AuthorTopic: The Surlynewz Channel  (Read 601824 times)

Offline Surly1

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LINDSEY GRAHAM INTRODUCING RESOLUTION TO PERMANENTLY ATTACH LIPS TO TRUMP’S ASS
« Reply #3975 on: October 25, 2019, 04:18:19 AM »
I sure would like to know what sort of kompromat the Russians have on Huckleberry J. Butchmeup.


LINDSEY GRAHAM INTRODUCING RESOLUTION TO PERMANENTLY ATTACH LIPS TO TRUMP’S ASS
The senator has had enough of this impeachment business and is formally condemning Democrats for their treatment of the president.




BY BESS LEVIN
OCTOBER 24, 2019

Lindsey Graham is hopping mad and he’s pretty sure you know why. Despite the South Carolina senator’s insistence that Donald Trump did nothing wrong when it comes to Ukraine, and that it’s “very appropriate” for the president of the United States to try to extort another country, House Democrats just had to go ahead and open their impeachment inquiry. Even though Trump, who admitted to withholding aid to Ukraine until it investigated his political rival, is quite obviously innocent. Even though, as God is his witness, Graham will testify Trump doesn’t have a corrupt bone in his body, and would never do any of the things his acting chief of staff has already confessed to on live television. Even though Nancy Pelosi can quite obviously see it’s tearing Graham up inside.

And that got Lindsey thinking: Sure, he can wag his finger at Democrats and tell them they should be ashamed of themselves, that their mamas raised them better than this, and that they should be sent to bed without any shrimp and grits, but serious times call for serious measures. And that is why, on Thursday afternoon, he will introduce a resolution that not only formally denounces the House’s impeachment inquiry, but makes it clear to any presidents listening that he is willing to go down with the ship. Speaking about his plan on Fox News, Graham told Sean Hannity, “This resolution puts the Senate on record condemning the House…. Here’s the point of the resolution: Any impeachment vote based on this process, to me, is illegitimate, is unconstitutional, and should be dismissed in the Senate without a trial.”

Of course, nowhere in the Constitution does it say that the House must hold a vote before opening an impeachment inquiry, nor does anyone believe that Republicans would suddenly be totally cool with the proceedings should one be held, but never mind you that. Graham is also apparently upset that the president has not been allowed to confront the whistle-blower, whose identity is protected by federal law. “We cannot allow future presidents and this president to be impeached based on an inquiry in the House that’s never been voted upon, that does not allow the president to confront the witnesses against him, to call witnesses on his behalf, and cross-examine people who are accusing him of misdeeds,” he said.

Graham, whose devotion to Trump runs so deep that he’s willing to overlook all the times the president has slandered his dead friend, announced the resolution after saying earlier this month that he would be sending a letter to Pelosi telling her that Senate Republicans have no intention of removing Trump from office over a friendly phone call with the president of Ukraine. And even though Graham is sticking his neck out for the president he loves, for some people, it’s apparently not enough. According to Jonathan Swan, “a source close to” Donald Trump Jr.doesn’t think a resolution is enough. “If you’re going to talk the talk on Fox, you better walk the walk in the chamber,” this person said. “And a resolution is just talk. People expect action.”

It’s not clear what kind of action Don Jr.’s inner circle would like Graham to take, or what would constitute walking the walk, though there is presumably a nonzero chance Graham will use his 3 p.m. press conference to chain himself to the doors of Pelosi‘s office and refuse to get out of the way until the House agrees to clear Trump on all charges and pass a law declaring him president for life.

“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline Surly1

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Cali in Chaos
« Reply #3976 on: October 28, 2019, 06:59:55 PM »


If you haven't been in the blackout zones, where I spent much of my weekend (climate benefit aside), it's like this: no traffic lights. No gas stations. No stores. No schools. No internet. Not a lot of options for recharging what wasn't charged. It is shut down. People can't work or go to school or run their businesses. The stars were beautiful last night in the darkness but I am sure people are feeling isolated and distressed and concerned about what's next in the short term and the long. The billions lost by people whose lives were put on freeze because of an antiquated evil corporation and its outdated, unmaintained grid and a growing climate catastrophe hasn't been estimated, but it's huge, to reduce what is productive and creative and socially beneficial work to dollars.

I was fine at a house with headlights and solar lights and a gas stove, but the no communications but my phone losing its charge wasn't fun. I'm back in the city, but getting up this morning to the brown horizon, the smell o smoke, and the two helicoptors near overhead: I thought, this is a war, and then I thought, nature finally pushed back. Most of the north bay and a lot of east bay is shut down and there was a traffic jam of people pouring into the city at midmorning. To San Francisco where everything works, since we don't have wildfires (because we barely have anything wild). The winds are due to start up again tomorrow. photo h/t Mary Diaz, who is an evacuee (and who did fantastic work in 2017 with fire evacuees). Many people who were severely traumatized in 2017 and who in some cases were still rebuilding or had recently rebuilt are among the evacuees.

It's so clear we're not adequately prepared for this. I don't even know where the 180,000 (official figure) Sonoma County evacuees went and mass evacuations by car, Southern California reminded us, leads to traffic jams, which when gas is hard to come by is also a mess. I heard someone on the radio (in my car, coming back to SF) saying they're getting emergency alerts that are just links that, without a smart phone you can't follow up on and also some cell towers are out, and not a lot of people (except me and your grandma) still have land lines.

We are the seventh largest economy in the world. We are also a disaster zone. This is climate chaos. This can't be the new normal. This is why I did a benefit for climate action and data last night. This is why I'll keep working on it.

--Rebecca Solnit

“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline RE

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Re: Cali in Chaos
« Reply #3977 on: October 29, 2019, 12:32:38 AM »
Anybody that does NOT have a Gennie by now in CA is deserving of a Darwin Award.  ::)

 

RE
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Offline Surly1

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Re: Cali in Chaos
« Reply #3978 on: October 29, 2019, 05:31:41 AM »
Anybody that does NOT have a Gennie by now in CA is deserving of a Darwin Award.  ::)

RE

Great idea for someone who lives in the city. And gas storage? Just keep the cans in your bedroom?
Fucking brilliant.
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

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Re: Cali in Chaos
« Reply #3979 on: October 29, 2019, 06:21:08 AM »
Anybody that does NOT have a Gennie by now in CA is deserving of a Darwin Award.  ::)

RE

Great idea for someone who lives in the city. And gas storage? Just keep the cans in your bedroom?
Fucking brilliant.

I live in an apartment, brother.  They have things called PORCHES.  You drop your gennie on the porch and run an extension cord inside.  Rocket Science.

For really Old Fashioned apartments in the inner cities, they have things called FIRE ESCAPES.  Drop your gennie on there, then run the cord through the window..  ::)

This is however CA, not NYC or Chicago or Baltimore.  The apartment complexes are just like mine.  There is no reason you cannot run a gennie in a typical suburban style apartment complex, and even in a tightly packed Big Shity of the old style, it can be done.  Easy COMMUNAL solution, get together with everyone else in the building, buy a good size one (say 12,000 Watts) and drop it on the roof.

RE
« Last Edit: October 29, 2019, 06:27:51 AM by RE »
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Offline Surly1

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The Real Reason Facebook Won’t Ban Political Ads
« Reply #3980 on: October 29, 2019, 06:23:34 AM »
The reach of the DDFB page has absolutely plummeted since FB has rolled out their soul-crushing algo. Maintaining the page is becoming a waste of time, but has become a bad habit.

The Real Reason Facebook Won’t Ban Political Ads
Brian Feldman@bafeldman6:22 P.M.
 

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Earlier this month, Facebook caught flack for its decision to not fact-check political advertising. It is not the role of Facebook, according to Mark Zuckerberg, to limit the speech of politicians or candidates for political office. He’d much rather take a hands-off approach and let the voters choose. Almost immediately, politicians put that decision to the test, as when Elizabeth Warren ran ads about Zuckerberg endorsing Donald Trump (Zuckerberg has not endorsed a candidate). Other troll ads included the assertion that Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell supported the progressive Green New Deal.

In defending the policy, Zuckerberg has asserted that the revenue Facebook collects from political advertising is negligible and that banning political ads entirely would not hurt his company’s bottom line. In a call with the press last week, he said, “This controversy is not worth the very small part of our business that this makes up. So, you know, this isn’t about money.”

Then why should Facebook continue letting people run political ads? “I believe that giving people a voice is important, and ads can be an important part of voice,” he said on the same call. “In the political system, if you’re a challenger candidate or an advocacy group that might not otherwise be covered by the media, ads are an important way to be able to get your message out in front of some people.”

In regards to Facebook, this is something of an understatement: On Facebook, buying ads is the only way to get your message in front of people.

In early 2018, Facebook announced it was changing the News Feed algorithm to favor posts from friends and family over those from Pages and brands. “We’ve gotten feedback from our community that public content — posts from businesses, brands, and media — is crowding out the personal moments that lead us to connect more with each other,” the CEO wrote at the time.

The result of this change was a significant reduction in organic reach, the metric that quantifies how many people see a post for free because they follow a page or a friend shares it. The opposite of this is paid reach, which quantifies how many people see a post because its placement in the News Feed was paid for.

In early 2018, when the algorithm change went into effect, a marketing exec explained to Digiday that “organic reach for some smaller business Facebook pages (fewer than 10,000 fans) has hovered around ten percent for some time.” That means ten percent of a page’s followers would see a post on that page appear in their News Feed if the page didn’t buy sponsored posts. If you were a local candidate, you might have one of these smaller pages. Following the friends-and-family change, that organic-reach number dropped to “virtually zero.”

Put another way, it is basically impossible for anyone running a Facebook page to reach their audience — people who have deliberately clicked the “Follow” button — without paying Facebook for the privilege. Depending on your perspective, Facebook is either a tollbooth or an extortion racket. Organic reach has gone down, and ad rates have gone up.

Anyone running a political campaign on Facebook hoping to reach voters is forced to buy ads. Otherwise, the campaign might as well not exist. That’s why the Trump campaign is spending so heavily on Facebook, and more so than any other campaign by a significant margin: More money equals more speech.

What’s important to note is that there is no longer some theoretical middle ground between all and nothing when it comes to posting on Facebook. Banning political ads there would effectively get rid of all campaigning on Facebook. The possible effects of such a decision are a big unknown.
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline Surly1

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Re: Cali in Chaos
« Reply #3981 on: October 29, 2019, 06:27:16 AM »
Anybody that does NOT have a Gennie by now in CA is deserving of a Darwin Award.  ::)

RE

Great idea for someone who lives in the city. And gas storage? Just keep the cans in your bedroom?
Fucking brilliant.

I live in an apartment, brother.  They have things called PORCHES.  You drop your gnnie on the porch and run an extension cord inside.  Rocket Science.

For really Old Fashioned apartments in the inner citities, they have things called FIRE ESCAPES.  Drop your gennie on there, then run the cord through the window..  ::)

This is however CA, not NYC or Chicago or Baltimore.  The apartment complexes are just like mine.  There is no reason you annot run a gennie in a typical suburban style apartment complex, and even in a tightly packed Big Shity of the old style, it can be done.  Easy COMMUNAL solution, get together with everyone else in the building, buy a good sie one (say 12,000 Watts) and drop it on the roof.

RE

And storage for your five gallon cans of gasoline, Einstein? If I saw you dragging gasoline bombs into your apartment and endangering me and my family, I'd be calling 9-1-1. The fact that you can do whatever on your porch in Palmer has little to do with the realities of urban living.
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Cali in Chaos
« Reply #3982 on: October 29, 2019, 06:28:23 AM »
Anybody that does NOT have a Gennie by now in CA is deserving of a Darwin Award.  ::)

RE

Great idea for someone who lives in the city. And gas storage? Just keep the cans in your bedroom?
Fucking brilliant.
It's starting to be cold here so locally we start thinking about power outages and furnaces. The same basic rules apply with wildfires.  Fridges, devices and a wall mount ac could easily and cheaply be run using this setup. The car generator people say it well. They tell you you have 75 percent of a backup generator in your driveway. Large fuel tank you regularly fill, engine you already maintain, large alternator that can do 800 to 1200 watts continuously, a battery used to doing hi amp starts for brief periods, a great muffler, and a great catalytic converter for polution. This one is really small I would homebuilt it with a 2000 watt inverter myself. Of course people would use up all their car gas on ac and fridge and get stranded... Darwin still has a say.

Here is a ready made one
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/tTZKgoejmuE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/tTZKgoejmuE</a>

Here is a more barebones version:   
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/R3MxonKaPu8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/R3MxonKaPu8</a>
« Last Edit: October 29, 2019, 06:31:19 AM by Nearingsfault »
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline RE

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Re: Cali in Chaos
« Reply #3983 on: October 29, 2019, 06:35:43 AM »
Anybody that does NOT have a Gennie by now in CA is deserving of a Darwin Award.  ::)

RE

Great idea for someone who lives in the city. And gas storage? Just keep the cans in your bedroom?
Fucking brilliant.

I live in an apartment, brother.  They have things called PORCHES.  You drop your gnnie on the porch and run an extension cord inside.  Rocket Science.

For really Old Fashioned apartments in the inner citities, they have things called FIRE ESCAPES.  Drop your gennie on there, then run the cord through the window..  ::)

This is however CA, not NYC or Chicago or Baltimore.  The apartment complexes are just like mine.  There is no reason you annot run a gennie in a typical suburban style apartment complex, and even in a tightly packed Big Shity of the old style, it can be done.  Easy COMMUNAL solution, get together with everyone else in the building, buy a good sie one (say 12,000 Watts) and drop it on the roof.

RE

And storage for your five gallon cans of gasoline, Einstein? If I saw you dragging gasoline bombs into your apartment and endangering me and my family, I'd be calling 9-1-1. The fact that you can do whatever on your porch in Palmer has little to do with the realities of urban living.

Gas storage is called your CAR or Motorcycle.  They have GAS TANKS.  You siphon as you need it.  WTF in CA doesn't have a car?  Especially if they live out where the fires are burning.  The fires aren't burning in the inner cities you know.

I have 2 cars, one has a 15 gallon gas tank, the other a 20 gallon one.  My gennie will run 9 hours on ONE gallon of gas.  I can run it for 2 hours and charge up all my batts, then run the fridge and everything else off an inverter the rest of the day.  I can even keep my Criipple Carts charged up this way, and BTW they are still more electric power storage units.  I got Batts here up the Wazoo.  ::)

RE

RE
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Offline Surly1

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Re: Cali in Chaos
« Reply #3984 on: October 29, 2019, 06:41:42 AM »
Anybody that does NOT have a Gennie by now in CA is deserving of a Darwin Award.  ::)

RE

Great idea for someone who lives in the city. And gas storage? Just keep the cans in your bedroom?
Fucking brilliant.
It's starting to be cold here so locally we start thinking about power outages and furnaces. The same basic rules apply with wildfires.  Fridges, devices and a wall mount ac could easily and cheaply be run using this setup. The car generator people say it well. They tell you you have 75 percent of a backup generator in your driveway. Large fuel tank you regularly fill, engine you already maintain, large alternator that can do 800 to 1200 watts continuously, a battery used to doing hi amp starts for brief periods, a great muffler, and a great catalytic converter for polution. This one is really small I would homebuilt it with a 2000 watt inverter myself. Of course people would use up all their car gas on ac and fridge and get stranded... Darwin still has a say.

Here is a ready made one
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/tTZKgoejmuE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/tTZKgoejmuE</a>

Here is a more barebones version:   
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/R3MxonKaPu8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/R3MxonKaPu8</a>

My objections to RE about this have to do with deployment of generators for apartments, in particular fuel storage. For those with a freestanding home, a setup like you describe ought to be considered table stakes.

Those videos are really good ideas.
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline Surly1

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Why the middle class can’t afford life in America anymore
« Reply #3985 on: October 29, 2019, 06:45:07 AM »
Why the middle class can’t afford life in America anymore




By Larry Getlen

After spending his days teaching AP American history and economics at the public Live Oak High School in San Jose, Calif., Matt Barry drives for Uber.

Barry’s wife, Nicole, teaches as well — they each earn $69,000, a combined salary that not long ago was enough to afford a comfortable family life. But due to the astronomical costs in his area, including real estate — a 1,500-square-foot “starter home” costs $680,000 — driving for Uber was a necessity.

“Teachers are killing themselves,” Barry says in the new book, “Squeezed: Why Our Families Can’t Afford America” (Ecco), out Tuesday. “I shouldn’t be having to drive Uber at eight o’clock at night on a weekday. I just shut down from the mental toll: grading papers between rides, thinking of what I could be doing instead of driving — like creating a curriculum.”

In her book, author Alissa Quart lays out how America’s middle class is being wiped out by the cost of living far outpacing salaries while a slew of traditionally secure professions — like teaching — can no longer guarantee a stable enough income to clothe and feed a family.

“Middle-class life is now 30 percent more expensive than it was 20 years ago,” Quart writes, citing the costs of housing, education, health care and child care in particular. “In some cases the cost of daily life over the last 20 years has doubled.”

In one of her book’s many striking findings, Quart writes that according to a Pew study, “Before the 2008 crash, only one-quarter of Americans viewed themselves as lower class or lower-middle class. No longer. After the recession of 2008 . . . a full 40 percent of Americans viewed themselves as being at the bottom of the pyramid.”

One of the book’s main messages, therefore, is that people finding it impossible to make ends meet shouldn’t blame themselves. It’s the system, she says, that’s broken.

“The main problem is a basic lack of a 21st century safety net for families,” Quart tells The Post, offering the cost of day care as just one example.

“In Montreal,” where day care is government subsidized, it costs “$7 to $20 a day. That makes a huge difference for families.” Figured annually for 50 weeks a year, five days a week, people in Montreal pay $1,750 to $5,000 per year on child care.

By comparison, Quart says that here, “many of the families I spoke to, who were ostensibly middle class, were spending around 20 to 30 percent of their income on day care.” Annual averages in the US range from “$10,468 for a center-based child-care program to $28,905 for a nanny.” According to the Economic Policy Institute, the annual average cost of infant care in New York state is $14,144. The average New York family with just one child pays 21.2 percent of their income on child care. For two kids, that rises to 38.7 percent.

For teachers with children, the problem is compounded by a decrease in salaries, benefits and general job security. The situation is equally dire for teachers of grade school, high school or college.

“These days, professors may be more likely than their students to be living in basement apartments and subsisting on ramen and Tabasco,” she writes.

At the professorial level, more colleges than ever, driven by bloated administrative bureaucracies, are relying on adjunct professors who receive low wages and no benefits. In the book, Quart cites one survey that found that 62 percent of adjunct professors earn less than $20,000 a year from teaching.

“A lot of things happened in [academia]. It became much more administrative,” says Quart, noting that tenured professor positions have been eliminated through attrition as more non-tenure track professors, such as adjuncts, were hired instead.

She writes that according to the Department of Education, “college and university administrative positions grew by 60 percent between 1993 and 2009 — 10 times the rate of growth of tenured faculty positions.”

By contrast, in 1975, Quart writes, “full-time tenure-stream professors were 45.1 percent of America’s professoriate. As of 2011, they are only 24.1 percent: Only one professor in six (16.7 percent) actually has tenure.”

“Something like 40 percent of teachers in American colleges and universities are adjuncts, which is insane,” Quart adds. “Middle-class parents are spending all their savings to pay for colleges where [their children are] going to be taught by people making $3,000 a class [per semester]. It’s going to change the quality of education, because people are teaching four classes a semester for no money.”

Quart profiled several struggling adjuncts in the book. Justin Thomas taught a total of four to six classes a semester at two colleges in Illinois. The first paid him $3,100 per class; the second, a paltry $1,675. Quart writes that “his paychecks arrived a month after each semester began, and during those four weeks it was macaroni and cheese and baked potatoes every night for his two daughters.”

Brianne Bolin, 35 years old with a disabled 8-year-old boy, taught four classes a year at Columbia College in Chicago for a grand total of $4,350 per class, per semester, never making more than $24,000 a year from teaching. At the time of the book’s writing, she shopped at Goodwill exclusively and relied on Medicaid and food stamps to feed her son.

Bolin began teaching at Westwood College in Chicago at age 26, switching to Columbia after one semester. She got pregnant at 28, then took two years off to care for her son.

When she returned to work, she got a rude awakening about how the realities of teaching had changed.

“Her boss warned her she’d never get a permanent job, [telling her], ‘Academia just isn’t a career choice anymore,’ ” Quart writes.

Those lucky enough to have a job in the field might find themselves needing to drive for Uber as well
Bolin quit teaching in 2016 and is now studying to become a speech pathologist. But the situation for professors has become so dire that before she left, she and two others founded PrecariCorps, a “nonprofit devoted to helping impoverished professors.”

So far, the “scrappy and fledgling” charity has “received over 100 donations and 50 requests for funding” and dispersed over $10,000 to professors in need.

If a charity for professors strikes you as sad, there is also a charity for members of another down and out profession, one that was once synonymous with high status and massive salaries — lawyers.

Leave Law Behind is an organization that helps lawyers exit the profession, declaring on its website that “there is an easier, less painful, less stressful and lucrative way to make money.” The organization’s founder, a former lawyer named Casey Berman, told Quart that “he saw his mission as ‘motivating’ former lawyers who are either broke or deeply frustrated, or both.”

In the book, Quart illustrates how lawyers are weighed down with massive debt while making a fraction of what they used to before the Great Recession — if they’re lucky enough to find a job at all.

“After the 2008 recession, law firms and corporations retained fewer lawyers,” she writes, noting that lawyers in some states have it worse than others.

“In Alaska, 56.7 percent of those with a law degree were not working as lawyers. In Tennessee, only 53.6 percent of degree holders were working as lawyers; in Missouri it’s 50.8, and in Maryland it’s 50.3 percent . . . there are excess attorneys in all but three states.” (For the record, those states are Rhode Island, North Dakota and Delaware.)

According to The New York Times, “10 months after graduation only 60 percent of the law school class of 2014 had found full-time jobs with longtime prospects.”

But those lucky enough to have a job in the field might find themselves needing to drive for Uber as well, since “lawyers may be making one-quarter of what they were making before 2008.”

The problem has been exacerbated by the automation of the review of legal documents, a task once accomplished by young lawyers. Programs like Viewpoint and Logikcull handle the organization, coding, retrieval and search of massive amounts of evidentiary documents, easily processing a slew of paperwork in ways that used to be done by people by hand. As a result, opportunities at the bottom of the profession have shrunk, taking pay levels down with them.

It’s the rare young lawyer who can get one of the few jobs remaining for this task, and they “are typically now earning just $17 to $20 an hour, while shouldering upward of $200,000 in student debt.”

As technology continues to advance, it will soon swallow the few entry-level jobs that are left, even as college debt continues to increase, Quart writes.

“The average law student’s debt was about $140,000 in 2012 — a 59 percent increase over 2004.”

While making ends meet is tougher than ever for teachers and lawyers, it’s even harder for those whose jobs have never been particularly secure.

Women in care professions, such as nannies, or even just professional women who become pregnant face similar standard-of-living obstacles, plus additional losses due to discrimination, Quart writes.

In the book, Quart notes that women’s salaries go down 7 percent for each child they bear and that cases of discrimination against women who become pregnant are on a massive upswing.

“In 2016,” she writes, “a report published by the Center for WorkLife Law found that so-called family-responsibilities discrimination cases had risen 269 percent over the last decade, even though the number of federal employee discrimination cases as a whole had decreased.”

This, Quart says, is due to a traditional lack of respect for caregivers.

“There’s a theory called Prisoner of Love, where people who do care work will accept lower wages supposedly because they love the people they’re being paid to care for. So they’re weakened by that, and they’re less part of a marketplace.”

As if these problems aren’t worrisome enough, Quart says technology is eliminating or degrading professions at a furious rate that will only increase, as “roughly 30 percent of the tasks within 60 percent of our current American occupations could soon be turned over to robots.”

The list of affected professions reads like a broad cross section of America, white-collar and blue-collar alike. Nurses, pharmacists, journalists, truckers, cashiers, tax preparers — very few professions will remain unaffected by advances in technology.

The problems have surprised many by reaching into the middle and upper-middle classes. The only people doing well in this economy, writes Quart, are the already wealthy, and our massive levels of income inequality are a significant factor.

“The United States is the richest and also the most unequal country in the world,” she writes. “It has the largest wealth inequality gap of the 200 countries in the [Credit Suisse Research Institute’s] Global Wealth Report of 2015. And when the top 1 percent has so much — so much more than even the top 5 or 10 percent — the middle class is financially and also mentally outclassed at each step.”

While the problems Quart lays out are sprawling and complex, she believes the only way out is to strengthen the social safety net. This includes considering solutions like universal basic income (UBI), which was first endorsed by President Richard Nixon in 1969 and is today supported by an unlikely mix of pundits on both sides of the political aisle.

“It’s like a monthly allowance for families and individuals that’s across the board, so it’s less of a handout for people specifically,” she says. “When I heard about it, I was thinking how much it would help, say, a mom I interviewed with two kids who had been laid off, or the professor who has a disabled kid and is on food stamps. If that person had $21,000 extra dollars a year through a basic income guarantee, would that have made all the difference?”

However we dig our way out — and especially if we don’t — Quart wants those who are struggling financially to realize that more and more people are in the same boat.

“There is a larger reason that your job is precarious and your parents’ jobs weren’t,” she writes. “It’s a system failure. It’s bigger than you.”
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Cali in Chaos
« Reply #3986 on: October 29, 2019, 06:48:45 AM »
Anybody that does NOT have a Gennie by now in CA is deserving of a Darwin Award.  ::)

RE

Great idea for someone who lives in the city. And gas storage? Just keep the cans in your bedroom?
Fucking brilliant.

I live in an apartment, brother.  They have things called PORCHES.  You drop your gnnie on the porch and run an extension cord inside.  Rocket Science.

For really Old Fashioned apartments in the inner citities, they have things called FIRE ESCAPES.  Drop your gennie on there, then run the cord through the window..  ::)

This is however CA, not NYC or Chicago or Baltimore.  The apartment complexes are just like mine.  There is no reason you annot run a gennie in a typical suburban style apartment complex, and even in a tightly packed Big Shity of the old style, it can be done.  Easy COMMUNAL solution, get together with everyone else in the building, buy a good sie one (say 12,000 Watts) and drop it on the roof.

RE

And storage for your five gallon cans of gasoline, Einstein? If I saw you dragging gasoline bombs into your apartment and endangering me and my family, I'd be calling 9-1-1. The fact that you can do whatever on your porch in Palmer has little to do with the realities of urban living.

Gas storage is called your CAR or Motorcycle.  They have GAS TANKS.  You siphon as you need it.  WTF in CA doesn't have a car?  Especially if they live out where the fires are burning.  The fires aren't burning in the inner cities you know.

I have 2 cars, one has a 15 gallon gas tank, the other a 20 gallon one.  My gennie will run 9 hours on ONE gallon of gas.  I can run it for 2 hours and charge up all my batts, then run the fridge and everything else off an inverter the rest of the day.  I can even keep my Criipple Carts charged up this way, and BTW they are still more electric power storage units.  I got Batts here up the Wazoo.  ::)

RE

RE
Siphoning gas from modern cars is really hard:  A gas tapper is a great kit. You need at least 2 sizes of solid tubing:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/KnvvA6OsCTQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/KnvvA6OsCTQ</a>
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline RE

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Re: Cali in Chaos
« Reply #3987 on: October 29, 2019, 07:10:53 AM »
Anybody that does NOT have a Gennie by now in CA is deserving of a Darwin Award.  ::)

RE

Great idea for someone who lives in the city. And gas storage? Just keep the cans in your bedroom?
Fucking brilliant.

I live in an apartment, brother.  They have things called PORCHES.  You drop your gnnie on the porch and run an extension cord inside.  Rocket Science.

For really Old Fashioned apartments in the inner citities, they have things called FIRE ESCAPES.  Drop your gennie on there, then run the cord through the window..  ::)

This is however CA, not NYC or Chicago or Baltimore.  The apartment complexes are just like mine.  There is no reason you annot run a gennie in a typical suburban style apartment complex, and even in a tightly packed Big Shity of the old style, it can be done.  Easy COMMUNAL solution, get together with everyone else in the building, buy a good sie one (say 12,000 Watts) and drop it on the roof.

RE

And storage for your five gallon cans of gasoline, Einstein? If I saw you dragging gasoline bombs into your apartment and endangering me and my family, I'd be calling 9-1-1. The fact that you can do whatever on your porch in Palmer has little to do with the realities of urban living.

Gas storage is called your CAR or Motorcycle.  They have GAS TANKS.  You siphon as you need it.  WTF in CA doesn't have a car?  Especially if they live out where the fires are burning.  The fires aren't burning in the inner cities you know.

I have 2 cars, one has a 15 gallon gas tank, the other a 20 gallon one.  My gennie will run 9 hours on ONE gallon of gas.  I can run it for 2 hours and charge up all my batts, then run the fridge and everything else off an inverter the rest of the day.  I can even keep my Criipple Carts charged up this way, and BTW they are still more electric power storage units.  I got Batts here up the Wazoo.  ::)

RE

RE
Siphoning gas from modern cars is really hard:  A gas tapper is a great kit. You need at least 2 sizes of solid tubing:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/KnvvA6OsCTQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/KnvvA6OsCTQ</a>

I don't own a car less than 15 years old. lol.

It's not hard though even on a modern car to get the gas out.  you go under the car and either pop a hole through the gas tank or cut the gas line.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

Offline Nearingsfault

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Re: Cali in Chaos
« Reply #3988 on: October 29, 2019, 07:23:37 AM »
Anybody that does NOT have a Gennie by now in CA is deserving of a Darwin Award.  ::)

RE


Great idea for someone who lives in the city. And gas storage? Just keep the cans in your bedroom?
Fucking brilliant.

I live in an apartment, brother.  They have things called PORCHES.  You drop your gnnie on the porch and run an extension cord inside.  Rocket Science.

For really Old Fashioned apartments in the inner citities, they have things called FIRE ESCAPES.  Drop your gennie on there, then run the cord through the window..  ::)

This is however CA, not NYC or Chicago or Baltimore.  The apartment complexes are just like mine.  There is no reason you annot run a gennie in a typical suburban style apartment complex, and even in a tightly packed Big Shity of the old style, it can be done.  Easy COMMUNAL solution, get together with everyone else in the building, buy a good sie one (say 12,000 Watts) and drop it on the roof.

RE

And storage for your five gallon cans of gasoline, Einstein? If I saw you dragging gasoline bombs into your apartment and endangering me and my family, I'd be calling 9-1-1. The fact that you can do whatever on your porch in Palmer has little to do with the realities of urban living.

Gas storage is called your CAR or Motorcycle.  They have GAS TANKS.  You siphon as you need it.  WTF in CA doesn't have a car?  Especially if they live out where the fires are burning.  The fires aren't burning in the inner cities you know.

I have 2 cars, one has a 15 gallon gas tank, the other a 20 gallon one.  My gennie will run 9 hours on ONE gallon of gas.  I can run it for 2 hours and charge up all my batts, then run the fridge and everything else off an inverter the rest of the day.  I can even keep my Criipple Carts charged up this way, and BTW they are still more electric power storage units.  I got Batts here up the Wazoo.  ::)

RE

RE
Siphoning gas from modern cars is really hard:  A gas tapper is a great kit. You need at least 2 sizes of solid tubing:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/KnvvA6OsCTQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/KnvvA6OsCTQ</a>

I don't own a car less than 15 years old. lol.

It's not hard though even on a modern car to get the gas out.  you go under the car and either pop a hole through the gas tank or cut the gas line.

RE
Have you tried syphoning on your older vehicles? I had a 1991 ranger and could not siphon it.. A 1996 explorer either. The whole point of that was MOST people would be better served with the inverter  car model instead of gas storage and generator. Efficiency is about the same. Of course if you drive a huge vehicle things change  you would have to test. Personally I've decided to use this model to recharge my off grid system in case of a prolonged outages instead of a generator. In case of a really prolonged one I would go to charcoal but if that happens the whole world has stopped working.
If its important then try something, fail, disect, learn from it, try again, and again and again until it kills you or you succeed.

Offline RE

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Re: Cali in Chaos
« Reply #3989 on: October 29, 2019, 12:23:02 PM »
Have you tried syphoning on your older vehicles? I had a 1991 ranger and could not siphon it.. A 1996 explorer either. The whole point of that was MOST people would be better served with the inverter  car model instead of gas storage and generator. Efficiency is about the same. Of course if you drive a huge vehicle things change  you would have to test. Personally I've decided to use this model to recharge my off grid system in case of a prolonged outages instead of a generator. In case of a really prolonged one I would go to charcoal but if that happens the whole world has stopped working.

I agree, the cheapest and easiest solution to problems mentioned in the article like keeping your cell phone charged, the easiest solution is the cigarette lighter plug type inverter of around 200W.  This is sufficient to keep your phone and laptop charged up as well as some rechargeable Diode lights.  A Thermoelectric cooler can keep some refrigerated goods OK for a while assuming the ambient temperature isn't TOO hot outside, but obviously not a full refrigerator and freezer.  For this you gotta have a gennie, as I think it's impractical to try and run an extension cord from the car to the house, unless of course you live in an individual dwelling, not an apartment complex.

If I lived in my old off-campus apartment at Columbia which was a 6 story Walk-Up (we lived on the 3rd floor) that had 10 apartments (2 to a floor, ground floor was Cannon's Bar & Grill), I would have got together with the neighbors I knew (about half the tenants were college students) and dropped a gennie like this one on the roof:



That would keep about 6 fridges running.  Split 6 ways, about $200/apartment.

RE
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