AuthorTopic: The Surlynewz Channel  (Read 682686 times)

Offline Surly1

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18654
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
#BREAKING: Jeffrey Epstein confidante, British socialite and heiress Ghislaine Maxwell, has been arrested by the FBI,
sources tell @Jonathan4NY

http://4.nbcny.com/6HecP4m

So Sad to hear that Maxwell committed suicide in federal custody next week.

Fuck GM, when will they get Prince Andrew?  ???   :icon_scratch:

RE

Dream on, Macduff.
Prince Andrew will be clapped in irons when a squadron of pigs takes flight from your ass and circles the moon.
"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline Surly1

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18654
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
A genuinely sad story and a cautionary tale.

California man who posted regret for attending party died a day later of coronavirus
"This is no joke," Thomas Macias wrote on Facebook the day before he died. "If you have to go out wear a mask and practice social distancing."



Thomas Macias died of complications from the coronavirus.

Janelle Griffith is a breaking news reporter for NBC News.

A California man posted his regret on Facebook about contracting the coronavirus after he attended a party in June. A day later, he died from COVID-19.

On June 20, Thomas Macias, wrote an impassioned message on Facebook in which he lamented ignoring social distancing guidance.

"Some of you may know, but most don't," Macias, 51, wrote. "I ... went out a couple of weeks ago" and contracted the coronavirus.

Macias, who was a truck driver, expressed guilt for having possibly exposed his family to the virus.

"Because of my stupidity I put my mom and sisters and my family's health in jeopardy," he wrote. "This has been a very painful experience."

"Hopefully with God's help," he added, "I'll be able to survive this."

He died the next day.

An official from the Riverside County Office of Vital Records told NBC News on Wednesday that Macias died from COVID-19.

From late March through early June, Macias was going out only when necessary, Gustavo Lopez, his brother-in-law, said in a phone interview Wednesday.

"He was quarantining because he was overweight and had diabetes," Lopez said.

IMAGE: Thomas Facias' Facebook post
The expletives have been blurred by NBC News.Courtesy Gustavo Lopez

Lopez said that sometime in early June, however — after Gov. Gavin Newsom indicated that he would loosen social distancing restrictions — Macias attended a party in Lake Elsinore, about 70 miles southeast of Los Angeles, where he lived.

Afterward, a friend of Macias' who was also at the party contacted him to say he had tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, Lopez said.

The friend told Macias that he was aware of the diagnosis when he attended the gathering but that because he was not showing symptoms, he did not believe he could infect anyone else.

The friend advised everyone who attended the party to get tested.

Naturally, Lopez said, Macias was upset. Still, he said, Macias took accountability for his actions, as evidenced in his Facebook post.

Lopez said that he was unsure how many people went to the party but that Macias was among more than a dozen people who contracted COVID-19.

Macias visited his sister Veronica, who is married to Lopez, at the couple's home on June 11, before he was tested. Lopez remembers being concerned for Macias after the visit.

"He did not look right," Lopez said. "He was really sweaty."

Macias, who did not marry and did not have children, soon started to feel sick and believed it was related to his diabetes.

He was tested for COVID-19 on June 16 and received a positive diagnosis on June 18. In his Facebook post two days later, Macias implored people to take the coronavirus seriously.

"This is no joke," he wrote. "If you have to go out wear a mask and practice social distancing."

He was rushed to the hospital at about 11 a.m. on June 21. He was put on a ventilator sometime from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. and died by 9 p.m., Lopez said.

"I think what he wanted people to know, this is a real thing," Lopez said. "It's serious, and it kills people."

Download the NBC News app for full coverage and alerts about the coronavirus outbreak

Macias is remembered by his family as a "good guy" with a lot of friends.

"He would do anything for everybody," Lopez said. "No questions asked."

He is survived by his mother, two sisters, four nieces and two great-nieces.

Veronica Lopez said her brother always greeted people with a smile and was not one to hold a grudge.

"He used to say opinions don't matter, relationships do," Lopez said.


"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline Phil Rumpole

  • Bussing Staff
  • **
  • Posts: 105
    • View Profile
#BREAKING: Jeffrey Epstein confidante, British socialite and heiress Ghislaine Maxwell, has been arrested by the FBI,
sources tell @Jonathan4NY

http://4.nbcny.com/6HecP4m

So Sad to hear that Maxwell committed suicide in federal custody next week.

Fuck GM, when will they get Prince Andrew?  ???   :icon_scratch:

RE

Dream on, Macduff.
Prince Andrew will be clapped in irons when a squadron of pigs takes flight from your ass and circles the moon.

So far, he's guilty of implausibly denying having sex with a girl who was of the age of consent. So far they are not prosecuting that as rape because of her saying she was "expected to" by Maxwell and Epstein. Unless some underage girls come forward to name others, not just Epstein and Maxwell,  or all the video Epstein obviously kept sees light, everyone implicated gets away with it.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2020, 09:32:44 AM by Phil Rumpole »

Offline Surly1

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18654
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
#BREAKING: Jeffrey Epstein confidante, British socialite and heiress Ghislaine Maxwell, has been arrested by the FBI,
sources tell @Jonathan4NY

http://4.nbcny.com/6HecP4m

So Sad to hear that Maxwell committed suicide in federal custody next week.

Fuck GM, when will they get Prince Andrew?  ???   :icon_scratch:

RE

Dream on, Macduff.
Prince Andrew will be clapped in irons when a squadron of pigs takes flight from your ass and circles the moon.

So far, he's guilty of implausibly denying having sex with a girl who was of the age of consent. So far they are not prosecuting that as rape because of her saying she was "expected to" by Maxwell and Epstein. Unless some underage girls come forward to name others, not just Epstein and Maxwell,  or all the video Epstein obviously kept sees light, everyone implicated gets away with it.

Yes.

Plus made men of "the Firm" get away with anything they want, any time they want.
"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline Surly1

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18654
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Want to Reduce Police Brutality? Require Officers to Buy Malpractice Insurance
Police brutality is a problem. Let’s not leave it to culture warriors to solve it.




James D. Miller
Police misconduct has become a topic of national conversation. Predictably, the discussion has featured lots of sloganeering and rhetorical posturing but few substantive proposals. Here’s my attempt to rectify that.

We should require police to buy market-priced malpractice insurance that pays out if an officer is caught engaging in misconduct.

How would this work?

Insurance companies would set rates based on the risk of an individual officer being found liable for bad behavior. Ideally, the most dangerous members of law enforcement would be driven out of their profession by high insurance rates. Insurance companies would seek ways of reducing police misconduct, while officers would have a financial motivation to follow their insurer’s advice.

The salaries of police officers would correspondingly be increased so that the average officer does not take a financial hit. Most likely, police who work in dangerous neighborhoods would face higher insurance rates and so their base pay would have to be especially pushed up. Where would we come up with the funds for this?

In 2019, New York City paid around $180 million “in civil judgments and claims for police-related lawsuits.” Under my proposal, much of the money for police misconduct settlements would now come from insurance companies and not cities. This frees up funds for higher police salaries.

The “magic of the market” would push insurers to find the traits that make officers most likely to be found guilty of malpractice. If a company charged too high a price for “safe” officers, competitors could steal customers by offering lower prices. A company that underpriced policies for “dangerous” officers would end up paying more in claims than it received in premiums.

Young men face relatively high auto insurance rates because they cause a disproportionate number of accidents. These elevated prices discourage many of them from driving and so reduce the number of car crashes. Forcing police officers to buy malpractice insurance would prevent those most at risk for engaging in brutality from entering law enforcement in the first place. Police with low likelihood of being found guilty of misconduct would do especially well financially and so these kinds of people would be driven into the profession.

Police captains who followed insurance company advice and managed to lower the risk of misconduct for all their officers would effectively be giving their underlings a raise. Police would especially want to work under these captains, and cities would eagerly bid for their services as it would allow them to attract better officers, or at least pay lower salaries for their police. Captains would, consequently, have a strong incentive to learn how to reduce police brutality.

Companies that provide fire insurance frequently force customers to take measures that have been proven to reduce the risk of fires. Expect the same to happen under police malpractice insurance. Poorly behaved departments will be forced to reform by their insurance carrier.

We should structure insurance around a negligent standard where payments are made only if someone is hurt because the police did something wrong. If police kill a criminal after he started shooting at the police, we would not want insurance policies to pay out because then insurance companies would advise police to run away from active shooters.

To prevent the police from minimizing their liability risk by avoiding all conflict we might want to define police misconduct to include not intervening in dangerous situations when we think help should have been provided. In general, we would have to worry about insurance companies pushing police to reduce misconduct by taking actions not in the public interest. Of course, we already have such incentives under the current system through the “Ferguson effect,” which is when the crime rate in a neighborhood increases because the police have reduced activity in such places to avoid triggering a backlash.

Police currently have qualified immunity which often shields them from lawsuits brought by supposed victims of their misconduct. This immunity might be difficult to eliminate because it has the strong support of police unions. My proposal would still work if qualified immunity remained, however, because under it victims of police misconduct would have the right to sue insurance companies if the insurance companies didn’t pay the victims a reasonable amount for the harm caused by negligent police officers.

To eliminate bad cops, we must first identify them. Unfortunately, absent a viral video of police brutality, cities often do not have any incentive to gather information on police misbehavior. And even if a city did want to determine which of their officers were most at risk of engaging in misconduct, most towns don’t have the analytical skills to make this determination. Insurance companies, however, excel at studying risks. That’s why it makes sense to create a system where they apply their talents to determine which members of law enforcement are most likely to misbehave.

Identifying dangerous police officers is not enough as the “system” must also have the will to push them out of law enforcement. Police unions typically block efforts to fire cops for anything other than the most outrageous conduct, at least after an officer has finished a probationary period. Unions do have some justification in restricting police firings because cities might otherwise make policing a patronage job where officers get removed to make room for the friends and relatives of major campaign contributors. Unions might object to the insurance approach less than they would to giving cities the right to easily fire police because it does not give cities discretionary power many would likely abuse.

Weakening police unions enough so cities could easily fire bad cops is probably not a realistic long-term option. Public sector unions are a key constituency of the Democratic Party, and police unions are the only ones Republicans tend to like. Furthermore, while the current circumstances might allow for a temporary reduction in the strength of police unions, most likely these unions would claw back their powers when the public was paying less attention.

Ideally, individual police officers, and not their unions, would pay for misconduct insurance. Even if, however, unions paid for each officer’s insurance out of general union dues, the liability insurance plan would still apply market pressure to reduce police brutality. If the union paid for all the liability insurance, then the union would have a strong incentive to regulate police conduct to minimize their insurance obligations.

My plan would fail, however, if unions negotiated a contract with cities where the cities paid the insurance premiums because then neither officers nor unions would be harmed by increased police misconduct.

Police malpractice insurance would also fail to improve law enforcement conduct if courts did not reasonably judge misconduct proceedings. Insurance companies will set rates and give advice based not directly on behavior but rather on legal liability. Malpractice insurance will only improve police behavior if insurance companies perceive that reducing actual misconduct would cut the amount they have to pay out in claims.

Malpractice insurance would also fail if laws prevent insurance companies from setting rates based on the best evidence. Imagine, for example, that insurance companies find that alcoholics are especially prone to police misconduct. Then, even if we think of alcoholism as more of a disease than a moral failing, we should want alcoholics to pay extremely high police malpractice insurance rates to discourage them from being in law enforcement. If, however, alcoholics can escape high insurance rates because this would constitute “discrimination,” then the insurance markets would do a worse job at policing officers’ behavior.

If you seek improvements, work with experts. The insurance companies are the experts at reducing the frequency of accidents. By requiring police to buy malpractice insurance, we can get our insurance sector to cut police brutality and, if we are very lucky, make the issue as dry, analytical, and boring as the rest of the insurance industry.
"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline Surly1

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18654
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
It wouldn't be 2020 without the plague
« Reply #4355 on: July 06, 2020, 03:05:25 AM »
Can frogs and boils be far behind?


BREAKING: Chinese authorities have issued a warning about the bubonic plague.
After suspected case was reported at a Mongolian hospital.
Known as the Black Death of the Middle Ages, the disease is highly infectious and often spread by the fleas on rodents.




Chinese authorities have issued a warning about the bubonic plague and forbidden eating certain animals after a suspected case was reported at a Mongolian hospital.

Known as the Black Death of the Middle Ages, the disease is highly infectious and often spread by the fleas on rodents.

The warning in the Chinese region of Inner Mongolia comes a day after a hospital reported a patient suspected to have fallen ill with the potentially fatal disease.

The health committee of the city of Bayan Nur issued the third-level alert, the second lowest in a four-level system.

The alert forbids the hunting and eating of animals that could carry plague.

The public is also asked to report any suspected cases of plague or fever with no clear causes, and to report any sick or dead marmots.


The bubonic plague epidemic in the mid-1300s devastated Europe and Asia. Photo: Getty
The warning on Sunday (local time) follows four reported cases of plague in people from Inner Mongolia last November, including two of pneumonic plague, a deadlier variant of plague.

Plague cases are not uncommon in China but outbreaks have become increasingly rare.

From 2009 to 2018, China reported 26 cases and 11 deaths.

Source:- China Daily & South China Post
"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline Surly1

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18654
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
The Pandemic Is the World’s Long Overdue Reality Check
« Reply #4356 on: July 07, 2020, 05:13:34 AM »
The Pandemic Is the World’s Long Overdue Reality Check
Populists came to power peddling political fantasies—but the coronavirus has broken the fever.



Trump and Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson arrive for a bilateral meeting during the G7 summit on Aug. 25, 2019 in Biarritz, France. POOL/GETTY IMAGES

Something may have broken—or rather, begun to break—last month when U.S. President Donald Trump held an indoor rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma in open defiance of the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic and found, to his shock and outrage, that his own supporters had failed to show up. That something is the politics of alternate reality that he and other illiberal populists have ridden to power in recent years.

It has long been understood that totalitarian leaders sustain themselves through the manipulation of reality; that, after all, is the theme of George Orwell’s 1984and Arthur Koestler’s Darkness at Noon. Orwell, who understood clearly the power of language to obscure rather than reveal, would hardly have been shocked to see the practice transposed to democracies, but it didn’t fully happen in his day. Perhaps it awaited the shotgun marriage of extreme polarization and social media.

Over the last few years, Trump, Boris Johnson in the United Kingdom, Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, Narendra Modi in India, and others have carried out an experiment in the mass manufacture of alternative realities in a democratic society. Their success has forced a question: What reality, if any, will prove so terrible that it will expose their game? Americans have experienced a few false starts, including an impeachment trial, that have only proved that much of what transpires in political life does not reach people intimately enough to dispel the shadows. Nothing, however, is more intimate than the prospect of sickness and death.

Three of the four largest democracies run by illiberal populists—the United States, Brazil, and the U.K.—now rank one, two, and three in deaths from the coronavirus. (India currently lags behind but is moving up with frightening speed.) That is not a coincidence, for the leaders in each country have tried to minimize the gravity of the disease or—in Bolsonaro’s case—deny it altogether. Populist leaders deny COVID-19 for the same reasons they deny climate change: first, because acknowledging a force beyond their control might break the spell of omniscience in which they have bound their followers; and second, because deference to science and logic undermines the emotional sources of their appeal. If Anthony Fauci is right, Trump must be wrong.

The overwhelming signs that the world is warming have done nothing to break the hold of the populists, perhaps because few of their followers have experienced climate change as a personal catastrophe. At first, while it chiefly affected a handful of wealthy nations and blue states in the United States, the same was true of the coronavirus. But we have entered a new phase where the disease has become ubiquitous and ill-prepared countries are paying a terrible price. The connection between state failure and death has become too obvious to ignore.

The political consequences of this dawning recognition have become clear in the last few months as populist leaders and parties have suffered a serious erosion of support. The New York Times reported last week that Trump has fallen a staggering 14 points behind Joe Biden in the presidential contest as voters have spurned his response both to the pandemic and to the killing of George Floyd. Since the spring, Boris Johnson has lost 20 points both in approval of his response to the coronavirus and in his Conservative Party’s lead over Labour. Bolsonaro’s approval rating has dropped eight points since the beginning of the year as virtually all Brazilians disagree with his open contempt for social distancing. Even Vladimir Putin, who pioneered the techniques of fabrication that the populists now emulate, has seen his popularity fall to the lowest levels ever as coronavirus cases have surged in Russia.

The major European right-wing parties that have thrived in recent years—first by insisting that the European Union gravely threatened national sovereignty and then by stoking apocalyptic fears over the influx of refugees and immigrants—have similarly fallen back in the wake of the pandemic, especially in countries where citizens have found the government response reassuring. A recent poll showed the Alternative for Germany party enjoying the support of only 9 percent of Germans, its worst result in two and a half years. The far-right Sweden Democrats, tied in polls with the ruling Social Democrats at the outbreak of the pandemic, have now fallen 11 points behind.

A poll, of course, is only a snapshot in time. Trump could still beat Biden, and Bolsonaro, as Foreign Policyrecently observed, still has a vast reservoir of support. The immense charisma of successful populists makes them almost immune to mistakes that would destroy a lesser figure. But democratic leaders have, of course, a smaller margin of error than do true autocrats; they depend on good luck to hide their shortcomings. What is now clear, at least in the United States, is that for three years Trump enjoyed a charmed life in which no real crisis challenged his simple-minded answers to complicated problems; now the law of averages has caught up with him.

It is true, of course, that populists on the left can prey on widespread resentments as easily as can those on the right; dangerous leaders from the time of Maximilien Robespierre and Jean-Paul Marat have exploited hatred of the entitled and the rich. The rising intensity of feeling on the left implies that such a world may lie before us; it is not, however, the one we live in. When Bernie Sanders blames corporate greed for the plight of the working class, he is advancing an arguable, if perhaps hyperbolic, proposition; when Trump describes Mexican immigrants as rapists and gangsters, or peaceful protesters as violent radicals, he is inviting his listeners to enter a parallel world. Leaders on the left in the United States do not traffic in hate as do leaders on the right.

It is true as well that we will never lack for politicians prepared to peddle pernicious fictions so long as citizens have powerful motivations to embrace them. People who feel left behind by immense changes in the economy and in social values will continue to grasp for satisfying explanations of their plight; social media will presumably only get better at magnifying grievance and vindicating conspiracy theories. Nations with strong democratic institutions and widely held democratic norms manage to confine this kind of demagoguery to the margins, but those with weak institutions, like Brazil or Poland, or states where norms have lost their cohesive force, like the United States and perhaps the U.K., will continue to be prey to the politics of resentment. If Poland’s liberal secular Civic Platform defeats the ruling Law and Justice party in elections this month, millions of Poles who are neither liberal nor secular will continue to believe that a German-led EU is plotting to destroy Poland’s Catholic values and traditions. If Biden defeats Trump in November, millions of the president’s supporters will continue to regard climate change as a hoax perpetrated by left-wing scientists in league with China.

Nevertheless, leaders shape norms: Trump is a cause as well as a consequence of American derangement. For that reason, one can at least hope that a clear-cut victory for Biden based on the growing recognition that the pandemic cannot be wished away, and that a history of racism cannot be wished away, will start to dispel the noxious pollutants from our mental atmosphere.

In Plato’s famous allegory, prisoners chained inside a cave since childhood mistake the flickering shadows they see on the wall before them for the reality of things. When one prisoner finally escapes and brings back the news of the world of tangible things, the prisoners refuse to break their chains for fear of being blinded by the sun—they cannot bear the full light of the real. Plato had a very dim regard for the wisdom of the people and thus for the idea of popular self-government; he assumed that democracy would bring forth the likes of Trump. But democracy has the capacity to cure its own ills, and that is its saving grace.
"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline Surly1

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18654
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Michael Cohen Taken Back Into Custody After Refusing Gag Terms
« Reply #4357 on: July 10, 2020, 04:20:07 AM »
Michael Cohen Was Taken Back Into Custody After Refusing The Terms Of His Early Release
His arrest comes a week after he was spotted eating out a restaurant and when he reportedly refused the terms for his continued release.





Salvador Hernandez

Last updated on July 9, 2020, at 6:09 p.m. ET

President Donald Trump's former attorney Michael Cohen was taken back into custody after refusing the terms of his early release from prison for lying to Congress, the Bureau of Prisons confirmed to BuzzFeed News.

Cohen, who meeting with probation officials Thursday, objected to terms of his release that would have prevented him from talking to the press, publishing a book, or speaking on social media, his former attorney Lanny Davis said.

"That was a point that disturbed him because he pointed out that he was able to speak to the media" when he was incarcerated, Davis said.

When US Marshals began to take Cohen into custody, Davis said, Cohen said he would "sign exactly what you want me to sign," but that an agent with the US Marshals told him, "It's out of our hands."

Cohen was released from prison on May 21 and limited to home confinement as part of the Department of Justice's effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus in federal prisons.

A longtime attorney for Trump and often referred to as his fixer, Cohen turned on the president and cooperated with federal investigators. As part of his cooperation, Cohen pleaded guilty to tax evasion, campaign finance fraud, and lying to the Senate intelligence committee about plans to build a Trump Tower in Moscow.

Cohen's charges regarding campaign finance fraud involved his role in paying Playboy model Karen McDougal and porn star Stormy Daniels money in 2016 to keep quiet about their alleged affairs with Trump. Prosecutors alleged the money was paid to influence the election. The White House has denied the president had affairs with the women.

Cohen was ultimately sentenced to three years in prison.

On Thursday, officials with the Bureau of Prisons said Cohen "refused the conditions of his home confinement and as a result, has been returned to a BOP facility."

Cohen's re-arrest comes a week after the New York Post photographed him dining at a Manhattan restaurant.

But Davis said Cohen was never told that he was not allowed to eat out at a restaurant near his home, and that he believed he was able to do so under the terms of his release.

When he brought back into court on Thursday, CNBC reported that Cohen refused to accept a judge's order that would have prevented him from speaking to reporters, accept any book deals, or post on social media.

Davis said Cohen and his attorney, Jeffrey Levine, pointed out that his book had already been completed, at which point probation officials left the meeting room to discuss the terms of release.

An hour-and-a-half later, Davis said, Marshals returned with shackles.

BOP officials said that despite being placed in home confinement, Cohen is still a federal inmate and "remains subject to compliance with BOP policy, which includes being subject to electronic monitoring and obtaining pre-approval for media interviews."

Cohen's attorney, Jeffrey Levine, did not immediately respond to BuzzFeed News' request for comment.
"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline Surly1

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18654
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
White House Tries To Shiv Dr. Fauci, Stabs Self In Dick
« Reply #4358 on: July 14, 2020, 06:14:17 AM »
White House Tries To Shiv Dr. Fauci, Stabs Self In Dick
Liz DyeJuly 13, 2020 01:21 PM

We've reached the point in the pandemic where the White House is putting out oppo research on its own public health officials. Because if Dr. Anthony Fauci is going to hurt Trump's re-election chances by telling Americans the truth about COVID, then he should probably expect to find a knife in his back, right?

Well, not in a functional democracy. But in Trump's America, letting people die so Dear Leader can pretend all is well is just par for the course.

It started Saturday when Trump's henchmen passed a memo to the Washington Post saying that "several White House officials are concerned about the number of times Dr. Fauci has been wrong on things" and listing statements he made early this year that were overtaken by facts on the ground. With Fauci's approval ratings on handling the pandemic running 40 points ahead of Trump's, the president knows firing him would be politically deadly. So the White House and Fox News are waging a systematic campaign to soften their own public health guy up by destroying his credibility.

Only the Post wouldn't play ball, publishing a balanced piece that painted Fauci as a tormented public servant, desperately trying to protect Americans from an administration willing to jettison science and send kids back to school to help the president's electoral prospects.

"You could just feel from Tony . . . how unsettled it made him," AIDS activist David Barr, a longtime friend of Fauci's, told the Post, adding later, "What he cares most about is not his influence, but what's happening — that things are going so badly and it's going to cause so much disease and death."

How is the White House supposed to spin that as a reason to fire the guy? UNHELPFUL!

So then those honorable public servants — hey, you pay their salaries! — decided to put their hit memo on blast. If they couldn't get the Post to do their dirty work on the DL, they'd go for quantity instead of quality. But even the New York Times's Maggie Haberman wasn't willing to swallow their spin, pointing out that the White House had selectively quoted Fauci to make it seem as if he'd pooh-poohed the possibility that coronavirus posed a real danger to Americans.

For example, White House officials pointed to a statement by Dr. Fauci in a Feb. 29 interview that "at this moment, there is no need to change anything that you're doing on a day-by-day basis." But they omitted a warning he delivered right after.

"Right now the risk is still low, but this could change," he said in the interview, conducted by NBC News. "When you start to see community spread, this could change and force you to become much more attentive to doing things that would protect you from spread."

In the same interview, Dr. Fauci also warned that the coronavirus could become "a major outbreak."
Is that the thanks these Trumpers get for leaking to Habes all day and night? The ingratitude!

Last week Dr. Fauci went on the FiveThirtyEight podcast and admitted that 135,000 dead Americans and tens of thousands of positive tests every day are not, in fact, indicative of a wonderful pandemic response by the Trump administration.

"As a country, when you compare us to other countries, I don't think you can say we're doing great. I mean, we're just not," he said.

The doctor has been similarly tepid on Trump's plan to throw open the schoolhouse doors and send kids back to class next month. So if the White House can't get the media to smear him, they'll have to make do with muzzling Fauci. The Post reports that after he appeared on a Facebook live event with Democratic Senator Doug Jones on Tuesday warning Americans against "false complacency," the White House revoked its permission for him to appear on PBS, CNN with Dr. Sanjay Gupta, and NBC's "Meet the Press" yesterday. Instead they sent Admiral Brett Giroir, an undersecretary at HHS, in his place.


When asked if Fauci's recommendation that parts of the country will have to be shut down again in response to localized coronavirus spikes, Giroir responded, "I respect Dr. Fauci a lot, but Dr. Fauci is not 100 percent right, and he also doesn't necessarily — and he admits that — have the whole national interest in mind. He looks at it from a very narrow public health point of view."

Presumably he meant that Dr. Fauci was doing his damn job and making public health recommendations, not economic ones. Although perhaps he was referring to the good doctor's failure to consider Trump's electoral prospects. We should probably ask Chuck Woolery about this one.


EVERYONE IS LYING!
"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline Surly1

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 18654
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
I read a story yesterday that said she wrapped her phone in foil to avoid detection when she traveled.

Ghislaine Maxwell concocted a fake identity to buy her $1 million New Hampshire hideout, prosecutors say




Haven Orecchio-Egresitz
15 hours ago

Ghislaine Maxwell pleaded not guilty to federal charges related to the abuse of young girls.
Laura Cavanaugh/Getty Images
Ghislaine Maxwell pleaded not guilty on Tuesday over charges related to the abuse of young girls.
Maxwell, the former associate of convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein who was hiding out in a $1 million New Hampshire estate, was arrested on July 2.
During a bail hearing, a prosecutor argued that she is an extreme flight risk, has hid her financial assets from the court, and is used to living in hiding.
Her attorney argued that she wasn't living in hiding, but rather trying to maintain privacy from the media and public, and that she should be released due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Judge Alison J. Nathan found that there were no conditions that could assure Maxwell wouldn't flee prosecution and ordered she be held without bail.
During a video bail hearing on Tuesday, a prosecutor said Ghislaine Maxwellused a fake name and posed as a journalist to purchase the $1 million remote New Hampshire estate where she had been living for the last year.

The FBI arrested Maxwell on July 2 on charges that she groomed young girls to be abused by her longtime associate Jeffrey Epstein, who died by suicide while awaiting trial on sex-trafficking charges last August. Maxwell pleaded not guilty Tuesday to enticing minors to travel to engage in sexual acts, transportation of a minor with intent to engage in sexual acts, and perjury.

She told investigators she didn't know who bought the New England mansion, but a real estate agent identified her to the FBI as the woman he met and accompanied on a tour of the home, a prosecutor said Tuesday.

Assistant US Attorney Alison Moe said Maxwell has "not come close" to disclosing her true financial assets to the court and emphasized "serious red flags" in her character and wealth, making her an extreme flight risk if released. 

Moe said Maxwell told the court's pretrial services department that she had fewer than $1 million in Swiss bank accounts and no income, but prosecutors feel that her current lifestyle makes that unlikely.

"It just doesn't make sense," Moe told the court. "Either there are other assets, or there is other income."

After hearing arguments from Moe and Maxwell's attorney Mark Cohen — who argued that Maxwell wasn't a flight risk and should be released due to coronavirus risks— Judge Alison Nathan ordered her to be held without bail pending trial.

"Not only does the defendant have significant financial resources, but she has demonstrated sophistication in hiding those resources and herself," Nathan said. "The court finds by a preponderance of evidence that no combination of conditions could reasonably assure her presence at court."

Prosecutors say Maxwell has extreme wealth she's not telling the court about and 3 passports
The FBI arrested Maxwell at a remote New Hampshire estate on July 2.

For the last year, the socialite has moved several times in New England and stayed out of the public eye. 

Moe said Maxwell has extreme wealth and three passports. She is a citizen of France, which would not extradite her if she were to flee there, the prosecutor said.

"A year is an extremely long period of time to live in hiding," Moe said.

Cohen, though, argued that his client wasn't living in hiding from law enforcement, but in the US for the last year litigating civil cases.

She had been living remotely, he said, to maintain a level of privacy from media and the public.

And when FBI arrived at the New Hampshire home, she ran from the doorbecause she was in her pajamas, he said. The front door, he said, was unlocked and there was no need to breach it.

Victims allege Epstein's abuse couldn't have happened without Maxwell
Cohen repeatedly tried to distance Maxwell from her former lover, saying Maxwell is "not Jeffrey Epstein."

But two victims who spoke or provided statements on Tuesday alleged that Maxwell was just as responsible for their abuse and that she shouldn't be released.

"Without Ghislaine, Jeffrey could not have done what he did," one Jane Doe said in a statement that Moe read. "She was in charge."

The woman told the court that she knew Maxwell for 10 years. During that time, she alleged, Maxwell knew that Epstein was abusing the young girl and "egged him on."

The woman also said that last year, during a civil proceeding that she was scheduled to testify at, she received a call in the middle of the night that was threatening towards her and her toddler.

"It's clear to me that she would have done anything to get what she wanted," Doe said in her statement. "Please do not let us down by allowing her the opportunity to further hurt her victims."

Another woman, Annie Farmer, spoke aloud at the hearing about the abuse she said she suffered at the hands of Maxwell and Epstein.

"She is a sexual predator who groomed and abused me and other young women," Farmer said. "She has lied under oath and tormented her survivors."

Maxwell is in custody at a Brooklyn detention center. Her trial date isn't until July 2021.
"...reprehensible lying communist..."

Offline Phil Rumpole

  • Bussing Staff
  • **
  • Posts: 105
    • View Profile
I read a story yesterday that said she wrapped her phone in foil to avoid detection when she traveled.

Ghislaine Maxwell concocted a fake identity to buy her $1 million New Hampshire hideout, prosecutors say




Haven Orecchio-Egresitz
15 hours ago

Ghislaine Maxwell pleaded not guilty to federal charges related to the abuse of young girls.
Laura Cavanaugh/Getty Images
Ghislaine Maxwell pleaded not guilty on Tuesday over charges related to the abuse of young girls.
Maxwell, the former associate of convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein who was hiding out in a $1 million New Hampshire estate, was arrested on July 2.
During a bail hearing, a prosecutor argued that she is an extreme flight risk, has hid her financial assets from the court, and is used to living in hiding.
Her attorney argued that she wasn't living in hiding, but rather trying to maintain privacy from the media and public, and that she should be released due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Judge Alison J. Nathan found that there were no conditions that could assure Maxwell wouldn't flee prosecution and ordered she be held without bail.
During a video bail hearing on Tuesday, a prosecutor said Ghislaine Maxwellused a fake name and posed as a journalist to purchase the $1 million remote New Hampshire estate where she had been living for the last year.

The FBI arrested Maxwell on July 2 on charges that she groomed young girls to be abused by her longtime associate Jeffrey Epstein, who died by suicide while awaiting trial on sex-trafficking charges last August. Maxwell pleaded not guilty Tuesday to enticing minors to travel to engage in sexual acts, transportation of a minor with intent to engage in sexual acts, and perjury.

She told investigators she didn't know who bought the New England mansion, but a real estate agent identified her to the FBI as the woman he met and accompanied on a tour of the home, a prosecutor said Tuesday.

Assistant US Attorney Alison Moe said Maxwell has "not come close" to disclosing her true financial assets to the court and emphasized "serious red flags" in her character and wealth, making her an extreme flight risk if released.

Moe said Maxwell told the court's pretrial services department that she had fewer than $1 million in Swiss bank accounts and no income, but prosecutors feel that her current lifestyle makes that unlikely.

"It just doesn't make sense," Moe told the court. "Either there are other assets, or there is other income."

After hearing arguments from Moe and Maxwell's attorney Mark Cohen — who argued that Maxwell wasn't a flight risk and should be released due to coronavirus risks— Judge Alison Nathan ordered her to be held without bail pending trial.

"Not only does the defendant have significant financial resources, but she has demonstrated sophistication in hiding those resources and herself," Nathan said. "The court finds by a preponderance of evidence that no combination of conditions could reasonably assure her presence at court."

Prosecutors say Maxwell has extreme wealth she's not telling the court about and 3 passports
The FBI arrested Maxwell at a remote New Hampshire estate on July 2.

For the last year, the socialite has moved several times in New England and stayed out of the public eye.

Moe said Maxwell has extreme wealth and three passports. She is a citizen of France, which would not extradite her if she were to flee there, the prosecutor said.

"A year is an extremely long period of time to live in hiding," Moe said.

Cohen, though, argued that his client wasn't living in hiding from law enforcement, but in the US for the last year litigating civil cases.

She had been living remotely, he said, to maintain a level of privacy from media and the public.

And when FBI arrived at the New Hampshire home, she ran from the doorbecause she was in her pajamas, he said. The front door, he said, was unlocked and there was no need to breach it.

Victims allege Epstein's abuse couldn't have happened without Maxwell
Cohen repeatedly tried to distance Maxwell from her former lover, saying Maxwell is "not Jeffrey Epstein."

But two victims who spoke or provided statements on Tuesday alleged that Maxwell was just as responsible for their abuse and that she shouldn't be released.

"Without Ghislaine, Jeffrey could not have done what he did," one Jane Doe said in a statement that Moe read. "She was in charge."

The woman told the court that she knew Maxwell for 10 years. During that time, she alleged, Maxwell knew that Epstein was abusing the young girl and "egged him on."

The woman also said that last year, during a civil proceeding that she was scheduled to testify at, she received a call in the middle of the night that was threatening towards her and her toddler.

"It's clear to me that she would have done anything to get what she wanted," Doe said in her statement. "Please do not let us down by allowing her the opportunity to further hurt her victims."

Another woman, Annie Farmer, spoke aloud at the hearing about the abuse she said she suffered at the hands of Maxwell and Epstein.

"She is a sexual predator who groomed and abused me and other young women," Farmer said. "She has lied under oath and tormented her survivors."

Maxwell is in custody at a Brooklyn detention center. Her trial date isn't until July 2021.


Phone wrapped in foil was reported to be on the table at arrest. Mossad agent with squillions of dollars should have just got a phone or sim card from a country you don't need to register any details, or just offer any random more than their phone is worth. One would think, but who knows

Offline Eddie

  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 19482
    • View Profile
I read a story yesterday that said she wrapped her phone in foil to avoid detection when she traveled.

Ghislaine Maxwell concocted a fake identity to buy her $1 million New Hampshire hideout, prosecutors say




Haven Orecchio-Egresitz
15 hours ago

Ghislaine Maxwell pleaded not guilty to federal charges related to the abuse of young girls.
Laura Cavanaugh/Getty Images
Ghislaine Maxwell pleaded not guilty on Tuesday over charges related to the abuse of young girls.
Maxwell, the former associate of convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein who was hiding out in a $1 million New Hampshire estate, was arrested on July 2.
During a bail hearing, a prosecutor argued that she is an extreme flight risk, has hid her financial assets from the court, and is used to living in hiding.
Her attorney argued that she wasn't living in hiding, but rather trying to maintain privacy from the media and public, and that she should be released due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Judge Alison J. Nathan found that there were no conditions that could assure Maxwell wouldn't flee prosecution and ordered she be held without bail.
During a video bail hearing on Tuesday, a prosecutor said Ghislaine Maxwellused a fake name and posed as a journalist to purchase the $1 million remote New Hampshire estate where she had been living for the last year.

The FBI arrested Maxwell on July 2 on charges that she groomed young girls to be abused by her longtime associate Jeffrey Epstein, who died by suicide while awaiting trial on sex-trafficking charges last August. Maxwell pleaded not guilty Tuesday to enticing minors to travel to engage in sexual acts, transportation of a minor with intent to engage in sexual acts, and perjury.

She told investigators she didn't know who bought the New England mansion, but a real estate agent identified her to the FBI as the woman he met and accompanied on a tour of the home, a prosecutor said Tuesday.

Assistant US Attorney Alison Moe said Maxwell has "not come close" to disclosing her true financial assets to the court and emphasized "serious red flags" in her character and wealth, making her an extreme flight risk if released.

Moe said Maxwell told the court's pretrial services department that she had fewer than $1 million in Swiss bank accounts and no income, but prosecutors feel that her current lifestyle makes that unlikely.

"It just doesn't make sense," Moe told the court. "Either there are other assets, or there is other income."

After hearing arguments from Moe and Maxwell's attorney Mark Cohen — who argued that Maxwell wasn't a flight risk and should be released due to coronavirus risks— Judge Alison Nathan ordered her to be held without bail pending trial.

"Not only does the defendant have significant financial resources, but she has demonstrated sophistication in hiding those resources and herself," Nathan said. "The court finds by a preponderance of evidence that no combination of conditions could reasonably assure her presence at court."

Prosecutors say Maxwell has extreme wealth she's not telling the court about and 3 passports
The FBI arrested Maxwell at a remote New Hampshire estate on July 2.

For the last year, the socialite has moved several times in New England and stayed out of the public eye.

Moe said Maxwell has extreme wealth and three passports. She is a citizen of France, which would not extradite her if she were to flee there, the prosecutor said.

"A year is an extremely long period of time to live in hiding," Moe said.

Cohen, though, argued that his client wasn't living in hiding from law enforcement, but in the US for the last year litigating civil cases.

She had been living remotely, he said, to maintain a level of privacy from media and the public.

And when FBI arrived at the New Hampshire home, she ran from the doorbecause she was in her pajamas, he said. The front door, he said, was unlocked and there was no need to breach it.

Victims allege Epstein's abuse couldn't have happened without Maxwell
Cohen repeatedly tried to distance Maxwell from her former lover, saying Maxwell is "not Jeffrey Epstein."

But two victims who spoke or provided statements on Tuesday alleged that Maxwell was just as responsible for their abuse and that she shouldn't be released.

"Without Ghislaine, Jeffrey could not have done what he did," one Jane Doe said in a statement that Moe read. "She was in charge."

The woman told the court that she knew Maxwell for 10 years. During that time, she alleged, Maxwell knew that Epstein was abusing the young girl and "egged him on."

The woman also said that last year, during a civil proceeding that she was scheduled to testify at, she received a call in the middle of the night that was threatening towards her and her toddler.

"It's clear to me that she would have done anything to get what she wanted," Doe said in her statement. "Please do not let us down by allowing her the opportunity to further hurt her victims."

Another woman, Annie Farmer, spoke aloud at the hearing about the abuse she said she suffered at the hands of Maxwell and Epstein.

"She is a sexual predator who groomed and abused me and other young women," Farmer said. "She has lied under oath and tormented her survivors."

Maxwell is in custody at a Brooklyn detention center. Her trial date isn't until July 2021.


Phone wrapped in foil was reported to be on the table at arrest. Mossad agent with squillions of dollars should have just got a phone or sim card from a country you don't need to register any details, or just offer any random more than their phone is worth. One would think, but who knows

Tinfoil doesn't even block a signal......you'd think a spy worth 20 million could afford a proper Faraday bag....not very well educated in phone tracking. There are many alternatives.....but K-dog is the expert.



What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
Azozeo's News Channel

Started by Surly1 « 1 2 ... 5 6 » Far Out Newz

82 Replies
30063 Views
Last post March 19, 2020, 04:27:44 AM
by azozeo
0 Replies
1047 Views
Last post July 01, 2018, 08:07:18 PM
by Palloy2
0 Replies
739 Views
Last post August 05, 2019, 03:51:00 AM
by RE