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Offline Petty Tyrant

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #180 on: May 26, 2013, 08:27:56 PM »
Quote Surly:
"It’s simple. Authorities invented the idea that other people have issues with authority.

Psychiatrists rank right up there among the elitists setting the standards. They, for example, have concocted a little fictional doodad called Oppositional Defiance Disorder. And magically, they never accuse their professional colleagues of having it. No.

Why should they? They amuse themselves by deciding when civilians are overly defiant and need pacification (drugs).
 

_____________________________________________________________________

More from the Department of Your Tax Dollars at Work.



Got PTSD? No problem. Here: take this. At a time when government funding for veterans hospitals and healthcare is being diverted by the military and replaced with private donations comes this news of the Pentagon development of memory adjustment pills. Perhaps the combination of so-called “medication” coupled with the use of targets featuring children and pregnant mothers waving guns will usher in a new generation of conscience-free troops for the next round of “nation-building” and empire extension"
...


Perhaps were not making much of a dent on the zombies taking us seriously because of this sort of kooky conspiracy theory discrediting anything sensible we have to say.

lets get this str8, ODD is a fictional doodad made up by psychiatrists as elite control agents (So I myself am this nefarious TPTB, no wonder most people dismiss the idea) but PTSD is such a given unfictional reality you dont even need to write in full what the abbreviation stands for. 

Why dont we diagnose ourselves you asked? were too old, its a dx made in childhood and adolescence. We do have fictional little doodads for older guys. Hows "Male Erectile Dysfunction" ? Oh No no problem with my little doodle needing a fictional little doodad but can I have some so called "medication" , little blue pill please?

Heres a free treatment tip from someone who favours keeping popping the poison pills to a minimum. Take a stamp, or if you are a soul brother take several off a roll. At night b4 bed wrap that stamp around Mr Johnson. In the morning when you wake up and the stamp is broken, you know you had a raging boner and you CAN get it up!!! But hey WTF would I know, were here to amuse ourselves deciding who is overly defiant not help anyone. Fact is ODD and Conduct Disorder are never endogenous and ALWAYS a product of dysfunctional environment, but so your kids from their priviledged caring loving and consistent homes can learn at school, you want the kid from the drug addict single mom whose only two words are FUCK YOU moved to the special class and so their symptoms are classified. Then when your privileged kids do well you embrace our fictional doodads like Intelligent Quotient (IQ) to suit.

Notice you ignored the memory medication mentioned being used prior to graded exposure therapy to treat PTSD and went with the more interesting opinion along a conspiracy of control theory. Not helpful to the truth movement retelling the truth to suit surly.


« Last Edit: May 26, 2013, 08:35:55 PM by Uncle Bob »
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Offline Surly1

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #181 on: May 27, 2013, 05:12:11 AM »
Quote Surly:
"It’s simple. Authorities invented the idea that other people have issues with authority.

Psychiatrists rank right up there among the elitists setting the standards. They, for example, have concocted a little fictional doodad called Oppositional Defiance Disorder. And magically, they never accuse their professional colleagues of having it. No.

Why should they? They amuse themselves by deciding when civilians are overly defiant and need pacification (drugs).
 

_____________________________________________________________________

More from the Department of Your Tax Dollars at Work.



Got PTSD? No problem. Here: take this. At a time when government funding for veterans hospitals and healthcare is being diverted by the military and replaced with private donations comes this news of the Pentagon development of memory adjustment pills. Perhaps the combination of so-called “medication” coupled with the use of targets featuring children and pregnant mothers waving guns will usher in a new generation of conscience-free troops for the next round of “nation-building” and empire extension"
...


Perhaps were not making much of a dent on the zombies taking us seriously because of this sort of kooky conspiracy theory discrediting anything sensible we have to say.

lets get this str8, ODD is a fictional doodad made up by psychiatrists as elite control agents (So I myself am this nefarious TPTB, no wonder most people dismiss the idea) but PTSD is such a given unfictional reality you dont even need to write in full what the abbreviation stands for. 

Why dont we diagnose ourselves you asked? were too old, its a dx made in childhood and adolescence. We do have fictional little doodads for older guys. Hows "Male Erectile Dysfunction" ? Oh No no problem with my little doodle needing a fictional little doodad but can I have some so called "medication" , little blue pill please?

Heres a free treatment tip from someone who favours keeping popping the poison pills to a minimum. Take a stamp, or if you are a soul brother take several off a roll. At night b4 bed wrap that stamp around Mr Johnson. In the morning when you wake up and the stamp is broken, you know you had a raging boner and you CAN get it up!!! But hey WTF would I know, were here to amuse ourselves deciding who is overly defiant not help anyone. Fact is ODD and Conduct Disorder are never endogenous and ALWAYS a product of dysfunctional environment, but so your kids from their priviledged caring loving and consistent homes can learn at school, you want the kid from the drug addict single mom whose only two words are FUCK YOU moved to the special class and so their symptoms are classified. Then when your privileged kids do well you embrace our fictional doodads like Intelligent Quotient (IQ) to suit.

Notice you ignored the memory medication mentioned being used prior to graded exposure therapy to treat PTSD and went with the more interesting opinion along a conspiracy of control theory. Not helpful to the truth movement retelling the truth to suit surly.

The DOD has a vicious little open secret called suicide, which is a directr result of repeated tours of duty by the "all-volunteer" force and the crimes against conscience these men and women are obliged to commit while in uniform. So after agreeing with most of my premise that the writing of the rule book itself is a means of coercion and control, you have a problem with my conclusion that the meds can be misused?

Really?

What part of DOD research is devoted to amerliorating suffering and otherwise crreaing a more just, verdant and peaceful world?

Every article I write is a "retelling of the truth to suit Surly."
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #182 on: May 27, 2013, 06:04:11 AM »
File this one under “justice that is swift and certain.” We have developed into a fully metasticized fascist state, with corporate executives usually free of prosecution no matter what crimes they commit in the name of corporate greed-- and rest assured, you will find this nowhere in mainstream media.

By Russell Mokhiber


Collateral Consequences Weighed for Corporations, Not for Individuals
http://www.corporatecrimereporter.com/news/200/collateralconsequences05242013/

In case you had any doubt that federal prosecutors favor corporations over individuals, check out Mythili Raman’s testimony before a House hearing this week.

Raman is the acting chief of the Criminal Division at the Department of Justice.

She appeared before the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee of the House Financial Services Committee.

The title of the hearing — “Who Is Too Big to Fail: Are Large Financial Institutions Immune from Federal Prosecution?”

In a nutshell, the answer is — Yes they are immune from federal prosecution.

But it’s not just them.

It’s the vast majority of major corporate criminals, which now are granted deferred and non prosecution agreements when twenty years ago they were forced to plead guilty.

This sea change in corporate crime practice was ushered in by then Deputy Attorney General Holder in 1999 when he drafted the Principles of Federal Prosecution of Business Organizations. (Holder has been through the revolving door since — over to Covington & Burling to defend the corporations he’s now charged with prosecuting, then back to the Justice Department as Attorney General under President Obama. And no doubt, soon back to Covington.)

Under the subsequent rewrites of the Holder memo, federal prosecutors must now take into consideration the collateral consequences of a criminal prosecution on a major corporation including “whether there is disproportionate harm to shareholders, pension holders, employees, and others not proven personally culpable, as well as impact on the public arising from the prosecution.”

And this, along with the the eight other factors that prosecutors must take into account before prosecuting a corporation tilts the balance away from prosecution and toward deferred and non prosecution agreements.

Raman made it a point to emphasize twice during her testimony that individuals are not given the same consideration.

“For individuals, collateral consequences never enter into the equation,” Raman said.

Why not?

After all, collateral consequences for individuals can be devastating.

According to the American Bar Association Task Force on Collateral Consequences, the individual convict “may be ineligible for many federally-funded health and welfare benefits, food stamps, public housing, and federal educational assistance.”

“His driver’s license may be automatically suspended, and he may no longer qualify for certain employment and professional licenses.  If he is convicted of another crime he may be subject to imprisonment as a repeat offender.  He will not be permitted to enlist in the military, or possess a firearm, or obtain a federal security clearance.  If a citizen, he may lose the right to vote. If not, he becomes immediately deportable.”

And Raman says that federal prosecutors can’t take these into consideration.

But must take the collateral consequences of a corporate conviction into consideration.

Why the difference?

Because the corporate crime lobby has marinated the justice system.

And morphed our criminal justice system from one that was meant to deliver equal justice for all to one where corporate criminals reign supreme.

“You can imagine why, when I see some of the biggest banks in the world, who get a slap on the wrist, for laundering drug money from the drug cartels, and (their executives) are not going to jail” Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-California) told Raman at the hearing. “And then we have all of these young people getting arrested, some of them not criminal, just stupid, getting involved with small amounts of cocaine. And yet we have some of the richest, most powerful banks in the world laundering drug money from the drug cartels. Why don’t they (the bank executives) go to jail?”

Raman started to answer and Waters cut her off.

“We know what you do,” Waters said. “It’s what you do that we don’t like. What you do is — they get fined. And it’s a cost of doing business.”
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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A Memorial Day meditation on Maj. Gen. Smedley D. Butler
« Reply #183 on: May 27, 2013, 10:59:50 AM »
A Memorial Day meditation on Maj. Gen. Smedley D. Butler written last year on Memorial Day by Diner Admin Surly now BACK up on the Diner Homepage as a Feature Article for Memorial Day 2013.

As true this year as last of course.

RE
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Offline Surly1

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- Memorial day thought by Dalton Trumbo
« Reply #184 on: May 27, 2013, 05:57:09 PM »
A little late, but better late than never. Found on FB, posted by William rivers Pitt, a friend who writes for truthout:


And then suddenly he saw. He had a vision of himself as a new kind of Christ as a man who carries within himself all the seeds of a new order of things. He was the new messiah of the battlefields saying to people as I am so shall you be. For he had seen the future he had tasted it and now he was living it. He had seen the airplanes flying in the sky he had seen the skies of the future filled with them black with them and now he saw the horror beneath. He saw a world of lovers forever parted of dreams never consummated of plans that never turned into reality. He saw a world of dead fathers and crippled brothers and crazy screaming sons. He saw a world of armless mothers clasping headless babies to their breasts trying to scream out their grief from throats that were cancerous with gas. He saw starved cities black and cold and motionless and the only things in this whole dead terrible world that made a move or a sound were the airplanes that blackened the sky and far off against the horizon the thunder of the big guns and the puffs that rose from barren tortured earth when their shells exploded.

That was it he had it he understood it now he had told them his secret and in denying him they had told him theirs.

He was the future he was a perfect picture of the future and they were afraid to let anyone see what the future was like. Already they were looking ahead they were figuring the future and somewhere in the future they saw war. To fight that war they would need men and if men saw the future they wouldn't fight. So they were masking the future they were keeping the future a soft quiet deadly secret. They knew that if all the little people all the little guys saw the future they would begin to ask questions. They would ask questions and they would find answers and they would say to the guys who wanted them to fight they would say you lying thieving sons-of-bitches we won't fight we won't be dead we will live we are the world we are the future and we will not let you butcher us no matter what you say no matter what speeches you make no matter what slogans you write. Remember it well we we we are the world we are what makes it go round we make bread and cloth and guns we are the hub of the wheel and the spokes and the wheel itself without us you would be hungry naked worms and we will not die. We are immortal we are the sources of life we are the lowly despicable ugly people we are the great wonderful beautiful people of the world and we are sick of it we are utterly weary we are done with it forever and ever because we are the living and we will not be destroyed.

If you make a war if there are guns to be aimed if there are bullets to be fired if there are men to be killed they will not be us. They will not be us the guys who grow wheat and turn it into food the guys who make clothes and paper and houses and tiles the guys who build dams and power plants and string the long moaning high tension wires the guys who crack crude oil down into a dozen different parts who make light globes and sewing machines and shovels and automobiles and airplanes and tanks and guns oh no it will not be us who die. It will be you.

It will be you-you who urge us on to battle you who incite us against ourselves you who would have one cobbler kill another cobbler you who would have one man who works kill another man who works you who would have one human being who wants only to live kill another human being who wants only to live. Remember this. Remember this well you people who plan for war. Remember this you patriots you fierce ones you spawners of hate you inventors of slogans. Remember this as you have never remembered anything else in your lives.

We are men of peace we are men who work and we want no quarrel. But if you destroy our peace if you take away our work if you try to range us one against the other we will know what to do. If you tell us to make the world safe for democracy we will take you seriously and by god and by Christ we will make it so. We will use the guns you force upon us we will use them to defend our very lives and the menace to our lives does not lie on the other side of a nomansland that was set apart without our consent it lies within our own boundaries here and now we have seen it and we know it.

Put the guns into our hands and we will use them. Give us the slogans and we will turn them into realities. Sing the battle hymns and we will take them up where you left off. Not one not ten not ten thousand not a million not ten millions not a hundred millions but a billion two billions of us all the people of the world we will have the slogans and we will have the hymns and we will have the guns and we will use them and we will live. Make no mistake of it we will live. We will be alive and we will walk and talk and eat and sing and laugh and feel and love and bear our children in tranquility in security in decency in peace. You plan the wars you masters of men plan the wars and point the way and we will point the gun.

- Dalton Trumbo, "Johnny Got His Gun"
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Petty Tyrant

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #185 on: May 27, 2013, 07:01:08 PM »
Quote Surly:
"It’s simple. Authorities invented the idea that other people have issues with authority.

Psychiatrists rank right up there among the elitists setting the standards. They, for example, have concocted a little fictional doodad called Oppositional Defiance Disorder. And magically, they never accuse their professional colleagues of having it. No.

Why should they? They amuse themselves by deciding when civilians are overly defiant and need pacification (drugs).
 

_____________________________________________________________________

More from the Department of Your Tax Dollars at Work.



Got PTSD? No problem. Here: take this. At a time when government funding for veterans hospitals and healthcare is being diverted by the military and replaced with private donations comes this news of the Pentagon development of memory adjustment pills. Perhaps the combination of so-called “medication” coupled with the use of targets featuring children and pregnant mothers waving guns will usher in a new generation of conscience-free troops for the next round of “nation-building” and empire extension"
...


Perhaps were not making much of a dent on the zombies taking us seriously because of this sort of kooky conspiracy theory discrediting anything sensible we have to say.

lets get this str8, ODD is a fictional doodad made up by psychiatrists as elite control agents (So I myself am this nefarious TPTB, no wonder most people dismiss the idea) but PTSD is such a given unfictional reality you dont even need to write in full what the abbreviation stands for. 

Why dont we diagnose ourselves you asked? were too old, its a dx made in childhood and adolescence. We do have fictional little doodads for older guys. Hows "Male Erectile Dysfunction" ? Oh No no problem with my little doodle needing a fictional little doodad but can I have some so called "medication" , little blue pill please?

Heres a free treatment tip from someone who favours keeping popping the poison pills to a minimum. Take a stamp, or if you are a soul brother take several off a roll. At night b4 bed wrap that stamp around Mr Johnson. In the morning when you wake up and the stamp is broken, you know you had a raging boner and you CAN get it up!!! But hey WTF would I know, were here to amuse ourselves deciding who is overly defiant not help anyone. Fact is ODD and Conduct Disorder are never endogenous and ALWAYS a product of dysfunctional environment, but so your kids from their priviledged caring loving and consistent homes can learn at school, you want the kid from the drug addict single mom whose only two words are FUCK YOU moved to the special class and so their symptoms are classified. Then when your privileged kids do well you embrace our fictional doodads like Intelligent Quotient (IQ) to suit.

Notice you ignored the memory medication mentioned being used prior to graded exposure therapy to treat PTSD and went with the more interesting opinion along a conspiracy of control theory. Not helpful to the truth movement retelling the truth to suit surly.

The DOD has a vicious little open secret called suicide, which is a directr result of repeated tours of duty by the "all-volunteer" force and the crimes against conscience these men and women are obliged to commit while in uniform. So after agreeing with most of my premise that the writing of the rule book itself is a means of coercion and control, you have a problem with my conclusion that the meds can be misused?

Really?

What part of DOD research is devoted to amerliorating suffering and otherwise crreaing a more just, verdant and peaceful world?

Every article I write is a "retelling of the truth to suit Surly."

The moonbat premise I disagree with is that psychiatrists are elitists, setting the standards, and making up ODDisorder as a fictional doodad yet PTSDisorder is not a fictional doodad. I dont know what rulebook you mean.

FYI, there are runours that in the US the govt is wanting to get new screening questions asked or flagged if mentioned by patients to be passed on regarding potential Domestic Terrorist profiling. This is new and unprecedented and opposed. Patient confidentiality and the need to report only when there is a crime likely to be committed is our right and our call and always has been.

PTSD is in fact one of the easier conditions to treat when it does not involve matters of conscience, which you rightly recognise as contributing to the suicide epidemic among veterans.

What part of DOD research betters humanity? Weapons development is a moot point and you were talking about the development of psychoactive substances in any case. I cant see anyone committed to the conspiracy theorist crazy crap pulling the baby out of the bathwater, when muddying the waters of valid truth movement with BS is the problem that allows  half the masses to write the whole lot off.

For the record the psych corps and psyops are seperate entities as the baby and the black bathwater. While I know of 2 faced dishonest Majors in the former, (how else does one climb the ladder?) the core business of the psych corps is psych testing and screening in recruiting as well as debriefing screening for PTSD as well as treatment pre and post deployment. Fact is some soldiers like to put in and have on record a little problem early on to use to get out of the army more easily should they choose. Many others see the debrief questions as a formality and simply say they are fine when they are not. I dont pretend to know what happens in psyops, I had a tutor in uni who later went from psych corps to psyops in the US prior to the so called war or terror, but Im in agreement with you there that whatever they are doing  it is nothing good.
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Offline Hilda R

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Re: Surlynewz, Analysis and Outrageous Opinions
« Reply #186 on: May 29, 2013, 07:13:57 AM »
A remarkable story of actual survival for many years in the Siberian taiga.

For 40 Years, This Russian Family Was Cut Off From All Human Contact, Unaware of World War II
In 1978, Soviet geologists prospecting in the wilds of Siberia discovered a family of six, lost in the taiga

    By Mike Dash
    Smithsonian.com, January 29, 2013
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/For-40-Years-This-Russian-Family-Was-Cut-Off-From-Human-Contact-Unaware-of-World-War-II-188843001.html#ixzz2JUBKy8B8

 
The Siberian taiga in the Abakan district. Six members of the Lykov family lived in this remote wilderness for more than 40 years—utterly isolated and more than 150 miles from the nearest human settlement.
The Siberian taiga in the Abakan district. Six members of the Lykov family lived in this remote wilderness for more than 40 years—utterly isolated and more than 150 miles from the nearest human settlement. (Wiki Commons)

Siberian summers do not last long. The snows linger into May, and the cold weather returns again during September, freezing the taiga into a still life awesome in its desolation: endless miles of straggly pine and birch forests scattered with sleeping bears and hungry wolves; steep-sided mountains; white-water rivers that pour in torrents through the valleys; a hundred thousand icy bogs. This forest is the last and greatest of Earth's wildernesses. It stretches from the furthest tip of Russia's arctic regions as far south as Mongolia, and east from the Urals to the Pacific: five million square miles of nothingness, with a population, outside a handful of towns, that amounts to only a few thousand people.

When the warm days do arrive, though, the taiga blooms, and for a few short months it can seem almost welcoming. It is then that man can see most clearly into this hidden world—not on land, for the taiga can swallow whole armies of explorers, but from the air. Siberia is the source of most of Russia's oil and mineral resources, and, over the years, even its most distant parts have been overflown by oil prospectors and surveyors on their way to backwoods camps where the work of extracting wealth is carried on.


Karp Lykov and his daughter Agafia, wearing clothes donated by Soviet geologists not long after their family was  rediscovered.

Thus it was in the remote south of the forest in the summer of 1978. A helicopter sent to find a safe spot to land a party of geologists was skimming the treeline a hundred or so miles from the Mongolian border when it dropped into the thickly wooded valley of an unnamed tributary of the Abakan, a seething ribbon of water rushing through dangerous terrain. The valley walls were narrow, with sides that were close to vertical in places, and the skinny pine and birch trees swaying in the rotors' downdraft were so thickly clustered that there was no chance of finding a spot to set the aircraft down. But, peering intently through his windscreen in search of a landing place, the pilot saw something that should not have been there. It was a clearing, 6,000 feet up a mountainside, wedged between the pine and larch and scored with what looked like long, dark furrows. The baffled helicopter crew made several passes before reluctantly concluding that this was evidence of human habitation—a garden that, from the size and shape of the clearing, must have been there for a long time.

It was an astounding discovery. The mountain was more than 150 miles from the nearest settlement, in a spot that had never been explored. The Soviet authorities had no records of anyone living in the district.


The Lykovs lived in this hand-built log cabin, lit by a single window "the size of a backpack pocket" and warmed by a smoky wood-fired stove.

The four scientists sent into the district to prospect for iron ore were told about the pilots' sighting, and it perplexed and worried them. "It's less dangerous," the writer Vasily Peskov notes of this part of the taiga, "to run across a wild animal than a stranger," and rather than wait at their own temporary base, 10 miles away, the scientists decided to investigate. Led by a geologist named Galina Pismenskaya, they "chose a fine day and put gifts in our packs for our prospective friends"—though, just to be sure, she recalled, "I did check the pistol that hung at my side."

As the intruders scrambled up the mountain, heading for the spot pinpointed by their pilots, they began to come across signs of human activity: a rough path, a staff, a log laid across a stream, and finally a small shed filled with birch-bark containers of cut-up dried potatoes. Then, Pismenskaya said,

    beside a stream there was a dwelling. Blackened by time and rain, the hut was piled up on all sides with taiga rubbish—bark, poles, planks. If it hadn't been for a window the size of my backpack pocket, it would have been hard to believe that people lived there. But they did, no doubt about it.... Our arrival had been noticed, as we could see.

    The low door creaked, and the figure of a very old man emerged into the light of day, straight out of a fairy tale. Barefoot. Wearing a patched and repatched shirt made of sacking. He wore trousers of the same material, also in patches, and had an uncombed beard. His hair was disheveled. He looked frightened and was very attentive.... We had to say something, so I began: 'Greetings, grandfather! We've come to visit!'

    The old man did not reply immediately.... Finally, we heard a soft, uncertain voice: 'Well, since you have traveled this far, you might as well come in.'

The sight that greeted the geologists as they entered the cabin was like something from the middle ages. Jerry-built from whatever materials came to hand, the dwelling was not much more than a burrow—"a low, soot-blackened log kennel that was as cold as a cellar," with a floor consisting of potato peel and pine-nut shells. Looking around in the dim light, the visitors saw that it consisted of a single room. It was cramped, musty and indescribably filthy, propped up by sagging joists—and, astonishingly, home to a family of five:

    The silence was suddenly broken by sobs and lamentations. Only then did we see the silhouettes of two women. One was in hysterics, praying: 'This is for our sins, our sins.' The other, keeping behind a post... sank slowly to the floor. The light from the little window fell on her wide, terrified eyes, and we realized we had to get out of there as quickly as possible.


Agafia Lykova (left) with her sister, Natalia.

Led by Pismenskaya, the scientists backed hurriedly out of the hut and retreated to a spot a few yards away, where they took out some provisions and began to eat. After about half an hour, the door of the cabin creaked open, and the old man and his two daughters emerged—no longer hysterical and, though still obviously frightened, "frankly curious." Warily, the three strange figures approached and sat down with their visitors, rejecting everything that they were offered—jam, tea, bread—with a muttered, "We are not allowed that!" When Pismenskaya asked, "Have you ever eaten bread?" the old man answered: "I have. But they have not. They have never seen it." At least he was intelligible. The daughters spoke a language distorted by a lifetime of isolation. "When the sisters talked to each other, it sounded like a slow, blurred cooing."

Slowly, over several visits, the full story of the family emerged. The old man's name was Karp Lykov, and he was an Old Believer—a member of a fundamentalist Russian Orthodox sect, worshiping in a style unchanged since the 17th century. Old Believers had been persecuted since the days of Peter the Great, and Lykov talked about it as though it had happened only yesterday; for him, Peter was a personal enemy and "the anti-Christ in human form"—a point he insisted had been amply proved by Tsar's campaign to modernize Russia by forcibly "chopping off the beards of Christians." But these centuries-old hatreds were conflated with more recent grievances; Karp was prone to complain in the same breath about a merchant who had refused to make a gift of 26 poods [940 pounds] of potatoes to the Old Believers sometime around 1900.

Things had only got worse for the Lykov family when the atheist Bolsheviks took power. Under the Soviets, isolated Old Believer communities that had fled to Siberia to escape persecution began to retreat ever further from civilization. During the purges of the 1930s, with Christianity itself under assault, a Communist patrol had shot Lykov's brother on the outskirts of their village while Lykov knelt working beside him. He had responded by scooping up his family and bolting into forest.


Peter the Great's attempts to modernize the Russia of the early 18th century found a focal point in a campaign to end the wearing of beards. Facial hair was taxed and non-payers were compulsorily shaved—anathema to Karp Lykov and the Old Believers.


That was in 1936, and there were only four Lykovs then—Karp; his wife, Akulina; a son named Savin, 9 years old, and Natalia, a daughter who was only 2. Taking their possessions and some seeds, they had retreated ever deeper into the taiga, building themselves a succession of crude dwelling places, until at last they had fetched up in this desolate spot. Two more children had been born in the wild—Dmitry in 1940 and Agafia in 1943—and neither of the youngest Lykov children had ever seen a human being who was not a member of their family. All that Agafia and Dmitry knew of the outside world they learned entirely from their parents' stories. The family's principal entertainment, the Russian journalist Vasily Peskov noted, "was for everyone to recount their dreams."

The Lykov children knew there were places called cities where humans lived crammed together in tall buildings. They had heard there were countries other than Russia. But such concepts were no more than abstractions to them. Their only reading matter was prayer books and an ancient family Bible. Akulina had used the gospels to teach her children to read and write, using sharpened birch sticks dipped into honeysuckle juice as pen and ink. When Agafia was shown a picture of a horse, she recognized it from her mother's Bible stories. "Look, papa," she exclaimed. "A steed!"

But if the family's isolation was hard to grasp, the unmitigated harshness of their lives was not. Traveling to the Lykov homestead on foot was astonishingly arduous, even with the help of a boat along the Abakan. On his first visit to the Lykovs, Peskov—who would appoint himself the family's chief chronicler—noted that "we traversed 250 kilometres [155 miles] without seeing a single human dwelling!"

Isolation made survival in the wilderness close to impossible. Dependent solely on their own resources, the Lykovs struggled to replace the few things they had brought into the taiga with them. They fashioned birch-bark galoshes in place of shoes. Clothes were patched and repatched until they fell apart, then replaced with hemp cloth grown from seed.

The Lykovs' mountain home, seen from a Soviet helicopter.

The Lykovs had carried a crude spinning wheel and, incredibly, the components of a loom into the taiga with them—moving these from place to place as they gradually went further into the wilderness must have required many long and arduous journeys—but they had no technology for replacing metal. A couple of kettles served them well for many years, but when rust finally overcame them, the only replacements they could fashion came from birch bark. Since these could not be placed in a fire, it became far harder to cook. By the time the Lykovs were discovered, their staple diet was potato patties mixed with ground rye and hemp seeds.

In some respects, Peskov makes clear, the taiga did offer some abundance: "Beside the dwelling ran a clear, cold stream. Stands of larch, spruce, pine and birch yielded all that anyone could take.... Bilberries and raspberries were close to hand, firewood as well, and pine nuts fell right on the roof."

Yet the Lykovs lived permanently on the edge of famine. It was not until the late 1950s, when Dmitry reached manhood, that they first trapped animals for their meat and skins. Lacking guns and even bows, they could hunt only by digging traps or pursuing prey across the mountains until the animals collapsed from exhaustion. Dmitry built up astonishing endurance, and could hunt barefoot in winter, sometimes returning to the hut after several days, having slept in the open in 40 degrees of frost, a young elk across his shoulders. More often than not, though, there was no meat, and their diet gradually became more monotonous. Wild animals destroyed their crop of carrots, and Agafia recalled the late 1950s as "the hungry years." "We ate the rowanberry leaf," she said,

    roots, grass, mushrooms, potato tops, and bark, We were hungry all the time. Every year we held a council to decide whether to eat everything up or leave some for seed.

Famine was an ever-present danger in these circumstances, and in 1961 it snowed in June. The hard frost killed everything growing in their garden, and by spring the family had been reduced to eating shoes and bark. Akulina chose to see her children fed, and that year she died of starvation. The rest of the family were saved by what they regarded as a miracle: a single grain of rye sprouted in their pea patch. The Lykovs put up a fence around the shoot and guarded it zealously night and day to keep off mice and squirrels. At harvest time, the solitary spike yielded 18 grains, and from this they painstakingly rebuilt their rye crop.


Dmitry (left) and Savin in the Siberian summer.

As the Soviet geologists got to know the Lykov family, they realized that they had underestimated their abilities and intelligence. Each family member had a distinct personality; Old Karp was usually delighted by the latest innovations that the scientists brought up from their camp, and though he steadfastly refused to believe that man had set foot on the moon, he adapted swiftly to the idea of satellites. The Lykovs had noticed them as early as the 1950s, when "the stars began to go quickly across the sky," and Karp himself conceived a theory to explain this: "People have thought something up and are sending out fires that are very like stars."

"What amazed him most of all," Peskov recorded, "was a transparent cellophane package. 'Lord, what have they thought up—it is glass, but it crumples!'" And Karp held grimly to his status as head of the family, though he was well into his 80s. His eldest child, Savin, dealt with this by casting himself as the family's unbending arbiter in matters of religion. "He was strong of faith, but a harsh man," his own father said of him, and Karp seems to have worried about what would happen to his family after he died if Savin took control. Certainly the eldest son would have encountered little resistance from Natalia, who always struggled to replace her mother as cook, seamstress and nurse.

The two younger children, on the other hand, were more approachable and more open to change and innovation. "Fanaticism was not terribly marked in Agafia," Peskov said, and in time he came to realize that the youngest of the Lykovs had a sense of irony and could poke fun at herself. Agafia's unusual speech—she had a singsong voice and stretched simple words into polysyllables—convinced some of her visitors she was slow-witted; in fact she was markedly intelligent, and took charge of the difficult task, in a family that possessed no calendars, of keeping track of time.  She thought nothing of hard work, either, excavating a new cellar by hand late in the fall and working on by moonlight when the sun had set. Asked by an astonished Peskov whether she was not frightened to be out alone in the wilderness after dark, she replied: "What would there be out here to hurt me?"

A Russian press photo of Karp Lykov (second left) with Dmitry and Agafia, accompanied by a Soviet geologist.

Of all the Lykovs, though, the geologists' favorite was Dmitry, a consummate outdoorsman who knew all of the taiga's moods. He was the most curious and perhaps the most forward-looking member of the family. It was he who had built the family stove, and all the birch-bark buckets that they used to store food. It was also Dmitry who spent days hand-cutting and hand-planing each log that the Lykovs felled. Perhaps it was no surprise that he was also the most enraptured by the scientists' technology. Once relations had improved to the point that the Lykovs could be persuaded to visit the Soviets' camp, downstream, he spent many happy hours in its little sawmill, marveling at how easily a circular saw and lathes could finish wood. "It's not hard to figure," Peskov wrote. "The log that took Dmitry a day or two to plane was transformed into handsome, even boards before his eyes. Dmitry felt the boards with his palm and said: 'Fine!'"

Karp Lykov fought a long and losing battle with himself to keep all this modernity at bay. When they first got to know the geologists, the family would accept only a single gift—salt. (Living without it for four decades, Karp said, had been "true torture.") Over time, however, they began to take more. They welcomed the assistance of their special friend among the geologists—a driller named Yerofei Sedov, who spent much of his spare time helping them to plant and harvest crops. They took knives, forks, handles, grain and eventually even pen and paper and an electric torch. Most of these innovations were only grudgingly acknowledged, but the sin of television, which they encountered at the geologists' camp,

    proved irresistible for them.... On their rare appearances, they would invariably sit down and watch. Karp sat directly in front of the screen. Agafia watched poking her head from behind a door. She tried to pray away her transgression immediately—whispering, crossing herself.... The old man prayed afterward, diligently and in one fell swoop.


The Lykovs' homestead seen from a Soviet reconnaissance plane, 1980.

Perhaps the saddest aspect of the Lykovs' strange story was the rapidity with which the family went into decline after they re-established contact with the outside world. In the fall of 1981, three of the four children followed their mother to the grave within a few days of one another. According to Peskov, their deaths were not, as might have been expected, the result of exposure to diseases to which they had no immunity. Both Savin and Natalia suffered from kidney failure, most likely a result of their harsh diet. But Dmitry died of pneumonia, which might have begun as an infection he acquired from his new friends.

His death shook the geologists, who tried desperately to save him. They offered to call in a helicopter and have him evacuated to a hospital. But Dmitry, in extremis, would abandon neither his family nor the religion he had practiced all his life. "We are not allowed that," he whispered just before he died. "A man lives for howsoever God grants."


The Lykovs' graves. Today only Agafia survives of the family of six, living alone in the taiga.

When all three Lykovs had been buried, the geologists attempted to talk Karp and Agafia into leaving the forest and returning to be with relatives who had survived the persecutions of the purge years, and who still lived on in the same old villages. But neither of the survivors would hear of it. They rebuilt their old cabin, but stayed close to their old home.

Karp Lykov died in his sleep on February 16, 1988, 27 years to the day after his wife, Akulina. Agafia buried him on the mountain slopes with the help of the geologists, then turned and headed back to her home. The Lord would provide, and she would stay, she said—as indeed she has. A quarter of a century later, now in her seventies herself, this child of the taiga lives on alone, high above the Abakan.

She will not leave. But we must leave her, seen through the eyes of Yerofei on the day of her father's funeral:

    I looked back to wave at Agafia. She was standing by the river break like a statue. She wasn't crying. She nodded: 'Go on, go on.' We went another kilometer and I looked back. She was still standing there.


Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/For-40-Years-This-Russian-Family-Was-Cut-Off-From-Human-Contact-Unaware-of-World-War-II-188843001.html#ixzz2JUBKy8B8
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter


War is darkness and peace is light.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2013, 08:33:54 PM by Hilda R »

Offline WHD

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #187 on: May 29, 2013, 07:37:07 AM »
Quote
War is darkness and peace is light.

Funny then, how America has never really not been at war, in all our long history.

Welcome to the Diner, Hilda R.  :)  I think that article struck you as much as it did me.

WHD

Offline agelbert

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Hilda R
« Reply #188 on: May 29, 2013, 03:53:32 PM »
What an amazing story! How tenacious and resourceful this family was. And the exploits of Dimitry in the cold are a testament to human adaptability in harsh climates. After reading the story, I wondererd, since they had hemp to make crude clothing, why they never made netting to catch fish. Holding one with a sharp stick over a fire can cook it when no metal is available. With so much cold weather, they should have been able to store lots of fish for the winter after the september freeze occurred.

I'm sure they had their reasons. I am awed by this family's perseverance in the face of a hostile government and bitter cold weather.

Thank you for a great read!  :emthup: :icon_sunny:
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline monsta666

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #189 on: May 29, 2013, 04:27:26 PM »
Funny then, how America has never really not been at war, in all our long history.

While the US has pretty much been in a continuous state of war there is an important distinction that needs to be considered. Unlike many nations no foreign army has attacked US soil in any significant manner for a long time. I feel one of the chief reasons for the fundamental difference in attitude to warfare between the US and European nations is the fact that the Europeans have had such a steeped history of violence and they have seen the real horrors of war up close and personal. It is those horrors of the past that have made the citizens much more leary of claims that point to the "glories of war". Let's not forget such propaganda is most heavily pushed by the financial elite who stand to benefit most from war. It is exceedingly rare that J6P really benefits from war but they do bear the brunt of the costs.

In fact you could argue one of the few times the American citizens really protested against a war occurred during the Vietnam war when the draft was still in effect. Because of the draft enough of the population was exposed to the horrors of war to see through the glory that elite tried to promote at the time. It is this lack of drafting coupled with the fact most US wars are conducted in distant lands (with minimum loss of life to US soldiers) that make people so disconnected to the reality of the situation. I do think if Americans had more experience of warfare on their shores and felt the real losses such conflicts caused they would be less gung ho about the idea of war.

The coming years will see more warfare on the US soil, if not by foreign powers then by the fascist elites who will try to maintain the hologram at any cost. As costs mount people will be less taken in by ideology and will value practical measures more highly. Diminishing fossil fuels will also act as the great leveller so no side can enter conflict relatively unscathed as is the case in modern warfare. These costs from both sides will demand a more cautious approach be taken when exercising in further armed conflicts. At the minimum I would expect Americans attitudes to war to change markedly in the next decade. There will be no easy battles and any battle fought will come at great human life. 

Offline Surly1

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #190 on: June 02, 2013, 08:46:18 AM »
The Week That Was in Doom now posted on the blog.
http://www.doomsteaddiner.net/blog/2013/06/02/the-week-that-was-in-doom-june-2-2013/
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #191 on: June 10, 2013, 07:28:57 AM »
Libertarianism’s Achilles’ heel
http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/ej-dionne-jr-libertarianisms-achilles-heel/2013/06/09/4dfd3c9c-cf8c-11e2-8f6b-67f40e176f03_story.html

By E.J. Dionne Jr., Published: June 9

In politics, we often skip past the simple questions. This is why inquiries about the fundamentals can sometimes catch everyone short.

Michael Lind, the independent-minded scholar, posed one such question last week about libertarianism that I hope will shake up the political world. It’s important because many in the new generation of conservative politicians declare libertarianism as their core political philosophy.

It’s true that since nearly all Americans favor limits on government, most of us have found libertarians to be helpful allies at one point or another. Libertarians have the virtue, in principle at least, of a very clear creed: They believe in the smallest government possible, longing for what the late philosopher Robert Nozick, in his classic book “Anarchy, State, and Utopia,” called “the night-watchman state.” Anything government does beyond protecting people from violence or theft and enforcing contracts is seen as illegitimate.

If you start there, taking a stand on the issues of the day is easy. All efforts to cut back on government functions — public schools, Medicare, environmental regulation, food stamps — should be supported. Anything that increases government activity (Obamacare, for example) should be opposed.

In his bracing 1970s libertarian manifesto “For a New Liberty,” the economist Murray Rothbard promised a nation that would be characterized by “individual liberty, a peaceful foreign policy, minimal government and a free-market economy.”

Rothbard’s book concludes with boldness: “Liberty has never been fully tried in the modern world; libertarians now propose to fulfill the American dream and the world dream of liberty and prosperity for all mankind.”

This is where Lind’s question comes in. Note that Rothbard freely acknowledges that “liberty has never been fully tried,” at least by the libertarians’ exacting definition. In an essay in Salon, Lind asks:

“If libertarians are correct in claiming that they understand how best to organize a modern society, how is it that not a single country in the world in the early 21st century is organized along libertarian lines?”

In other words, “Why are there no libertarian countries?”

The ideas of the center-left — based on welfare states conjoined with market economies — have been deployed all over the democratic world, most extensively in the social democratic Scandinavian countries. We also have had deadly experiments with communism, a.k.a Marxism-Leninism.

From this, Lind asks another question: “If socialism is discredited by the failure of communist regimes in the real world, why isn’t libertarianism discredited by the absence of any libertarian regimes in the real world?”

The answer lies in a kind of circular logic: Libertarians can keep holding up their dream of perfection because, as a practical matter, it will never be tried in full. Even many who say they are libertarians reject the idea when it gets too close to home.

The strongest political support for a broad anti-statist libertarianism now comes from the tea party. Yet tea party members, as the polls show, are older than the country as a whole. They say they want to shrink government in a big way but are uneasy about embracing this concept when reducing Social Security and Medicare comes up. Thus do the proposals to cut these programs being pushed by Republicans in Congress exempt the current generation of recipients. There’s no way Republicans are going to attack their own base.

But this inconsistency (or hypocrisy) contains a truth: We had something close to a small-government libertarian utopia in the late 19th century and we decided it didn’t work. We realized that many Americans would never be able to save enough for retirement and, later, that most of them would be unable to afford health insurance when they were old. Smaller government meant that too many people were poor and that monopolies were formed too easily.

And when the Great Depression engulfed us, government was helpless, largely handcuffed by this anti-government ideology until Franklin D. Roosevelt came along.

In fact, as Lind points out, most countries that we typically see as “free” and prosperous have governments that consume around 40 percent of their gross domestic product. They are better off for it. “Libertarians,” he writes, “seem to have persuaded themselves that there is no significant trade-off between less government and more national insecurity, more crime, more illiteracy and more infant and maternal mortality . . . .”

This matters to our current politics because too many politicians are making decisions on the basis of a grand, utopian theory that they never can — or will — put into practice. They then use this theory to avoid a candid conversation about the messy choices governance requires. And this is why we have gridlock.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Thoughts on the NSA Leak Story
« Reply #192 on: June 10, 2013, 10:40:49 AM »
If you have been following the story, and viewing the video, (indeed it is hard to avoid it), you might be wondering how a 29-year old gets the keys to the family Lamborghini, plus the $200K+ job and the house in Hawaii.

It just occurs to me to wonder, absent any other information that official reports and the scat left by the MSM. Apparently I am not the only crank who wonders thus.

NSA leaker: are there serious cracks in Ed Snowden's story?
By Jon Rappoport
June 10, 2013
www.nomorefakenews.com

 

First, I'm not doubting the documents Ed Snowden has brought forward. I'm not doubting the illegal reach of the NSA in spying on Americans and the world.

But as to how this recent revelation happened, and whether Ed Snowden's history holds up...I have questions.

Could Snowden have been given extraordinary access to classified info as part of a larger scheme? Could he be a) an honest man and yet b) a guy who was set up to do what he's doing now?

If b) is true, then Snowden fits the bill perfectly. He wants to do what he's doing. He isn't lying about that. He means what he says.
 
Okay. Let's look at his history as reported by The Guardian.

In 2003, at age 19, without a high school diploma, Snowden enlists in the Army. He begins a training program to join the Special Forces. The sequence here is fuzzy. At what point after enlistment can a new soldier start this training program? Does he need to demonstrate some exceptional ability before Special Forces puts him in that program?

Snowden breaks both legs in a training exercise. He's discharged from the Army. Is that automatic? How about healing and then resuming Army service? Just asking.

If he was accepted in the Special Forces training program because he had special computer skills, then why discharge him simply because he broke both legs?

Circa 2003 (?), Snowden gets a job as a security guard for an NSA facility at the University of Maryland. He specifically wanted to work for NSA? It was just a generic job opening he found out about?

Also in 2003 (?), Snowden shifts jobs. He's now in the CIA, in IT. He has no high school diploma. He's a young computer genius?

In 2007, Snowden is sent to Geneva. He's only 23 years old. The CIA gives him diplomatic cover there. He's put in charge of maintaining computer-network security. Major job. Obviously, he has access to a very wide range of classified documents. Sound a little odd? Again, just asking. He's just a kid. Maybe he has his GED by now. Otherwise, he still doesn't have a high school diploma.

Snowden says that during this period, in Geneva, one of the incidents that really sours him on the CIA is the "turning of a Swiss banker." One night, CIA guys get a banker drunk, encourage him to drive home, the banker gets busted, the CIA guys help him out, then with that bond formed, they eventually get the banker to reveal deep banking secrets to the Agency.

Snowden is this naďve? He doesn't know by now that the CIA does this sort of thing all the time? He's shocked? He "didn't sign up for this?"

In 2009, Snowden leaves the CIA. Why? Presumably because he's disillusioned. It should noted here that Snowden claimed he could do very heavy damage to the entire US intelligence community in 2008, but decided to wait because he thought Obama, just coming into the presidency, might make good changes.

After two years with the CIA in Geneva, Snowden really had the capability to take down the whole US intelligence network, or a major chunk of it? He had that much access to classified data?

Anyway, in 2009, Snowden leaves the CIA and goes to work for a private defense contractor. Apparently, by this time, he knows all about the phony US war in Iraq, and yet he chooses to work for a sector that relentlessly promotes such wars. Go figure.

This defense contractor (unnamed) assigns him to work at an NSA facility in Japan. Surely, Snowden understands what the NSA is. He knows it's a key part of the whole military-intelligence network, the network he opposes.

But he takes the job anyway. Perhaps he's doing it so he can obtain further access to classified data, in advance of blowing a big whistle. Perhaps.

Snowden goes on to work for two private defense contractors, Dell and Booze Allen Hamilton. In this latter job, Snowden is again assigned to work at the NSA.

He's an outsider, but he claims to have so much sensitive NSA data that he can take down the whole US intelligence network in a single day. Hmm.

These are red flags. They raise questions. Serious ones.

If The Guardian, which has such close access to Snowden, wants to explore these questions, they might come up with some interesting answers.

Again, I'm not doubting that the documents Snowden has brought forward are real. I have to assume they are. I certainly don't doubt the reach and the power and the criminality of the NSA.

Although I'm sure someone will write me and say I'm defending the NSA. I'M NOT.

But if Snowden was maneuvered, in his career, without his knowing it, to arrive at just this point, then we have a whole new story. We have a story about unknown forces who wanted this exposure to occur.

Who would these forces be? I could make lots of guesses. But they would just be guesses.

Perhaps all the anomalies in the career of Ed Snowden can be explained with sensible answers. I realize that. But until they are, I put the questions forward. And leave them there.

 

Jon Rappoport

The author of two explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED and EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at
www.nomorefakenews.com
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline g

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #193 on: June 10, 2013, 02:25:22 PM »
Quote
Perhaps all the anomalies in the career of Ed Snowden can be explained with sensible answers. I realize that. But until they are, I put the questions forward. And leave them there.


Sure smells fishy Surly. Had the same thoughts but different conclusions. Thought it was a test for us to check the reaction.  See how dumbed down and listless we have become from the fluoride and anti depressants and the worthless shit on the boob tube. Have a horrible feeling we passed the test and they have something much bigger planned due to our apathy. Never have been able to get the billion hollow point bullets out of mind like most seem to have.   :-\

Realize how silly and paranoid I might appear to many, but I am being honest. Whatever the case, the story being put out is pure bull shit, smells of mendacity and play acting. 

Boston Marathon lock down fits in  as well.  I started to get those horrible unexplained feelings of an EVIL presence a few weeks before that and I tried my best to explain it.   

                                                                 
Satan Exulting Over Eve     Blake
Satan Exulting Over Eve     Blake

Offline Surly1

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #194 on: June 11, 2013, 03:11:24 AM »
Sure smells fishy Surly. Had the same thoughts but different conclusions. Thought it was a test for us to check the reaction.  See how dumbed down and listless we have become from the fluoride and anti depressants and the worthless shit on the boob tube. Have a horrible feeling we passed the test and they have something much bigger planned due to our apathy. Never have been able to get the billion hollow point bullets out of mind like most seem to have.   :-\

Realize how silly and paranoid I might appear to many, but I am being honest. Whatever the case, the story being put out is pure bull shit, smells of mendacity and play acting. 

Boston Marathon lock down fits in  as well.  I started to get those horrible unexplained feelings of an EVIL presence a few weeks before that and I tried my best to explain it.   

Some rough beast is slouching towards Bethlehem to be born, to be sure.... whenever the history of these evil times is written, iit will be well noted that all of this happened publicly, in plain sight, and with the assent of the people's representatives and with their apparent approbation.

This from the commentariat on Kunstler's page:

Quote
My brother in law, didn’t think it was a ‘bad thing’ for the Democratic party to be pulling illegal shit, in what we term ‘Chicago style’ politics. He thought it was righteous because the Democrats were the righteous ones. But, if Republican’s pulled the same stunts, it would be an act worthy of the death penalty.

I asked him if he thought that was somewhat unfair… “No, because, we’re ‘RIGHT’ and they’re ‘WRONG’….

I asked if it mattered whether it was a right boot or a left boot on our necks… No Response… But, his eyes went wide open, and I think, for the first time, I got through to him…

“Don’t you understand the ideologies of both parties end up the same way? With a few guys owning everything and proclaiming themselves BOSS?”

“But this is America… ” Jim said… “That’s what the Jews said about Germany” I said….

“National Socialism, was a combined ideology… it was neither communist nor fascist, it was both, in one. It was the ideology of practical rich and powerful people who wanted total mind control… that is what money is Jim, power and control. That’s what its all about. Its not a game of left versus right, its a game of haves versus have nots. They have it, and they don’t want you to get it. The problem is, there are too many of us, and that destroys ‘their’ resources… you see, they, think they own planet Earth. In order for them and their children to live in luxury, they will have to reduce the rest of us to poverty, that’s called the Zero Sum Game. Earth is a Zero Sum game, you can’t burn that oil in your engine twice, mother nature sets the rules, and she is a bitch.”

“So what do you think has to happen, in order for the rich people to remain ‘rich’ and ‘powerful’, into the future?”

He thought about it… and eventually his eyes went wide… “You mean?” I smiled… “Do you get it now? How many people do you think they’re gonna have to kill so that their children inherit the Earth?”

“Oh my God… you mean like… Revelations?”
“Call it what it is Jim… the NAZI’s are here too.”

I smiled, another sleeper has awakened.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

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