AuthorTopic: Official Chinese Toast Thread  (Read 213545 times)

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As I predicted, this idea is a major loser.  ::)

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https://www.vox.com/world/2019/10/4/20898568/hong-kong-protests-face-masks-ban-carrie-lam


The Hong Kong government tried to ban face masks. Protesters are already defying it.


Protesters in masks have been a defining image of the Hong Kong pro-democracy demonstrations.
By Jen Kirbyjen.kirby@vox.com Oct 4, 2019, 3:50pm EDT


A demonstrator offers face masks during a protest against a government ban on face masks in Hong Kong on October 4, 2019. Laurel Chor/Getty Images

The Hong Kong government has invoked a colonial-era law to ban face masks in an attempt to crack down on the months-long protest movement that’s gotten increasingly tense in recent weeks.

Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s embattled chief executive, announced the ban Friday. “The decision to enact an anti-mask law is not easy one, but it is a necessary decision considering the situation today,” Lam said at a press conference.

The law, which went into effect Saturday at midnight local time, bans protesters from wearing any sort of mask or face covering, including paint, at any public gathering, including both lawful protests and unlawful assemblies. Those who violate the ban could face up to one year in jail and a fine of HK$25,000 (about $3,200 US dollars), according to the Hong Kong Free Press.

The rule will exempt people who wear face coverings for their job or for religious reasons.

Lam relied on a 1922 law that gives Hong Kong’s leader additional powers in times of emergency. The statute predates the handover of Hong Kong — once a British colony — to the People’s Republic of China in 1997, and hasn’t been used since 1967, the Hong Kong Free Press reports. Lam denied that the face mask ban meant that Hong Kong was in a state of emergency, though she warned that “freedoms are not without limits.”

But so far, the ban has only galvanized those opposed to Hong Kong’s government. Protesters — in face masks, of course — continued to demonstrate after Lam enacted the ban. Protests broke out across Hong Kong Friday night into Saturday, with more businesses and transit stations vandalized, and clashes with police turned violent.
Masks have been a feature of the Hong Kong protests since the beginning

Demonstrators wear masks for both practical reasons — the masks protect against tear gas, which the police have used against protesters — and more symbolic ones.

Since the start of these protests in June, the movement has valued anonymity above all else. Protesters organize online and closely guard their real identities, and their disguises — whether face masks or hoodies or face paint — allow them to protest in public with less fear of reprisal from school or work or family. Masks also protect them from being recognized on CCTV cameras around the city, which could be used to identify them and arrest them. (The government argues that this allows the protesters to act with impunity.)

But given that masks are a defining element of the protests, it seems impossible to institute an all-out ban. It may deter some people from protesting, but it almost certainly isn’t going to prevent the most committed of the demonstrators. It also may have the effect of increasing solidarity against the government, as even those not actively participating in the unrest may view the Hong Kong government’s steps as far too harsh.

In other words, the measure is likely to infuriate the very protesters most likely to cause disruptions and chaos across Hong Kong, and it also makes their cause look more just, and necessary.

“This is adding fuel to the fire,” Fernando Cheung, a pro-democracy lawmaker, told the Washington Post. “People are already extremely angry at the police and the government for not responding to their demands.”

The Hong Kong protests intensified in June over a controversial extradition bill that would have allowed for people accused of crimes to be sent to face trial in mainland China, which many critics feared would allow Beijing to target dissidents and others critical of the Communist Party.

Hong Kong’s chief executive Carrie Lam formally withdrew the extradition law in early September after weeks of relentless protests. But by then, many pro-democracy protesters interpreted the concession as insufficient, as it came far too late and failed to address all of their grievances.

In addition to calling for an independent investigation into police tactics, protesters want all activists arrested to be freed with charges dropped. They are also demanding universal suffrage — a chance for Hong Kong to be able to fully elect its own leaders, outside the influence of Beijing.

The mask ban was quickly interpreted as another undemocratic move, and it once again puts the Hong Kong government in direct opposition with the protesters.

Beyond the streets, the mask ban is being challenged in Hong Kong’s court. The judges have denied an emergency injunction, so the rule has gone into effect. But it’s unlikely to be the end of the legal challenges.

Lam introduced the ban a few days after violent protests marred Beijing’s celebration of the 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China. President Xi Jinping presided over a huge military parade, meant to signal to domestic and international audiences Beijing’s growing role and prowess in the world. But the protests in Hong Kong tainted that commemoration, at least on the international stage, where protesters directly challenged China’s system.

Lam has denied that China influenced her decision to put the ban into place, but there’s a lot of skepticism about why the Hong Kong government acted in this manner, and why now. Some have speculated that this is a test case so Hong Kong can take harsher measures if it withstands legal and public challenges.

But nothing, to date, has really quelled the pro-democracy uprising in Hong Kong. Any concessions the Hong Kong government has made — including withdrawing the extradition bill that ignited the movement — have been met with still more resistance from activists, who want a fully functioning democracy and the preservation of their autonomy from China under the “one country, two rules” system.

The face mask rule is now in effect in Hong Kong. But the transit system is shut down, a 14-year-old has been injured by live ammunition fired by an off-duty police officer, and protesters are in the streets, in masks, in defiance of the ban and Lam’s government.
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⛩️ The end of the Chinese miracle
« Reply #856 on: October 14, 2019, 12:23:06 AM »
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⛩️ China is erasing its border with Hong Kong
« Reply #857 on: October 14, 2019, 05:29:56 PM »
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⛩️ How China Hides Its Infrastructure Debt
« Reply #858 on: October 16, 2019, 02:12:45 AM »
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⛩️Hong Kong protests getting more violent as anger at police grows
« Reply #859 on: November 10, 2019, 11:12:29 AM »
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🏹 Hong Kong police officer shot with arrow during university siege
« Reply #860 on: November 17, 2019, 01:37:02 AM »
Out come the Primitive Weapons!  Remember Diners, you heard this predicted here first!  :icon_sunny:  Bring on the Trebuchets!



Now, back to Vikings.  We are once again kicking serious ass in our League.  :icon_sunny:  I am Chief Ghostbuster and Zombie Assassin in the Clan at the moment.  I don't attack other towns, even though they are enemies unless they attack me or another Clan member.  This puts a limitation on my total points accumulation, but it's philosophically correct, IMHO.  I still do quite well just nailing the Ghosts and Zombies though.  I am at L25 now.

RE

Hong Kong police officer shot with arrow during university siege

By Ben Westcott and Jo Shelley, CNN

Updated 3:45 AM ET, Sun November 17, 2019


A protester throws a tear gas canister fired by police during a rally against a controversial extradition law proposal outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong on June 12, 2019. - Violent clashes broke out in Hong Kong on June 12 as police tried to stop protesters storming the city&#39;s parliament, while tens of thousands of people blocked key arteries in a show of strength against government plans to allow extraditions to China. (Photo by DALE DE LA REY / AFP)


Hong Kong (CNN)A Hong Kong police officer was shot with an arrow on Sunday during the siege of a fortified central university campus, a new escalation after nearly six months of demonstrations in the fiercely divided city.
Hundreds of protesters with bricks, petrol bombs and makeshift barricades are holding off riot police on roads surrounding the campus in the city's Hung Hom district, just across Victoria Harbor from Hong Kong Island. The authorities have responded with tear gas and water cannons in skirmishes that heated up Sunday afternoon.
As violence has escalated in recent days, protesters have begun using bows and arrows against the police and authorities said a media liaison officer was hit in the leg with an arrow during a skirmish Sunday afternoon.
He is conscious and has been sent to hospital for treatment, according to a police statement.

Police launch water cannon and tear gas outside the Hong Kong Polytechnic University to disperse protesters in Hong Kong on Sunday.
Police launch water cannon and tear gas outside the Hong Kong Polytechnic University to disperse protesters in Hong Kong on Sunday.
Hong Kong's Polytechnic University is just one of a number of university campuses being used in the past week as a rallying point for Hong Kong's protest movement.
Hong Kong&#39;s student protesters are turning campuses into fortresses
Hong Kong's student protesters are turning campuses into fortresses
But unlike other campuses such as the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the Polytechnic University sits in the center of the city, close to a number of major roads including a cross harbor tunnel.
In the past week, protesters have blocked these roads, severely disrupting the city's public transport system.
Polytechnic University is also less than 164 feet (50 meters) from a Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) base. So far there has been no sign that the country's military will be used to crack down on protesters.
The protests in Hong Kong have now been raging for almost six months after they began in June over a controversial China extradition bill, which sparked huge marches across the city.
Universities are new battleground in Hong Kong protests

Universities are new battleground in Hong Kong protests 02:42
When the government suspended but didn't withdraw the bill, the movement's focus quickly expanded to focus on complaints of police brutality and wider calls for democracy.
The protests took a turn in early November after the protest-related death of a 22-year-old student, the first since the demonstrations began. Protesters began to fortify university campuses across the city, holding off police with weapons ranging from bows and arrows and petrol bombs.
On Saturday night police attempted to clear the roads around Polytechnic University but were forced to back down after protesters started fires on the street and threw petrol bombs.
A protester reacts from tear gas fired by police at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University in Hong Kong on Sunday.
A protester reacts from tear gas fired by police at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University in Hong Kong on Sunday.
"They showed total disregard for the safety of everyone at scene," police said in a statement Sunday, confirming they tried to disperse the group using tear gas.
A 23-year-old protester and Polytechnic University alumni told CNN that they didn't have a plan and were just waiting to see how the police would react. "If we don't come out, no one will come out and protect our freedoms. Polytechnic University is my home," he said.
On Sunday the government announced that all schools would be shut again on Monday as protests were expected to continue across the city.
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🏹 Hong Kong: Protesters and police in fiery stand-off at university
« Reply #861 on: November 18, 2019, 04:50:36 AM »
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-50452277

Hong Kong: Protesters and police in fiery stand-off at university

    5 hours ago
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A stand-off at a Hong Kong university campus has led to fiery clashes overnight, as hundreds of protesters tried to repel a police advance.

Large fires broke out at entrances to the Polytechnic University (PolyU), where protesters hurled petrol bombs and shot arrows from behind barricades.

Officers earlier warned they could use live ammunition if protesters did not stop attacking them using such weapons.

Months of anti-government protests have caused turmoil in the city.

The latest violence is some of the worst the semi-autonomous Chinese territory has seen since the movement began.

The police have become targets for radical demonstrators, who accuse them of excessive force.

Demonstrators have been occupying the PolyU for days. Fresh clashes erupted on Sunday, with tear gas and water cannon being met with petrol bombs, bricks and other improvised weapons.

A police media liaison officer was wounded in the leg with an arrow on Sunday.

    The protests explained in 100 and 500 words
    The context to Hong Kong protests
    Timeline of Hong Kong unrest
    How is Hong Kong run?

What is the latest?

The protesters occupying the university had been told to leave immediately on Sunday evening but hundreds remained inside.

Sporadic battles continued throughout the night, with police making a push to re-take the campus at about 05:30 local time (21:30 GMT).

They were met with petrol bombs, which started blazes around the campus.

Later, some protesters tried to leave the campus but were met with tear gas and retreated.
Media captionProtesters around Hong Kong Polytechnic University have armed themselves with an array of weapons

"I hereby warn rioters not to use petrol bombs, arrows, cars or any deadly weapons to attack police officers," police spokesman Louis Lau said in a statement broadcast via Facebook late on Sunday.

"If they continue such dangerous actions, we would have no choice but to use the minimum force necessary, including live rounds, to fire back."

Earlier in the stand-off, police fired a live round in response to what they said was a car hurtling towards officers near the university.
Image copyright Reuters
Determined to fight to the end

By the BBC's Gabriel Gatehouse in Polytechnic University, at 04:00 Hong Kong time

It's only the most radical left now - or the bravest, depending on your point of view. About a hundred of them are hunkered down at a junction outside the main entrance. On the other side of the road: an armoured police vehicle, and a water cannon truck.

Every 10 minutes or so, these two sides play a game of cat and mouse. The police fire tear gas and the water cannon advances, squirting noxious blue liquid. The protesters, crouching behind umbrellas, respond with petrol bombs and rocks fired from improvised catapults. The police vehicles retreat. The net result is zero. It's a stalemate. There are several hundred more protesters milling around the campus. Medics treat those who have been hit by tear gas or the blue liquid in the water cannon, which stings on contact with the skin. Others man barricades at the many entrances to this sprawling campus which is now completely surrounded. When the police announced a 22:00 deadline for the protesters to surrender or face the possibility of lethal force a significant number changed out of their black outfits, ditched their masks, and disappeared into the night. Some were arrested but others escaped.

Those who remain seem determined to fight to the end, no matter the risk. "If I die, remember me," one young man said to me. "Do you believe that could happen?" I asked. He gave a nervous shrug.

The protests in Hong Kong, which began in June, were triggered by a now-withdrawn plan to allow extradition to mainland China but have since expanded into wider demands for greater democracy and for investigations into the actions of police.

The government recently confirmed the city had entered its first recession for a decade.

In recent days, Hong Kong's university campuses have been the scenes of pitched battles between police and demonstrators.

A police truck on a bridge above the Cross Harbour tunnel, which links Kowloon and Hong Kong island, was set on fire on Sunday and it was forced to retreat by large crowds of protesters hiding behind umbrellas and hurling petrol bombs.
Image copyright AFP
Image caption Fires raged around the campus on Monday morning
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Protesters have been holding a bridge above the Cross Harbour tunnel

In a statement the university had urged those occupying the campus to leave.

"Universities are venues for advancing knowledge and nurturing talents. Universities are not battlegrounds for political disputes and should not be drawn into violent confrontations," it said.
Image copyright AFP
Image caption Protesters armed with bows and arrows have been seen on the PolyU campus
Image copyright AFP
Image caption The officer was struck in the leg close to the Hong Kong Polytechnic University

On Saturday, in a move that sparked controversy, Chinese soldiers in shorts and T-shirts took to the streets to help clean up debris and remove barricades.

It was the first time since the protests erupted that Chinese soldiers, who very rarely leave their barracks in Hong Kong, had taken to the streets.
Media captionIn a rare move, Chinese soldiers left their barracks on Saturday to help clean up Hong Kong's streets
Why are there protests?

Hong Kong - a British colony until 1997 - is part of China under a model known as "one country, two systems".

Under this model, Hong Kong has a high degree of autonomy and people have freedoms unseen in mainland China.
Media captionHow Hong Kong got trapped in a cycle of violence

The protests started in June after the government planned to pass a bill that would allow suspects to be extradited to mainland China.

Many feared this bill would undermine the city's freedoms and judicial independence.

The bill was eventually withdrawn but the protests continued, having evolved into a broader revolt against the police, and the way Hong Kong is administered by Beijing.
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🏹 Hong Kong's pro-democracy movement sees landslide victory in local elections
« Reply #862 on: November 25, 2019, 09:18:34 AM »
Hong Kong is a terrific example of why "Democracy" and Voting are meaningless in a Collapsing Civilization.  This vote is even MORE meaningless then the Brexit referendum!

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