AuthorTopic: The Potfolio  (Read 61077 times)

Offline azozeo

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Re: The Potfolio
« Reply #540 on: April 01, 2019, 09:56:34 AM »


Federal legalization of hemp arrived in the U.S. late last year and expanded an industry already booming because of the skyrocketing popularity of CBDs, a compound in hemp that many see as a health aid.

But now, just a few months after Congress placed the marijuana look-alike squarely in safe legal territory, the hemp industry has been unsettled by an unexpected development.

Truckers, now free to haul hemp from state to state, have been stopped and sometimes arrested by police who can’t tell whether they have intercepted a legal agricultural crop or the biggest marijuana bust of their careers. That’s because the only way to distinguish hemp and marijuana, which look and smell alike, is by measuring their tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, and officers don’t have the testing technology to do so on the spot.

Marijuana, illegal under federal law , has enough THC to get users high. Hemp has almost none — 0.3 percent or less under U.S. government standards — yet drug-sniffing dogs will alert on both. Field tests that officers now use can detect THC but aren’t sophisticated enough to specify whether a shipment is legal hemp or low-grade illegal pot.

In a sign of the significance of the problem, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration earlier this month put out a request for information on private companies that might have the technology for field tests sensitive enough to distinguish between hemp and marijuana.

“Nobody wants to see someone in jail for a month for the wrong thing,” DEA spokeswoman Barbara Carreno said. “To enable us to do our job, we have to have something that can help us distinguish.”

It’s an unanticipated hiccup for the rapidly growing hemp industry, which relies on interstate trucking to transport hemp from farms to processing labs that extract the compound cannabidiol, or CBD, from the raw plant material. The pure CBD powder is then resold for use in everything from makeup to smoothies to pet food.

Kentucky and Oregon are big producers of hemp, and much of what they grow is processed in Colorado. Companies that transport the plant often drive through Oklahoma and Idaho, which is where some arrests have occurred.

Hemp remains illegal under Idaho law, and lawmakers there are scrambling to pass a legalization bill. Law enforcement agencies are urging them to include guidance on field tests.

To further complicate the issue, states that already have their own hemp programs must have them approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which could take months.

“It’s the greatest example of the cart being put before the horse that I’ve ever thought of,” said Grant Loebs, who is on the board of directors of the Idaho Prosecuting Attorneys Association, which has demanded better testing. “You’re trying to make hemp legal so farmers can grow it, but you haven’t put into place anything that’s going to keep marijuana dealers from taking advantage of a huge loophole.”

At least three truckers and two security guards transporting state-certified hemp have been arrested and charged with felony drug trafficking. Thousands of pounds worth more than $2 million combined after processing remain in warehouses in Oklahoma and Idaho as evidence while the cases play out.

Frank Robison, a Colorado-based attorney specializing in such cases, said he has about a half-dozen clients in similar situations in other locations. He declined to provide more information, citing his clients’ desire for privacy.

“What local law enforcement is doing is they’re stifling an industry that Congress intended to promote to help American farmers and help the American economy — not to make people nervous that they’re going to get tossed in jail over a (THC) discrepancy,” said Robison, who represents one of the companies involved in the Oklahoma case.

Robison and others hope the USDA will work quickly to create rules for validating hemp shipments that local law enforcement could use instead of relying on THC field tests, such as state agricultural certificates or lab certificates. That way, police could let a suspicious load through without arrests and if the hemp samples come back high in THC from testing done in a lab setting, authorities could pursue the grower or shipper after the fact.

Andrew Ross, a Marine who served in Afghanistan and Iraq, is facing 18 years to life in Oklahoma if convicted after he was arrested in January while providing security for a load of state-certified hemp from Kentucky. Ross and a colleague were riding in a van behind a semi-truck filled with the plant that ran a red light and was pulled over.

Andrew Ross, a Marine who served in Afghanistan and Iraq, is facing 18 years to life in Oklahoma if he is convicted after he was arrested in January while providing security for a load of state-certified hemp from Kentucky. CREDIT: THOMAS PEIPERT/AP

Ross said he provided police in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, with the state-issued license for the Kentucky farm that grew the hemp, the license for the Colorado lab that was buying it and chemical analysis paperwork for all 60 sacks of hemp that he said shows it was within federal guidelines for hemp.

That wasn’t enough for the officers. They tested the shipment and found it contained THC — although not how much — and arrested Ross, his colleague and the two truck drivers…


https://kuow.org/stories/federal-legalization-of-hemp-creates-confusion-for-state-and-local-police
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Offline azozeo

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THE CBD SECRET: WHAT BIG PHARMA DOESN’T WANT YOU TO KNOW ABOUT CBD OIL
« Reply #541 on: April 18, 2019, 10:38:23 AM »

April 11, 2019

Sofia Adamson, Staff
Waking Times

The pharmaceutical industry has a reputation for being corrupt and putting their financial interests above all else.

They push drugs that cause more harm than good, bribe doctors to administer their prescriptions, and bury any evidence that may damage the public perception of their products.

Big pharma has proven time and time again that they are only interested in making money—nothing else.

This is why they have worked relentlessly to hide powerful natural remedies from the public. If everyone starts using natural remedies instead of prescriptions, pharmaceutical companies will lose billions of dollars in revenue.

By far one of the biggest threats to the pharmaceutical industry is CBD oil, a compound that is naturally extracted from hemp.

Big Pharma does not want you to know about CBD oil because it has a wide range of therapeutic benefits that can replace several different drugs highly profitable drugs.


https://www.wakingtimes.com/2019/04/11/the-cbd-secret-what-big-pharma-doesnt-want-you-to-know-about-cbd-oil/
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🌿 The Big Loser in Canopy Growth's Latest Pot Deal
« Reply #542 on: April 24, 2019, 01:32:14 AM »
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/big-loser-canopy-growth-apos-210200058.html

The Big Loser in Canopy Growth's Latest Pot Deal
[Motley Fool]
Dan Caplinger, The Motley Fool
Motley FoolApril 23, 2019


The marijuana industry has seen more attention than ever from the investing community this year, and major players in the cannabis space have been jockeying for position to take advantage of prevailing trends that look increasingly favorable for future growth. In particular, although the U.S. market remains closed to legal sales of cannabis, moves like the recent passage of the U.S. farm bill legalizing hemp products appear to be opening a window that could eventually lead to full legalization in the not-too-distant future.

Canopy Growth (NYSE: CGC) has been one of the most aggressive Canadian cannabis companies in seeking to prepare to enter the U.S. marijuana market, with big investments including a planned hemp facility in upstate New York. Yet the pot player upped the ante last week with its acquisition of an option to purchase U.S.-based Acreage Holdings (NASDAQOTH: ACRGF). Canopy's stock has soared in the aftermath of the deal, but based on its own share-price response, Acreage Holdings could be shaping up to be a surprise loser.
How the deal got done

The structure of the Canopy-Acreage deal was unusual because of the restrictions on Canopy's ownership of U.S. marijuana operations. Specifically, Canopy's listing on the New York Stock Exchange prevents it from taking direct control of Acreage Holdings as long as marijuana remains illegal at the federal level.
Person wearing Tweed-branded shirt and clear hairnet working with a cannabis plant.
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Person wearing Tweed-branded shirt and clear hairnet working with a cannabis plant.

Image source: Canopy Growth.

To accomplish the same goal without running afoul of those regulations, Canopy obtained an option rather than doing an outright purchase of Acreage. Under its terms, Canopy will pay $300 million to Acreage now. Later on, if the U.S. makes marijuana legal within a specified time frame, then Acreage shareholders will receive 0.5818 shares of Canopy stock for every Acreage share they own. That yields a total potential value of $3.4 billion based on recent prices, and it represents a premium of more than 40% compared to where Acreage shares traded prior to the announcement.
The rise and fall of Acreage shares

As you'd expect when the deal got announced, Acreage shares rose substantially. However, what's decidedly unusual is that in the days after the announcement, Acreage gave up much of those gains -- even as Canopy shares continued to gain ground.

CGC Price Chart
CGC Price Chart

CGC Price data by YCharts.

Based on current prices of $48.50 per share for Canopy, just the stock component of the deal alone should put the value of Acreage stock above $28 per share. Yet at a price of just $22 per share, Acreage trades at a more than 20% discount to the implied price under the deal.
Losing optionality

Acreage Holdings' share-price discount seems to reflect skepticism about whether the deal will eventually get done at all. Under the agreement's terms, the parties are bound for up to 90 months until U.S. legalization occurs. Only after that -- in the second half of 2026 -- would Canopy and Acreage be free to walk away from the deal.

Most of those writing about the agreement seem convinced that legalization will happen sooner rather than later. Efforts to allow state decisions on marijuana to supersede federal law through the passage of the STATES Act appear to be gaining steam, and bipartisan support for the measure could eventually provide a pathway toward allowing cannabis companies to have U.S. operations freely in jurisdictions that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational purposes.

Yet banking on Washington to get anything done in a timely manner is often foolhardy, and in the meantime, Acreage will lose much of its ability to pursue its own strategic vision. The Canopy deal allows Acreage to make its own acquisitions to a limited extent, but only under defined parameters. Moreover, with the need to get shareholder approval, it's far from certain that a Canopy-Acreage tie-up will ever actually come to fruition.
It's not a sure thing

Canopy Growth investors are excited about the potential acquisition of what could become a key part of the cannabis giant's international strategy. Yet the fact that Acreage Holdings isn't seeing the same share-price gains points to some uncertainty about just how good the deal will be for its own shareholders. Cannabis investors shouldn't count on a Canopy-Acreage deal before the two companies successfully jump through all the hoops to make it a reality -- and get the cooperation from U.S. lawmakers that they'll need along the way.
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Offline azozeo

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Re: The Potfolio - "The High Life"
« Reply #543 on: May 02, 2019, 05:38:39 AM »






Willie Nelson is sitting on a couch at his home, a modest cabin that overlooks his 700 acres of gorgeous Texas Hill Country, when he reaches into his sweatshirt and produces a small, square vaporizer, takes a hit and exhales slowly. “Wanna puff?” he asks.

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/willie-nelson-weed-issue-826290/
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Re: The Potfolio
« Reply #544 on: May 02, 2019, 11:10:49 AM »


Is Nationwide Marijuana Legalization Just Around the Corner?

APRIL 19, 2019

By Reason

It’s hard to be pessimistic about marijuana legalization these days.

Recreational cannabis is legal in 10 states and decriminalized in another 14. Virtually all presidential candidates, including Trump, favor letting states decide the legal status of marijuana. For the first time, polls show a majority of Republicans support legalization. And six proposals to move marijuana laws in a more or less libertarian direction are now making their way through Congress.

What do these policy proposals look like? How are states navigating the conflicts between state and federal law? And are there any obstacles left on the path to nationwide legalization?

Reason’s Todd Krainin sat down with Erik Altieri, the executive director of NORML, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, to talk about the building momentum towards nationwide legal pot.


https://www.activistpost.com/2019/04/is-nationwide-marijuana-legalization-just-around-the-corner.html
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Offline azozeo

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The Potfolio - Levi's Is Now Using Hemp in their Jeans
« Reply #545 on: May 18, 2019, 11:07:32 AM »

May 10, 2019

Mayukh Saha, Truth Theory
Waking Times

December marked a historic moment in the United States with the hemp legalization. No wonder the industry is now flourishing. It has been estimated that the industry might go up and stand at a value of about $13.03 billion by the year 2026. You might have already come across hemp-derived products in the market, but now Levi Strauss & Co. is capturing a part of the fashion world by using hemp for sustainable clothing.

Levi’s is a denim icon and many people will swear by its name. But to keep up with its goodwill, as well as do something for our planet, Levi’s is going for sustainable clothing. While you might think that cotton is a harmless product, the water requirement of cotton is huge, almost 2,655 liters of fresh water, just for cultivation. With processing and finally using it in garments, it takes about 3,781 liters of fresh water. These are data that has been collected from the Stockholm Environmental Institute. Using alternatives like hemp can cut down the water use by 2/3rd.

So, in March, Levi’s collaborated with the Outerknown label, to introduce a jacket and a pair of jeans made out of 69% cotton and 31% hemp blend which gives the pure cotton fuel. The cannabis plant uses a lot less chemicals and water than cotton but is a bit difficult to manage too. While cotton is derived from the puffy bud found on top of the plant, indicating its softness, hemp fibers are taken from the trunk. It’s coarse and stiff, according to Paul Dillinger, the head of Levi’s global product innovation. It can be converted into a sturdy rope easily but for clothes – it just doesn’t seem like the ideal material.


https://www.wakingtimes.com/2019/05/10/levis-is-using-hemp-in-their-new-line-of-sustainable-clothing/
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Re: The Potfolio
« Reply #546 on: June 09, 2019, 09:48:44 AM »

 How Legal Weed Is Killing America’s Most Famous Marijuana Farmers

In the forests of Northern California, the regulatory state—not the DEA—is forcing thousands of growers out of business, or back underground.

By NATALIE FERTIG

June 04, 2019


https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2019/06/04/humboldt-county-marijuana-farmers-regulations-227041?utm_source=pocket-newtab
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Potfolio - Cannabis relieves pain 30 X's BETTER than aspirin
« Reply #547 on: July 28, 2019, 09:27:26 AM »

(TMU) — Medical marijuana is fast gaining credibility as a valid pain relief treatment, with data from various studies attesting to the medical and health benefits of cannabis as a viable alternative to pharmaceutical drugs.

And now, researchers have uncovered a new reason why: the cannabis plant produces pain-relieving molecules that are 30 times more potent at reducing inflammation than aspirin.

What makes the discovery so groundbreaking is that it could carve a new path to natural pain relief medications that would save patients who suffer chronic pain from the risks of addiction associated with opioid-based pain killers.

According to the team of researchers at Canada’s University of Guelph, they found out how the two important molecules—cannflavin A and cannflavin B—were produced through a combination of genomics and biochemistry.

The two cannflavins, known as “flavonoids,” were identified in 1985 when scientists proved that they had benefits which could fight inflammation at a gram-for-gram rate of about 30 times that of aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid.

However, prohibitionist laws in Canada prevented further research into the potent anti-inflammatory qualities of the molecules.

https://themindunleashed.com/2019/07/cannabis-can-relieve-pain-30-times-better-than-aspirin.html
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