AuthorTopic: The Surlynewz Channel  (Read 538007 times)

Offline AJ

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Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3615 on: January 09, 2019, 02:44:46 PM »
Using the budget as a blunt instrument should be illegal for the POTUS and/or the Congress. There should be an automatic continuing resolution to fund the departments until something gets hammered out...in all circumstances.

See how long it would take to reach a compromise if they cut off Trump's golf until it happened. Maybe take away his phone so he can't tweet.

The American people should be hopping mad.....but they're a bunch of passive doofuses.

Nah, as long as their true masters at Fox News and talk radio (Limbaugh, Ingaham, etc.) tell them this is good they will go along. Maybe when the don't get their tax refunds (or food stamps?) they might lose faith? :icon_scratch: Nah, you're probably right.
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Offline Surly1

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Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3616 on: January 09, 2019, 05:16:39 PM »
Using the budget as a blunt instrument should be illegal for the POTUS and/or the Congress. There should be an automatic continuing resolution to fund the departments until something gets hammered out...in all circumstances.

See how long it would take to reach a compromise if they cut off Trump's golf until it happened. Maybe take away his phone so he can't tweet.

The American people should be hopping mad.....but they're a bunch of passive doofuses.

I saw this some days ago but didn't think to post it:

While federal workers go without pay, senior Trump administration officials are poised to get $10,000 raises
https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2019/01/04/while-federal-workers-go-without-pay-senior-trump-administration-officials-are-poised-get-raises/?utm_term=.6c8382393508

Some of us are mad. The rest are distracted. And the minions of the Golden Golum of Greatness never even saw this story and have no idea, because Hannity and Hobbs didn't tell them. I even missed the MTV premiere of Lindsay Lohan's Beach Club last night.

To your point, if Congress had to live under the conditions they pass, and also to your point, if THEY didn't get paid if fed workers didn't get paid, what a Christmas it would be.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3617 on: January 09, 2019, 05:29:18 PM »
Using the budget as a blunt instrument should be illegal for the POTUS and/or the Congress. There should be an automatic continuing resolution to fund the departments until something gets hammered out...in all circumstances.

See how long it would take to reach a compromise if they cut off Trump's golf until it happened. Maybe take away his phone so he can't tweet.

The American people should be hopping mad.....but they're a bunch of passive doofuses.

Nah, as long as their true masters at Fox News and talk radio (Limbaugh, Ingaham, etc.) tell them this is good they will go along. Maybe when the don't get their tax refunds (or food stamps?) they might lose faith? :icon_scratch: Nah, you're probably right.

Some of the soybean farmers assfucked by the Trump Tariffs (So much winning!) are starting to notice their checks are late. Perhaps underlining the urgency of the China trade team negotiations.
But in Trumpworld, if it ain't happening to me, it ain't happening.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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“THERE IS NO ENDGAME”: WHITE HOUSE AIDES FEAR BORDER WALL IS HIS ALAMO
« Reply #3618 on: January 10, 2019, 09:41:49 AM »
“THERE IS NO ENDGAME”: WHITE HOUSE AIDES FEAR TRUMP HAS TURNED THE BORDER WALL INTO HIS ALAMO
“The president put himself in a box” as Trump tries to fight his way out, his new chief of staff already eyes the exits, and Giuliani worries about Mueller’s possibly “horrific” report.




 

Eighteen days into the standoff over his $5.7 billion wall-fence-barrier, Donald Trump is rolling out his heaviest weapons: a prime-time Oval Office address tonight and a visit to the Mexican border later this week. It’s the president’s personal Alamo. Inside the West Wing, Trump has told aides he’s prepared to stake his presidency on making a last stand. “He has convinced himself he can’t win re-election in 2020 unless he gets a lot of the wall built. It’s fundamental to his id,” a former West Wing official said. “The problem is, the Democrats know that.”

Trump’s aides fear he has given himself no way out. “The president put himself in a box,” the former official in touch with the White House told me. “The problem is there’s no endgame. Right now the White House is at a seven on the panic scale. If this thing goes on past the State of the Union they’re going to be at an 11.” Another prominent Republican close to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell described Trump’s handling of the shutdown as “total fucking chaos.”

Acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, installed in the job just before Christmas, may already be looking at escape routes. Unlike his long-suffering predecessor, John Kelly, Mulvaney has indicated he’s prepared to walk away if things go south with the president. “Mick has both eyes open,” said a person who spoke with Mulvaney recently. “So far, Trump has been more DIY than ever before. It’s a continuation of where things left off with Kelly. Mulvaney is not going to stick around and get ground up.” Before Christmas, Trump’s former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski told people that Mulvaney wouldn’t last long, according to a person who spoke with Lewandowski. Last night, The New York Timesreported Mulvaney is interested in becoming president of the University of South Carolina.

Meanwhile, Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump have been underwhelmed with Mulvaney’s political skills, two people familiar with their thinking said. The sources said Jared and Ivanka have discussed recruiting Blackstone executive Wayne Berman to serve as White House strategist, but so far Berman hasn’t been interested a source familiar with his thinking said. Blackstone declined to comment.

The shutdown has pushed the Russia investigation out of the news cycle. But Trumpworld knows it hasn’t gone away. Rudy Giuliani recently told a friend that he expects Mueller’s report to be “horrific,” a person briefed on the conversation said (Giuliani did not respond to a request for comment). “You’re already hearing people speculate Trump could do a deal and resign.”

The White House did not respond to a request for comment.

« Last Edit: January 11, 2019, 06:55:49 AM by Surly1 »
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Miami-Dade’s septic tanks are already failing due to sea rise
« Reply #3619 on: January 11, 2019, 07:01:02 AM »
A $3 billion problem: Miami-Dade’s septic tanks are already failing due to sea rise--
Half of the county’s septic tanks break down yearly, a problem that sea level rise will worsen.



A Miami-Dade neighborhood that relies on septic tanks experiences flooding during the 2016 King Tide. A new report commissioned by the county shows that half of the county’s septic tanks break down yearly, a problem that sea level rise will worsen. MIAMI-DADE COUNTY


Miami-Dade has tens of thousands of septic tanks, and a new report reveals most are already malfunctioning — the smelly and unhealthy evidence of which often ends up in people’s yards and homes. It’s a billion-dollar problem that climate change is making worse.

As sea level rise encroaches on South Florida, the Miami-Dade County study shows that thousands more residents may be at risk — and soon. By 2040, 64 percent of county septic tanks (more than 67,000) could have issues every year, affecting not only the people who rely on them for sewage treatment, but the region’s water supply and the health of anyone who wades through floodwaters.

“That’s a huge deal for a developed country in 2019 to have half of the septic tanks not functioning for part of the year,” said Miami Waterkeeper Executive Director Rachel Silverstein. “That is not acceptable.”

Septic tanks require a layer of dirt underneath to do the final filtration work and return the liquid waste back to the aquifer. Older rules required one foot of soil, but newer regulations call for double that. In South Florida, there’s not that much dirt between the homes above ground and the water below.

“All those regulations were based on the premise the elevation of groundwater was going to be stable over time, which we now know is not correct,” said Doug Yoder, deputy director of Miami-Dade County’s Water and Sewer Department. “Now we find ourselves in a situation where we know sea level has risen and continues to rise.”

septic.JPG
A graphic explaining the relationship between groundwater levels and the effectiveness of a septic tank. A new report commissioned by Miami-Dade County shows that half of the county’s septic tanks break down yearly, a problem that sea level rise will worsen.
Miami-Dade County

Sea level rise is pushing the groundwater even higher, eating up precious space and leaving the once dry dirt soggy. Waste water doesn’t filter like it’s supposed to in soggy soil. In some cases, it comes back out, turning a front yard into a poopy swamp.

High tides or heavy rains can push feces-filled water elsewhere, including King Tide floodwaters — as pointed out in a 2016 study from Florida International University and NOAA — or possibly the region’s drinking supply.

In total, there are about 108,000 properties within the county that still use septic, about 105,000 of which are residential. The vast majority (more than 65,000) of the septic systems are in unincorporated Miami-Dade.

Miami Gardens, North Miami Beach, Palmetto Bay and Pinecrest have the most of any city, at about 5,000 each.

Some of those cities will see hundreds more septic tanks experiencing yearly failures within the decade, like North Miami Beach, which has 2,780 homes with septic tanks with periodic issues now. By 2030, that is expected to jump to 3,751.

The report did not forecast past 2040, when the region is expecting around 15 inches of sea rise, a number that is predicted to creep exponentially upward over the decades.

septic2.JPG
More than half of Miami-Dade County’s 105,000 residential septic tanks have annual issues. A new report commissioned by the county shows that half of the county’s septic tanks break down yearly, a problem that sea level rise will worsen.
Miami-Dade County

“The best response is sewer extension, but obviously that infrastructure takes quite a bit of planning and time,” said Katherine Hageman, the county’s resilience program manager.

“And money,” County Chief Resilience Officer James Murley added.

Neighbors on a Coconut Grove street worked with a landscape architect to come up with a list of ideas for how to keep their flooded neighborhood dry in the face of sea level rise. Now the city will decide what gets built and how it’s paid for.

Ripping out every septic tank and laying down new pipes to connect the homes to the county’s sewer system won’t be cheap. The latest estimate put the price tag at $3.3 billion.

“Who has that?” said Commissioner Rebeca Sosa, who called for the study. “We need to act as fast as possible. We need to get as much assistance as we can from the federal government, from the state.”

That $3.3 billion price tag doesn’t cover commercial properties, an estimated $230 million cost, Yoder said. The county’s current general obligation bond includes $126 million to extend sewer services to businesses. Yoder said the plans are in the design phase.

For now, anyone who wants to connect their property to the county’s sewer system has to pay out of pocket. The report cites the average price as $15,000, but Yoder estimated that in septic-reliant areas like Pinecrest, it could cost around $50,000 per home to tap into the sewer system.

That’s cash most residents don’t have on hand, Haggman said, which is why the county is exploring other ways to help residents out.

“We have options, but I think that’s a good area for more conversation,” she said.

Besides borrowing more money with another bond, the report pointed out the county’s best options would be continuing to collect the per-home fee or establishing special taxing districts and spreading the cost into a neighborhood.

Silverstein said the findings raise significant concerns about impacts from septic tanks not just in 20 years, but now.

“Clearly the county is facing a major system failure here. Septic tanks are already compromised and will continue to be even more comprised with sea level rise and they need to take rapid action to address this and make the system more resilient,” she said.

Miami Herald Staff Writer Jenny Staletovich contributed to this story.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Eddie

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Re: Miami-Dade’s septic tanks are already failing due to sea rise
« Reply #3620 on: January 11, 2019, 07:04:02 AM »
A $3 billion problem: Miami-Dade’s septic tanks are already failing due to sea rise--
Half of the county’s septic tanks break down yearly, a problem that sea level rise will worsen.



A Miami-Dade neighborhood that relies on septic tanks experiences flooding during the 2016 King Tide. A new report commissioned by the county shows that half of the county’s septic tanks break down yearly, a problem that sea level rise will worsen. MIAMI-DADE COUNTY


Miami-Dade has tens of thousands of septic tanks, and a new report reveals most are already malfunctioning — the smelly and unhealthy evidence of which often ends up in people’s yards and homes. It’s a billion-dollar problem that climate change is making worse.

As sea level rise encroaches on South Florida, the Miami-Dade County study shows that thousands more residents may be at risk — and soon. By 2040, 64 percent of county septic tanks (more than 67,000) could have issues every year, affecting not only the people who rely on them for sewage treatment, but the region’s water supply and the health of anyone who wades through floodwaters.

“That’s a huge deal for a developed country in 2019 to have half of the septic tanks not functioning for part of the year,” said Miami Waterkeeper Executive Director Rachel Silverstein. “That is not acceptable.”

Septic tanks require a layer of dirt underneath to do the final filtration work and return the liquid waste back to the aquifer. Older rules required one foot of soil, but newer regulations call for double that. In South Florida, there’s not that much dirt between the homes above ground and the water below.

“All those regulations were based on the premise the elevation of groundwater was going to be stable over time, which we now know is not correct,” said Doug Yoder, deputy director of Miami-Dade County’s Water and Sewer Department. “Now we find ourselves in a situation where we know sea level has risen and continues to rise.”

septic.JPG
A graphic explaining the relationship between groundwater levels and the effectiveness of a septic tank. A new report commissioned by Miami-Dade County shows that half of the county’s septic tanks break down yearly, a problem that sea level rise will worsen.
Miami-Dade County

Sea level rise is pushing the groundwater even higher, eating up precious space and leaving the once dry dirt soggy. Waste water doesn’t filter like it’s supposed to in soggy soil. In some cases, it comes back out, turning a front yard into a poopy swamp.

High tides or heavy rains can push feces-filled water elsewhere, including King Tide floodwaters — as pointed out in a 2016 study from Florida International University and NOAA — or possibly the region’s drinking supply.

In total, there are about 108,000 properties within the county that still use septic, about 105,000 of which are residential. The vast majority (more than 65,000) of the septic systems are in unincorporated Miami-Dade.

Miami Gardens, North Miami Beach, Palmetto Bay and Pinecrest have the most of any city, at about 5,000 each.

Some of those cities will see hundreds more septic tanks experiencing yearly failures within the decade, like North Miami Beach, which has 2,780 homes with septic tanks with periodic issues now. By 2030, that is expected to jump to 3,751.

The report did not forecast past 2040, when the region is expecting around 15 inches of sea rise, a number that is predicted to creep exponentially upward over the decades.

septic2.JPG
More than half of Miami-Dade County’s 105,000 residential septic tanks have annual issues. A new report commissioned by the county shows that half of the county’s septic tanks break down yearly, a problem that sea level rise will worsen.
Miami-Dade County

“The best response is sewer extension, but obviously that infrastructure takes quite a bit of planning and time,” said Katherine Hageman, the county’s resilience program manager.

“And money,” County Chief Resilience Officer James Murley added.

Neighbors on a Coconut Grove street worked with a landscape architect to come up with a list of ideas for how to keep their flooded neighborhood dry in the face of sea level rise. Now the city will decide what gets built and how it’s paid for.

Ripping out every septic tank and laying down new pipes to connect the homes to the county’s sewer system won’t be cheap. The latest estimate put the price tag at $3.3 billion.

“Who has that?” said Commissioner Rebeca Sosa, who called for the study. “We need to act as fast as possible. We need to get as much assistance as we can from the federal government, from the state.”

That $3.3 billion price tag doesn’t cover commercial properties, an estimated $230 million cost, Yoder said. The county’s current general obligation bond includes $126 million to extend sewer services to businesses. Yoder said the plans are in the design phase.

For now, anyone who wants to connect their property to the county’s sewer system has to pay out of pocket. The report cites the average price as $15,000, but Yoder estimated that in septic-reliant areas like Pinecrest, it could cost around $50,000 per home to tap into the sewer system.

That’s cash most residents don’t have on hand, Haggman said, which is why the county is exploring other ways to help residents out.

“We have options, but I think that’s a good area for more conversation,” she said.

Besides borrowing more money with another bond, the report pointed out the county’s best options would be continuing to collect the per-home fee or establishing special taxing districts and spreading the cost into a neighborhood.

Silverstein said the findings raise significant concerns about impacts from septic tanks not just in 20 years, but now.

“Clearly the county is facing a major system failure here. Septic tanks are already compromised and will continue to be even more comprised with sea level rise and they need to take rapid action to address this and make the system more resilient,” she said.

Miami Herald Staff Writer Jenny Staletovich contributed to this story.


The grass is always greener over the septic tank.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

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The decline in U.S. life expectancy is unlike anything we've seen in a century
« Reply #3621 on: January 13, 2019, 04:29:51 AM »
The decline in U.S. life expectancy is unlike anything we've seen in a century
The CDC identified three things shortening American lives.



More Americans are dying by their own hands and by overdoses.
Pexels


By Sara Chodosh November 29, 2018

For a nation that spends more on healthcare per citizen than almost any other, America isn’t exactly reaping the rewards. Life expectancy has been steadily climbing for decades now, but in the last few years it’s taken a troubling turn in the other direction.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control shows that a small decrease in life expectancy, from 78.7 to 78.6 years, is part of a continuing trend. Even as we make progress treating cancer, heart disease, and stroke—three of the biggest killers—we’re losing ground on other fronts and have been since 2014. That makes this continuous decline unlike anything we've seen since World War I and the Spanish influenza, which both happened between 1915 and 1918.

In its report, the CDC highlighted three things that have contributed to American's shrinking life expectancy in recent years: drug overdoses, chronic liver disease, and suicide. “Increased death rates for unintentional drug overdoses in particular—a subset of unintentional injuries—contributed to the negative change in life expectancy observed in recent years," the report reads.

But the changes aren’t affecting everyone equally. Take a look at these charts:

life expectancy factors

These are the three main factors the CDC identified as being behind the drop in life expectancy.

Infographic by Sara Chodosh

Health and life expectancy varies geographically. Worldwide variation is enormous, but even within the United States you can expect to live 6.6 years longer if you live in Hawaii, the top-ranked state, than in Mississippi, which comes in last. With its 81.3 year life expectancy, Hawaii looks more like the Netherlands than the United States. Mississippi's 74.7 year projection looks more like Kuwait.

life expectancy US 2016

Americans living in much of the South have much shorter lives than those in the rest of the country.

Infographic by Sara Chodosh

Tackling the various problems that contribute to the recent upticks in suicide, liver disease, and drug overdoses won’t be easy. They’re multifaceted issues—often complicated by economics—that we’ve only just begun to parse. But if we want Americans to lead long and healthy lives, it looks like we’re going to have to change what we’re doing. If these charts tell us anything, it's that our current methods aren’t working.

« Last Edit: January 15, 2019, 08:25:56 AM by Surly1 »
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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The Oceans Are Warming Fast, and Our Lives Are About to Change
« Reply #3622 on: January 15, 2019, 05:48:52 AM »
An interim summary on a familiar theme.

The Oceans Are Warming Fast, and Our Lives Are About to Change
Vanishing coral reefs, intensifying hurricanes, rising seas — new studies confirm the toll of climate change



Sea ice melts on the Franklin Strait along the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.


By

Climate deniers want you to believe otherwise, but the basic physics of climate science is as solid as the basic physics of gravity (or maybe even more solid, since the graviton, the elementary particle that mediates the force of gravity, still has not been detected). But there are plenty of unknowns in Earth’s climate system, such as exactly how much each ton of carbon dioxide we emit warms the atmosphere, or how different clouds can cool (by reflecting away sunlight) and warm (by trapping heat) the Earth. These uncertainties don’t mean that scientists don’t understand how burning fossil fuels cooks the planet. But it does mean there are still scientific nuances that could make the risks we face from climate change lower than scientists now anticipate – or higher.

Last week, an important uncertainty was resolved – and, like most news about climate change these days, it’s not a happy story. A paper published in the journal Science shows that the Earth’s oceans are warming at a rate that’s about 40 percent faster than indicated in the 2013 U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report. Because the world’s oceans work like a giant flywheel, capturing heat energy and then spinning it out over time, warmer oceans have huge implications for everything from the rate of sea-level rise to hurricane intensity for generations to come.

During the last century, as the world heated up from pumping fossil fuels into the atmosphere, about 90 percent of the extra heat going into the climate system has been absorbed by the oceans. “If the ocean wasn’t absorbing as much heat, the surface of the land would heat up much faster than it is right now,” Malin L. Pinsky, an associate professor in the department of ecology, evolution and natural resources at Rutgers University, told The New York Times. “In fact, the ocean is saving us from massive warming right now.”

The ocean’s ability to absorb heat was no mystery to scientists. But what has been a mystery is that the ocean seemed to be warming more slowly than it should have been, given the climate models. This is important, because if a climate model can’t accurately capture the past, then it won’t be accurate predicting the future.

But actually measuring the heat content of the world’s oceans is not a small task. What matters is not just the surface temperature, which is relatively easy to calibrate, but also measuring the temperature as deep as 2,000 meters.

Since the data had been suggesting the oceans were warming more slowly than climate models predicted, did that mean the models were wrong, or the measurements were off?

The authors the new paper resolved the dilemma by using new data from a network of thousands of autonomous robots – called Argo floats –that dive down to depths of 2,000 meters or so and measure temperature, salinity, pH and other ocean characteristics as they slowly ascend. Once the Argo floats surface, the data they have collected is relayed back to scientists by satellite. The upshot of this new data: The climate models were right after all, and the oceans are warming much faster than anyone understood.

The implications are huge.

Fast-warming oceans are devastating to coral reefs. Coral reefs are vanishing five times more frequently than they were 40 years ago, and will be gone entirely within your lifetime.

Fast-warming oceans intensify hurricanes. For example, one recent paper linked the disastrous rains associated with Hurricane Harvey, which hit Houston in 2017, with the amount of heat stored in the ocean. Harvey dumped 60 inches of water on Southeast Texas (the most ever recorded from a single storm in U.S. history).

The study, published in the journal Earth’s Future, argued that the added ocean heat content not only increases a storm’s rainfall but also “invigorates and enlarges the storm,” turning it into an even bigger rain-producer. Two independent studies found climate warming boosted Harvey’s rainfall by about 20 to 35 percent.

Hotter oceans also means faster sea-level rise, in part because as water warms, it expands.

But fast-warming oceans are also melting the great ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica from below, which has the potential to greatly increase the rate and height of sea-level rise. The warming of the Southern Ocean is particularly alarming, because it could destabilize West Antarctica and lead to the collapse of ice sheets that could raise global sea levels by 10 feet.

Fast-warming oceans also have big impacts on marine life. “As the ocean heats up, it’s driving fish into new places, and we’re already seeing that that’s driving conflict between countries,” Pinsky told the Times. “It’s spilling over far beyond just fish, it’s turned into trade wars. It’s turned into diplomatic disputes. It’s led to a breakdown in international relations in some cases.”

Fast-warming oceans also mean that Big Fix technologies like geoengineering and carbon removal, which are increasingly seen as last resort measures to cool the planet, will be less effective. It’s one thing to throw up a sun shade beside a pool; it’s another thing entirely to try to cool down the water in the pool itself.

If there is an upside to this recent paper, it’s this: It’s further proof that climate science — and knowledge about the risks we face in the future — are getting better, more accurate and more sophisticated. We may or we may not be doomed, but we can’t say we weren’t warned

« Last Edit: January 15, 2019, 08:25:05 AM by Surly1 »
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: The Oceans Are Warming Fast, and Our Lives Are About to Change
« Reply #3623 on: January 15, 2019, 05:59:38 AM »
Our lives have already changed.

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

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Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3624 on: January 15, 2019, 12:00:07 PM »
Yeah, we're all old and gonna die soon anyway :o so yeah our lives have already changed and will change again.
I think the take home message from this piece is that once again the alarmists about Climate Change are right: The IPCC always picks the least apocalyptic version of the data they can. This is because their reports are political documents and not rigorous peer reviewed documents. When you have FF countries as part of the IPCC process they steer the process to a report that is the least catastrophic within the science they report. So. . . Climate Change is gonna happen faster and be worse, que up McPherson.
AJ
Nullis in Verba

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Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3625 on: January 15, 2019, 12:23:20 PM »
Yeah, we're all old and gonna die soon anyway :o so yeah our lives have already changed and will change again.
I think the take home message from this piece is that once again the alarmists about Climate Change are right: The IPCC always picks the least apocalyptic version of the data they can. This is because their reports are political documents and not rigorous peer reviewed documents. When you have FF countries as part of the IPCC process they steer the process to a report that is the least catastrophic within the science they report. So. . . Climate Change is gonna happen faster and be worse, que up McPherson.
AJ

Dr. McStinksion believes we'll be Extinct by 2030.  You buy that bullshit?

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SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline Eddie

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The decline in U.S. life expectancy is unlike anything we've seen in a century
The CDC identified three things shortening American lives.



More Americans are dying by their own hands and by overdoses.
Pexels



First, Oklahoma is not the south. It's COMPLEATLY north of Texas,as anyone can see.

I'm guessing a government ban on grits and gravy might do a lot to save southern  lives...mebbe put a Surgeon General's warning on Budweiser that says not to mix it with fentanyl and oxycontin.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2019, 04:06:26 AM by Surly1 »
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline AJ

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Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3627 on: January 15, 2019, 03:56:05 PM »
Yeah, we're all old and gonna die soon anyway :o so yeah our lives have already changed and will change again.
I think the take home message from this piece is that once again the alarmists about Climate Change are right: The IPCC always picks the least apocalyptic version of the data they can. This is because their reports are political documents and not rigorous peer reviewed documents. When you have FF countries as part of the IPCC process they steer the process to a report that is the least catastrophic within the science they report. So. . . Climate Change is gonna happen faster and be worse, que up McPherson.
AJ

Dr. McStinksion believes we'll be Extinct by 2030.  You buy that bullshit?

RE
I keep repeating myself. He's now saying we will be extinct in 18 months, give or take a few months. Blue Ocean Event the end of this coming summer, causes massive shift in Jet Stream to circle the new cold spot in the Arctic (Greenland 17o from north). This shift collapses N. American agriculture. Civilization collapses from this. Global dimming is removed and planet heats up because of this. I just had this discussion with K-dog. I'm not saying I buy it 100%, but it's starting to get within the realm of possibility. And it's not just McPherson. It's Arctic News, Paul Beckwith, David Suzuki, AND more. So, I think we could easily all be gone by 2030 (maybe not every last one. . . but close). Whether we squeak through is all a matter of luck now IMHO. Hope I'm wrong.
AJ
Nullis in Verba

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Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3628 on: January 15, 2019, 06:21:13 PM »
Yeah, we're all old and gonna die soon anyway :o so yeah our lives have already changed and will change again.
I think the take home message from this piece is that once again the alarmists about Climate Change are right: The IPCC always picks the least apocalyptic version of the data they can. This is because their reports are political documents and not rigorous peer reviewed documents. When you have FF countries as part of the IPCC process they steer the process to a report that is the least catastrophic within the science they report. So. . . Climate Change is gonna happen faster and be worse, que up McPherson.
AJ

Dr. McStinksion believes we'll be Extinct by 2030.  You buy that bullshit?

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I keep repeating myself. He's now saying we will be extinct in 18 months, give or take a few months. Blue Ocean Event the end of this coming summer, causes massive shift in Jet Stream to circle the new cold spot in the Arctic (Greenland 17o from north). This shift collapses N. American agriculture. Civilization collapses from this. Global dimming is removed and planet heats up because of this. I just had this discussion with K-dog. I'm not saying I buy it 100%, but it's starting to get within the realm of possibility. And it's not just McPherson. It's Arctic News, Paul Beckwith, David Suzuki, AND more. So, I think we could easily all be gone by 2030 (maybe not every last one. . . but close). Whether we squeak through is all a matter of luck now IMHO. Hope I'm wrong.
AJ

18 Months!  Even I stand an even money chance of being alive in 18 months!  If we are both still alive in July of 2020, you owe me a beer.

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SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

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The World Will End in Fire
« Reply #3629 on: January 16, 2019, 03:44:34 AM »
Book review.
Me, I thought Greenland was "distorted"by Mercator projection rather than "by northern prejudice to appear larger than Africa on most western maps," But that's me.

The World Will End in Fire

JANUARY 15, 2019 BY DAVID SWANSON




Proclaiming that the end is nigh has now become the labor of the very opposite of a deluded religious devotee. And the question framed by Robert Frost of whether the world will end in fire or ice is no longer in dispute. The world will soon end in fire, possibly the fire of the Pentagon’s “usable” nuclear weapons, certainly the fire of anthropogenic climate collapse. Not only will the world not end in ice, but the vanishing of ice from the earth is helping to rapidly render this planet uninhabitable for humans and many other species.

As we observe up-close in Dahr Jamail’s new book The End of Ice: Bearing Witness and Finding Meaning in the Path of Climate Disruption, great masses of ice are melting away. Glacier National Park will soon lack any glaciers. Greenland, that ice-covered land falsely labeled green and distorted by northern prejudice to appear larger than Africa on most western maps, is being transformed into something you can spray through a hose . . . or drown in. Ice that most of us have never seen, but upon which our lives depend, is disappearing, not just quickly, but at a rate that is constantly becoming quicker, and even quicker, and quicker still.

The permafrost in the Arctic, Jamail tells us, is thawing and releasing methane, and could at any moment release methane equivalent to several times the total carbon dioxide released by humans ever. Barring that catastrophe, the feedback loops or vicious cycles are real and underestimated. When the glaciers melt, the streams warm up or dry up, ecosystems collapse, forests burn, and the glaciers melt more. By 2015, forests in California had become climate polluters rather than CO2 reducers. Jamail finds that every single worst case scenario predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) regarding temperature, sea level, severe weather, and CO2 in the atmosphere has fallen short. In fact, Jamail explains why the IPCC is generally not just excessively conservative but 10 years out of date. That figure places the IPCC’s late-2018 report claiming that humanity had 12 years left in which to change its ways and avert disaster in a harsh light.

While that IPCC report came out after Jamail wrote The End of Ice, it can add little perspective to a book that looks at our state of affairs far more clearly. Yet the fact that I am writing this review months before the book and this review will be published strikes me as somewhat obscene. What’s a quarter of a year, anyway, to wait to publish a silly book review? Well it’s an eighth of the 2 years one might conclude we have left to work with. But that would be clinging to fantasy. There is no preventing utter disaster. Yet there is urgency. The need is to work to slow the collapse and to mitigate its impacts and provide aid to each other as it washes over us.

The End of Ice takes us on a tour of magnificent and critically wounded areas of the earth, beginning in Alaska on Denali, which is changing — melting — dramatically. In many of the locations that Jamail takes us to, people have observed the warming for decades. Many people in the “developed” world, Jamail suggests, have not been connected enough to a place to notice — at least until now, when it is too late.

As Jamail travels the planet, he meets with top scientists, local officials, and other observers of what’s happening. One makes the point about Alaska being out-of-sight and out-of mind: “If this was happening in California, every one of these changes would be front-page news. That is why you’ve had no idea that Alaska’s glaciers are losing an estimated 75 billion tons of ice every year.”

Of course, that’s a very partial explanation of denialism, which has, by definition, consisted of denying something, not of being unaware of it. The news has been unwanted, especially by those paid not to want it. While Sarah Palin could see Russia from Alaska, there was no evidence that she saw Alaska from Alaska. In South Florida, which is doomed to go underwater, insurance rates are skyrocketing, the lengths of mortgages are shrinking, and construction — including of nuclear reactors — is booming. A grave for humanity might bear the word “Ignorance” or it might, just as appropriately, display an image of Ronald Reagan ripping solar panels off the White House roof.

Those living in some fortunate untouched inland suburb will not have the benefit of a lengthy warning in the form of direct impact. They can only warn themselves by caring what’s happening in other places ravaged by drought and flooding and storms and heat. Rather than sitting in the mythical warming pot alongside the poor slandered frog who actually knows better, people are on the comfortable stovetop next to the pot, about to be engulfed as the pot boils over.

Jamail finds his visits to natural wonders bittersweet and takes extra pleasure in spending time with doomed places. But I don’t think he intends to encourage morbid tourism. When he visits the Matanuska Glacier, he finds privatized profiteering from visits to the glacier’s receding edge. As the glacier melts, chainsaws take down trees, construction noise echoes, and ATVs buzz about — knowingly turning up the heat that such last-chance tourism industries fully feel.

Millions of humans depend on glaciers for drinking water. The countries where over half of humanity lives are over-pumping their aquifers. The rising sea levels accelerated by the melting ice will render a significant portion of humanity homeless. I fear that, beyond the physical feedback loops that scientists tell Jamail about, human feedback loops could worsen the coming crises. If people respond with greed, fear, bigotry, corruption, and violence, they will make matters far worse immediately, and by further fueling the climate collapse. Building walls to keep out refugees, and promoting the idea that climate disaster produces war (all by itself, without any human involvement, it would seem from many such predictions) is a recipe for catastrophe, possibly of the nuclear sort.

What to do is not the focus of The End of Ice, but some ideas come through, beyond that of enjoying what time we have. First, I think, we must cease adding to the methane and CO2. As war is the biggest producer of C02 around, making plans to use war as a response to climate collapse is one of the dumber moves available. As the meat industry is one of the greatest producers of methane around, enjoying some delicious end-of-times cooked flesh is not the solution. We need a radical reworking of our culture into the sort of society that could have survived had it reformed itself 30 years sooner.

Then we need to mitigate the damage, by helping those in need. We need to relocate people and other species out of areas that are going underwater, and not just people but the worst of their physical creations as measured by the degree to which they will poison the oceans if left behind. As long as there is some hope of reducing the speed or enormity of the damage, I will find an exclusive focus on mitigation to be an outrage. But even more outrageous is the fact that right now our society isn’t even trying to mitigate the damage.

I’ve never shared the widespread interest in hope or despair. We have a moral responsibility to do what needs doing. What more has to be said? But the work of the doctor / narrator in Albert Camus’ The Plague, which I’ve referred people to as a model is not quite right — or at least could be misleading. The importance of preparing for the plague at the first signs of it must be increased dramatically. And one cannot simply plod along, working long hours, until the plague has run its course. This plague ends us before it runs its course. We have to dedicate ourselves to ending with dignity and kindness, with the closest thing we can manage to the grace and wisdom that could have saved us. And then we have to rededicate ourselves to redoubling our efforts, again and again, with ever greater effort as we continue. The alternative of giving up is guaranteed not to be more enjoyable than working well together on a crisis that could bring out the best in us. The alternative of pretending everything is normal, scorning radical activism, and contenting ourselves with voting in yet another “most important election of our lifetime” every two years is guaranteed to create a crisis of faith and a crisis of guilt. Let’s not go there. Or rather, let’s not stay there.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

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