AuthorTopic: The Surlynewz Channel  (Read 510758 times)

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15432
    • View Profile
Re: The Surlynewz Channel --- The United States of Guns
« Reply #3195 on: May 20, 2018, 08:25:02 AM »
I don't usually post graphics, but this one is worth it.

First, let me say that I favor some gun control measures. Essentially I am in favor doing whatever is necessary to protect teachers and children in our schools and innocent people in public places. I'm also in favor of decreasing gun violence in general.
But the problem of mass shootings, and also the far more prevalent  (but less noticed) brand of gun violence can definitely be tracked these days as a phenomenon of social media.

I predict more Go-Pro cameras next, for live utoobs of mass shootings and other acts of violence.


https://yins.yale.edu/illustrative-projects/social-networks-help-explain-gun-violence


Social Networks Help Explain Gun Violence

Andrew V. Papachristos

Tragic acts of violence like the Sandy Hook shooting in Newtown, CT, or the slaying of 15-year old Hadiya Pendalton in Chicago, IL, redirect political and public attention towards gun violence. And, indeed, gun violence remains a pervasive problem. Each year, more than 10,000 people in the U.S. are shot and killed by another person, and another 60,000 are treated for non-fatal gunshot injuries caused by assaults.

Statistics like these and images of innocent victims fuel the notion that violence is both pervasive and random. If gun violence can happen in an elementary school classroom or to an innocent adolescent girl standing in a public park with her friends, it can happen anywhere or to anyone. Yet, tragic as these events and statistics are, gun violence is far from random. Gun violence is highly concentrated among particular segments of the population and in particular places.

Young, minority males between the ages of 18-24 are the most likely victims of gun homicide, with rates of gun homicide more than fifty times higher than the overall U.S. average and ten times higher than white men in the same age range. Gun homicide also concentrates in small geographic areas within major U.S. cities, especially socially and economically disadvantaged neighborhoods.



Co-Offending network of high-risk individuals in a Boston community, 2008. Each of the nodes represents a unique individual (N = 763). Each of the ties represents an observation of the individuals engaging in criminal behavior. Red nodes represent the victims of fatal or non-fatal gunshot injuries, and these are clustered within the network.

Research by the author and colleagues has recently uncovered that the gun violence is also severely concentrated within social networks. In particular, gun violence tends to concentrate within small social networks of individuals in high-crime communities and populations. For example, in a recent study of one Boston, MA community, Papachristos et al. (2012) found that 85% of all fatal and non-fatal gunshot injuries occurred in a social network of N = 763 individuals, that is, in less than 6% of the community’s population (see figure on left). Likewise, in a study of one high-crime Chicago community, Papachristos and Wildeman (2014) found that 41% of all gun homicides occurred in a single network containing less than 4% of the community’s population. Such concentration of gun violence in social networks has important implications for understanding America’s gun violence epidemic, and for doing something about it.


“In the future, everyone with a gun and a Facebook account will be world-famous for 15 minutes.”




What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Karpatok

  • Contrarian
  • Sous Chef
  • *
  • Posts: 1427
    • View Profile
Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3196 on: May 20, 2018, 08:49:58 AM »
I don't usually post graphics, but this one is worth it.

First, let me say that I favor some gun control measures. Essentially I am in favor doing whatever is necessary to protect teachers and children in our schools and innocent people in public places. I'm also in favor of decreasing gun violence in general.
But the problem of mass shootings, and also the far more prevalent  (but less noticed) brand of gun violence can definitely be tracked these days as a phenomenon of social media.

I predict more Go-Pro cameras next, for live utoobs of mass shootings and other acts of violence.


https://yins.yale.edu/illustrative-projects/social-networks-help-explain-gun-violence


Social Networks Help Explain Gun Violence

Andrew V. Papachristos

Tragic acts of violence like the Sandy Hook shooting in Newtown, CT, or the slaying of 15-year old Hadiya Pendalton in Chicago, IL, redirect political and public attention towards gun violence. And, indeed, gun violence remains a pervasive problem. Each year, more than 10,000 people in the U.S. are shot and killed by another person, and another 60,000 are treated for non-fatal gunshot injuries caused by assaults.

Statistics like these and images of innocent victims fuel the notion that violence is both pervasive and random. If gun violence can happen in an elementary school classroom or to an innocent adolescent girl standing in a public park with her friends, it can happen anywhere or to anyone. Yet, tragic as these events and statistics are, gun violence is far from random. Gun violence is highly concentrated among particular segments of the population and in particular places.

Young, minority males between the ages of 18-24 are the most likely victims of gun homicide, with rates of gun homicide more than fifty times higher than the overall U.S. average and ten times higher than white men in the same age range. Gun homicide also concentrates in small geographic areas within major U.S. cities, especially socially and economically disadvantaged neighborhoods.



Co-Offending network of high-risk individuals in a Boston community, 2008. Each of the nodes represents a unique individual (N = 763). Each of the ties represents an observation of the individuals engaging in criminal behavior. Red nodes represent the victims of fatal or non-fatal gunshot injuries, and these are clustered within the network.

Research by the author and colleagues has recently uncovered that the gun violence is also severely concentrated within social networks. In particular, gun violence tends to concentrate within small social networks of individuals in high-crime communities and populations. For example, in a recent study of one Boston, MA community, Papachristos et al. (2012) found that 85% of all fatal and non-fatal gunshot injuries occurred in a social network of N = 763 individuals, that is, in less than 6% of the community’s population (see figure on left). Likewise, in a study of one high-crime Chicago community, Papachristos and Wildeman (2014) found that 41% of all gun homicides occurred in a single network containing less than 4% of the community’s population. Such concentration of gun violence in social networks has important implications for understanding America’s gun violence epidemic, and for doing something about it.


“In the future, everyone with a gun and a Facebook account will be world-famous for 15 minutes.”





Yes, this is the population of users and abusers. But it doesn't go far enough. This population has been damned from the get go by poverty, drug use, lack of nutrition for developing a brain both in the womb, after birth as well as in formation of egg and sperm. Chaotic family upbringing, chaotic meaningless schooling, etc.etc. I say remove guns from the clutches of everybody. Then no need for the excuse of self defense. Etc This is obviously the most moral, rational choice.

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15432
    • View Profile
Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3197 on: May 20, 2018, 09:18:49 AM »
I prefer to keep my guns.

No slogans. I'm not in the NRA, and I don't make excuses. But I probably would go to some trouble to avoid allowing myself to be disarmed.

The hard core gun control freaks want to disarm everyone and see no problem with that. I don't like it....and I know it's not necessary to decrease the violence down to near zero.

As RE points out, there are way too many guns out there already to round them all up successfully anyway. The solution probably is going to be found by making it hard to buy bullets. I have no problem with limiting cartridge sales to responsible people and making them prove they are responsible.

In Chicago (where my son lives, btw) the gun laws are the strictest in the nation...and yet it's the worst place in the country for gun violence. You can't easily buy a firearm legally there, but you can buy all the ammo you want, and have it FedExed to your door. Our laws make no real sense at all.

The real problem is that you can buy any legislation you want in this country with enough money. Money perverts the process of making sensible laws. Politicians are all whores.

 
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 13882
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Two-story lava wall cuts off parts of Highway 137, impacting thousands
« Reply #3198 on: May 21, 2018, 09:07:42 AM »
Two-story lava wall cuts off parts of Highway 137, impacting thousands--

Two-story lava wall cuts off parts of Highway 137, impacting thousands

A 20-foot lava flow has cut off part of Highway 137, a critical access point for those wanting to get in or out of lava affected areas. (Image: Hawaii News Now)A 20-foot lava flow has cut off part of Highway 137, a critical access point for those wanting to get in or out of lava affected areas. (Image: Hawaii News Now)
 
A 20-foot lava flow has cut off part of Highway 137, a critical access point for those wanting to get in or out of lava affected areas. (Image: Hawaii News Now)A 20-foot lava flow has cut off part of Highway 137, a critical access point for those wanting to get in or out of lava affected areas. (Image: Hawaii News Now)
PUNA, BIG ISLAND (HawaiiNewsNow) -

The destructive lava flows that have been setting homes, roads, and land ablaze in Lower Puna dealt a critical blow on Saturday night when it created a 20-foot wall of lava on Highway 137.

MORE

 
 

Around 10:30 p.m. on Saturday, the powerful lava flows cut a crucial access point to Lower Puna communities when it crossed the road just south of the major roadway's 13-mile marker. The late-night lava flow forced Big Island police to shut down parts of the highway and implement roadblocks between Kamaili and Pohoiki roads.

One of the only other routes in that area — Highway 130 — is currently only open to residents, and has already begun developing cracks. Authorities installed metal plates on Highway 130 earlier last week, resulting in weight limits for motorists using that route.

The highway closure is expected to impact thousands of residents trying to get in or out of the already isolated Lower Puna communities. 

Maui Emergency Management Agency crews are helping Hawaii County with resources, but it's unlike anything many of them have ever seen.

"(Look at) how huge this thing is," said Herman Andaya with Maui Emergency Management, when he first saw the two-story wall of lava. "The magnitude in the flow, and everything."

"I'm speechless," Andaya said.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 13882
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3199 on: May 21, 2018, 09:14:49 AM »
Hundreds of homeless people fined and imprisoned in England and Wales
The Guardian finds over 50 local authorities with PSPOs in place prohibiting begging and loitering




href="https://www.theguardian.com/profile/patrick-greenfield" rel="author" > Patrick Greenfield and Sarah Marsh

Homeless people are banned from town centres, routinely fined hundreds of pounds and jailed if caught repeatedly asking for money in some cases. Photograph: Alamy

Growing numbers of vulnerable homeless people are being fined, given criminal convictions and even imprisoned for begging and rough sleeping, the Guardian can reveal.

Despite updated Home Office guidance at the start of the year, which instructs councils not to target people for being homeless and sleeping rough, the Guardian has found over 50 local authorities with public space protection orders (PSPOs) in place

Homeless people are banned from town centres, routinely fined hundreds of pounds and sent to prison if caught repeatedly asking for money in some cases. Local authorities in England and Wales have issued hundreds of fixed-penalty notices and pursued criminal convictions for “begging”, “persistent and aggressive begging” and “loitering” since they were given strengthened powers to combat antisocial behaviour in 2014 by then home secretary, Theresa May .

Cases include a man jailed for four months for breaching a criminal behaviour order (CBO) in Gloucester for begging – about which the judge admitted “I will be sending a man to prison for asking for food when he was hungry” – and a man fined £105 after a child dropped £2 in his sleeping bag.

Data obtained by the Guardian through freedom of information found that at least 51 people have been convicted of breaching a PSPO for begging or loitering and failing to pay the fine since 2014, receiving CBOs in some cases and fines up to £1,100. Hundreds of fixed-penalty notices have been issued.

Advertisement

Lawyers, charities and campaigners described the findings as “grotesque inhumanity”, saying disadvantaged groups were fined for being poor. They said civil powers were being used by overzealous councils who wanted to sweep inconveniences off their streets and sanitise town centres.

Councils use a range of tools to crackdown on begging, but PSPOs are the most popular. Breaching a PSPO can lead to a £100 fixed-penalty notice, but offenders face a summary conviction, sometimes a criminal behaviour order (CBO) banning an individual for future begging and a fine of up to £1,000 if they fail to pay. Violating a CBO can result in five years in prison.

Rosie Brighouse, a lawyer for Liberty, said: “We warned from the start that PSPOs were far too broad and ripe for misuse by over-zealous councils wanting to sweep inconveniences off their streets. Now we see dozens of local authorities using them to target marginalised groups and fine people for being poor.”

Campaigners say bans on drinking alcohol and swearing in town centres are also being used to target homeless people, but councils insist PSPOs are only being used to target antisocial behaviour, not homelessness and rough sleeping. In a few cases, people who are not homeless have been prosecuted for begging.

Brighouse added: “This approach just pushes people into debt or the criminal justice system.”

May introduced PSPOs in 2014 to restrict how a particular area could be used.

In December 2017, then home secretary Amber Rudd told councils not to misuse antisocial behaviour laws by targeting homeless people. New guidance says PSPOs “should not be used to target people based solely on the fact that someone is homeless or rough sleeping, as this in itself is unlikely to mean that such behaviour is having an unreasonably detrimental effect on the community’s quality of life which justifies the restrictions imposed”.

But councils that use PSPOs to ban begging and related activities from their town centres insist the measures are not targeted at homeless people.

Kettering borough council, which hailed what they believed to be “the most criminal behaviours orders issued at once on the back of convictions” for begging after they took 10 people to court for breaching PSPOs in May 2017, said: “The PSPO is used to address antisocial behaviours in the town centre. During the course of their work, if our staff identify individuals in need of support, they refer people to the appropriate agencies for help. The council is very proactive in this regard.”

Some charities have called on the government to scrap PSPOs entirely, arguing they are an example of abuse of power and do not help take people off the streets, but push them further into debt and the criminal justice system.

Josie Appleton, director of the Manifesto Club campaign against hyper-regulation of everyday life said: “It’s a travesty that people who most need our help are being treated like they arescum ... how do you treat the poor? The fact they are being seen as a messy thing is grotesque inhumanity and lots of places with these orders in place have faced huge public outcry to the orders.”

She added: “It’s this kind of very harsh officious mentality ... it’s not to do with representing people but airbrushing things.”

The impact on homeless people, Appleton said, includes them being run out of town or if they reoffend they face imprisonment, making it harder to get back on their feet and find work.

When contacted by the Guardian, a Home Office spokesperson said: “We are clear that PSPOs should be used proportionately to tackle antisocial behaviour, and not to target specific groups or the most vulnerable in our communities. We set this out clearly when in December last year we refreshed the statutory guidance for frontline professionals on the use of the antisocial behaviour powers.

“It is for local agencies to determine whether their use of the powers is appropriate, and that they are meeting the legal tests set out in the legislation. The government is committed to tackling and reducing homelessness and to offer support to the most vulnerable in our society.”

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 13882
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
It's not just you: Everything really is getting more expensive
« Reply #3200 on: May 21, 2018, 09:21:13 AM »
It's not just you: Everything really is getting more expensive


by Nathaniel Meyersohn   @CNNMoney


You're not imagining things: Prices are creeping up.

Americans want to buy more stuff, and businesses are rushing to meet demand.

Unemployment is below 4% for the first time in 17 years, wages are slowly inching up, and consumers are spending money on clothes, furniture, and cars. At the same time, elevated labor, transportation and commodity costs are pinching their profit margins.

 

Related: The reason shipping costs are skyrocketing

Both consumers and producers are feeling the squeeze from a healthy US economy. After years of low inflation, prices rose 1.9% in March from a year ago, according to the Federal Reserve's favored inflation measuring stick.

Consumer prices were up 2.1% in April from a year ago, while suppliers paid 2.6% more.

Auto loans are getting more expensive because the Federal Reserve is gradually raising interest rates. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage has moved to a seven-year high above 4.6%, according to Freddie Mac.

Dozens of companies in recent weeks have said they already hiked prices or plan to in the coming months to combat inflation.

Related: Coke and Hershey's costs are going up. Will you pay more?

Deere (DE) said on Friday that it would raise prices for its equipment because of higher material and freight costs.

McDonald's (MCD) and Chipotle (CMG) have raised burger and burrito prices. Amazon (AMZN) is increasing Prime memberships by 20%. Netflix made monthly subscription prices 10% higherlate last year.

Tyson Foods (TSN) is planning to make Ball Park hot dogs more expensive, while Stanley Black & Decker (SWH) will hike the prices of their industrial tools.

"We're in business to make money, and in order to do that, we have to achieve price increases to offset some of that inflation," Stanley Black & Decker's CEO said last month.

Oil prices crossed $70 a barrel for the first time in more than three years. Americans are experiencing it at the pump: A gallon of gas is $2.91 — 24% higher than a year ago.

Related: What Trump's Iran decision means for oil and gas prices

Higher oil prices will also eat into companies' margins, which could lead them to pass off the costs to consumers. Paint, chemical, consumer products and packaged food companies all depend on crude oil to produce and package their goods. Airlines, trucking, and railroad firms need fuel for transportation.

Oil is American Airlines' (AAL) second largest expense, making air travel costlier for the company. That will trickle down to customers: "I would expect you would see higher fares," American's CEO said last month.

Related: American Airlines bans insects, hedgehogs and goats as emotional support animals

Freight costs are climbing. There aren't enough truck drivers right now to haul all the products manufacturers are churning out around the country. That has sent shipping costs soaring.

"Any company whose product ends up on a truck is going to feel it big time," said Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley Advisory Group. "If anyone is going to be affected by rising freight costs, it's going to be Amazon. Raising Prime is a way of offsetting that."

Steel and aluminum prices are also going up, a concern for consumers. Campbell Soup (CPB)said on Friday that it expected double-digit increases in the two.

 

 

Related: Campbell Soup CEO abruptly steps down

"A lot of that driven — or all of it driven by the impact of anticipated tariffs," Campbell's chief financial officer told analysts.

In the past, Campbell could charge consumers more, but intense competition between Amazon, Walmart (WMT), Kroger (KR) and other top grocers and retailers could soften the blow to Americans' wallets.

Kroger said in March that it sacrificed lower margins to keep vegetable and meat price tags down, while Walmart reported Wednesday that cheaper prices dented profit.

Household care manufacturers such as Procter & Gamble (PG) and Kimberly-Clark (KMB) have struggled to retain their pricing power against the pressure from retailers. P&G's prices fell 2% last quarter from the year prior, while Kimberly Clark's dropped 1%.

 
 
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15432
    • View Profile
Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3201 on: May 21, 2018, 09:36:55 AM »
Hundreds of homeless people fined and imprisoned in England and Wales
The Guardian finds over 50 local authorities with PSPOs in place prohibiting begging and loitering




href="https://www.theguardian.com/profile/patrick-greenfield" rel="author" > Patrick Greenfield and Sarah Marsh

Homeless people are banned from town centres, routinely fined hundreds of pounds and jailed if caught repeatedly asking for money in some cases. Photograph: Alamy

Growing numbers of vulnerable homeless people are being fined, given criminal convictions and even imprisoned for begging and rough sleeping, the Guardian can reveal.

Despite updated Home Office guidance at the start of the year, which instructs councils not to target people for being homeless and sleeping rough, the Guardian has found over 50 local authorities with public space protection orders (PSPOs) in place

Homeless people are banned from town centres, routinely fined hundreds of pounds and sent to prison if caught repeatedly asking for money in some cases. Local authorities in England and Wales have issued hundreds of fixed-penalty notices and pursued criminal convictions for “begging”, “persistent and aggressive begging” and “loitering” since they were given strengthened powers to combat antisocial behaviour in 2014 by then home secretary, Theresa May .

Cases include a man jailed for four months for breaching a criminal behaviour order (CBO) in Gloucester for begging – about which the judge admitted “I will be sending a man to prison for asking for food when he was hungry” – and a man fined £105 after a child dropped £2 in his sleeping bag.

Data obtained by the Guardian through freedom of information found that at least 51 people have been convicted of breaching a PSPO for begging or loitering and failing to pay the fine since 2014, receiving CBOs in some cases and fines up to £1,100. Hundreds of fixed-penalty notices have been issued.

Advertisement

Lawyers, charities and campaigners described the findings as “grotesque inhumanity”, saying disadvantaged groups were fined for being poor. They said civil powers were being used by overzealous councils who wanted to sweep inconveniences off their streets and sanitise town centres.

Councils use a range of tools to crackdown on begging, but PSPOs are the most popular. Breaching a PSPO can lead to a £100 fixed-penalty notice, but offenders face a summary conviction, sometimes a criminal behaviour order (CBO) banning an individual for future begging and a fine of up to £1,000 if they fail to pay. Violating a CBO can result in five years in prison.

Rosie Brighouse, a lawyer for Liberty, said: “We warned from the start that PSPOs were far too broad and ripe for misuse by over-zealous councils wanting to sweep inconveniences off their streets. Now we see dozens of local authorities using them to target marginalised groups and fine people for being poor.”

Campaigners say bans on drinking alcohol and swearing in town centres are also being used to target homeless people, but councils insist PSPOs are only being used to target antisocial behaviour, not homelessness and rough sleeping. In a few cases, people who are not homeless have been prosecuted for begging.

Brighouse added: “This approach just pushes people into debt or the criminal justice system.”

May introduced PSPOs in 2014 to restrict how a particular area could be used.

In December 2017, then home secretary Amber Rudd told councils not to misuse antisocial behaviour laws by targeting homeless people. New guidance says PSPOs “should not be used to target people based solely on the fact that someone is homeless or rough sleeping, as this in itself is unlikely to mean that such behaviour is having an unreasonably detrimental effect on the community’s quality of life which justifies the restrictions imposed”.

But councils that use PSPOs to ban begging and related activities from their town centres insist the measures are not targeted at homeless people.

Kettering borough council, which hailed what they believed to be “the most criminal behaviours orders issued at once on the back of convictions” for begging after they took 10 people to court for breaching PSPOs in May 2017, said: “The PSPO is used to address antisocial behaviours in the town centre. During the course of their work, if our staff identify individuals in need of support, they refer people to the appropriate agencies for help. The council is very proactive in this regard.”

Some charities have called on the government to scrap PSPOs entirely, arguing they are an example of abuse of power and do not help take people off the streets, but push them further into debt and the criminal justice system.

Josie Appleton, director of the Manifesto Club campaign against hyper-regulation of everyday life said: “It’s a travesty that people who most need our help are being treated like they arescum ... how do you treat the poor? The fact they are being seen as a messy thing is grotesque inhumanity and lots of places with these orders in place have faced huge public outcry to the orders.”

She added: “It’s this kind of very harsh officious mentality ... it’s not to do with representing people but airbrushing things.”

The impact on homeless people, Appleton said, includes them being run out of town or if they reoffend they face imprisonment, making it harder to get back on their feet and find work.

When contacted by the Guardian, a Home Office spokesperson said: “We are clear that PSPOs should be used proportionately to tackle antisocial behaviour, and not to target specific groups or the most vulnerable in our communities. We set this out clearly when in December last year we refreshed the statutory guidance for frontline professionals on the use of the antisocial behaviour powers.

“It is for local agencies to determine whether their use of the powers is appropriate, and that they are meeting the legal tests set out in the legislation. The government is committed to tackling and reducing homelessness and to offer support to the most vulnerable in our society.”



Not sure, but my impression has been that in the UK, there has been greater tolerance for squatters and de-powered fringe communities of various stripes than there is here. Looks like that isn't true, at least not anymore.

I view it as a new and modern problem that poor people simply have no place left to even exist. In times past there were spaces not claimed and policed, where people could live between the cracks. Not many cracks left in this country, other than in the western desert, and I'm not sure that's even doable anymore. Alaska was once such a place, but that time has passed.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2018, 02:29:57 PM by Surly1 »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 13882
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Remembering One of the Most Violent Days in the History of the U.S. Senate
« Reply #3202 on: May 24, 2018, 08:05:00 AM »
Fondly remembering the good Old Days of the US Senate.

Would that someone would take a cane to Mitch Mcconnell.

Remembering One of the Most Violent Days in the History of the U.S. Senate

On May 22, 1856, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives caned a Senator into unconsciousness.


Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15432
    • View Profile
Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3203 on: May 24, 2018, 08:23:14 AM »
There weren't any winners.

Virtually every family in America buried one or more of their numbers.

The whole system of government was irreparably damaged, with the establishment once and forever of a top-down federal government that usurped certain freedoms that existed before, but never came back.

Sumner was a self-righteous blowhard. Brooks was a vicious coward. No good guys, I don't care what anybody tells you in some revisionist history vignette. A really sad day for the Republic. A real disaster for the nation.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15432
    • View Profile
Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3204 on: May 24, 2018, 09:48:19 AM »
In South Carolina, the so-called Fire Eaters, which included Representative Brooks, were the extreme faction that dragged the South into the war. Not everyone in the South agreed with them. Sam Houston was the voice of the more reasonable Texas faction. You might have heard some other politician quoted as saying something about "a house divided." Sound familiar?

That guy stole the line from Sam Houston, who said it first, by a few years.




Sam Houston
"I would lay down my life to defend any one of the States from aggression, which endangered peace or threatened its institutions. I could do more for the union, but I wish to do more; for the destruction of the union would be the destruction of all the States. A stab in the heart is worse then a cut in a limb, for this may be healed."

"This feeling has been impressed my heart by the instruction and example of the great man (Andrew Jackson) whom when I was a boy, I followed as a soldier."

"I beseech those whose piety will permit them reverently to petition, that they will pray for this union, and ask that He who buildeth up and pulleth down nations will, the mercy preserve and unite us. For a Nation divided against itself cannot stand. I wish, if this Union must be dissolved, that its ruins may be the monument of my grave, and the graves of my family. I wish no epitaph to be written to tell that I survive the ruin of this glorious Union."

Not all the Texans had such good sense. Rip Ford was the voice of secession here. Also larger than life, like Houston, although not quite as well remembered. Ford was a doctor, a lawyer, a Texas Ranger, and a journalist and newspaper publisher. People could wear more hats in those days. Training was not as time consuming as it is now. Not surprisingly, Ford was from South Carolina.

Ford fought to the end, literally, winning the last battle of the Civil War, the Battle of Palmito Ranch (in Texas) a month after Lee surrendered at Appomattox. Word traveled slowly to Texas, since the railroads and telegraphs were mostly destroyed.



John Salmon (Rip) Ford

Ford's book "Rip Ford's Texas" is a great narrative of the history of early Texas and the West, and it remains in print, although it's not particularly PC.


« Last Edit: May 24, 2018, 10:01:38 AM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 13882
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3205 on: May 24, 2018, 10:00:53 AM »
I really enjoyed your commentary. But it wasn't Sam Houston who uttered the famous phrase first:

Matthew 12:22-28 New King James Version (NKJV)

22 Then one was brought to Him who was demon-possessed, blind and mute; and He healed him, so that the [a]blind and mute man both spoke and saw. 23 And all the multitudes were amazed and said, “Could this be the Son of David?”

24 Now when the Pharisees heard it they said, “This fellow does not cast out demons except by Beelzebub, the ruler of the demons.”

25 But Jesus knew their thoughts, and said to them: “Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation, and every city or house divided against itself will not stand.

26 If Satan casts out Satan, he is divided against himself. How then will his kingdom stand? 27 And if I cast out demons by Beelzebub, by whom do your sons cast them out? Therefore they shall be your judges. 28 But if I cast out demons by the Spirit of God, surely the kingdom of God has come upon you.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15432
    • View Profile
Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3206 on: May 24, 2018, 10:04:20 AM »
Awesome. Thanks for correcting me.

I did not know that verse, or forgot it, more likely. God probably borrowed it from Shakespeare. LOL.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15432
    • View Profile
Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3207 on: May 24, 2018, 11:25:12 AM »
Another interesting bit of Civil War trivia is that the first battle of the Civil War was not Ft. Sumter, but was a battle fought by Rip Ford in South Texas. Yep, really. So he literally fought the war from start to finish.

Called the 2nd Cortina War, it happened some two weeks prior to Ft. Sumter, when some Mexican nationals crossed the border into Zapata County, with the purpose of preventing Texas from joining the Confederacy. Needless to say, they didn't succeed (and Texas did secede.)

Although he was a secessionist, I do not believe Rip Ford was a racist. His actions don't indicate it anyway. When he forced the Union forces to surrender at Palmito Ranch, among the POW's were a number of negro soldiers.

"Some of the Sixty-Second Colored Regiment were also taken. They had been led to believe that if captured they would either be shot or returned to slavery. They were agreeably surprised when they were paroled and permitted to depart with the white prisoners. Several of the prisoners were from Austin and vicinity. They were assured they would be treated as prisoners of war. There was no disposition to visit upon them a mean spirit of revenge."-Colonel John Salmon Ford, May 1865.[3]

When Colonel Ford surrendered his command following the battle at Palmito Ranch he urged his men to honor their paroles. He insisted that "the negro had a right to vote." [3]


(from Wiki)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Salmon_Ford

What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Eddie

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 15432
    • View Profile
Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3208 on: May 24, 2018, 12:18:27 PM »
When Ford came to Texas, he first settled in San Augustine, where he practiced medicine from 1838 until 1846.

This is actually quite close to the part of Deep East Texas where I grew up. San Augustine, along with Nacogdoches (where I went to state university for undergrad) are considered the oldest towns in Texas, predating San Antonio. The original towns were Spanish missions and garrisons, established in the 18th century. Even today, it's about as rural as America gets. Norman Rockwell territory, Texas style.





Taken during WWII, these are photos of people in San Augustine. The kids in the photos are probably 15 or 20 years older than you and I. Different world. (the photos were taken by John Vachon, whom you will remember from Look Magazine.)

It was pretty wild country in Ford's day. In the cemetery some miles away where my parents are buried, there are some interesting grave markers from that era. Two small stone markers for two children, both girls dated to the 1830's, and one for their father, who was a doctor, buried the next year. I don't know their story. It's been lost in time. There weren't any other stone markers in that cemetery for more than 50 years. Nobody had that kind of money.

I've seen a very old map of that area, and that part of Deep East Texas (now Cherokee County)  bore a simple legend. "Indian Territory".



« Last Edit: May 24, 2018, 02:26:46 PM by Eddie »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 13882
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3209 on: May 24, 2018, 01:30:23 PM »
Awesome. Thanks for correcting me.

I did not know that verse, or forgot it, more likely. God probably borrowed it from Shakespeare. LOL.

That is funny AF, as the young people say.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
68 Replies
17699 Views
Last post November 09, 2017, 09:37:32 AM
by azozeo
1 Replies
1048 Views
Last post June 12, 2015, 10:34:49 AM
by Eddie
0 Replies
174 Views
Last post July 01, 2018, 08:07:18 PM
by Palloy2