be a Big Freaking Deal. But the fact that over 35% of them have been trained by the world’s biggest mass-killing institution is simply not of any interest.

UPDATE: It’s not a shooting incident, but there was an incident of mailing potentially deadly poisons last month, and a reader pointed it out to me as also having a veteransuspect.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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BAYER CEO: ROUNDUP WEEDKILLER CANCER VICTIMS ARE ‘NUISANCES’
« Reply #3511 on: November 10, 2018, 07:49:04 AM »
BAYER CEO: ROUNDUP WEEDKILLER CANCER VICTIMS ARE ‘NUISANCES’



Above Photo: From Organicconsumers.org

There are about 8,700 lawsuits pending againstMonsanto, by people who allege that exposure to Roundup weedkiller is responsible for their cancer. Most of the people behind these lawsuits have stories not unlike the one told by Dewayne Johnson, during his landmark jury trial which resulted in a unanimous decision against Monsanto.

Like Johnson, many of these people have non-Hodgkin lymphoma—or they have family members who have already died from the disease. They face long, grueling trials as they go up against the biotech behemoth.

To Werner Baumann, CEO of Bayer (which acquired Monsanto last year for $63 billion), these people are just “nuisances.”

According to a recent Reutersreport, Baumann told reporters:

“If we can settle nuisances at some point where the defense costs in preparing cases are higher than potential settlement amounts, we will of course consider it from an economic standpoint.”

No wonder. After all, Bayer could end up on the hook for$800 billion in liability—a possibility that has made shareholders of the German company very unhappy.

But whatever Bayer decides—go to trial or settle—Baumanntold reporters he’s clear on one thing:

“We will resolutely and with all means defend ourselves in this (glyphosate) litigation.”

Defending the indefensible

On an August conference call following the verdict in the Johnson trial, Baumannpromised investors the agrochemical company would defend glyphosate, and in the meantime, continue business as usual.

“Nothing has changed concerning our strategy. We want to make sure that glyphosate will continue to be available to our key stakeholders as an excellent, safe and very important tool for modern agriculture.”

In other words, Bayer intends to do everything in its power to keep glyphosate on the market—despite a U.S. court’s determination that the weedkiller causes cancer. For Bayer, “business as usual” means profits before human health.

In the meantime, Bayer wants the rest of the world to think that the company is focused on sustainable farming practices that benefit farmers, consumers and the planet.

Bayer tweeted last month about hosting an international group of food bloggers at one of its Forward Farms in Abbenes, North Holland, where the topic of discussion was reported to be “sustainability.”

The farm is one of several around the world that make up Bayer’s ForwardFarming network, a project designed to bolster the idea that Bayer cares about the environment. Bayer currently has Forward Farms in the U.S., Latin America and in various parts of Europe including Italy, France, Belgium and Berlin.

Precision pesticide-spraying—‘holistic’ and ‘sustainable’?

Bayer describes its ForwardFarming project as “an initiative that works with independent farms around the world to help advance sustainable agriculture.”

So, what is it exactly that Bayer is doing that’s sustainable? Promoting GPS technology that helps farmers spray pesticides with precision, glyphosate included. According to Bayer’swebsite, “digital farming techniques, such as GPS informed precision spraying . . . are all demonstrated on the fam.” These tools allow farmers “to take a holistic approach to sustainable farming.”

Holistic approach? Don’t be fooled by Bayer’s feelgood choice of words, as the agrochemical giant’s definition of “holistic” simply means more glyphosate. Bayer even goes as so far to say that without glyphosate, soil organic matter would suffer, and climate change would actually get worse.

Those claims contradict the latest research, which shows that over time, over time, the application of crop chemicals, such as glyphosate, destroy beneficial bacteria in the soil, which reduces soil fertility and causes soil carbon to escape into the atmosphere where it contributes to a warming planet.

The real future of farming—organic and regenerative

Organic agriculture, on the other hand, prohibits the use of toxic crop chemicals and is repeatedly proven to boost soil health, increase yields and fight climate change, all while supporting farmer livelihood.

Regenerative agriculture, with its focus on biodiversity and soil health (which increases the soil’s capacity to retain water during periods of drought), has the potential to build resilient local farming systems that provide abundant, nutritious food.

Both time and research have shown that industrial, chemical-intensive agriculture is not the solution to feeding the world, and is in fact moving us backwards in terms of being able to solve world hunger, while at the same time reversing global warming.

If the prospect of billions of dollars in settlements from Roundup cancer lawsuits isn’t enough to scare Bayer off of glyphosate, we’re not sure what will. But one thing is for sure—increasing consumer demand for clean, healthy and pesticide-free food is driving the world’s food system away from toxic chemicals and toward a system that promotes healthy humans, healthy animals and healthy soil. No matter what Bayer says.

If you’d like to honor Johnson, a former school groundskeeper who is now terminally ill with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, help OCA and other organizations get Roundup out of schools.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline azozeo

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Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3512 on: November 10, 2018, 08:08:12 AM »
Werner Baumann, hmmmm, nazi in the woodpile, perhaps ?  :coffee:
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Old Nazis Never Die
« Reply #3513 on: November 10, 2018, 08:33:26 AM »
Werner Baumann, hmmmm, nazi in the woodpile, perhaps ?  :coffee:

Old Nazis never die, they just Fade Away for a while.  Rust never sleeps.

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Offline Eddie

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Re: Global GDP Still Propped Up By A Massive Amount Of Debt
« Reply #3514 on: November 10, 2018, 08:51:19 AM »
Tick tock, tick tock...

Global GDP Still Propped Up By A Massive Amount Of Debt

While the government agencies and economists continue to publish strong GDP figures, they seem to overlook how much debt it took to produce that growth. Or should I say, the “supposed growth.” The days of adding one dollar of debt to get one dollar of GDP growth have been long gone for more than 40 years. And, as global debt has increased, it has forced governments to lower interest rates.

Yes, it’s really that simple. I get a good chuckle when I hear analysts talk about rising interest rates to 10-15%. If the U.S. Government interest rate on the Treasury Bonds increased to just 5%, Uncle Sam would be paying over a trillion dollars a year just to service the debt. So, no… we aren’t going to see 10-15% rates again.

Well, we could… but, most of the global debt would have to collapse or be forgiven. Unfortunately, if global debt vaporizes or is forgiven, then the entire economy collapses as well. We must remember, GDP growth is also driven by oil production growth. There is no way in HADES that the oil industry can fund future production with 10-15% interest rates. IT JUST AIN’T GONNA HAPPEN.

Why? If it weren’t for the Fed dropping rates down to nearly zero, the Great U.S. Shale Oil Ponzi Scheme and the six million barrels per day of unprofitable shale oil production would have been a pipe dream. I can assure you that the shale oil industry could not fund operations or service their debt with 10-15% interest rates.

Most shale oil companies are paying on average between 4-5% interest to service their debt. If the companies’ interest rates double or triple, then it would make it extremely difficult to service the shale industry debt that is estimated to be $280-$300 billion.

However, this article isn’t about the about the Great U.S. Shale Ponzi Scheme; rather it’s about the global debt bubble propping up the economy.

Global Debt Increased More Than Five Times The GDP Q1 2018

According to data from the IMF and the Institute of International Finance, global debt increased four times more than the GDP growth during the first quarter of 2018. The IMF forecastsGlobal GDP to reach $84.8 trillion in 2018 and the Institute of International Finance reported total world debt increased by $8 trillion in the first quarter of 2018. Thus, I estimated that Q1 2018 GDP growth was $1.3 trillion, one-quarter of the $5 trillion increase from last year.

So, the world is now adding an astonishing six dollars of debt for each dollar of GDP growth:

Now, this is just an estimate as the quarterly GDP dollar figures aren’t released, but the debt is still rising at least fives times more than the GDP. It is quite amazing to see the global debt increase at such a rapid rate. The following chart (courtesy of Bloomberg), shows how much the global debt has grown over the past 15 years. However, since Q1 2008, global debt has jumped by more than $70 trillion.

Thus, the average annual global debt increase is approximately $7 trillion. So, to see world debt balloon by $8 trillion in the first quarter of 2018 shows just how much more the Central Banks are motivated in propping up the markets.

On the subject of Central Banks, the U.S. Government continues to rack up its public debt which has now reached $21.7 trillion… up $1.2 trillion since the same period last year. As I have mentioned, rising debt and interest rates forces Uncle Sam to pay a great deal more to service the debt:

Now that the U.S. Treasury has to pay more than a half trillion just to service its debt, I hardly doubt the Federal Reserve is going to allow rates to rise above 3% anytime soon. According to the TreasuryDirect.gov, the interest expense of $31.7 billion paid for October jumped by a stunning 30%, compared to $24.4 billion during the same month last year.

Even though $7 billion of additional interest expense in one month doesn’t seem like much compared to the trillions of debt being added, it adds up to a lot of stuff:

$7 billion = 30,000 homes (valued at $232,000)

$7 billion = 200,000 cars (valued at $35,000)

$7 billion = half annual Global Silver Mine supply

And again, this is just the additional U.S. Government interest expense for one month. Unfortunately, Americans have become oblivious to the staggering amount of debt in the system. Furthermore, the public and investors are also immune to the tremendous volatility taking place in the markets.

For example, one of the industrial bellwethers of the Dow Jones Index, Caterpillar, has seen its share price go into cardiac arrest over the past six months:

Caterpillar hit a high of $170 at the beginning of the year and a low of $112 last month. That is a 34% correction in a little more than six months. Moreover, if you look at the candlesticks on the upper right-hand of the chart, you will see the tremendous volatility not experienced in the past ten years.

In crazy October, Caterpillar’s stock traded between a high of $159 and a low of $112. That is a $45 movement from one of the leading manufacturing blue-chip stocks in just one month. Caterpillar is not supposed to trade in this manner, but this is the NEW NORMAL in a market that is about to go HOG WILD.

While the broader markets corrected higher from the lows last month, investors should not think the worst has passed. Oh no… the worst is yet to come. Nothing goes up or down in a straight line, but this economic cycle is nearly ten years long in the tooth and at some point will need to correct back towards reality. Caterpillar will likely have to fall back to its 200 Month Moving Average of $62, which is more than 50% lower from where it is trading today.

Forecasts For Much Higher Global GDP Growth By 2023 Means Gobs More Debt

The IMF forecasts that Global GDP will reach a staggering $108 trillion in the next five years. However, for Global GDP to rise by $23 trillion by 2023, then it makes sense that total world debt must also increase by at least 4-5 times:

As I have shown in prior articles, the world has been adding between 4-5 dollars of debt for each new dollar of GDP growth. If we assume the same with continue over the next five years, then world debt will have to jump by $100 trillion. Now, if we also consider a conservative 3% interest rate to service this $100 trillion of additional debt, the world will have to pay a mind-blowing $3 trillion a year, JUST TO SERVICE THE NEW DEBT….. LOL.

Lastly, the Central Banks will continue doing what they do best, and that is print money and kick the can down the road. Unfortunately, the debt and interest expense are getting to a level that is not sustainable for another decade. And if we add the coming disintegration of the U.S. Shale Oil Industry, Americans won’t have the growing energy supply to drive GDP growth. This is another factor not taken into consideration by economists.

IMPORTANT NOTICE:

I wanted to apologize to my subscribers and followers for the lack of articles this past month. There has been a lot going on here, especially after the mini tornado did a great deal of damage to the property. However, the mess has finally been cleaned up about 90%, and I will be returning to publishing 2-3 articles a week. I also plan on putting out some new videos as well.

If you are new to the SRSrocco Report, please consider subscribing to my: SRSrocco Report Youtube Channel.

Check back for new articles and updates at the SRSrocco Report. You can also follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Youtube below:


I get the debt.

But I don't agree, anymore, with most of the take-aways the alternative press say  (the "death of the dollar" crowd).....or the things (like this article) that they've published on a daily basis for 10 years and papered the internet with on a daily basis.

The most likely outcome is not a giant crash and a reset. The most likely outcome is that working class people are going to become REAL debt serfs, much worse than now. It's going to get much worse first. The real crash is probably still a decade a way, at least.

Tax breaks for the rich are going to be paid for...by more taxes for people who can't afford pet congressmen. In other words, by me and you.

By serious inflation, which HAS to happen to keep the house of cards from imploding.

And there is going to continue to be an erosion of all social programs, government-funded healthcare, and social security pensions, one way or another. It has not gotten nearly bad enough to make people do much...yet.





« Last Edit: November 10, 2018, 09:11:31 AM by Eddie »
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Offline azozeo

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Re: Old Nazis Never Die
« Reply #3515 on: November 10, 2018, 12:04:26 PM »
Werner Baumann, hmmmm, nazi in the woodpile, perhaps ?  :coffee:

Old Nazis never die, they just Fade Away for a while.  Rust never sleeps.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/0O1v_7T6p8U" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/0O1v_7T6p8U</a>

RE


No SHIT ! Great album amigo......
Grooved to the tunes on that vinyl for many a session back in the day.

This takes racial profiling to a new level. There the only "me-too" that's back peddling. The rest are in yer' face.
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Re: Global GDP Still Propped Up By A Massive Amount Of Debt
« Reply #3516 on: November 10, 2018, 01:41:54 PM »
I get the debt.

But I don't agree, anymore, with most of the take-aways the alternative press say  (the "death of the dollar" crowd).....or the things (like this article) that they've published on a daily basis for 10 years and papered the internet with on a daily basis.

The most likely outcome is not a giant crash and a reset. The most likely outcome is that working class people are going to become REAL debt serfs, much worse than now. It's going to get much worse first. The real crash is probably still a decade a way, at least.

Tax breaks for the rich are going to be paid for...by more taxes for people who can't afford pet congressmen. In other words, by me and you.

By serious inflation, which HAS to happen to keep the house of cards from imploding.

And there is going to continue to be an erosion of all social programs, government-funded healthcare, and social security pensions, one way or another. It has not gotten nearly bad enough to make people do much...yet.

Needless to say, I don't agree at all.  This is wishful thinking on your part IMHO.  You want time to make the $10M you think you need to live a comfortable retirement.  Erosion of social programs will be preceeded by erosion of pension plans and the stock market, which will lose value faster than SS does.  The rich will be hurt the most as their 401Ks go worthless.  Poor people like me will be hurt the least, because we are so far down already we can't fall too far.  We pay no taxes and raising them is pointless, it wouldn't raise any money.  Only stupid tax donkeys in the top 10% will see their taxes go up.

Masters of the Universe and the Filthy Rich will do fine for a while, until they end up swinging from lamp posts.

RE
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Offline Surly1

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Re: Global GDP Still Propped Up By A Massive Amount Of Debt
« Reply #3517 on: November 11, 2018, 01:58:42 AM »
I get the debt.

But I don't agree, anymore, with most of the take-aways the alternative press say  (the "death of the dollar" crowd).....or the things (like this article) that they've published on a daily basis for 10 years and papered the internet with on a daily basis.

The most likely outcome is not a giant crash and a reset. The most likely outcome is that working class people are going to become REAL debt serfs, much worse than now. It's going to get much worse first. The real crash is probably still a decade a way, at least.

Tax breaks for the rich are going to be paid for...by more taxes for people who can't afford pet congressmen. In other words, by me and you.

By serious inflation, which HAS to happen to keep the house of cards from imploding.

And there is going to continue to be an erosion of all social programs, government-funded healthcare, and social security pensions, one way or another. It has not gotten nearly bad enough to make people do much...yet.

Needless to say, I don't agree at all.  This is wishful thinking on your part IMHO.  You want time to make the $10M you think you need to live a comfortable retirement.  Erosion of social programs will be preceeded by erosion of pension plans and the stock market, which will lose value faster than SS does.  The rich will be hurt the most as their 401Ks go worthless.  Poor people like me will be hurt the least, because we are so far down already we can't fall too far.  We pay no taxes and raising them is pointless, it wouldn't raise any money.  Only stupid tax donkeys in the top 10% will see their taxes go up.

Masters of the Universe and the Filthy Rich will do fine for a while, until they end up swinging from lamp posts.

RE

I see both POVs expressed here, but keep coming back to one assertion expressed by Eddie:

Quote
By serious inflation, which HAS to happen to keep the house of cards from imploding.

Seems to me inflation has to be baked into the fiat cake by definition, and that alone, over time, will be enough to strip-mine savings and pensions. OTOH, the greater the inflation, the greater the cost of borrowing of Uncle Sam, the deeper the hole gets, wash, rinse, repeat.

Even the article says that the Fed won't raise rates above 3%.

We've been waiting for wheelbarrows full of Weimar money since the Speedy Gonzalo Lira days, and it hasn't happened yet.
So which is it?
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline monsta666

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Re: Global GDP Still Propped Up By A Massive Amount Of Debt
« Reply #3518 on: November 11, 2018, 05:37:40 AM »
We've been waiting for wheelbarrows full of Weimar money since the Speedy Gonzalo Lira days, and it hasn't happened yet.
So which is it?

The economic/financial system is more robust that these commentators expected. Instead of acknowledging this mistake however these commentators continue to double down on what they say lest they have to admit on calling it wrong. What should be noted is why inflation of 3% is baked into economics. Inflation acts not only as a means of wealth distribution (in this regard it is generally more regressive than progressive) but it also acts as means of incentivizing people to invest and spend their money. If I keep my money in a savings account it will lose value but if I put it in on more high risk instrument such as stocks, bonds or real estate I can beat the odds and get a return. This incentive is what the government (and banks) want hence why it is here to stay. They want inflated markets and real estate because the primary beneficiaries to such a scenario are the rich and powerful.

To demonstrate why inflation is needed the best way to look at this is through the deflationary lens. What happens in a deflationary scenario? The value of your savings goes up in time. Sounds good? Problem is if this happens on a grand scale it means all options of buying/spending are deferred. Why spend now when I can spend more tomorrow? This attitude especially if it becomes ingrained as is the case in Japan means that you will get continual recessions. The other problem is with deflation is the value of your outstanding loans increases and guess what? The banks, governments, businesses (small and large) are experiencing historic highs when it comes to debt levels. Loans become unaffordable and you can easily tilt the economy to a huge credit crunch which would lead us to a repeat of 2008. As such the people in power want to stop a deflationary scenario at ALL COSTS hence they will prevent central banks from ever raising interest rates above the modest threshold of 3%.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2018, 05:40:10 AM by monsta666 »

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Re: Global GDP Still Propped Up By A Massive Amount Of Debt
« Reply #3519 on: November 11, 2018, 06:04:37 AM »
We've been waiting for wheelbarrows full of Weimar money since the Speedy Gonzalo Lira days, and it hasn't happened yet.
So which is it?

The economic/financial system is more robust that these commentators expected.


The money system is no more robust than a car engine leaking oil kept running by adding more oil continually.


Or to use another metaphor: it's all smoke and mirrors.

Offline monsta666

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Re: Global GDP Still Propped Up By A Massive Amount Of Debt
« Reply #3520 on: November 11, 2018, 06:17:28 AM »
The money system is no more robust than a car engine leaking oil kept running by adding more oil continually.


Or to use another metaphor: it's all smoke and mirrors.

True that however the point is these type of commentators have been predicting an imminent collapse within the "next two years" for the past 10 years so which is it? Is the system really that fragile or perhaps it is not as frail as they expected or they are wrong with their conclusions. If what you say doesn't happen after such a long time frame then there must be something that you have overlooked or got wrong. The ability to manipulate the system as you allude is definitely a valid reason but I also suspect the global economy is more robust than people are willing to admit. Don't get me wrong I do not believe business as usual will continue indefinitely. What is unsustainable must end at some point, it is just the tipping point needs to be something large like a breakup of the EU, peak oil, unexpected global major war, climate change etc. I don't think things will change through simple mismanagement which again is what these commentators are alluding too by mentioning the Reich government.

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Re: Global GDP Still Propped Up By A Massive Amount Of Debt
« Reply #3521 on: November 11, 2018, 06:58:17 AM »
I get the debt.

But I don't agree, anymore, with most of the take-aways the alternative press say  (the "death of the dollar" crowd).....or the things (like this article) that they've published on a daily basis for 10 years and papered the internet with on a daily basis.

The most likely outcome is not a giant crash and a reset. The most likely outcome is that working class people are going to become REAL debt serfs, much worse than now. It's going to get much worse first. The real crash is probably still a decade a way, at least.

Tax breaks for the rich are going to be paid for...by more taxes for people who can't afford pet congressmen. In other words, by me and you.

By serious inflation, which HAS to happen to keep the house of cards from imploding.

And there is going to continue to be an erosion of all social programs, government-funded healthcare, and social security pensions, one way or another. It has not gotten nearly bad enough to make people do much...yet.

Needless to say, I don't agree at all.  This is wishful thinking on your part IMHO.  You want time to make the $10M you think you need to live a comfortable retirement.  Erosion of social programs will be preceeded by erosion of pension plans and the stock market, which will lose value faster than SS does.  The rich will be hurt the most as their 401Ks go worthless.  Poor people like me will be hurt the least, because we are so far down already we can't fall too far.  We pay no taxes and raising them is pointless, it wouldn't raise any money.  Only stupid tax donkeys in the top 10% will see their taxes go up.

Masters of the Universe and the Filthy Rich will do fine for a while, until they end up swinging from lamp posts.

RE

I see both POVs expressed here, but keep coming back to one assertion expressed by Eddie:

Quote
By serious inflation, which HAS to happen to keep the house of cards from imploding.

Seems to me inflation has to be baked into the fiat cake by definition, and that alone, over time, will be enough to strip-mine savings and pensions. OTOH, the greater the inflation, the greater the cost of borrowing of Uncle Sam, the deeper the hole gets, wash, rinse, repeat.

Even the article says that the Fed won't raise rates above 3%.

We've been waiting for wheelbarrows full of Weimar money since the Speedy Gonzalo Lira days, and it hasn't happened yet.
So which is it?

  You only get Weimar style double digit inflation if the International Banking Cartel repudiates the currency and central banks don't buy the debt issued by that country.  This hasn't heppened to the Dollar and is unlikely to happen in the near future.  What is happening and is liekly to continue is a *relatively* slow deflation where people lose purchasing power over time and more and more biznesses go BK due to less money circulating.

RE
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Offline Eddie

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Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3522 on: November 11, 2018, 08:40:30 AM »
I bought a nice new  4X4 pickup in  1995 for 28K.

I bought a comparable 4X4 pickup this year for 42K.

Know what that works out to?

I get 2.1% per year inflation. Do the math.  I think that's a valid indicator. Durable goods. Apples to apples.

This...during what has generally been regarded as a period with some of the lowest inflation in history. If you control the money supply, you can cause inflation at will. Even during these times when huge deflationary forces ARE in play, and I'm not saying they aren't, because you are right  that the real circulating money supply is shrinking and the velocity of money is next to nothing.

And I really only need 5 million, but it would be nice to make 10, because I expect to pay half in tax. LOL.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2018, 08:47:44 AM by Eddie »
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Offline Surly1

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Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3523 on: November 11, 2018, 08:42:00 AM »
I bought a nice new  4X4 pickup in  1995 for 28K.

I bought a comparable 4X4 pickup this year for 42K.

Know what that works out to?

I get 2.1% per year inflation. Do the math.  I think that's a valid indicator. Durable goods. Apples to apples.

This...during what has generally been regarded as a period with some of the lowest inflation in history. If you control the money supply, you can cause inflation at will. Even during these times when huge deflationary forces ARE in play, and I'm not saying they aren't, because you are right  that the real circulating money supply is shrinking and the velocity of money is next to nothing.

Damn.

Economists lie. Governments lie. Math don't lie.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3524 on: November 11, 2018, 08:48:16 AM »
Economists lie. Governments lie. Math don't lie.

Depends who does the math and where they get their numbers from.

RE
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