AuthorTopic: The Surlynewz Channel  (Read 601603 times)

Offline WHD

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #195 on: June 11, 2013, 10:42:04 AM »
I don't see an anomaly in the story at all, as conspiratorially minded as I am. If you are a computer whiz, and a true believer, which he claims to have been, you can write your own ticket. I mean, the mythos of the dysfunctional student of institutional learning, in the geek community, looms large. He was probably singled out early, as soon as he showed interest in gov service, as the perfect kind of character to help build the surveillance state, which logistically is a techie geek thing.

The anomaly for me is that there are an estimated 500,000 contractors who may be working on Big Brother, plus another 500,000 + in the gov who knew about it, and yet only ONE has come out and said anything. Doesn't bode well for the species.

Offline g

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #196 on: June 11, 2013, 10:55:37 AM »
I don't see an anomaly in the story at all, as conspiratorially minded as I am. If you are a computer whiz, and a true believer, which he claims to have been, you can write your own ticket. I mean, the mythos of the dysfunctional student of institutional learning, in the geek community, looms large. He was probably singled out early, as soon as he showed interest in gov service, as the perfect kind of character to help build the surveillance state, which logistically is a techie geek thing.

The anomaly for me is that there are an estimated 500,000 contractors who may be working on Big Brother, plus another 500,000 + in the gov who knew about it, and yet only ONE has come out and said anything. Doesn't bode well for the species.


You certainly make valid points Duncan, just something about it doesn't add up however. Going to a foreign press establishment, hiding out in Hong Kong, his demeanor. Probably wrong of me, too judgmental  and not very Christian on my part, but my brain tells me intuitively he is no Bradley Manning. Flimsy evidence for sure, gut feelings that is, but in his case I just smell a rat.


Offline Surly1

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #197 on: June 11, 2013, 11:29:16 AM »
I don't see an anomaly in the story at all, as conspiratorially minded as I am. If you are a computer whiz, and a true believer, which he claims to have been, you can write your own ticket. I mean, the mythos of the dysfunctional student of institutional learning, in the geek community, looms large. He was probably singled out early, as soon as he showed interest in gov service, as the perfect kind of character to help build the surveillance state, which logistically is a techie geek thing.

The anomaly for me is that there are an estimated 500,000 contractors who may be working on Big Brother, plus another 500,000 + in the gov who knew about it, and yet only ONE has come out and said anything. Doesn't bode well for the species.


You certainly make valid points Duncan, just something about it doesn't add up however. Going to a foreign press establishment, hiding out in Hong Kong, his demeanor. Probably wrong of me, too judgmental  and not very Christian on my part, but my brain tells me intuitively he is no Bradley Manning. Flimsy evidence for sure, gut feelings that is, but in his case I just smell a rat.

Too early to say. I am troubled by the fact that most of what we know is via the echo chamber of the MSM, and Glenn Greenwald's original reporting.

As the athletes say, "let the game come to you." This will unfold soon enough, and we may have a better idea of his bonafides. His rise DID seem a little ... meteoric.

Meanwhile we can all console ourselves in the knowledge that there are a half million people with security clearances sniffing our virtual underwear. What could possibly go wrong?
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline WHD

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #198 on: June 11, 2013, 11:31:35 AM »
I don't see an anomaly in the story at all, as conspiratorially minded as I am. If you are a computer whiz, and a true believer, which he claims to have been, you can write your own ticket. I mean, the mythos of the dysfunctional student of institutional learning, in the geek community, looms large. He was probably singled out early, as soon as he showed interest in gov service, as the perfect kind of character to help build the surveillance state, which logistically is a techie geek thing.

The anomaly for me is that there are an estimated 500,000 contractors who may be working on Big Brother, plus another 500,000 + in the gov who knew about it, and yet only ONE has come out and said anything. Doesn't bode well for the species.


You certainly make valid points Duncan, just something about it doesn't add up however. Going to a foreign press establishment, hiding out in Hong Kong, his demeanor. Probably wrong of me, too judgmental  and not very Christian on my part, but my brain tells me intuitively he is no Bradley Manning. Flimsy evidence for sure, gut feelings that is, but in his case I just smell a rat.


GO,

To refute gently, precisely what domestic press establishment would have printed it? Glenn Greenwald is an American who writes for the Guardian in part because no American press establishment of that caliber would put up with the way he speaks to American Power. And going to Hong Kong in my mind is a clever way to put himself between the two largest gov powers in the world. Anywhere else in the world other than Russia, he might already have been whisked away. And what about his demeanor bothers you? Is a man trying to save his soul such a foreign thing in our experience, that it looks suspicious? Perhaps he understood, that had he continued to serve the State, he would have become the demon he saw so much in those who served around him?

Sure, I can imagine he may remain an asset, and this is just a kabuki play to normalize the TOTAL SURVEILLANCE STATE. But then, watching the Establishment in this country practically hyperventilate in their attempts to denounce him, and how readily, how shamelessly, how humorlessly they have advocated in favor of total surveillance, I can't help but feel like, they just don't see what fascists they have become. Most of them. Others are like, FUCK, we are revealed, disappear him!   

Offline WHD

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #199 on: June 11, 2013, 11:36:18 AM »
Quote
His rise DID seem a little ... meteoric.

I imagine the fascist State would love nothing more than to make this a referendum on Snowden. Anything but a serious discussion about tearing down the American empire. Which, I do love his name, Snowden, Snowed In - a chill wind is a blowin'.

Offline Surly1

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column/Add Snowden
« Reply #200 on: June 11, 2013, 11:38:52 AM »
I don't see an anomaly in the story at all, as conspiratorially minded as I am. If you are a computer whiz, and a true believer, which he claims to have been, you can write your own ticket. I mean, the mythos of the dysfunctional student of institutional learning, in the geek community, looms large. He was probably singled out early, as soon as he showed interest in gov service, as the perfect kind of character to help build the surveillance state, which logistically is a techie geek thing.

The anomaly for me is that there are an estimated 500,000 contractors who may be working on Big Brother, plus another 500,000 + in the gov who knew about it, and yet only ONE has come out and said anything. Doesn't bode well for the species.


You certainly make valid points Duncan, just something about it doesn't add up however. Going to a foreign press establishment, hiding out in Hong Kong, his demeanor. Probably wrong of me, too judgmental  and not very Christian on my part, but my brain tells me intuitively he is no Bradley Manning. Flimsy evidence for sure, gut feelings that is, but in his case I just smell a rat.


GO,

To refute gently, precisely what domestic press establishment would have printed it? Glenn Greenwald is an American who writes for the Guardian in part because no American press establishment of that caliber would put up with the way he speaks to American Power. And going to Hong Kong in my mind is a clever way to put himself between the two largest gov powers in the world. Anywhere else in the world other than Russia, he might already have been whisked away. And what about his demeanor bothers you? Is a man trying to save his soul such a foreign thing in our experience, that it looks suspicious? Perhaps he understood, that had he continued to serve the State, he would have become the demon he saw so much in those who served around him?

Sure, I can imagine he may remain an asset, and this is just a kabuki play to normalize the TOTAL SURVEILLANCE STATE. But then, watching the Establishment in this country practically hyperventilate in their attempts to denounce him, and how readily, how shamelessly, how humorlessly they have advocated in favor of total surveillance, I can't help but feel like, they just don't see what fascists they have become. Most of them. Others are like, FUCK, we are revealed, disappear him!

To your point, WHD, Huffpo yesterday moved a story on how The Atlantic's Steve Clemons overheard some security workers who were overheard in an airport saying that very thing.
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/06/10/nsa-leaker-and-journalist-should-be-disappeared-overheard_n_3414346.html?utm_hp_ref=uk&just_reloaded=1


For perspective, some reflections by Mark Ash on Edward Snowden:

Quote
A very public high-speed chase will serve to paint Snowden as a criminal and, of equal or greater value, divert attention from what Snowden exposed.

Before the chase scene begins it bears noting what Edward Snowden said, and the sacrifice that he made.

    "I will be satisfied if the federation of secret law, unequal pardon and irresistible executive powers that rule the world that I love are revealed even for an instant."

    "I really want the focus to be on these documents and the debate which I hope this will trigger among citizens around the globe about what kind of world we want to live in ... My sole motive is to inform the public as to that which is done in their name and that which is done against them."

    [Communicating with Washington Post reporter Barton Gellman]: The U.S. intelligence community, he wrote, "will most certainly kill you if they think you are the single point of failure that could stop this disclosure and make them the sole owner of this information."

    "I had full access to the full rosters of everyone working at the NSA, the entire intelligence community, and undercover assets all around the world … Any analyst at any time can target anyone … I, sitting at my desk, certainly have the authorities to wiretap anyone - from you or your accountant, to a federal judge, to even the President."

    "The government has granted itself power it is not entitled to. There is no public oversight. The result is people like myself have the latitude to go further than they are allowed to."

    "I'm willing to sacrifice all of that because I can't in good conscience allow the US government to destroy privacy, internet freedom and basic liberties for people around the world with this massive surveillance machine they're secretly building."

    "I don't see myself as a hero," he said, "because what I'm doing is self-interested: I don't want to live in a world where there's no privacy and therefore no room for intellectual exploration and creativity."

He certainly says the right things.

Watch how they play the story, about the illegality of what he did, as opposed to the merits of the Panopticon. It is as sure as sunrise. And anyone who expects Ron Wyden and rand Paul to work together to de-authorize the PATRIOT Act needs to put the pipe down. Won't happen unless millions gather in the streets. And I am DAMNED sure that won't happen.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 11:42:04 AM by Surly1 »
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline g

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #201 on: June 11, 2013, 11:41:38 AM »
Hear you Duncan, and again all valid and true points. It's him, something I don't really understand, very bad vibe sort of thing. Suspicion, instinct, timing, background, method, something just doesn't seem right. Not a feeling I get with Bradley Manning, sort of the opposite.  :icon_scratch:

Offline WHD

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #202 on: June 11, 2013, 11:44:43 AM »
Quote
He certainly says the right things.

Which perhaps he is too now, casting a light on how cynical we have become.

Offline JoeP

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #203 on: June 11, 2013, 04:14:26 PM »
Flimsy evidence for sure, gut feelings that is, but in his case I just smell a rat.

Just an idea - do you suppose you may have suffered a bit of olfactory damage yesterday morning when you got that wiff from you know who?  Ya might want to get that checked out.  :icon_mrgreen:
just my straight shooting honest opinion

Offline agelbert

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #204 on: June 11, 2013, 06:58:06 PM »
My take on all this leak stuff.

THE EMPIRE IS LOSING IN SYRIA.

France and England are FRANTIC to get the war going to the last drop of American blood. THEY WANT A NO-FLY ZONE TO GET THE BLOOD FLOWING!

IOW they are trying to pressure Obama to commit planes AND troops before Assad consolidates the recent destruction of a major death squad held city and its all over.

However, Obama has been told in no uncertain terms that the Russian missiles in Syria will knock anything out of the sky, PERIOD. The Russkies aren't backing down this time.

Still don't get it? Obama is being blackmailed so he will go to war with Syria. Russia is saying, go ahead, if you want to lose a pack of aircraft. But if you are smart, you'll ignore the blackmail and hang TOUGH. China has our and YOUR back if you do. England and France are BROKE. FUCK EM'!

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Offline Surly1

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #205 on: June 12, 2013, 12:11:08 PM »
Add Snowden, from Michael Snyder:

27 Edward Snowden Quotes About U.S. Government Spying That Should Send A Chill Up Your Spine

By Michael, on June 10th, 2013
http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/archives/27-edward-snowden-quotes-about-u-s-government-spying-that-should-send-a-chill-up-your-spine


Would you be willing to give up what Edward Snowden has given up?  He has given up his high paying job, his home, his girlfriend, his family, his future and his freedom just to expose the monolithic spy machinery that the U.S. government has been secretly building to the world.  He says that he does not want to live in a world where there isn't any privacy.  He says that he does not want to live in a world where everything that he says and does is recorded.  Thanks to Snowden, we now know that the U.S. government has been spying on us to a degree that most people would have never even dared to imagine.  Up until now, the general public has known very little about the U.S. government spy grid that knows almost everything about us.  But making this information public is going to cost Edward Snowden everything.  Essentially, his previous life is now totally over.  And if the U.S. government gets their hands on him, he will be very fortunate if he only has to spend the next several decades rotting in some horrible prison somewhere.  There is a reason why government whistleblowers are so rare.  And most Americans are so apathetic that they wouldn't even give up watching their favorite television show for a single evening to do something good for society.  Most Americans never even try to make a difference because they do not believe that it will benefit them personally.  Meanwhile, our society continues to fall apart all around us.  Hopefully the great sacrifice that Edward Snowden has made will not be in vain.  Hopefully people will carefully consider what he has tried to share with the world.  The following are 27 quotes from Edward Snowden about U.S. government spying that should send a chill up your spine...

#1 "The majority of people in developed countries spend at least some time interacting with the Internet, and Governments are abusing that necessity in secret to extend their powers beyond what is necessary and appropriate."

#2 "...I believe that at this point in history, the greatest danger to our freedom and way of life comes from the reasonable fear of omniscient State powers kept in check by nothing more than policy documents."

#3 "The government has granted itself power it is not entitled to. There is no public oversight. The result is people like myself have the latitude to go further than they are allowed to."

#4 "...I can't in good conscience allow the US government to destroy privacy, internet freedom and basic liberties for people around the world with this massive surveillance machine they're secretly building."

#5 "The NSA has built an infrastructure that allows it to intercept almost everything."

#6 "With this capability, the vast majority of human communications are automatically ingested without targeting. If I wanted to see your e-mails or your wife's phone, all I have to do is use intercepts. I can get your e-mails, passwords, phone records, credit cards."

#7 "Any analyst at any time can target anyone. Any selector, anywhere... I, sitting at my desk, certainly had the authorities to wiretap anyone, from you or your accountant, to a federal judge, to even the President..."

#8 "To do that, the NSA specifically targets the communications of everyone. It ingests them by default. It collects them in its system and it filters them and it analyzes them and it measures them and it stores them for periods of time simply because that's the easiest, most efficient and most valuable way to achieve these ends. So while they may be intending to target someone associated with a foreign government, or someone that they suspect of terrorism, they are collecting YOUR communications to do so."

#9 "I believe that when [senator Ron] Wyden and [senator Mark] Udall asked about the scale of this, they [the NSA] said it did not have the tools to provide an answer. We do have the tools and I have maps showing where people have been scrutinized most. We collect more digital communications from America than we do from the Russians."

#10 "...they are intent on making every conversation and every form of behavior in the world known to them."

#11 "Even if you're not doing anything wrong, you're being watched and recorded. ...it's getting to the point where you don't have to have done anything wrong, you simply have to eventually fall under suspicion from somebody, even by a wrong call, and then they can use this system to go back in time and scrutinize every decision you've ever made, every friend you've ever discussed something with, and attack you on that basis, to sort of derive suspicion from an innocent life."

#12 "Allowing the U.S. government to intimidate its people with threats of retaliation for revealing wrongdoing is contrary to the public interest."

#13 "Everyone everywhere now understands how bad things have gotten — and they’re talking about it. They have the power to decide for themselves whether they are willing to sacrifice their privacy to the surveillance state."

#14 "I do not want to live in a world where everything I do and say is recorded. That is not something I am willing to support or live under."

#15 "I don't want to live in a world where there's no privacy, and therefore no room for intellectual exploration and creativity."

#16 "I have no intention of hiding who I am because I know I have done nothing wrong."

#17 "I had been looking for leaders, but I realized that leadership is about being the first to act."

#18 "There are more important things than money. If I were motivated by money, I could have sold these documents to any number of countries and gotten very rich."

#19 "The great fear that I have regarding the outcome for America of these disclosures is that nothing will change. [People] won't be willing to take the risks necessary to stand up and fight to change things... And in the months ahead, the years ahead, it's only going to get worse. [The NSA will] say that... because of the crisis, the dangers that we face in the world, some new and unpredicted threat, we need more authority, we need more power, and there will be nothing the people can do at that point to oppose it. And it will be turnkey tyranny."

#20 "I will be satisfied if the federation of secret law, unequal pardon and irresistible executive powers that rule the world that I love are revealed even for an instant."

#21 "You can't come up against the world's most powerful intelligence agencies and not accept the risk."

#22 "I know the media likes to personalize political debates, and I know the government will demonize me."

#23 "We have got a CIA station just up the road – the consulate here in Hong Kong – and I am sure they are going to be busy for the next week. And that is a concern I will live with for the rest of my life, however long that happens to be."

#24 "I understand that I will be made to suffer for my actions, and that the return of this information to the public marks my end."

#25 "There’s no saving me."

#26 "The only thing I fear is the harmful effects on my family, who I won't be able to help any more. That's what keeps me up at night."

#27 "I do not expect to see home again."


Would you make the same choice that Edward Snowden made?  Most Americans would not.  One CNN reporter says that he really admires Snowden because he has tried to get insiders to come forward with details about government spying for years, but none of them were ever willing to...

    As a digital technology writer, I have had more than one former student and colleague tell me about digital switchers they have serviced through which calls and data are diverted to government servers or the big data algorithms they've written to be used on our e-mails by intelligence agencies. I always begged them to write about it or to let me do so while protecting their identities. They refused to come forward and believed my efforts to shield them would be futile. "I don't want to lose my security clearance. Or my freedom," one told me.

And if the U.S. government has anything to say about it, Snowden is most definitely going to pay for what he has done.  In fact, according to the Daily Beast, a directorate known as "the Q Group" is already hunting Snowden down...

Quote
    The people who began chasing Snowden work for the Associate Directorate for Security and Counterintelligence, according to former U.S. intelligence officers who spoke on condition of anonymity. The directorate, sometimes known as “the Q Group,” is continuing to track Snowden now that he’s outed himself as The Guardian’s source, according to the intelligence officers.

If Snowden is not already under the protection of some foreign government (such as China), it will just be a matter of time before U.S. government agents get him.

And how will they treat him once they find him?  Well, one reporter overheard a group of U.S. intelligence officials talking about how Edward Snowden should be "disappeared".  The following is from a Daily Mail article that was posted on Monday...

Quote
    A group of intelligence officials were overheard yesterday discussing how the National Security Agency worker who leaked sensitive documents to a reporter last week should be 'disappeared.'

    Foreign policy analyst and editor at large of The Atlantic, Steve Clemons, tweeted about the 'disturbing' conversation after listening in to four men who were sitting near him as he waited for a flight at Washington's Dulles airport.

    'In Dulles UAL lounge listening to 4 US intel officials saying loudly leaker & reporter on #NSA stuff should be disappeared recorded a bit,' he tweeted at 8:42 a.m. on Saturday.

    According to Clemons, the men had been attending an event hosted by the Intelligence and National Security Alliance.

As an American, I am deeply disturbed that the U.S. government is embarrassing itself in front of the rest of the world like this.

The fact that we are collecting trillions of pieces of information on people all over the planet is a massive embarrassment and the fact that our politicians are defending this practice now that it has been exposed is a massive embarrassment.

If the U.S. government continues to act like a Big Brother police state, then the rest of the world will eventually conclude that is exactly what we are.  At that point we become the "bad guy" and we lose all credibility with the rest of the planet.
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline Surly1

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #206 on: June 12, 2013, 12:25:23 PM »
And in the highly speculative category, there is this.

perhaps I should have posted this in "conspiracy."

But far fetched and speculative? Yes. But wheels within wheels within wheels is not unknown. I post this as a follow up to AG's speculation about Syria above. Could be Syria; could be CIA v. NA v a player to be named later.

But a license to essentially print your own money? Unheard of?

 

Did someone help Ed Snowden punch a hole in the NSA?


by Jon Rappoport

June 11, 2013

www.nomorefakenews.com


Ed Snowden, NSA leaker. Honest man. Doing what was right. Bravo.

That still doesn't preclude the possibility that, unknown to him, he was managed by people to put him the right place to expose NSA secrets.
 
Snowden's exposure of NSA was a righteous act, because that agency is a RICO criminal. But that doesn't mean we have the whole story.

How many people work in classified jobs for the NSA? And here is one man, Snowden, who is working for Booz Allen, an outside contractor, but is assigned to NSA, and he can get access to, and copy, documents that expose the spying collaboration between NSA and the biggest tech companies in the world---and he can get away with it. If so, then NSA is a sieve leaking out of all holes. Because that means a whole lot of other, higher NSA employees can likewise steal these documents. Many, many other people can copy them and take them. Poof.

If the NSA is not a sieve, it's quite correct to suspect Snowden, a relatively low-level man, was guided and helped.

Does that diminish what Snowden accomplished? No. But it casts it in a different light.

Or you can believe a scenario like this:

"Mr. Snowden, I'm closing up now for the day. Do you need anything before I go?"

"No thanks, Sarah, I'll be staying late tonight."
 
NSA isn't a little community bank or a liquor store. We aren't talking about an employee with a printer and a file folder to hold top-secret pieces of paper he carries in a briefcase out of the office on his way home.

If there are people who arranged Snowden's access to NSA secrets, without him knowing it, they'll be obscured by the maze of partisan political squabbling and Congressional idiots holding hearings.

Between these morons and the press, the public will be treated, night and day, to the following: Can Snowden be extradited back here? Is he a terrorist? Should those giant tech companies have agreed to supply the government with information on private citizens? If so, how much information? Etc., etc. Diversions. False trails.

To understand who might have been behind Snowden, we first need to understand the real reach of the Surveillance State.

The Surveillance State has created an apparatus whose implications are staggering. It's a different world now. And sometimes it takes a writer of fiction to flesh out the larger landscape.
 
Brad Thor's novel, Black List, posits the existence of a monster corporation, ATS, that stands along side the NSA in collecting information on every move we make. ATS' intelligence-gathering capability is unmatched anywhere in the world.

At his site, www.BradThor.com, the author lists some of the open-source material he discovered that formed the basis for Black List. The material, as well as the novel, is worth reading.

On pages 117-118 of Black List, Thor makes a stunning inference that, on reflection, is as obvious as the fingers on your hand:

"For years ATS [substitute NSA] had been using its technological superiority to conduct massive insider trading. Since the early 1980s, the company had spied on anyone and everyone in the financial world. They listened in on phone calls, intercepted faxes, and evolved right along with the technology, hacking internal computer networks and e-mail accounts. They created mountains of 'black dollars' for themselves, which they washed through various programs they were running under secret contract, far from the prying eyes of financial regulators.

"Those black dollars were invested into hard assets around the world, as well as in the stock market, through sham, offshore corporations. They also funneled the money into reams of promising R&D projects, which eventually would be turned around and sold to the Pentagon or the CIA.

"In short, ATS had created its own license to print money and had assured itself a place beyond examination or reproach."

In real life, whether the prime criminal source is one monster corporation or the NSA itself, the outcome would be the same.

Total surveillance has unlimited payoffs when it targets financial markets and the people who have intimate knowledge of them.

"Total security awareness" programs of surveillance are ideal spying ops in the financial arena, designed to grab millions of bits of inside information, and then utilize them to make investments and suck up billions (trillions?) of dollars.

It gives new meaning to "the rich get richer."

Taking the overall scheme to another level, consider this: those same heavy hitters (NSA) who have unfettered access to financial information can also choose, at opportune moments, to expose certain scandals and crimes.

In this way, they can, at their whim, cripple governments, banks, and corporations. They can cripple investment houses, insurance companies, and hedge funds. Or, alternatively, they can merely blackmail these organizations.

It's likely that the probe Ron Paul has been pushing---audit the Federal Reserve---has already been done by those who control unlimited global surveillance. They already know far more than any Congressional investigation will uncover. If they know the deepest truths, they can use them to blackmail, manipulate, and control the Fed itself.

Corruption on top of corruption.

In this global-surveillance world, we need to ask new questions and think along different lines now.

For example, how long before the mortgage-derivative crisis hit did the Masters of Surveillance know, from spying on bank records, that insupportable debt was accumulating at a lethal pace? What did they do with that information?

When did they know that at least a trillion dollars was missing from Pentagon accounting books (as Donald Rumsfeld eventually admitted), and what did they do with that information?

Did they discover precisely where the trillion dollars went? Did they discover where billions of dollars, in cash, shipped to post-war Iraq, disappeared to?

When did they know the details of the Libor rate-fixing scandal? Press reports indicate that Barclays was trying to rig interest rates as early as January 2005.

Have they tracked, in detail, the men responsible for recruiting hired mercenaries and terrorists, who eventually wound up in Syria pretending to be an authentic rebel force?

Have they discovered the truth about how close or how far away Iran is from producing a nuclear weapon?

Have they collected detailed accounts of the most private plans of Bilderberg, CFR, and Trilateral Commission leaders?

For global surveillance kings, what we think of as the future is, in many respects the present and the past.

It's a new world. These overseers of universal information-detection can enter and probe the most secret caches of data, collect, collate, cross reference, and assemble them into vital bottom-lines. By comparison, an operation like Wikileaks is an old Model-T Ford puttering down a country road, and Julian Assange is a mere piker.

Previously, we thought we needed to look over the shoulders of the men who were committing major crimes out of public view. But now, if we want to be up to date, we also have to factor in the men who are spying on those criminals, who are gathering up those secrets and using them to commit their own brand of meta-crime.

And in the financial arena, that means we think of Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan as perpetrators, yes, but we also think about the men who already know everything about GS and Morgan, and are using this knowledge to steal sums that might make GS and Morgan blush with envy.

Therefore....when looking for who might have helped Ed Snowden punch a hole in NSA, we should think about who the NSA has been spying on. Not the little guy, not the medium-sized guy, but a very big guy. Perhaps a Goldman Sachs or a JP Morgan.

At the highest levels of criminal power, the players don't always agree. It's not always a smooth conspiracy. There is fierce in-fighting as well.

Goldman Sachs, Chase, and Morgan consider trillion-dollar trading markets their own private golden-egg farm. They run it, they own it, they manipulate it for their own ends.

If NSA has been looking over their shoulders for the past 30 years, discovering all their knowledge, and operating a meta invasion, siphoning off enormous profits, NSA would rate as Enemy Number One.

And would need to be torpedoed.

 Enter Ed Snowden.

 Looking elsewhere, consider this. Snowden worked for the CIA. He was pushed up the ranks quickly, from an IT position in the US to a posting in Geneva, under diplomatic cover, to run security on the CIA's computer systems there.

Then, Snowden quit the CIA and eventually ended up at Booz Allen, a private contractor. He was assigned to NSA, where he stole the secrets and exposed the NSA.

The CIA and NSA have a long contentious relationship. The major issue is, who is king of US intelligence? We're talking about an internal war.

Snowden could have been the CIA's man at NSA, where certain CIA players helped him access files he wouldn't have been able to tap otherwise.

You can bet your bottom dollar that NSA analysts are looking into this possibility right now.


Jon Rappoport


The author of an explosive collection, THE MATRIX REVEALED, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the worl
d.

www.nomorefakenews.com

 

 
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline Surly1

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #207 on: June 16, 2013, 06:12:08 PM »
That Was The Week That Was in Doom for June 16, 2013 now posted on the blog.

This Father’s Day edition caps a week that moved the story of Edward Snowden, and a host of stories examining his bona fides, and speculation about the provenance of the story worthy of a convention hall full of conspiracy theorists. A week in which we saw the collective IQ of Virginia dip a dozen points as Republicans nominated for Lieutenant Governor a man  live and direct from the ninth century, a process enabled by the apathy of Virginians . . . and, on the subject of apathy, Sibel Edmonds placed the blame for the NSA whistleblower flap squarely where it belongs.  and others speculate on whether the CIA is punching a hole in the NSA…bAnd while we sleep, the Trans-Pacific partnership continues to be negotiated behind closed doors, safely out of sight of  mere Muppets,  interested citizens, and  other annoyances such as elected representatives.

“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

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Re: The Week that Was in Doom- The Surlynewz Column
« Reply #208 on: June 17, 2013, 09:11:35 AM »
Edward Snowden Is Not the Issue
http://weeklysift.com/2013/06/17/edward-snowden-is-not-the-issue/

Focusing Snowden distracts us from the NSA. The NSA loves that.

Whether Edward Snowden is a hero or a traitor* makes for great talking-head debates. Why did he do it? Will he get away with it? What’s he going to do next?

Let me ask a better question: Why do you care? You’re not going to invite Snowden over for dinner or offer him a job, so why do you need to know whether he’s a good person or not? On the other hand, if you’re planning to keep living in the United States, or in any country under the influence of the United States, how the NSA might be spying on you is important. That’s where your attention should be.

I know, I know. Making Snowden the issue lets journalists interview Snowden’s attractive girlfriend (an ABC News article — with picture, naturally — describes her as “an acrobatic pole performer“), her father, and even some woman who lives next door to his mother. (He “seemed like a nice young man”.)

Pole dancer!

Great stuff for ratings, but completely beside the point — what the logicians call an ad hominem fallacy. It’s also standard operating procedure when anybody blows the whistle on wrong-doing in high places: First make the whistleblower the issue, and then assassinate his or her character.

Leaving pole dancers out of it for a few minutes, let’s review the important questions:

Are the programs Snowden described real? Yes. So far the government is not denying the authenticity of the documents Snowden has leaked. Much of it they have verified.

Are they as invasive as the Guardian article made them sound? Unclear. As the techies look at the leaked PRISM documents, many are concluding that one key slide was misinterpreted. It doesn’t really mean that the NSA has a pipe into the central servers at Google and Facebook, from which it can grab whatever it wants at will. There seems to be more process involved than that.

On the other hand, AP reports:

   
Quote
But interviews with more than a dozen current and former government and technology officials and outside experts show that, while Prism has attracted the recent attention, the program actually is a relatively small part of a much more expansive and intrusive eavesdropping effort.
CNET reports the NSA admitting in a congressional briefing that their analysts can listen to phone calls on their own authority, just as Snowden said he could. But other sources are saying that also is based on a misunderstanding. Julian Sanchez does a good job of sorting out what we know and don’t know.

Quote
    Legally speaking, the analysts don’t have carte blanche. In other words, this isn’t “warrantless wiretapping” so much as “general warrant wiretapping.” They can’t just tap any old call or read any old e-mail they strikes them as “suspicious.” They’ve got to be flagging content for interception because they believe it’s covered by a particular §702 authorization, and observe whatever “targeting procedures” the FISA Court has established for the relevant authorization.

On the third hand, it’s not clear who is enforcing those rules or whether the analysts ever break them.

Are they legal? It depends on what the meaning of is is.  If you mean: “Can the government point to laws and procedures that they are following?”, then the answer seems to be yes. But if the question is whether those laws and procedures fulfill the Fourth Amendment‘s guarantee of “the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures”, I would say no.

Are the safeguards protecting the privacy of innocent people working? We don’t yet have an egregious example of them not working. But if it makes you feel safe that a secret court has to approve these programs, you should read what retired Judge Nancy Gertner says:

Quote
    As a former Article III judge, I can tell you that your faith in the FISA Court is dramatically misplaced.

The judges appointed to this court aren’t representative of the judiciary as a whole, and chosen precisely because they are sympathetic to government power.

Quote
    it’s not boat rockers. … To suggest that there is meaningful review it seems to me is an illusion.
Congressional oversight also looks more impressive on paper than it seems to be in practice. WaPo reporter Bruce Gellman said on Face the Nation:

Quote
    Aside from the members of the intelligence committees, there is something near zero members of Congress who have a member of their staff who is cleared to know anything about this.
He described a “locked room” where Congressmen can go to read unbelievably complicated documents for themselves, “and the number of members who do that is zero.”

What’s the effect on democracy if those safeguards fail? The country would effectively be ruled by the people who know everybody else’s secrets. How many congressmen could vote against them? What president could shut them down?

Do these programs really catch terrorists? I’m impressed that Al Franken says they do. But I’m not impressed that we have to take other people’s word for it. It’s like the torture debate: The government can say it works, but if we’re not cleared to look at the evidence, then why should we believe them?

And none of these claims assess how much domestic terrorist recruitment is aided by Americans’ sense that they are subjects of a government beyond their control or understanding.

Why do they have to be secret? Senator Tester denies that Snowden’s leaks harmed national security. And it’s hard to imagine a terrorist cell that wouldn’t already be thinking about people tapping its phones and reading its email.

Some details need to be secret — plans for the H-bomb, dates for the D-Day invasion, and so on. But the government’s interpretations of the laws should never be secret. The American people are owed a map of the rights they have lost, and at every wall that keeps them from knowing more, we are owed an explanation of why we can’t know more. We haven’t gotten that yet.

*Notice what a hero/traitor dichotomy assumes. If what the government is doing is evil, then Snowden could be both a hero and a traitor.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2013, 09:49:34 AM by Surly1 »
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline Surly1

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Re: Summer movies
« Reply #209 on: June 19, 2013, 08:43:42 AM »
A little something I posted up this morning about some upcoming movies with a common and familiar theme:

On Fathers’ Day, my daughter took Contrary and I to the movies. The Star trek  movie we saw was just fine, but what really struck me were the coming attractions.

I found, in these trailers echoes of topics and issues we have discussed here.

Now that you will have an idea when Doom is Coming To A Theatre Near You.
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

 

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