AuthorTopic: French Fried Frog Frexit  (Read 1045 times)

Offline RE

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French Fried Frog Frexit
« on: December 02, 2016, 02:12:49 AM »
The Frogs appear to be the next up on the Grand Stage here with their upcoming Presidential Election.  Hollandaise Sauce is stepping down after a few years of magnificent failure.  Based on the article below from the NYT, it appears their choice is Francois Fillon, another right wing jackass.  So much for the idea the Media is "Lefty".  lol.

Compared to this dimwit, Marine LePen actually seems GOOD!  ::)

RE

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/01/business/international/francois-fillon-marine-le-pen-economy-france-election.html?_r=0

 International Business
With Presidency in Play, Can France Embrace Economic Change?

By LIZ ALDERMANDEC. 1, 2016


François Fillon, who won the center-right nomination for the French presidency, has pledged to shrink big government, aid business and face down labor unions. Credit Charles Platiau/Reuters

PARIS — He compares himself to Margaret Thatcher, the British leader who set her country on a right-leaning economic course. A French newspaper splashed him on its cover with the Iron Lady’s hairdo and pearl earrings.

François Fillon, the conservative politician who has vaulted to the forefront of France’s presidential race against the far-right National Front leader Marine Le Pen, is vowing to make France’s economy great again. Campaigning on fears of a country in decline, he has pledged “shock therapy” to liberalize the economy, à la Mrs. Thatcher, through a program of shrinking big government, aiding business and facing down France’s powerful labor unions.

His brash talk has raised concerns about a radical shift from French traditions, while reviving a perennial question: Can France actually be reformed?

“The short answer is yes, but not so ambitiously,” said Mujtaba Rahman, the managing director for Europe at Eurasia Group, a political risk consultancy. “The French love economic reform in theory. They hate it in practice once they understand what it means.”
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While the French economy has become more open and competitive in recent decades, resistance breaks out almost anytime the government tries to reshape France’s way of life, especially the vaunted social model, designed to protect citizens from the ravages of the free market. When the focus is on whittling hard-fought human and worker rights — a concept whose roots reach back to the French Revolution — tensions can boil over.

Thousands of demonstrators took to the streets this year when President François Hollande sought to loosen labor laws to stoke employment, proposals that do not go as far as Mr. Fillon wants. Garbage piled up on sidewalks. Oil refineries were blockaded. Banks were defaced and police cars were firebombed. In the end, Mr. Hollande’s Socialist government forced the measures through by special decree.

With his approval ratings at record lows, Mr. Hollande announced on Thursday that he would not seek a second term, the first postwar French president to do so.

If elected in May, Mr. Fillon will probably face a similar showdown as he seeks government cuts and deeper labor overhauls while the economy is weak. “France’s social model is broken,” he said on the campaign trail. “Sometimes you just need to pull the house down and rebuild it.”

His most bitter medicine involves shrinking a government that accounts for more than half of the country’s economy, by cutting 500,000 Civil Service jobs and slashing 100 billion euros in spending over five years. To enhance competitiveness, he wants to weaken labor union power, kill the infamous 35-hour workweek, cut corporate taxes and distill France’s 3,400-page labor code to 150 pages.

Much of that will not be easy to carry out. Mr. Fillon will face opposition on austerity from Socialist and National Front lawmakers in Parliament. Heightened security after the terrorist attacks in France will add pressure not to include police and hospital workers in Civil Service reductions. And his ambitious plans for helping businesses are likely to bring unions and workers back out into the streets.

“At the smallest sign of change, there’s protest,” said Philippe Plantier, the founder of Travaux Grande Hauteur, a midsize industrial cleaning company near Aix-en-Provence, in southern France. He is one of thousands of businessmen across France who hope that Mr. Fillon, if elected, will stand firm in the face of almost certain strike action.

“As an employer, anything that will streamline the labor code and get rid of the 35 hours would help create jobs,” Mr. Plantier said. “We need to liberate this economy, Anglo-Saxon style, if France is to be competitive.”

In the sluggish economy, his orders fell this summer for cleaning big industrial structures, like bridges and cement factories. Mr. Plantier moved to lay off several of his more than 50 employees to adjust for declining income.

But the workers sued to block the layoffs and sought more than €100,000 in damages. “When you hire someone in France, it’s for life,” he said.
Journalism that matters.
More essential than ever.

French politicians, and the French people, agree that the economy needs repairing.

Since France emerged from a recession in 2010 after Europe’s debt crisis, growth has languished below 2 percent annually. Unemployment is stuck around 10 percent, more than twice the rate in Germany. Nearly a quarter of young people are without work, and many of the new jobs being created are on precarious temporary contracts.

France is, of course, still a rich country. It has the second-largest economy in the eurozone behind Germany’s, scores of world-class multinational companies and a stream of international investment. Yet there remains a heated debate about how to improve growth.

The Socialist party now in power did little to invigorate the economy. It is divided and weak, and will be in more disarray with Mr. Hollande’s resignation. Other possible contenders on the left include Emmanuel Macron, a young, reformist former economy minister, who wants what he calls an “Uber-ization” of the economy to stoke innovation, an idea that would also dilute worker security.

Ms. Le Pen’s program is more populist, keeping the retirement age at 60, enhancing labor protections and raising the minimum wage. She would spurn international trade deals, and promises a national referendum on “Frexit,” a reference to a French exit from the European Union, after Britain’s departure vote this summer.

Economists say those plans are unsustainable. But Ms. Le Pen is betting that voters are more worried by Mr. Fillon’s Thatcheresque vision for the country. And the election of Donald J. Trump in the United States has given a lift to populists like Ms. Le Pen.

“People are going to realize that he wants to fire 500,000 civil servants, scrap the 35-hour workweek, cut social security and raise the sales tax,” Florian Philippot, vice president of the National Front, said of Mr. Fillon. “It’s terrible.”

While Mrs. Thatcher also tackled labor rules to reshape Britain, many in France don’t buy the argument that companies will hire more if they are allowed to fire more. On this issue, France’s labor unions are able to rally support.

Philippe Martinez, the secretary general of the hard-line General Confederation of Labor, which spearheaded the nationwide strikes this year, threatened a “mass mobilization” if Mr. Fillon tried to liberalize the economy too much. He warned that Mr. Fillon’s platform was little more than a pretext to strip workers of rights while companies profited.

Although union membership in France has slumped to around 8 percent of the work force, unions still wield power and don’t hesitate to use it. Last year union members ripped shirts off the backs of Air France executives as they escaped over a fence after detailing layoffs. Union workers have also held company bosses hostage or damaged property to make their point.

Mr. Fillon argues it’s time for France to “go around the unions.”

On a recent visit to a Smart Car factory in eastern France, he heralded the company as a model for letting employers negotiate more directly with employees. Last year, workers there agreed in a split vote to work 39 hours a week while being paid for 37 hours, because the company was facing difficulties.

And where mass demonstrations have struck fear into the hearts of previous presidents, Mr. Fillon’s attitude is: Bring it on.

“I’m willing to face strikes if that’s the price to save France,” he said.
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The Latest: Le Pen lays out platform for French economy
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2017, 02:39:11 AM »
mmmm, Deep Fried Frogs Legs with Beer Batter, Tartar Sauce, Fries & Lemon Wedges!  Yummy!

RE


RE

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/the-latest-macron-calls-for-roadmap-to-fight-extremism/2017/03/02/9493c0b8-ff30-11e6-9b78-824ccab94435_story.html?utm_term=.2c0ac65db2d0

Europe
The Latest: Le Pen lays out platform for French economy

Independent centrist presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron addresses the media during a press conference held in Paris, Thursday, March 2, 2017. With just 52 days left before French voters choose their president, the man leading polls is only now releasing his campaign platform. (Christophe Ena/Associated Press)

By Associated Press March 2 at 4:54 PM

PARIS — The Latest on the French presidential election campaign (all times local):

9:25 p.m.

French far-right presidential candidate Marine Le Pen envisions the protective hand of the state guiding a reordered economy that punishes companies that fail to serve the interests of the nation and rewards those that put France first.

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In a speech on Wednesday, Le Pen laid out the nationalist policies based on “economic patriotism” that would be put enacted if she wins the two-round presidential election.

They include a tax of up to 35 percent for French companies that produce their goods elsewhere then reimport them. Companies that respect the made-in-France label end-to-end would be compensated.

To create jobs, Le Pen wants to make the “reconquest” of French markets a priority.

She said: “No country has ever succeeded in building its industry without protecting it.”

Le Pen, who is currently jockeying for the top spot in polls with independent centrist Emmanuel Macron, also wants to pull France out of the European Union and the euro currency.

___

8:50 p.m.

Police officials say authorities searched the Paris home of French presidential candidate Francois Fillon in an investigation into parliamentary jobs for his family members.

Two police officials said the search was carried out Thursday morning. The officials, who were not authorized to publicly comment on the investigation, would not provide further details.

Lawyers for Fillon and his wife Penelope would not comment on the search.

In a campaign rally in Nimes in southern France on Thursday night, Fillon said, “My life has been put to the test in recent weeks” and is being “dissected” because of the jobs allegations.

Fillon is struggling to keep his conservative party together amid discord over his decision to continue his campaign despite facing preliminary charges in the jobs investigation.

He denies wrongdoing in the case, in which he’s accused of arranging taxpayer-funded jobs for his wife and two of his children that they never did.

“Standing before you is a fighter,” he told the cheering crowd.

___

Associated Press Writer Angela Charlton prepared this report.

___

7:05 p.m.

French conservative Francois Fillon’s presidential bid is hitting new trouble, with more defections from his campaign because of pending corruption charges against him.

The campaign treasurer and three legislators from his Republicans party announced Thursday they are quitting his campaign, amid growing pressure for Fillon to step down in favor of someone else.

Treasurer Gilles Boyer tweeted his departure, while legislators Benoist Apparu, Edouard Philippe and Christophe Bechu said in a statement that the campaign has taken a turn “incompatible” with their political vision. They’re particularly angry that Fillon initially said he would step down if charged, but decided Wednesday to maintain his candidacy even though he’s been summoned to face charges March 15.

Fillon denies the accusations, which center on allegations that he arranged taxpayer-funded jobs for his family that they never performed.

Others are also reportedly quitting the campaign, mainly those who supported staunchly conservative Fillon’s more moderate rival Alain Juppe in last year’s primary. Juppe was runnerup, but has said he doesn’t want to run in Fillon’s place.

Fillon’s supporters meanwhile plan a rally near the Eiffel Tower on Sunday that they hope will help hold the campaign together.

___

3:00 p.m.

France’s minister of culture says a rise in ultra-nationalism in France will negatively impact the prized French fashion industry that relies strongly on foreign talent.

Audrey Azoulay told The Associated Press outside the Chloe show in Paris Thursday that a “populist power” like the National Front, which wants France to exit the EU, would be “absolutely incompatible with the idea of fashion and freedom.”

Azoulay added “a lot of our great fashion designers come from elsewhere.”

National Front leader Marine Le Pen, who’s leading in polls for the April-May elections, has campaigned in favor of leaving the EU and against immigration.

Each season hundreds of fashion industry workers with EU passports travel to Paris without visas because of the EU freedom of movement rules.

___

1:15 p.m.

French independent presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron says he wants tight security cooperation with the U.S. despite his ideological differences with Donald Trump.

Macron on Thursday called Trump’s skepticism toward the Paris Agreement to fight global warming “a deep mistake” and expressed opposition to proposed U.S. protectionist trade measures.

But he said he would ask Trump to respect decades of French-US security alliances, most notably in recent times fighting the Islamic State group.

Macron, who presented his platform Thursday in Paris, wants to cut the number of lawmakers, introduce term limits and ban officials from hiring family members.

He said he would lead a “demanding” policy toward Russia, but that could involve easing sanctions if Russia fulfills promises under European-brokered efforts to seek peace in eastern Ukraine.

___

12:05 p.m.

The European Parliament has voted to lift French far-right leader Marine Le Pen’s immunity from prosecution.

The legislature voted by a broad majority in Brussels on Thursday to clear the way for the possible prosecution of Le Pen over her tweets of gruesome images of violence by Islamic State extremists. Le Pen, a leading candidate in this year’s French presidential election, posted them in response to a journalist who drew an analogy between her anti-immigration National Front party and IS extremists.

Le Pen was trying to show the difference between the two groups but the effort backfired, drawing widespread condemnation. The French interior minister accused her of fomenting Islamic State propaganda.

Le Pen, in addition to being the leader of France’s far-right National Front party, is also a lawmaker with the European Parliament.

___

11:25 a.m.

Amid growing French political scandals, centrist presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron wants to shrink the size of parliament, introduce term limits — and ban officials from hiring their family members.

In releasing his presidential platform Thursday, he said he wants to “eradicate conflicts of interest.”

Two of Macron’s chief rivals for the April-May two-round vote — conservative Francois Fillon and far-right leader Marine Le Pen — are facing corruption investigations. Macron, a 39-year-old who has never held elected office, is presenting himself as a fresh face without political baggage.

His platform calls for cutting the size of both houses of parliament by a third, banning lawmakers from consulting activity and banning all officials from employing family members.

___

11:20 a.m.

Centrist French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron says the remaining 27 European Union members must vigorously defend their single market in talks with Britain on its exit.

Macron, in presenting his platform Thursday, also urged efforts to reinvigorate the eurozone and closer European cooperation. He said the EU cannot survive “without a real European strategy” and called for a “new impulse for the single market.”

Far-right candidate Marine Le Pen wants to pull France out of the EU and eurozone, and there has been growing anti-EU sentiment in many countries since Britain’s vote to leave.

Polls suggest Macron and Le Pen may face off in the May 7 presidential runoff.

___

11:10 a.m.

Independent French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron wants an international “roadmap” to better fight Islamic extremism from the Mideast to Africa.

In releasing his presidential platform Thursday, Macron also called for increased military spending to 2 percent of GDP — as U.S. and other NATO allies have long demanded.

He would hire 10,000 more police and create 15,000 more places in prison and boost efforts to improve relations between police and minority youths in poor suburbs.

Macron’s critics on the right have called him too soft on security. Polls suggest he could face far-right leader Marine Le Pen, who has made fighting Islamic extremism central to her campaign, in the May 7 presidential runoff.

___

8:20 a.m.

With just 52 days left before French voters choose their president, the man leading polls is only now releasing his campaign platform.

Until now, Emmanuel Macron has risen to popularity largely based on what he is not - he’s neither left nor right, he has no party, and he’s the only top contender not facing corruption investigations.

Macron lays out his platform Thursday on an upswing, as pressure mounts on conservative rival Francois Fillon, facing charges that he arranged taxpayer-funded jobs for his family that they never performed.

Denying wrongdoing, Fillon vowed Wednesday to pursue his candidacy even if he’s charged, but is now struggling to keep his party from falling apart.

Polls suggest Macron and far-right leader Marine Le Pen will be the top two vote-getters in the April 23 first round and advance to the May 7.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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French Election Fraud? Will Macron be Able to Form a Government?
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2017, 01:22:35 AM »
More from The Saker Peter Koenig.

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http://www.globalresearch.ca/french-election-fraud-will-macron-be-able-to-form-a-government/5589262

French Election Fraud? Will Macron be Able to Form a Government?
By Peter Koenig
Global Research, May 09, 2017
Region: Europe
Theme: Police State & Civil Rights


The final tally is Emmanuel Macron 66% against 34% for Marine Le Pen, a historic landslide never seen in France’s recent past. Many have voted for Macron because it meant a vote against Le Pen. They were scared. The massive fear-mongering propaganda against her was successful. The choice was clearly between the Devil and Lucifer, and the vast majority voted for Lucifer. He is slyer. He is killing slowly with a smile, vs. Le Pen’s outspoken, confrontational approach. He does it by continuously administering small doses of poison. Taking over the economy from the 99% for the 1%. It’s the old salami tactic, in new clothes. It’s a fascist economy. People don’t notice until it’s too late.

Voter participation has drastically declined since the two previous times, with 65% compared to 72% in 2012 and 75% in 2007. It shows that many disenchanted French have abstained. Intentional abstentions and non-voters accounted for 35%, a record in over 50 years. With 66% of actual voters casting their ballot for Macron, he has actually obtained just slightly above 40% of the eligible voters’ approval, not discounting all those whose vote was a vote against Le Pen. Some estimates conclude it could be as high as 15% – which would leave Macron with a mere 25% of real votes, as compared to the total of eligible French voters. If that’s the making of a President in a key European country, then we are headed for deep dark trouble.

One of the key phrases Macron voiced in his victory speech was that France will be first in line in fighting ‘terrorism’ – in clear text, the militarization of France and by extension of Europe, will continue.

This will bode well with the semi-clandestine effort underway by Germany’s Bundeswehr to train German and NATO troops for war-like offensives against western cities. The project, largely unreported, has been going on since at least 2012. It involves building in Germany’s north-eastern federal state of Saxony-Anhalt an entire ghost town, where German and NATO troops will train to fight and suppress possible social upheavals in western European cities. The camp, budgeted at several hundred million euros, is expected to be ready for training by 2018. The idea is not new. It’s a copy of what’s already going on for years in the US. Clandestine military hubs around ‘vulnerable’ cities, like Chicago, New York, Los Angeles – and more, are in full swing.

Election fraud is difficult to prove. But circumstantial evidence clearly points to electoral “irregularities”. First, the traditional two-party system was purposefully eviscerated and the country was divided into four groups. There were the old-style Republicans and Socialists, represented by François Fillon and Benoît Hamon. Until a few weeks ago, Marine Le Pen from the extreme right-wing National Front was leading all polls. Mr. Fillon came in second. Then a suddenly floated scandal about his wife’s cashing in huge amounts of public money in the form of remunerations for work she had not done, decimated his popularity. Was this part of the game plan?

Both candidates, Fillon and Le Pen, had politically similar positions, except that Le Pen, whom the media called demeaningly a populist, campaigned for FREXIT, exit from the euro and from NATO. All very popular ideas. Let’s face it, 80% of the French want a referendum on FREXIT. Jean-Luc Mélenchon of ‘France insoumise’, had and has a terrific program for a socially and politically independent France, regaining sovereignty from Brussels and exiting NATO, and a France with a direct Democracy. He calls it the 6th Republic. He consistently ran on the left, but didn’t break ground in 2012. In the last few months, his quick wit and modern campaign technology (hologram speeches at several locations simultaneously) suddenly attracted a lot of followers, especially among the young and students, as well as those disenchanted with the socialist party. He ascended quickly to the top, outranking François Fillon, second only to Le Pen. But a run-off Mélenchon – Le Pen was unthinkable for the powers in Washington and Brussels. The dangers of a Mélenchon win were real.

Then came the meteoric rise out of nowhere by the youthful, 39-year-old Emmanuel Macron, with his non-party political movement “En Marche” (On the Move). The former Rothschild investment banker, never held any elected office, was catapulted in 2014 into the post of Minister of Economy, where he pushed through the controversial and unpopular “Macron Law”, largely a deregulation of industry and service sectors against the interests of labor. Mr. Macron, despite his self-given label of a ‘centrist’, represents the interests of the banksters and of Big Business. He is also a staunch friend of Washington and Brussels, defending the un-defendable euro and European Union. That’s what the elite, the world’s Deep State, wants.

Going into the first round of elections on 23 April, the country was divided into four voter segments, with the front runners Le Pen, Macron, Mélenchon and Fillon clustered closely together. This reminds of the 2015 / 2016 Spanish elections – “divide to conquer” – a division from an essentially two-party system into four parties. The Spanish ‘election’ eventually ended up in a parliamentary coup to make sure Mariano Rajoy, the neoliberal right-winger, would continue the Spanish austerity oppression of the working class, despite a vast majority of Spaniards, with a 23% unemployment rate, being against Rajoy –

see http://www.globalresearch.ca/spain-the-dice-are-cast-another-parliamentary-coup-instigated-from-outside/5553699.


François Fillon, Marine Le Pen, Emmanuel Macron, Jean-Luc Mélenchon

To avoid a similar fiasco, the French election had to be ‘decided’ in the first round, in as much as Fillon and Mélenchon needed to be discarded from the second round, to make sure Macron would confront Le Pen. This was the easiest gamble to have Macron win.

And so it happened. With a massive and well targeted media campaign, very likely using the Cambridge Analytica model of mind manipulation, as was applied to make Trump President –

see http://www.globalresearch.ca/mind-manipulations-to-influence-election-results/5566894

And to bring about Brexit, Macron became a front runner, barely outranking Le Pen in the first round, with Fillon and Mélenchon coming in third and fourth on 23 April. That Mélenchon after the first round ended up fourth, with a paper-thin margin behind the scandal-plagued Fillon, is not an accident. Ballot fraud is very likely and has, in fact, been detected by Mélenchon’s people. Had he come in as third, he might have contested the thin margin between him and Macron and asked for a recount. So, he had to be ‘pushed’ back to number four. As such, a recount was not likely.

Whoever would like to understand how elections are made these days, not only in developing countries, but also in our wester so-called democracies should read this

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/07/the-great-british-brexit-robbery-hijacked-democracy?CMP=share_btn_tw .

It provides a deep look into who is running the world and with what intent. There is not a shred left of DEMOCRACY. It’s mind control and mind manipulation to the extreme. It is very likely that France did not escape this soft, but super-sharp behind the scene technology.

Macron has now 5 years to continue – and speed up – the work of his predecessor, Hollande: more austerity for the average French, more tax breaks for the Corporate Lords and the rich, more militarization of France and Europe – and especially keep following Brussels’ and Washington’s dictates.

Without arbitrating whether Macron or Le Pen should have won the elections – is this massive media – and Silicone Valley – manipulation for the candidate that clearly defends Big Business, the corrupt EU Brussels construct and the unsustainable, fraudulent European currency, the euro – and membership in NATO – ethically correct? All of it serves the interests of giant corporations and the war mongering on Russia’s borders, against the interests of the people. With today’s neoliberal laws that defy any moral standards as long as they benefit the rich and powerful, it is difficult to say whether the method is legal. Is it legitimate to lie and use mind control tactics to attain a socially indefensible and unjust objective? Or is it an outright criminal act? Let our conscience be the judge.

However, the game is not over yet. There will be two rounds of legislative elections in June. At this point, Mr. Macron will have a hard time forming a government. His movement (not a party), “En Marche”, is new and not established well-enough to gain necessarily enough parliamentary seats to govern. Therefore, a coalition, or as the French call it, a ‘Cohabitation’, is a possibility. With whom? With Le Pen’s Front National, with Fillon’s traditional right wing Republicans? – Or with Mélenchon’s ‘France insoumise’? Le Pen and Mélenchon will likely increase their seats in Parliament. A three-way fairly even split – Macron – Mélenchon – Le Pen – has been suggested by several analysts.

With whom Macron will ’cohabitate’ is anybody’s guess.

The three-way split scenario might leave Macron in a deadlock, unable to form a government. Would that bring about new elections à la Spain? – And if mind control doesn’t work well-enough, end up in a Parliamentary coup, where votes and alliances may be traded, not to say ‘bought’ – to eventually propel the Luciferian Deep State’s darling, Macron, into the Presidency?

Peter Koenig is an economist and geopolitical analyst. He is also a former World Bank staff and worked extensively around the world in the fields of environment and water resources. He lectures at universities in the US, Europe and South America. He writes regularly for Global Research, ICH, RT, Sputnik, PressTV, The 4th Media (China), TeleSUR, The Vineyard of The Saker Blog, and other internet sites. He is the author of Implosion – An Economic Thriller about War, Environmental Destruction and Corporate Greed – fiction based on facts and on 30 years of World Bank experience around the globe. He is also a co-author of The World Order and Revolution! – Essays from the Resistance.

The original source of this article is Global Research
Copyright © Peter Koenig, Global Research, 2017
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Did Macron Really Win in France? You’ll Know in June
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2017, 01:58:08 AM »
Ar least the FSoA isn't the only country with political problems!  :icon_sunny:

Misery loves company.

RE

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-05-11/did-macron-really-win-in-france-you-ll-know-in-june

Did Macron Really Win in France? You’ll Know in June
“We could be headed toward an ungovernable situation.”
by Gregory Viscusi
, Helene Fouquet
, and Marc Champion
May 11, 2017, 2:00 PM AKDT

Photographer: Revelli-Beaumont/Sipa/AP Photo

On the evening of May 7, Emmanuel Macron took the stage at a boisterous celebration in the courtyard of the Louvre in Paris. At 39, he’d just become the youngest person to win the French presidency, and with Beethoven’s Ode to Joy blaring from loudspeakers, he thanked thousands of supporters for backing him in the hard-fought campaign. A few hours earlier, his far-right, nationalist rival, Marine Le Pen, stood before a more somber—but raucously defiant—crowd at a restaurant on the eastern flank of Paris to concede the race. Then well before midnight, both Macron and Le Pen went off the radar. The election was finally over, and the candidates looked drawn and exhausted after months of interviews, speeches, debates, and rallies.

The next morning, the first order of business for the two camps: more campaigning. On June 11, French voters will return to the polls for legislative elections, followed by a runoff a week later for districts where no candidate wins outright—typically most of them. While the president’s party often gains a majority or a strong plurality in the National Assembly, this year things look different. For the first time, France’s two main parties were absent from the second round of the presidential election, and they’re seeking to use the legislative vote to bounce back. Macron, meanwhile, has never held elected office. He founded his party just over a year ago and has little on-the-ground infrastructure to field candidates or get voters to the polls. “Macron’s biggest challenge is to win the battle for Parliament,” says Dominique Reynié, a politics professor at Sciences Po university in Paris. “Without a majority, he’d have only limited power.”

On the day after the election, Macron’s party said it would change its name from En Marche! (On the Move!) to La République en Marche! to reflect that it’s no longer a personal vehicle for its leader. Macron, who is scheduled to be sworn in on May 14, has vowed to compete in each of France’s 577 constituencies, and the party said it would announce a full slate of names on May 11. Before the second round of the presidential election, polling group OpinionWay S.A.S. published a survey suggesting Macron’s party would fall just short of a majority in the assembly, so he’d probably need to form a coalition with either the center-right Republicans or the Socialists. An Ipsos poll on May 8 said 61 percent of voters don’t want Macron to win a majority in Parliament, because much of his support in the second round was from people more interested in keeping Le Pen out of office than in endorsing his program. “I don’t see a clear majority emerging,” says Jérôme Fourquet, head of the opinion department at polling house Ifop SA. “We could be headed toward an ungovernable situation.”

Although Le Pen trailed Macron by 30 percentage points, she garnered more than 10 million votes, the National Front’s best showing ever. In her concession speech, Le Pen said France had undergone “a recomposition of political life” that had made the National Front the primary opposition party. That may be something of an exaggeration, as it now has just two seats in Parliament, and it’s unlikely to see sufficient gains to wield real power: Ipsos projects the party will capture at best a couple dozen seats. What’s changed is that despite its racist, anti-Semitic roots, the party is no longer a pariah. “The whole system ganged up on us,” says Franck Briffaut, a National Front member and mayor of Villers-Cotterêts, a town of 10,000 about an hour and a half north of Paris. “We got to the second round. That was a victory in itself.”

Opponents of the National Front fret that if Macron can’t deliver meaningful change, this year’s setback may just be a bump in the road to a Le Pen presidency in 2022. That’s assuming she doesn’t succumb to a challenge within the party. Although French voters rejected her as too extreme, Le Pen wasn’t extreme enough for core supporters who have questioned her decision to run an anti-European Union campaign rather than focus on the National Front’s traditional themes of immigration and security. While there’s no clear challenger today, old-timers have said they want to return to the days when the movement was led by Le Pen’s father, Jean-Marie. “Terrorism, unemployment, and Trump—the environment was so favorable, so favorable,” says Jean-François Touzé, a former senior National Front official. The result was “a total failure.”

Macron has been unabashedly pro-Europe in the face of Le Pen’s nationalism and proposals to ditch the euro and return to the franc. With unemployment at 10 percent overall and more than twice that for young people, he understands he must deliver on the economy. To get things moving, Macron has proposed cutting corporate tax rates to the European average of 25 percent, from 33 percent; making it easier to fire workers and cheaper to hire them; loosening collective bargaining rules; and making the social security net and pension system more fair. Le Pen voters “expressed their anger,” Macron told the crowd at the Louvre on election night. “I’ll do everything in the next five years to ensure there’s no reason to vote for extremes.”

Several high-profile Republicans and Socialists have expressed interest in running for Macron’s party, and the Socialists have said they’d be willing to form a coalition with the new president. The Republicans, by contrast, insist they can win an outright majority, which would allow them to appoint the prime minister and limit Macron’s ability to enact his program. Macron, too, says his party can win a majority, and he hasn’t said whether he’d accept an alliance with anyone.
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At the end of the day, Macron will almost certainly accept a coalition, says Nicolas Lebourg, a researcher in politics at the University of Montpellier. Macron understands that he must push through his program or risk increasing the appeal of Le Pen or another populist, Lebourg says, and he has often hinted that he’d be open to cooperation. “That’s the idea behind all his talk about taking the best people and ideas from both the left and the right,” Lebourg says. “The French people wouldn’t necessarily oppose a government of nonpolitical technocrats.”

The bottom line: With only a nascent party organization, Macron will have difficulty putting together a majority in Parliament.
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🔥 Thousands in France are protesting gas taxes — and their president
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2018, 12:49:10 AM »
The Frogs do seriously good street protesting.  No pussy footing around sitting down and waiting to get pepper sprayed while singing "We Shall Overcome" for them!  Rocks, Molotovs, Gas Masks, they come Prepped!

RE

https://www.vox.com/2018/11/27/18113124/paris-gas-tax-riots-france-macron

Thousands in France are protesting gas taxes — and their president
People in yellow vests are deeply unhappy with Emmanuel Macron.
By Alex Ward@AlexWardVoxalex.ward@vox.com Nov 27, 2018, 8:30am EST

A demonstrator waves the French flag on a burning barricade on Paris’s Champs-Élysées avenue during a demonstration against the raising of fuel taxes on Novermber 24, 2018. Michel Euler/AP

Thousands of French police fired tear gas and used water cannons against protesters who were destroying shops and lighting fires along Paris’s Champs-Élysées this weekend.

People were protesting fuel taxes, but the demonstrations are also an indication of growing animosity toward French President Emmanuel Macron.

Nearly 20 people — including police — were injured in Saturday’s skirmish, which could cost the city $1.7 million. It’s one of the most dramatic moments in more than a week of demonstrations that have led to a total of about 400 injured and at least one death.

The protests started around November 17 when French drivers sporting yellow vests led a demonstration of 280,000 people across the country to push back against rising taxes on gas and diesel. Macron, as part of his many economic reforms, announced the gas taxes earlier this year to minimize France’s reliance on fossil fuels.

The tax will increase the price of fuel by about 30 cents per gallon and will continue to rise over the next few years, the French government says. Gas already costs about $7.06 per gallon in France.

The protest movement — known as gilets jaunes, French for the “yellow vests” demonstrators wear — has blockaded streets and highways, burned cars, and skirmished with police in response to the price hike. In recent days, protesters seem to be directing their anger at the state of France’s economy as well.

“It’s unacceptable that people do not have decent salaries, that at the end of the month, they are in the red and can’t afford to eat,” Idir Ghanes, an unemployed computer technician in Paris, told the Guardian on November 24.

In effect, the protests are turning into a large-scale rebuke to Macron’s leadership — and it’s unclear if he’ll survive it.
Why so many French people are unhappy with Macron

Jeff Lightfoot, an expert on France at the Atlantic Council think tank in Washington, DC, told me there are two main reasons Macron has become such an unpopular figure.

The first is that Macron doesn’t really have a political base. He’s a Parisian technocrat that rode a wave of dissatisfaction with traditional French political parties to presidential victory in May 2017. He has yet to gain much support outside of urban areas, and didn’t receive tremendous support during last year’s vote. So one of Macron’s biggest political liabilities is that he doesn’t have a reliable contingent of support if things get bad.

The second reason, unfortunately for Macron, is that things have gotten bad. France’s economy is growing, but very slowly. Most of the growth is centered in its major cities, like Paris, but others on the periphery and rural communities haven’t seen as much profit. “The discontent has been rising,” Lightfoot said, in part because Macron can come off as arrogant and out of touch.

It also doesn’t help that Macron, in an effort to reform France’s economy, is cutting longstanding benefits and ending labor protections. For example, he’s made it easier for companies to hire and fire employees and fought unions to end subsidies for certain sectors. That’s why some see Macron as a president of the rich, Lightfoot added, initiating changes that many of the country’s wealthy can muddle through but that the nation’s poorer cannot.

That means Macron will be in protesters’ crosshairs for quite some time, especially since he has given no indication he will bend to their demands. It’s therefore possible that some of his political competitors — like the far-right politician Marine Le Pen — can take advantage of the public’s disaffection and become the premier alternative to Macron.

That has France watchers quite nervous about what happens not just in the next few days but well into the future. “It’s going to be a bumpy few years coming up,” Lightfoot told me.
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🌍 French President Holds Security Meeting On Yellow Vest Protests
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2018, 01:38:50 AM »
https://www.npr.org/2018/12/02/672714809/french-president-holds-security-meeting-on-yellow-vest-protests

Europe
French President Holds Security Meeting On Yellow Vest Protests
December 2, 20181:32 PM ET
Shannon Van Sant


More than 350 people were arrested in demonstrations Saturday in Paris. The protests began on November 17th over a hike in gas prices.
Thibault Camus/AP

French President Emmanuel Macron is chairing an urgent security meeting in Paris to discuss the riots that have spread across the country, and could declare a state of emergency to contain the unrest.

The "yellow vest" demonstrations, named for the roadside safety vests worn by the protesters, started last month over a hike in gas prices and have evolved into protests over the high cost of living in France.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports from Paris that more than 350 people were arrested in demonstrations in the city on Saturday, and that "police shot 10,000 teargas volleys, and used 134,000 liters of water against the protesters."

Earlier on Sunday, Macron visited the Arc de Triomphe to survey the damage there.

The protests began on November 17th, when hundreds of thousands of people across France turned out to protest fuel taxes that Macron imposed as part of a plan to reduce energy consumption and tackle climate change. According to The New York Times demonstrators say the French government "talks about the end of the world while we are talking about the end of the month."

At least three people have died in the protests since they began, all in traffic accidents caused by blockades set up by yellow vest protesters.

The BBC reports, "This is the 50 percent of the French population, that we don't really see very much. This is not those thriving in the big cities. This is not the impoverished people in the high immigration areas. This is the other 50 percent who live out in small towns, around the country. People who feel that they are completely forgotten economically, culturally, politically."

The protesters have no apparent leaders, making it difficult for the French government to negotiate or meet with them.

"It's clear that the government doesn't really know how to respond," Beardsley reports. "This sort of movement has never happened before. Usually you have unions you can deal with or leaders you can deal with." The current protests, Beardsley says, is a fluid and ever-changing movement with no clear leaders.

Extremists on the left and right, anarchists and vandals have joined the demonstrations. In Paris, protesters sprayed the Arc de Triomphe with graffiti, overturned cars and set them on fire, and smashed store shop windows.

Macron said on Saturday, "What happened today in Paris has nothing to do with the peaceful expression of legitimate anger. Nothing justifies attacking the security forces, vandalizing businesses, either private or public ones, or that passers-by or journalists are threatened, or the Arc de Triomphe defaced."

The French government says it is considering all options to control the protests and stem the violence.
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🌍 France fuel protests: 'Yellow vests' pull out of PM meeting
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2018, 12:50:46 AM »
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-46434707

France fuel protests: 'Yellow vests' pull out of PM meeting

    3 hours ago


Related Topics

    France fuel protests

Media captionFrance fuel protests: Who are the people in the yellow vests?

Protesters from France's "gilet jaunes" (yellow vests) movement have pulled out of a meeting with PM Edouard Philippe scheduled for Tuesday.

Some members of the group said they had received death threats from hardline protesters warning them not to enter into negotiations with the government.

The "yellow vests" have been protesting about a controversial fuel tax since mid-November.

But the protests now reflect more widespread anger at the government.

Three people have died since the unrest began and the resulting violence and vandalism - notably when statues were smashed at the Arc de Triomphe last Saturday - have been widely condemned.

    Ball in Macron's court after violent protests
    Jobseeker: Macron should help me find work
    Will Macron face down French fuel protesters?

"Yellow-vests" are so called because they have taken to the streets wearing the high-visibility yellow clothing that is required to be carried in every vehicle by French law.

The movement has grown via social media and has supporters across the political spectrum.

President Emmanuel Macron has accused his political opponents of hijacking the movement in order to block his reform programme.
How has the government responded?

The French president held an urgent security meeting on Monday. Ministers said that while no options had been ruled out, imposing a state of emergency had not been discussed during the talks.

Mr Macron has also cancelled a planned trip to Serbia to concentrate on the crisis.

Culture Minister Franck Riester told reporters that Mr Philippe would announce "a strong conciliatory gesture in the coming days", without giving details.
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Private ambulance drivers protested against reforms to the healthcare system

Mr Philippe also spoke with leaders of the opposition on Monday.

Far-right leader Marine Le Pen, who was at the meeting, warned that Mr Macron could become the first president to give the order to open fire on his own people in 50 years.

Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire met business representatives to assess the damage caused to businesses over the weekend.

Some retailers had seen sales drop by around 20-40% during the demonstrations, while some restaurants had lost 20-50% of their takings, he added.
Who are the protesters?

The "gilets jaunes" movement began as a protest against a rise in duties on diesel - which is widely used by French motorists and has long been less heavily taxed than other types of fuel.

Mr Macron says his motivation for the increase is environmental, but protesters call him out of touch - particularly with non-city dwellers who rely on their cars.

The movement later grew to reflect a range of grievances, including the marginalisation of rural areas, high living costs, and general anger at President Macron's economic policies.

The protests have no identifiable leadership and gained momentum via social media, encompassing a whole range of participants from the anarchist far left to the nationalist far right, and plenty of moderates in between.

Nearly 300,000 people took part in the first countrywide demonstration. There were more than 106,000 a week later and 136,000 people last Saturday.
Do the protests show any sign of stopping?

Protests continued into Monday. About 50 "yellow vests" blocked access to a major fuel depot in the port of Fos-sur-Mer, near Marseille, and petrol stations across the country have run out of fuel.

Students in about 100 secondary schools across the country held demonstrations against educational and exam reforms.
Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Changes affecting ambulance drivers are part of a raft of reforms by President Macron

Also on Monday, French private ambulance drivers staged further demonstrations against a range of social security and healthcare reforms they say could affect their services.

One protester told the Reuters news agency: "[The reforms] will bludgeon us financially and destroy our companies. We're going to have to fire people, that's for sure."

It is unclear whether the groups of students and health workers have directly aligned themselves with the "yellow vests".

One member of the movement, a man in his 20s, is in a critical condition in hospital in Toulouse.

He was injured in a clash with police.
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🔥 Emmanuel Macron goes AWOL as protests, violence plague Paris
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2018, 12:10:25 AM »
https://www.foxnews.com/world/emmanuel-macron-goes-awol-as-protests-violence-plague-paris

Emmanuel Macron goes AWOL as protests, violence plague Paris
Adam Shaw
By Adam Shaw | Fox News

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/tmlZRMg4Hpw" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/tmlZRMg4Hpw</a>


French students protesting police brutality and government policiesVideo
French students protesting police brutality and government policies

High school students in Paris, France are protesting against police brutality and new military and education policies set forth by French President Emanuel Macron.

As France braces for another round of violent protests this weekend in Paris and the rest of the country, embattled French President Emmanuel Macron is a missing man as his government tries to curb the chaos caused in part by his unpopular plan to hike gas taxes.

Macron swept into power in 2017, having emerged out of obscurity less than a year earlier. Espousing his own brand of centrism, he has presented himself on the world stage as a spokesman for multilateralism and internationalism against a nationalist wave moving through Europe.

While he has regularly been seen on world stages, including the United Nations and the U.S. Congress, he has been conspicuous by his absence this week, choosing to keep away from the limelight as his government attempts to deal with the issues being protested by the “yellow jacket” protesters who have protested and even rioted in cities over France in recent weeks.

Macron had initially stood firm on the hikes, saying they were necessary to combat climate change and France’s reliance on oil. But on Wednesday, Prime Minister Edouard Philippe announced that the government was scrapping the tax hike altogether. A government spokesman also suggested on French radio that a wealth tax that Macron ended last year could be re-introduced.

The French government has said that 89,000 additional police officers and law enforcement personnel -- with 8,000 in Paris -- had been mobilized ahead of Saturday to head off planned protests, which show no sign of slowing down, despite the damage control by the government.
French students take to the streets of Paris on Friday furious at the treatment of high schoolers at the hands of police

French students take to the streets of Paris on Friday furious at the treatment of high schoolers at the hands of police (Fox News/Aurelien Morissard)

But as ministers scramble, Macron himself has been neither seen nor heard, leading to criticism from his political opponents. Marine Le Pen, Macron's right-wing 2017 presidential election rival, urged Macron on Wednesday to meet with the protesters before Saturday.

"Do not hide at the Elysee, do not ask others to do what the French expect of you, listen to them, hear them before Saturday," she told reporters.

FRENCH STUDENTS JOIN MOUNTING FURY AFTER VIDEO EMERGES OF SCHOOL KIDS ON THEIR KNEES IN FRONT OF RIOT POLICE

“Is Macron still in Argentina? He must surely have an opinion,” left-wing 2017 presidential candidate Jean-Luc Melenchon tweeted, a reference to Macron’s recent visit to the G20 summit in Buenos Aires.

According to Reuters, Macron intends to address the nation early next week. The Associated Press reported Friday that Macron has spent the week holding closed-door meetings in the Elysee Palace, with his office announcing that he would not speak before Saturday’s protests.
Riots force President Macron to reverse course on gas taxVideo

Although the government has scrapped the gas tax, the protests have morphed into a broader protest against Macron’s presidency -- which has been dogged by missteps as his approval rating has sunk as low as 18 percent, according to one poll.

On Friday, hundreds of students in Paris took to the streets a day early as a preview of Saturday’s protests after footage emerged of students on their knees in front of police with hands tied.

FRANCE SCRAPS FUEL TAX, WEIGHS WEALTH TAX IN RESPONSE TO MASSIVE PROTESTS

The students in Paris climbed on the statue of Marianne, representing liberty and reason, with some also defacing the monument with anti-Macron slogans.

Main tourist attractions like the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre, will also be closed. Tourists are advised to stay away from the protest and avoid central Paris in general.
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Offline K-Dog

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Doom Wears a Yellow Vest
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2018, 11:54:08 PM »


https://www.facebook.com/100011197985759/videos/736790716704188/  <===  Drama.  If she were your girlfriend the make-up sex would kill you.  Go full screen on this vid!

What do they want?
Quote
Supporters' goals are amorphous. Some want to reverse tax cuts seen as favouring the rich while others want more measures to help the poorest.

Many have called on the business-friendly president, a former investment banker, to resign.

The fuel tax "was the spark", said Thierry Paul Valette, a Paris protest coordinator.

"If it hadn't been (that), it would have been something else," he told the Associated Press news agency.

"People want fair fiscal justice. They want social justice," he added, as well as improved purchasing power.

Thirty cents tax on diesel that costs twice as much as ours sparked the protest which originated in French fly-over land.  The tax was green-washed by claiming to be needed to aid the switch from fossil fuels but nobody is buying that bullshit at all.  None of the tax money would be spent to reduce fuel use apparently.  I saw no evidence that it would have funded any worthwhile initiatives unless you call preserving the status quo a noble goal.

Quote
Initially backed by people in small towns and rural France where most get around by car, the protests snowballed into a wider movement against Macron's perceived bias in favour of the elite and well-off city dwellers.

Macron is the kind of banker RE usually would like to see swinging from a lamp post or guillotined.  I'm surprised he has been so quiet about the current French mayhem.  People are being killed.

Quote
In 2010, Macron was promoted to partner with the bank after working on the recapitalization of Le Monde and the acquisition by Atos of Siemens IT Solutions and Services.[39] In the same year, Macron was appointed as managing director and put in charge of Nestlé's acquisition of one of Pfizer's largest subsidiaries based around baby drinks. His share of the fees on this €9 billion deal made Macron a millionaire.

But I guess RE's silence is understandable.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/3rQEbQJx5Bo?ecver=2" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/3rQEbQJx5Bo?ecver=2</a>

RE is all shook up.

But still, France is going full on Doom!

 

We should not let this go by.  Comprenez-vous?
« Last Edit: December 09, 2018, 12:07:10 AM by K-Dog »
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline K-Dog

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Doom Wears a Yellow Vest
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2018, 12:14:14 AM »
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

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Re: Doom Wears a Yellow Vest
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2018, 12:56:39 AM »
This seems to be a clear example of the climate change "solution" being worse than the disease, partly because it did not take into account inevitable unintended consequences. Even if the taxes were intended to help the transition away from fossil fuels, it turns a lot of poor and middle class people place more value on remaining alive and somewhat prosperous now than 20-50 years into the hypothetical future.

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Re: Doom Wears a Yellow Vest
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2018, 01:52:57 AM »

Macron is the kind of banker RE usually would like to see swinging from a lamp post or guillotined.  I'm surprised he has been so quiet about the current French mayhem.  People are being killed.

I haven't been quiet about it, you're just not reading the French Fried Frexit thread where I post this material.  Ill merge this thread with that one.

RE
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Re: Doom Wears a Yellow Vest
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2018, 04:17:50 AM »
This seems to be a clear example of the climate change "solution" being worse than the disease, partly because it did not take into account inevitable unintended consequences. Even if the taxes were intended to help the transition away from fossil fuels, it turns a lot of poor and middle class people place more value on remaining alive and somewhat prosperous now than 20-50 years into the hypothetical future.

Not at all.  It was transparently obvious to everyone that this tax wasn't about helping to transition to "Green" energy, it was about plugging holes in the Frog budget so that Manny didn't have to raise taxes on the rich scumbags and corporations in France he serves.  If it was to help transition to green energy, the tax would have been earmarked to provide subsidies to the working class to switch to EVs.  It wasn't.  Typical Bankster that he is, he thought he could get away with it again.  Not this time.  One thing the French are good at, it's rioting.  You don't quit after one weekend.  You keep at it, week after week and you hit 'em where it hurts, in the pocketbook.  This mayhem is costing the Frog Goobermint and rich fuck bizness owners Millions, if not Billions.  Well done by the French People.  :emthup:

RE
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Re: Doom Wears a Yellow Vest
« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2018, 04:42:12 AM »
This seems to be a clear example of the climate change "solution" being worse than the disease, partly because it did not take into account inevitable unintended consequences. Even if the taxes were intended to help the transition away from fossil fuels, it turns a lot of poor and middle class people place more value on remaining alive and somewhat prosperous now than 20-50 years into the hypothetical future.

Not at all.  It was transparently obvious to everyone that this tax wasn't about helping to transition to "Green" energy, it was about plugging holes in the Frog budget so that Manny didn't have to raise taxes on the rich scumbags and corporations in France he serves.  If it was to help transition to green energy, the tax would have been earmarked to provide subsidies to the working class to switch to EVs.  It wasn't.  Typical Bankster that he is, he thought he could get away with it again.  Not this time.  One thing the French are good at, it's rioting.  You don't quit after one weekend.  You keep at it, week after week and you hit 'em where it hurts, in the pocketbook.  This mayhem is costing the Frog Goobermint and rich fuck bizness owners Millions, if not Billions.  Well done by the French People.  :emthup:

RE

It occurs to me the French have historically had a solution for oppression from above.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

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