AuthorTopic: The Surlynewz Channel  (Read 596131 times)

Offline Surly1

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Just 100 Companies Will Sign Humanity’s Death Warrant
« Reply #3960 on: October 15, 2019, 06:25:51 PM »
Just 100 Companies Will Sign Humanity’s Death Warrant




Shutterstock

Only 100 companies will sign humanity’s death sentence. That’s it. One hundred corporate boards filled with sociopaths. But I’ll get back to that in a moment.

In recent weeks, climate activists in New York City jammed up foot traffic on Wall Street with a die-in, covering themselves in fake blood and lying on the ground. Other activists in Washington, D.C., blocked intersections using a variety of tactics, gridlocking traffic and pissing off a lot of people. It seems clear that when it comes to our impending extinction, practically no one cares, unless it means they have to sit in traffic for 10 extra minutes. Apparently there is nothing that upsets Americans more than being stuck in their car, moving at a negative MPH, completely unable to get to the jobs they fucking hate.

And that’s why those are the types of protests that matter—the ones that interrupt the flow of capitalism, not the colorful marches where we all show up for two hours while the politicians we’re ostensibly trying to influence go play golf. I’m not saying don’t get involved in the friendly marches—I’m just saying our rulers don’t care that you did. It’s like when you dress up your baby in a costume: I’m not saying you have to stop, but you’re only doing it for yourself. The ruling elite, like your baby, doesn’t actually care.

But since I aim to please, here’s a point for those of you who don’t give a shit about the climate crisis. The corporations that are screwing up your life, tainting your water, polluting your air, buying up your favorite coffee shop and turning it into a gas station, sucking your tax dollars up through subsidies, and all the while paying their employees a warm can of farts per hour—those corporations are the same ones creating the climate catastrophe.

In fact, The Guardian reported that just 100 companies are responsible for 71% of global greenhouse gas emissions. These include Exxon Mobil, Saudi Aramco, Shell, Chinese and Russian coal, Chevron, BP, CNPC, ConocoPhillips, Gazprom, Lukoil, Total, Petrobas and many others.

One hundred incredibly rich yet morally bankrupt companies. That’s it.

It gets even worse. The Carbon Majors Report revealed that more than half of all industrial emissions over the past 30 years were put out by just 25 corporate and state-owned entities. Twenty-five companies are killing us, smothering us, stealing our futures while choking us (and not the fun kind of consensual choking done in the bedroom. This is the bad kind of choking that results in drought and hurricanes and your dog stuck in a tree!).

Basically, a tiny number of sociopaths make the decisions that are currently dooming us all, and as much as I’d like to tell you otherwise, those people don’t even notice if we all march outside in colorful hats. The marches are kinda like those “rate your experience” things at airports and restaurants, with giant color-coded buttons that feature four choices, ranging from a smiley face all the way down to the dreaded frowny face. I hate to get conspiratorial, but I’m 84% certain that those buttons aren’t even connected to anything. The powers that be just know that you feel better if you think you gave your opinion. Although I will say that the last time I “rated my experience,” I actually did get a response from TSA at the airport. I was only halfway through taking a dump on the frowny face when guys with guns showed up.

Point is, the only protests that create change are those that interrupt the flow of business, because these corporations will not give up easily. Too much profit rests in the balance for them to stop their prolonged execution of the human race.

The Guardian article continues: “Fossil fuel companies risked wasting more than two trillion dollars over the coming decade by pursuing coal, oil and gas projects that could be worthless in the face of international action on climate change and advances in renewables – in turn posing substantial threats to investor returns.”

They have made a two trillion-dollar gamble that we will all keep using fossil fuels even as society collapses. So they don’t just have a dog in the race, they have a goddamn elephant riding on top of a T. rex riding on top of Mike Pompeo. (One can argue that such an animal would not fare well in a race, but it is undeniably a significant beast to have in said contest.)

And I realize that for the average American—the regular person scraping by, trying to get the kids to eat, the dogs to poop and the grandpa to shut up for one second—climate change isn’t his or her top concern. But the truth is, your daily troubles are connected to the same corporations that are causing the largest existential threat we fleshy apes have ever faced. The higher-ups at those organizations control our governments, and therefore, our day-to-day lives.

As Tamara Pearson writes for CommonDreams, “The CEOs making these calculated decisions are hubristic-parasites with a fallacy-fetish, who treat wealth as a game—declaring themselves winners when they have more zeros than whole countries, while treading all over our magical habitat in their race for wealth. … Spoon-fed elitists who are so white and male and wealthy that they aren’t touched by the problems they create.”

While I love Pearson’s analysis, she’s wrong about one thing. These parasites are not only white and male. As President Obama pointed out last year in a speech, “American energy production, you wouldn’t always know it, but it went up every year I was president. … And you know that … suddenly America’s like the biggest oil producer … that was me, people.”

Our former president is actually proud of the fact that he helped put the nail in our coffin. When the ruling elite don’t think you’re paying attention, they brag about their crimes—the same way you or I might sit around privately and say, “Man, you wouldn’t believe how much weed I smoked last night.” Our powers that be sit around boasting, “Man, you wouldn’t believe how many regulations I gutted last night.”

The 100 corporations actively suffocating us in a blanket of global warming emissions are the same ones that run our government. They have wrapped their tentacles around our politicians, the regulatory agencies and the criminal justice system. It’s now one big, incestuous, money-obsessed pile of X-rated nastiness—and you and I are not part of it. We are the cannon fodder, the collateral damage, the chum. Until we stop these corporations, the expiration date of the human race is set in stone.

If you think this column is important, please share it.

You can join Lee Camp’s free email newsletterhere. This column is based on a monologue written by Lee Camp and performed on his television show “Redacted Tonight.”

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Just Take a Look at Yesterday's Stories
« Reply #3961 on: October 17, 2019, 05:59:51 AM »
I've been ab le to read for 65 years, and have never seen a news day like yesterday.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: Just Take a Look at Yesterday's Stories
« Reply #3962 on: October 17, 2019, 07:32:43 AM »
I've been ab le to read for 65 years, and have never seen a news day like yesterday.

CAP.
Collapse Acceleration Phenomena.

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Offline azozeo

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Re: Just Take a Look at Yesterday's Stories
« Reply #3963 on: October 17, 2019, 11:21:52 AM »
I've been ab le to read for 65 years, and have never seen a news day like yesterday.
[/quote]

I just posted Fulford's latest spin.....

Maybe that will help your digestion issues.

2 weeks to the mutha of all sheet-storms amigo  :icon_mrgreen:
« Last Edit: October 17, 2019, 12:48:41 PM by Surly1 »
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Mick Mulvaney Has Conservatives Asking: WTF Are You Doing?
« Reply #3964 on: October 18, 2019, 05:20:11 AM »
When republicans engage in a circular firing squad, it's best to not interrupt them. And when they engage in self-immolation, the same rules apply. Starting to smell like a trump admin death spiral.

Mick Mulvaney Has Conservatives Asking: WTF Are You Doing?
The acting chief of staff had himself a day on Thursday and his critics say he’s in over his head.




Over the course of about 40 minutes on Thursday, President Donald Trump’s acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, made two startling admissions: that U.S. military aid to Ukrainian had been contingent on an investigation into a debunked conspiracy theory about interference in the 2016 election; and that politics was influencing his boss’ foreign policy.

And if all but admitting the president engaged in quid pro quo wasn’t enough, he then proceeded to act like it was the most natural thing in the world… until a few hours later, when he pretended it never happened at all.

It was, in short, a remarkable afternoon for the acting chief of staff, whose standing in the White House seems a bit more precarious by the day as he himself gets drawn further into impeachment proceedings threatening the president.

Those who know the man say they’re not worried about him in the slightest.

“When you're in the middle of it, trying to make decisions—I think Mick's doing a good job of trying to serve the country and serve the president,” said Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.), an ally of Trump’s, a day before Mulvaney’s press conference. “I do know there's a lot of things that get said that aren't backed up with facts. I'm waiting for the facts to come out before I jump to any conclusions.”

But others are not so kind when assessing the role Mulvaney is now playing, arguing that he finds himself in over his head as he tries to guide the White House through turbulent political waters.

“He is a smart guy, a very smart guy, but he’s only about 70 percent as smart as he thinks he is,” said Republican strategist Terry Sullivan, who has known Mulvaney since the acting chief of staff’s days in the South Carolina State Senate. “There’s only one person in that entire White House that has a bigger ego than he does, but it’s not by much.”

The trickiness of Mulvaney’s task—and the difficulty he is having handling it—was on full display Thursday. It was about 20 minutes into the briefing when he was asked whether he was directly involved in withholding funds from Ukraine. After riffing about the president’s dislike of foreign aid, belief the U.S. shoulders too much of it in proportion to others and that the country is corrupt anyway, Mulvaney touched on the 2016 race.

“Did he also mention to me in the past that the corruption related to the DNC server? Absolutely,” he said. “No question about that. But that’s it. That’s why we held up the money.”

After pillorying former State Department adviser Michael McKinley, who reportedly testified he’d left the administration because he was “disturbed by the implication that foreign governments were being approached to procure negative information on political opponents,” Mulvaney went in for the kill.

“I have news for everybody. Get over it,” he advised. “There’s going to be political influence in foreign policy... Elections have consequences and foreign policy is going to change from the Obama administration to the Trump administration.”

As wild—damning, even—as the admissions may have seemed, Mulvaney actually had the intention of bringing the temperature down, with hopes of clearing the air after his name had cropped up in press reports implicating him in the Ukraine-related scandal. He wanted to “take allegations head-on, and show he wasn’t going into hiding,” one White House official said.

“Might as well own it,” the official added.

And own it he did—but only for part of the day.

Hours after the briefing, Mulvaney tried to backtrack, saying in a statement released by the White House press office: “Let me be clear: there was absolutely no quid pro quo between Ukrainian military aid and any investigation into the 2016 election.” He also claimed that “once again, the media has decided to misconstrue my comments to advance a biased and political witch hunt against President Trump.”

By that point, however, real damage had been done. Mulvaney’s earlier round of comments had left some close White House allies utterly perplexed and questioning his fitness for the role.

“What is Mulvaney even talking about?” Sean Hannity, a Fox News host and prominent outside adviser to Trump, said on his radio show on Thursday. “I just think he's dumb, I really do. I don't even think he knows what he's talking about. That's my take on it.”

And the bad reviews came from within the Trump administration itself. Not long after Mulvaney left the briefing room, a senior Department of Justice official began telling reporters that DOJ wasn’t aware that Ukraine military aid and the Justice Department's probe into the potential origins of the Russia investigation were linked. “If the White House was withholding aid in regards to the cooperation with any investigation at the Department of Justice, that is news to us,” the official told Fox News.

One of Trump’s personal attorneys Jay Sekulow released a brief statement that, while not directly criticizing Mulvaney or his briefing, unequivocally stated that the president’s outside lawyers had nothing to do with it.

To a certain degree, Mulvaney’s performance—and subsequent mop-up—was just another illustration of the remarkable tensions that all top White House aides have come to confront. And yet, Thursday’s drama provided a unique instance of how Trump has transformed his own party and endangered those within it.

Four years ago, Mulvaney was a fiscal conservative stalwart in Congress and a public Trump critic. During his 2016 congressional re-election campaign, he told an audience in his South Carolina district in the wake of the release of the Access Hollywood tape that he was supporting then-candidate Trump, “despite the fact that I think he’s a terrible human being.”

But, like many Republicans before and after him, Mulvaney warmed to the president when it became clear that there were opportunities for advancement for those willing to ignore the unsavory elements of Trump. First, he served as the head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (which he gutted), then he became the director of the Office of Management and Budget (a title he still, technically, holds), and now he’s acting chief of staff.

When he first assumed his current post, Mulvaney seemed determined to avoid the drama that had consumed his predecessors. He opted for a less combative approach than prior chief of staff, John Kelly, who frequently butted heads with the president on a range of decisions and rankled Trump with his attempts to corral and restrict access to the impulsive president. He kept a low profile too. Indeed, his Thursday appearance at the White House briefing room was his first during his tenure as acting chief of staff.

“It’s pretty clear to me he’s reading between the lines and he’s trying to execute the president’s policies across the board and not pushing back on what the president’s trying to do,” said one Republican national security expert. “You could see Gen. Kelly likely pushing back on this kind of request.”

But being a Trump foot soldier willing to say and do anything to please the commander in chief came with a cost. And in Mulvaney’s case it was both the sacrificing of long-held principles (the deficit and debt has ballooned under his stewardship) and, increasingly, proximity to political scandal.

On Tuesday, former Senior Director for Russian and Eurasian Affairs Fiona Hill testified to the House Intelligence Committee that former National Security Adviser John Bolton was concerned about actions by Mulvaney, Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani, and European Union ambassador Gordon Sondland that circumvented the normal procedures and diplomatic channels, according to a report in The New York Times.

Thinking it might have legal ramifications, Bolton instructed Hill to alert the chief lawyer for the National Security Council, remarking: “I am not part of whatever drug deal [Sondland and Rudy] and Mulvaney are cooking up.”

On Capitol Hill, lawmakers who worked with Mulvaney—and like him—have watched with a mixture of concern and confusion that their former colleague may have gotten in over his head even before his appearance in the briefing room. There is chatter about whether his “Let Trump Be Trump” approach to the job helped create an environment in which the Ukraine shenanigans were allowed to flourish. And though they are revelling in exposing corruption at the heart of the Trump administration, even Democrats are feeling a bit torn about watching their former colleague get swept away in it all.

“I have worried from day one about Mick working for Trump,” said Rep. John Yarmuth (D-KY), who calls Mulvaney a friend. “Because I believe in the title of that book—that everything Trump touches dies. And I’m just hoping he escapes with his integrity and his career intact. Mick’s a very good guy, a smart guy. I just think it’s unfortunate that he took that responsibility on.”
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Re: The Surlynewz Channel
« Reply #3965 on: October 18, 2019, 03:32:41 PM »
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Oh Noes, Not My Phooooone...
« Reply #3966 on: October 18, 2019, 04:43:53 PM »
Sea-Level Rise Might Cause Massive Internet Outage That Could Disrupt Modern Life



Imagine that the internet is suspended for days; no email, no social media, no online banking, and no streaming services. Climate change could turn this into a reality.

 —

Sea-level rise might cause massive internet outages that could disrupt modern life and inflict major damage on the global economy in the next decade.

According to a recentstudy by the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Oregon, more than 6500 kilometers of buried fiber optic conduit in the United States will be underwater due to sea-level rise in less than 15 years. More than 1,100 traffic hubs will be inundated in major cities like Seattle, Miami, and New York. Thousands of companies and millions of people across the world will be affected because of the subsequent internet blackout.

“The impacts (of infrastructure damage in US coastal cities) could ripple out and potentially disrupt global communications,”says the study’s lead author Ramakrishnan Durairajan.

Internet infrastructures in the US have already faced the wrath of climate change induced extreme weather events. In 2012, when Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast, millions of residents in the states of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticutfaced a complete internet blackoutfor days. Several central offices of major Internet Service Provider (ISP) Verizon in lower Manhattan, Queens, and Long Island City were flooded.

The new research — the first-ever study to look at the impact of climate change on the internet — warns that communication infrastructures in the US are much more vulnerable than previously imagined.

“Our analysis is conservative in that we only looked at the static dataset of sea-level rise and then overlapped that over the infrastructure to get an idea of risk,” Durairajan says. “Sea-level rise can have other factors — a tsunami, a hurricane, coastal subduction zone earthquakes — all of which could provide additional stresses that could be catastrophic to infrastructure already at risk.” 

Seawater inundation projected for New York City by 2033 and its effect on internet infrastructure. Anything in the blue shade is estimated to be underwater in 15 years.

The buried fiber optic cables, data centers, traffic exchanges, and termination points are the nerve centers and arteries of the vast global information network. They are not waterproof like marine cables that ferry data under the ocean. When sea-levels rise, these conduits and cable landing points will be permanently submerged. Seawater will corrode connectors and optical transponders of the cables. Major ISPs like CenturyLink, Inteliquent, and AT&T will be affected.

“Most of the damage that’s going to be done in the next 100 years will be done sooner than later,” says the study’s senior author Professor Paul Barford. “That surprised us. The expectation was that we’d have 50 years to plan for it. We don’t have 50 years.”

Researchers estimate that over 771 Points of Presence (PoPs) — the infrastructure that allows remote users to connect to the internet — and 235 data centres will be affected when sea levels rise by one foot in 2030. As many as 780 PoPs and 242 data centres will be submerged by 2075 when the seawater rise by four feet. 

An internet outage due to sea-level rise even for a brief period will create significant detrimental impacts on economic activity around the world. Areportfrom Brookings that examined the economic effects of 81 internet shutdowns that took place in the span of a year estimates that internet blackout cost a minimum of $2.4 billion in GDP, globally. The country most economically harmed by internet shutdowns was India—by a long shot—which lost out on nearly $1 billion in GDP. The bill for Saudi Arabia’s blackouts came to $465 million, Morocco’s was $320 million, and Iraq’s amounted to $209 million.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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This startup is building a massive indoor farm in a Rust Belt steel town
« Reply #3967 on: October 22, 2019, 05:54:06 AM »
Braddock is over the hill from where I grew up east of Pittsburgh. When I was a little boy, the red glow from the Edgar Thompson works would light up the night, such that a four year old would ask whether it was time to get up yet. At the height of its operations, worker cars would be parked on the street for nearly a mile in either direction from the plant.
When I visited five or six years ago, a friend and I drove down Braddock Avenue to revisit old haunts. I took pictures of vegetable gardens then being planted outside of the dormant plant. This is quite an amazing development.

This startup is building a massive indoor farm in a Rust Belt steel town
Fifth Season will begin selling spinach, lettuce, and other leafy greens—all grown inside with the help of robots—early next year.


This startup is building a massive indoor farm in a Rust Belt steel town

In a vacant lot next to one of the last remaining steel mills in Braddock, Pennsylvania, a town just south of Pittsburgh, a massive new indoor farm is taking shape. The farm, from a startup called Fifth Season, will begin selling spinach, lettuce, and other leafy greens early next year, using a robotic system that the founders say costs as little as growing the same crops on a traditional farm.

It’s more affordable, they argue, than some others in the vertical farming industry. “We looked at vertical farming and realized that the industrywide struggle to make the economics work was a huge factor, and something that would really prevent the industry from truly taking off,” says Austin Webb, cofounder and CEO of Fifth Season, which incubated its first farm at Carnegie Mellon University. “The per-unit economics don’t work. Companies are losing money for every pound that they sell. And that obviously needs to change.”

[Photo: courtesy Fifth Season]

Like others in the space, the startup touts the advantages of growing indoors. It’s possible to use only a tiny fraction of the water that’s used to grow greens in fields; most lettuce is currently grown in drought-prone California and Arizona. (In Arizona, farmers will also soon start losing access to water from the Colorado River.) Growing indoors eliminates the need for pesticides. It eliminates food safety hazards like E. coli contamination. And if crops are grown close to end markets—in this case, restaurants and stores in Pittsburgh—it also eliminates the emissions from trucks traveling thousands of miles and the problem of less-than-fresh produce that may be more likely to be thrown out because it’s already starting to wilt. “When we look at the food distribution system, we looked at it and saw an overly complicated broken system, where no one’s connected to their food, and there’s a lot of food waste,” Webb says.

[Photo: courtesy Fifth Season]

Some past efforts at indoor farming have failed because of high costs, such as FarmedHere, near Chicago, which shut down in 2017 in part because of the cost of labor. “When you look at vertical farms and labor is 40% to 60% of their cost—labor for them is actually more than the all-in delivered cost of Western-grown field produce—it’s just not going to work,” he says. The company’s system, which it has running now at another location and which it’s recreating at the new location, uses around 40 robots. “Together, they’re completely integrated so that our facility is, in a sense, one robotic system.”

Robots plant seeds in trays and deliver trays to grow rooms, where automated systems control everything from the amount of nutrients the plants receive to the schedule of lighting and the amount of carbon dioxide in the air. When a crop is ready, it goes into an automated harvesting system, and then to an automated packaging system, and the trays are sent back to be automatically cleaned and sanitized and then replanted. “We essentially looked at it and said that we should create an automated fulfillment center,” says Webb. “The difference being that instead of pallets of boxes, it should be trays of plants.” Solar panels on the roof and a battery backup system means that the facility can continue operating even if extreme weather takes out the electric grid.

[Photo: courtesy Fifth Season]
Other companies in the industry are also developing automated systems, including Plenty, a Softbank-funded Silicon Valley startup that now has a suite of state-of-the-art custom robotics. Plenty hasn’t shared the details of the cost of its system. But Fifth Season estimates, as an example, that its own robot used for storing and retrieving plants may cost two to three times less. It also uses space more efficiently than some other companies; because everything is automated and humans don’t need to access rows of produce on scissor-lift equipment, the aisles between plants can shrink, growing more produce in the same amount of space. (The new farm is 60,000 square feet, a little smaller than the 69,000-square-foot farm run by another company called Aerofarms.) During its first full year of operation, it expects to grow half a million pounds of greens and herbs, with prices in line with organically grown produce. At that price point, the payback period of the full system will be less than two years.
[Photo: courtesy Fifth Season]
In Braddock, where the population has shrunk more than 90% since its high point in the 1920s to around 2,000 people today, the new farm can provide some new jobs, despite the automation. Three shifts a day will employ 20 workers each. “These are manufacturing-like jobs where we’ve got folks that are helping us operate our machinery,” Webb says. “We’ve got folks that are monitoring the health of the equipment. All of that is something where someone can come from a previous job and you’re not necessarily saying you’re going to do something that’s totally completely different, such as sit at a computer and write code.” As the company expands, it will also hire more engineers and plant scientists.

The startup hopes to replicate the new facility, designed as a modular system, throughout the country. “We’re able to take what we’re building in Braddock and take those blueprints and really hit the repeat button quickly,” he says.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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You Can Use Google Maps to Find Out Where Cops Are Hiding
« Reply #3968 on: October 22, 2019, 06:09:06 AM »
You Can Now Use Google Maps to Find Out Where Cops Are Hiding and Police Don’t Like It One Bit



Photo: Shutterstock

Law enforcement is “concerned” that citizens may try to abide by the law after the team at Google Maps announced the rollout of a new feature that will allow customers to avoid tickets, arrests, or being shot in the face by tracking the real-time location of police officers.

For years, Waze—a GPS-based traffic and navigation app owned by Google—allowed its users to report the location of speed traps, roadblocks, and police checkpoints but the feature was only available in specific cities and on certain Android phones. On Thursday, Google announced that it will migrate the reporting component to the more popular Google Maps app and make the feature available across all platforms, including iOS devices. The app upgrade now allows users to report police locations, along with crashes, slowdowns, construction, lane closures, disabled vehicles, and road debris.

This technological advancement doesn’t sit well with some police officers and law enforcement organizations, who allege that the tool enables illegal activities, encourages drunk driving and makes it easier for killers to ambush police officers. Of course, there is absolutely no evidence that this ever happened, but still…the police said it, so it must be true.

In 2015, the Los Angeles Times wrote that LAPD Police Chief Charlie Beck condemned the Waze app for putting officers in harm’s way. The Sergeants Benevolent Association, a union representing active and retired NYPD sergeants wrote a letter demanding that Google disable the feature or face legal action, alleging that Ismaaiyl Brinsley used the app to locate and kill two officers, an accusation that investigators said was not true.

The tech giant did neither.

The National Sheriffs’ Association issued a fact sheet (pdf) condemning the tool, writing:

Our concerns are for officer safety and community safety. Wazers can use this feature to avoid law enforcement or to find law enforcement to carry out possible acts of violence against that officer. We are concerned that terrorists, organized crime groups, and gangs will find this a valuable tool to further their illegal activities.

Our number one concern is officer safety. We agree that if a person is intent on harming an officer they could do it without the app. The question becomes, why put a tool in their hand that aids them in locating law enforcement?

Our second concern is community safety. There is evidence that shows that drunk drivers use the App to avoid law enforcement, meaning they then put public safety at risk by drinking and driving, knowing they can drive an alternate route to miss DUI/DWI checkpoints or an officer on duty.

Traffic stops were the number one source for police-initiated contact according to a 2018 report by the Bureau of Justice Statistics. The BJS analysis found that police are more than twice as likely to threaten black citizens or use non-lethal force (including shooting, kicking, punching and pushing) against black people. And when the Stanford Open Policing Project analyzed more than 200 million police stops, they discovered that officers are more likely to stop black drivers, and are more likely to search black drivers during stops but found that cops aren’t any more likely to find contraband on black drivers than white drivers.

Black men are two-and-a-half times more likely to be killed by police use of force. Unarmed black people are two times more likely to be killed by cops, and unarmed, fleeing black people are four times more likely than whites to be killed by cops, according to data from Mapping Police Violence.

As of Oct. 21, two law enforcement officers have been killed this year in ambush-style attacks, according to the FBI.

As of Oct. 24, law enforcement officers have shot and killed 34 unarmed people this year. According to the Washington Post’s “Fatal Force” database, at least 12 of those victims were killed during police-initiated traffic stops.

At least eight were black.

When asked if they would use an app that informed them where police were waiting to pull drivers over, Sandra Bland, Philando Castile, and Sam Dubosewere not available for comment.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: You Can Use Google Maps to Find Out Where Cops Are Hiding
« Reply #3969 on: October 22, 2019, 07:01:19 AM »
Information Wars.  Works both ways, at least for the time being.  I wonder how long this one lasts as a generally available tool?  ???  :icon_scratch:

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Re: This startup is building a massive indoor farm in a Rust Belt steel town
« Reply #3970 on: October 22, 2019, 12:42:23 PM »
Braddock is over the hill from where I grew up east of Pittsburgh. When I was a little boy, the red glow from the Edgar Thompson works would light up the night, such that a four year old would ask whether it was time to get up yet. At the height of its operations, worker cars would be parked on the street for nearly a mile in either direction from the plant.
When I visited five or six years ago, a friend and I drove down Braddock Avenue to revisit old haunts. I took pictures of vegetable gardens then being planted outside of the dormant plant. This is quite an amazing development.

This startup is building a massive indoor farm in a Rust Belt steel town
Fifth Season will begin selling spinach, lettuce, and other leafy greens—all grown inside with the help of robots—early next year.

This startup is building a massive indoor farm in a Rust Belt steel town

In a vacant lot next to one of the last remaining steel mills in Braddock, Pennsylvania, a town just south of Pittsburgh, a massive new indoor farm is taking shape. The farm, from a startup called Fifth Season, will begin selling spinach, lettuce, and other leafy greens early next year, using a robotic system that the founders say costs as little as growing the same crops on a traditional farm.

It’s more affordable, they argue, than some others in the vertical farming industry. “We looked at vertical farming and realized that the industrywide struggle to make the economics work was a huge factor, and something that would really prevent the industry from truly taking off,” says Austin Webb, cofounder and CEO of Fifth Season, which incubated its first farm at Carnegie Mellon University. “The per-unit economics don’t work. Companies are losing money for every pound that they sell. And that obviously needs to change.”

[Photo: courtesy Fifth Season]

Like others in the space, the startup touts the advantages of growing indoors. It’s possible to use only a tiny fraction of the water that’s used to grow greens in fields; most lettuce is currently grown in drought-prone California and Arizona. (In Arizona, farmers will also soon start losing access to water from the Colorado River.) Growing indoors eliminates the need for pesticides. It eliminates food safety hazards like E. coli contamination. And if crops are grown close to end markets—in this case, restaurants and stores in Pittsburgh—it also eliminates the emissions from trucks traveling thousands of miles and the problem of less-than-fresh produce that may be more likely to be thrown out because it’s already starting to wilt. “When we look at the food distribution system, we looked at it and saw an overly complicated broken system, where no one’s connected to their food, and there’s a lot of food waste,” Webb says.

[Photo: courtesy Fifth Season]

Some past efforts at indoor farming have failed because of high costs, such as FarmedHere, near Chicago, which shut down in 2017 in part because of the cost of labor. “When you look at vertical farms and labor is 40% to 60% of their cost—labor for them is actually more than the all-in delivered cost of Western-grown field produce—it’s just not going to work,” he says. The company’s system, which it has running now at another location and which it’s recreating at the new location, uses around 40 robots. “Together, they’re completely integrated so that our facility is, in a sense, one robotic system.”

Robots plant seeds in trays and deliver trays to grow rooms, where automated systems control everything from the amount of nutrients the plants receive to the schedule of lighting and the amount of carbon dioxide in the air. When a crop is ready, it goes into an automated harvesting system, and then to an automated packaging system, and the trays are sent back to be automatically cleaned and sanitized and then replanted. “We essentially looked at it and said that we should create an automated fulfillment center,” says Webb. “The difference being that instead of pallets of boxes, it should be trays of plants.” Solar panels on the roof and a battery backup system means that the facility can continue operating even if extreme weather takes out the electric grid.

[Photo: courtesy Fifth Season]
Other companies in the industry are also developing automated systems, including Plenty, a Softbank-funded Silicon Valley startup that now has a suite of state-of-the-art custom robotics. Plenty hasn’t shared the details of the cost of its system. But Fifth Season estimates, as an example, that its own robot used for storing and retrieving plants may cost two to three times less. It also uses space more efficiently than some other companies; because everything is automated and humans don’t need to access rows of produce on scissor-lift equipment, the aisles between plants can shrink, growing more produce in the same amount of space. (The new farm is 60,000 square feet, a little smaller than the 69,000-square-foot farm run by another company called Aerofarms.) During its first full year of operation, it expects to grow half a million pounds of greens and herbs, with prices in line with organically grown produce. At that price point, the payback period of the full system will be less than two years.
[Photo: courtesy Fifth Season]
In Braddock, where the population has shrunk more than 90% since its high point in the 1920s to around 2,000 people today, the new farm can provide some new jobs, despite the automation. Three shifts a day will employ 20 workers each. “These are manufacturing-like jobs where we’ve got folks that are helping us operate our machinery,” Webb says. “We’ve got folks that are monitoring the health of the equipment. All of that is something where someone can come from a previous job and you’re not necessarily saying you’re going to do something that’s totally completely different, such as sit at a computer and write code.” As the company expands, it will also hire more engineers and plant scientists.

The startup hopes to replicate the new facility, designed as a modular system, throughout the country. “We’re able to take what we’re building in Braddock and take those blueprints and really hit the repeat button quickly,” he says.

[/quote]

I had also read where Heinz Foods is growing their shrooms in the old abandoned coal mines ...

Are you familiar with this as well Surly ?

I am not. But I am aware of other companies taking positions in hydroponics and vertical farming.
Will check out the coal mine angle.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2019, 07:53:39 PM by Surly1 »
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

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Matt Gaetz And Fellow GOP Goons Breach Secure SCIF With Cell Phones In Tow
« Reply #3971 on: October 23, 2019, 11:09:22 AM »
Matt Gaetz And Fellow GOP Goons Breach Secure SCIF With Cell Phones In Tow
Many are calling this Brooks Brothers Riot 2.0. The GOP toddlers stormed into the secured room where Laura Cooper was about to testify behind closed doors.




Republicans in Congress think it's a cool stunt to breach national security protocol for a photo op/political stunt.

GOP Head Dunce Matt Gaetz led the mob down to the secured room, called a SCIF, where a BIPARTISAN committee, mind you, was about to hear testimony from Laura Cooper about dealings in Ukraine. Please, please, do not let it fly under the radar that there were already members of the GOP on this committee, in the room, who were going to be allowed to ask questions and hear her testimony.

No, that wasn't good enough. Gaetz, Louis Gohmert, Jim Jordan, and their merry band of drunks and child molester-enabling cretins saw fit to wind their way down to the basement of the Capitol building and force their way into this room WITH THEIR CELL PHONES. According to reports on Twitter, they were screaming, and taking photos and videos. The Sargeant-At-Arms had to be called, and police had to do a sweep to ensure security hadn't been meaningfully compromised.

This is your "law and order" party. Anything to keep Trump from having to be held accountable for his crimes — crimes against our country and crimes against humanity.

***

Standoff continues as House Republicans attempt to have pizza delivered to the secure SCIF room they’re holed up in



Standoff continues as House Republicans attempt to have pizza delivered to the secure SCIF room they’re holed up in
Bill Palmer
The thing about standoffs is that the perpetrators almost never think up an exit strategy before going ahead with their plan. Earlier today a couple dozen House Republicans illegally rampaged their way into a secure SCIF room, taking photos and videos while in the classified setting, in an attempt at derailing the testimony of a key impeachment witness. The standoff isn’t going well.

Some of the House Republicans have posted tweets announcing that they were in the SCIF at the time. After various observers on Twitter pointed out that tweeting from the SCIF would be a serious crime, one of them has since asserted that the tweeting was instead done by a staffer who was not in the SCIF. Okay fine, whatever. But now these idiots have another problem: they’re hungry.

It’s unclear how long these rogue Republicans expected to remain holed up, but they clearly didn’t bring any food with them. Now that it’s past lunchtime, they’re attempting to have a pizza delivered to them in the classified SCIF room. No really, this happening. Democratic Congressman Tom Malinowski is openly mocking them for it, quipping that the Republicans are a “bunch of brave freedom fighters having pizza in a secure conference room.”

All this idiocy and potential criminality aside, there are two very serious aspects to this story. First, these House Republicans have no basis for their protest, as other Republicans who are actually on the House committees in question have been allowed to fully participate in the impeachment hearings thus far. Second, this desperate stunt comes after Bill Taylor’s testimony delivered a bodyblow to Donald Trump, and it’s currently holding up the impeachment testimony of a key Department of Defense official. Team Trump clearly knows this is going poorly for them.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Exposed: Donald Trump was behind the failed House Republican SCIF coup
« Reply #3972 on: October 23, 2019, 01:58:51 PM »
Exposed: Donald Trump was behind the failed House Republican SCIF coup



Not only was today’s failed House Republican SCIF coup one of the most embarrassing things to ever happen in the history of Congress, it also served no purpose, as Defense Department official Laura Cooper ended up being able to give her impeachment testimony anyway. If you’re wondering who was behind the stunt, let’s just say it turns out the ringleader’s name rhymes with “Ronald Grump.”

Donald Trump knew about the House Republican SCIF stunt in advance and encouraged it, according to a predictable report this evening from Bloomberg. This shouldn’t surprise anyone. But it may end up being important, for both legal reasons and perceptual reasons.

First, the House Republicans appear to have committed a criminal act by illegally entering the SCIF without authorization, by refusing to leave when asked, and by taking photos and video within the SCIF. This illegal stunt was specifically aimed at preventing an impeachment witness from testifying against Donald Trump. Now that it turns out Trump was behind it, this is a clear cut case of felony obstruction of justice on his part. It could well end up being included in the articles of impeachment against him.

Second, this idiotic House Republican SCIF stunt was already shaping up to make Donald Trump look even more guilty. When your allies do something buffoonish to try to block a witness from testifying against you, it’s not a good look. But now the House Democrats can promote the fact that Trump himself was behind this stunt, which makes him look even more guilty. Impeachment polls will solely decide whether Trump is ousted, and this kind of thing helps shift those numbers.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: Exposed: Donald Trump was behind the failed House Republican SCIF coup
« Reply #3973 on: October 23, 2019, 08:17:58 PM »
Exposed: Donald Trump was behind the failed House Republican SCIF coup



Not only was today’s failed House Republican SCIF coup one of the most embarrassing things to ever happen in the history of Congress, it also served no purpose, as Defense Department official Laura Cooper ended up being able to give her impeachment testimony anyway. If you’re wondering who was behind the stunt, let’s just say it turns out the ringleader’s name rhymes with “Ronald Grump.”

Donald Trump knew about the House Republican SCIF stunt in advance and encouraged it, according to a predictable report this evening from Bloomberg. This shouldn’t surprise anyone. But it may end up being important, for both legal reasons and perceptual reasons.

First, the House Republicans appear to have committed a criminal act by illegally entering the SCIF without authorization, by refusing to leave when asked, and by taking photos and video within the SCIF. This illegal stunt was specifically aimed at preventing an impeachment witness from testifying against Donald Trump. Now that it turns out Trump was behind it, this is a clear cut case of felony obstruction of justice on his part. It could well end up being included in the articles of impeachment against him.

Second, this idiotic House Republican SCIF stunt was already shaping up to make Donald Trump look even more guilty. When your allies do something buffoonish to try to block a witness from testifying against you, it’s not a good look. But now the House Democrats can promote the fact that Trump himself was behind this stunt, which makes him look even more guilty. Impeachment polls will solely decide whether Trump is ousted, and this kind of thing helps shift those numbers.


No surprise here of course.  Trumpovetsky is once again trying to use a media ploy to energize his base of "Drain the Swamp" dimwits.  ::)

The longer this goes, the more ammunition El Trumpo hands to the pro-Impeachment folks.  He is of course his own worst enemy.

At this point, the Demodopes can't lose with the strategy of delaying filing the articles of impeachment.  The Donald's polling numbers keep going down, so he'll get hammered in the election even if the Senate doesn't convict.  So will any Senator who supports him.

RE
Save As Many As You Can

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Re: Exposed: Donald Trump was behind the failed House Republican SCIF coup
« Reply #3974 on: October 24, 2019, 02:19:17 AM »
Exposed: Donald Trump was behind the failed House Republican SCIF coup



Not only was today’s failed House Republican SCIF coup one of the most embarrassing things to ever happen in the history of Congress, it also served no purpose, as Defense Department official Laura Cooper ended up being able to give her impeachment testimony anyway. If you’re wondering who was behind the stunt, let’s just say it turns out the ringleader’s name rhymes with “Ronald Grump.”

Donald Trump knew about the House Republican SCIF stunt in advance and encouraged it, according to a predictable report this evening from Bloomberg. This shouldn’t surprise anyone. But it may end up being important, for both legal reasons and perceptual reasons.

First, the House Republicans appear to have committed a criminal act by illegally entering the SCIF without authorization, by refusing to leave when asked, and by taking photos and video within the SCIF. This illegal stunt was specifically aimed at preventing an impeachment witness from testifying against Donald Trump. Now that it turns out Trump was behind it, this is a clear cut case of felony obstruction of justice on his part. It could well end up being included in the articles of impeachment against him.

Second, this idiotic House Republican SCIF stunt was already shaping up to make Donald Trump look even more guilty. When your allies do something buffoonish to try to block a witness from testifying against you, it’s not a good look. But now the House Democrats can promote the fact that Trump himself was behind this stunt, which makes him look even more guilty. Impeachment polls will solely decide whether Trump is ousted, and this kind of thing helps shift those numbers.


No surprise here of course.  Trumpovetsky is once again trying to use a media ploy to energize his base of "Drain the Swamp" dimwits.  ::)

The longer this goes, the more ammunition El Trumpo hands to the pro-Impeachment folks.  He is of course his own worst enemy.

At this point, the Demodopes can't lose with the strategy of delaying filing the articles of impeachment.  The Donald's polling numbers keep going down, so he'll get hammered in the election even if the Senate doesn't convict.  So will any Senator who supports him.

RE

Yep. the longer they wait, the more news footage of R's ducking reporters' questions airs back in the home districts. As I mention elsewhere, the real trial is in American public opinion, where 40 percent of the people have no idea that Bill Taylor testified or what he said, and only know what FNC or Rush tell them. Ot who only listen to what emerges from Trump's oral sphincter. More time and a longer time frame give Ds a better window in which to build the public case.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

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