AuthorTopic: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread  (Read 173271 times)

Offline RE

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🤡 Trumptofsky Protest Growing - Livestream
« Reply #1980 on: June 04, 2019, 03:42:33 AM »
Started with a few 100 when I signed on, looks to be a few 1000 now.  Entertaining signs and a couple of mini-Trumpsky Baby Balloons.

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https://www.thedailybeast.com/nancy-pelosi-wants-to-slow-walk-impeachment-dems-who-support-it-are-trying-to-recruit-other-lawmakers

Pro-Impeachment Dems Are Privately Recruiting Other Members Despite Pelosi’s Warnings

The effort is organic. But lawmakers say that, behind the scenes, the pro-impeachment faction are trying to talk other members into joining them.
Sam Brodey,  Erin Banco,  Sam Stein
Updated 06.04.19 4:38AM ET / Published 06.03.19 9:25PM ET


Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty

Unwilling to wait for Nancy Pelosi to embrace their cause, pro-impeachment House Democrats have begun recruiting fellow lawmakers to their camp in a bid to put more pressure on the House Speaker.

The effort has been described by one lawmaker as “organic.” But the goal is clear: the lawmakers are hoping to build a critical mass of members that will force Pelosi to choose between defying the majority of her own caucus or moving forward with a process of removing the president from office—a step that has not been taken on in more than 20 years.

To do so, pro-impeachment members have been setting up meetings with other Democrats over the past week—and plan to do so over the next few as well—to try and sell them on the merits of impeachment proceedings, according to three sources with direct knowledge of that effort. Among the points being emphasized is that going towards impeachment proceedings could consolidate the oversight activity around President Donald Trump in addition to strengthening the party’s hand in establishing a legitimate legislative purpose to their investigative work.

A senior House aide, whose boss is in the pro-impeachment camp, said that current efforts to make this case to on-the-fence members is “hodge-podge right now.” But the aide expected it to ramp up, with potentially a single lawmaker becoming point for the operation and a formal list of targets being put together.

“In order to keep the momentum going, there has to be a more organized operation,” said the aide.

    HOT SEAT
    Kimmel Grills Pelosi on Trump Impeachment: ‘Why Not?’
    Marlow Stern

The mere fact that informal “whip” operations are happening is a sign of the growing impatience and frustration felt by the pro-impeachment crowd on the Hill. It also threatens to exacerbate riffs within the Democratic caucus, where some of the party’s moderate members and top leaders have resisted the push to move more aggressively on impeachment.

When lawmakers returned from the Memorial Day recess on Monday, Democratic leadership staged a show of force for Pelosi’s line on impeachment during a closed-door members’ meeting. Some lawmakers, including Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY), the caucus chair, spoke out to support her. Jeffries invoked a Ben Franklin quote, saying they were in danger of being governed by passion, not reason.

The Speaker, according to two sources with knowledge of the meeting, expressed concerns that the public still doesn’t understand how the process of impeachment would play out. She noted that in her time over the recess in California well educated voters didn’t seem to understand that impeachment proceedings would not necessarily result in Trump’s immediate ouster from office.

But even within Pelosi’s own leadership ranks there have been murmurs of a desire to give impeachment proceedings a more sympathetic reception publicly. During the Monday meeting, Rep. David Cicilline (D-R.I.)—the only member of leadership to explicitly endorse an impeachment inquiry—challenged lawmakers to push two messages during TV appearances: the party’s domestic agenda and their belief that the president wasn’t above the law. Pelosi, pointing back at him, said: “Everyone should heed your advice, including you”—in what was interpreted as a shot at the congressman’s penchant to emphasize the latter and not the former during his own TV hits.

    FAN THE FLAMES
    GOP Congressman’s Impeachment Call Boosts Pressure on Pelosi
    Allison Quinn

But Cicilline isn’t the only one in leadership ranks with impeachment on his mind. House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) said on Sunday that he believed the chamber would eventually move to impeachment proceedings, though not right now. And aides have said that Jeffries, who hails from a liberal New York district, has been feeling conflicted, though at the end of the day continues to support the speaker.

For the members who have spoken out already, there are lingering questions about just how committed leadership is to slow walking the impeachment process. One lawmaker said Pelosi was only mildly pushing back against the pro-impeachment faction, calling her effort to convince fellow Democrats that it would be bad politics a, “soft whip.” Rep. John Yarmuth (D-KY), who supports impeachment, says Pelosi hadn’t told him to tone it down. “I’m not aware she’s done it with anyone,” he told The Daily Beast. “I think everybody’s pretty much letting everybody do their own thing.”

But not everyone is convinced that Pelosi won’t mind the impeachment recruitment efforts. The senior House aide said one of the reasons cited by on-the-fence Democrats for not coming out in favor of beginning impeachment proceedings was fear of publicly crossing Pelosi.
Related in Politics
Pelosi to Impatient Dems: We’ve Got Trump on the Ropes
GOP Congressman’s Impeachment Call Boosts Pressure on Pelosi
"FILE PHOTO: Robert Mueller, as FBI director, testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington March 12, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque/File Photo - RC18ECAE12B0"
2020 Dems Ramp Up Impeachment Calls After Mueller Speaks

“It is kind of like a quiet threat. I don’t think she has said, ‘Don’t go out there and whip other people,’” said the aide. “It is known that if you do that you are defying the Speaker and she will remember that when you need something down the line. She has the longest memory of anybody.”

Pelosi’s office declined to comment.

    SEE YOU IN COURT
    Nadler Announces Subpoena for Full Mueller Report
    Erin Banco

Since Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s press conference last week—in which he reiterated the point in his report that said he could not clear the president of wrongdoing—a number of Democratic members have called for the start of an official impeachment inquiry. All told, the pro-impeachment caucus now numbers more than 50, and others, behind closed doors, have said that obtaining access to the underlying evidence of the Mueller report would ease their minds about moving forward.

It’s not clear, however, whether the evidence can be obtained. For weeks, the Trump administration has ignored Democrats’ requests and subpoenas for more documents and testimony related to Mueller’s investigation and findings. The stonewalling has left activists alarmed, fearful that Democrats were essentially allowing the administration to slow-walk the oversight process into non-existence.

“They definitely stumbled out of the gate,” said Max Bergman, who runs the Moscow Project, an initiative of the Center for American Progress Action Fund. “And as a result the White House’s disinformation campaign has had a real impact and served to muddy the waters. This was the most damning official report ever written about a president and Democrats need to talk about it.”

Acknowledging that their current approach had so far failed to move public opinion, Democrats said they were switching tactics and refocusing more of their oversight on to the actual substance of the report. On Monday, Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) announced that his committee would be holding a series of hearings featuring legal experts—including former Richard Nixon counsel John Dean—to keep the spotlight on what exactly Mueller found.   

On Twitter, some—including Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL), a GOP member of the committee—jokingly questioned whether Democrats knew which president, Trump or Nixon, was under investigation. But Democrats defended the approach in the face of the current administration’s stonewalling.

“Obviously,” said Rep. Ted Deutch (D-FL), “we would like to hear from the subjects in the Mueller report instead of experts talking about the Mueller report.”

“The whole idea here is to refocus this debate on where it should be, which is whether or not the President of the United States violated his oath of office, held himself above the law, and potentially committed high crimes and misdemeanors.”

And on Monday evening, in a regularly-scheduled meeting, House members discussed their plan to vote next week to hold Attorney General Bill Barr in contempt for failing to comply with a subpoena for an unredacted version of Mueller’s report and its underlying evidence.

Publicly, and even privately, Democrats who are supportive of impeachment have little criticism to offer for Pelosi, even as they work to put pressure on her.

In her suburban Philadelphia district last week, Rep. Madeleine Dean (D-PA) told The Daily Beast that she’s been encouraging her colleagues to back impeachment. The Judiciary Committee member added that she’s encouraged Nadler to do so, too.

But she was more careful when it came to the Speaker. “She keeps herself out of the petty and the small that the president would like to drag her into,” said Dean. “I'm one of the foot soldiers on the Judiciary and Financial Services Committees, and she has to shepherd something much, much larger.”
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🤡 Trolling Calling: Trump Gets 'Baby Blimp' Treatment In London
« Reply #1982 on: June 05, 2019, 03:28:23 AM »
According to Trumpovetsky, the protests didn't happen and are "fake newz" because he didn't see them.  Not surprising, since he only watches Faux Newz.  ::)

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🤡 Manafort goes to Rikers
« Reply #1983 on: June 05, 2019, 11:51:05 AM »
It couldn't have happened to a nicer guy.  :icon_sunny:

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Here’s What Paul Manafort Can Expect at Rikers Island

We had a saying when I worked there: ‘If they had no mental health issues before they entered solitary, they do now!’

Mary Buser
Published 06.05.19 5:08AM ET


Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty

Less than three years after he was the presidential campaign chairman for Donald Trump, Paul Manafort is about to be transferred from a low-security Pennsylvania prison to New York City’s notorious Rikers Island to face trial on additional state charges here.

From what I saw in five years working for the Mental Health Department there, I expect the 70-year old former political high-flyer is in for a shock. The worst of his previous experiences behind bars might not seem so bad in comparison to the gloomy island where he’s headed.
Advertisement

Rikers, a complex of aged and decrepit jails that sit on a 415-acre island in the northern region of New York City’s East River, functions primarily as a pre-trial holding facility for criminal defendants who are awaiting resolution of their cases as they wind slowly through the courts. During this time, they not only agonize over the eventual outcome of their case, but they must also survive Rikers—and for a high-profile inmate like Paul Manafort this will be especially difficult.

    MUST BE NICE
    Manafort Says He’s Treated Like a ‘VIP’ in Jail: Prosecutors
    Betsy Woodruff

I saw many high-profile inmates come through the jails, where they were routinely held in protective custody for their own safety. Reassuring as this may sound,“PC” is actually a double-edged sword: these inmates are well protected from everyday jailhouse violence, but to ensure this safety they are segregated from the general population and confined to a cell where their existence becomes tantamount to solitary confinement.

As former acting chief of mental health in the solitary confinement unit, I have seen firsthand just how grim this can be, and how easily people can unravel under its duress. Manafort will likely face 23 hours a day in a cell the size of a parking space, furnished with a cot, a footlocker, a tiny metal sink and toilet. There will be no desks or phones, like he boasted about as part of his “VIP” treatment in a previous lock-up. Food will be passed on a tray through a flap in the cell door. A small mesh-covered window will transform any outside sunshine into grayness.

Depending on which jail he is assigned to—a location which will be shrouded in secrecy—he might glimpse a few passing seagulls, but will likely see nothing more than the side of another jail.

And then, there’s the heat. Manafort has the misfortune of arriving on the damp, muggy island just as the mercury is creeping up. The idea of air-conditioning on Rikers is laughable, and the old brick buildings heat up like ovens. As stifling as the jails become, nowhere is the misery greater than in the closed cells—solitary confinement and protective custody.

I well remember the sight and sounds of the frantic occupants inside these cells—of sweaty palms sliding down the little plexiglas windows, voices crying out, “Help, help, please—we’re dying in here.” I requested that they receive pitchers of ice water. Request denied. The tiny sinks with their dribbles of lukewarm water would have to suffice.
ADVERTISING

At Rikers Island, the Mental Health Department was a constant presence in the solitary unit. We had a saying: “If they had no mental health issues before they entered solitary, they do now!” Like so many others in isolation, Manafort will inevitably struggle with depression, sleeplessness, and anxiety. Hopefully, he will get the support he needs to survive it.

Within the next 10 years, the scandal-plagued Rikers Island is slated to finally be closed. It will be replaced with modern and more humane borough-based facilities. Unfortunately, the closure will not come in time for Manafort.

In the meantime, like every other inmate on Rikers, the best he can hope for is that his cases will resolve quickly.
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Re: 🤡 Manafort goes to Rikers
« Reply #1984 on: June 05, 2019, 12:05:48 PM »
It couldn't have happened to a nicer guy.  :icon_sunny:

RE

Here’s What Paul Manafort Can Expect at Rikers Island

We had a saying when I worked there: ‘If they had no mental health issues before they entered solitary, they do now!’

Mary Buser
Published 06.05.19 5:08AM ET


Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty

Less than three years after he was the presidential campaign chairman for Donald Trump, Paul Manafort is about to be transferred from a low-security Pennsylvania prison to New York City’s notorious Rikers Island to face trial on additional state charges here.

From what I saw in five years working for the Mental Health Department there, I expect the 70-year old former political high-flyer is in for a shock. The worst of his previous experiences behind bars might not seem so bad in comparison to the gloomy island where he’s headed.
Advertisement

Rikers, a complex of aged and decrepit jails that sit on a 415-acre island in the northern region of New York City’s East River, functions primarily as a pre-trial holding facility for criminal defendants who are awaiting resolution of their cases as they wind slowly through the courts. During this time, they not only agonize over the eventual outcome of their case, but they must also survive Rikers—and for a high-profile inmate like Paul Manafort this will be especially difficult.

    MUST BE NICE
    Manafort Says He’s Treated Like a ‘VIP’ in Jail: Prosecutors
    Betsy Woodruff

I saw many high-profile inmates come through the jails, where they were routinely held in protective custody for their own safety. Reassuring as this may sound,“PC” is actually a double-edged sword: these inmates are well protected from everyday jailhouse violence, but to ensure this safety they are segregated from the general population and confined to a cell where their existence becomes tantamount to solitary confinement.

As former acting chief of mental health in the solitary confinement unit, I have seen firsthand just how grim this can be, and how easily people can unravel under its duress. Manafort will likely face 23 hours a day in a cell the size of a parking space, furnished with a cot, a footlocker, a tiny metal sink and toilet. There will be no desks or phones, like he boasted about as part of his “VIP” treatment in a previous lock-up. Food will be passed on a tray through a flap in the cell door. A small mesh-covered window will transform any outside sunshine into grayness.

Depending on which jail he is assigned to—a location which will be shrouded in secrecy—he might glimpse a few passing seagulls, but will likely see nothing more than the side of another jail.

And then, there’s the heat. Manafort has the misfortune of arriving on the damp, muggy island just as the mercury is creeping up. The idea of air-conditioning on Rikers is laughable, and the old brick buildings heat up like ovens. As stifling as the jails become, nowhere is the misery greater than in the closed cells—solitary confinement and protective custody.

I well remember the sight and sounds of the frantic occupants inside these cells—of sweaty palms sliding down the little plexiglas windows, voices crying out, “Help, help, please—we’re dying in here.” I requested that they receive pitchers of ice water. Request denied. The tiny sinks with their dribbles of lukewarm water would have to suffice.
ADVERTISING

At Rikers Island, the Mental Health Department was a constant presence in the solitary unit. We had a saying: “If they had no mental health issues before they entered solitary, they do now!” Like so many others in isolation, Manafort will inevitably struggle with depression, sleeplessness, and anxiety. Hopefully, he will get the support he needs to survive it.

Within the next 10 years, the scandal-plagued Rikers Island is slated to finally be closed. It will be replaced with modern and more humane borough-based facilities. Unfortunately, the closure will not come in time for Manafort.

In the meantime, like every other inmate on Rikers, the best he can hope for is that his cases will resolve quickly.


Martha Stewart part deux......

He writes a book & gets a cookin' shew after detention class  :icon_mrgreen:

Pauly Wally Dootle all day long is the latest 1%'er poster child (yawn)
I know exactly what you mean. Let me tell you why you’re here. You’re here because you know something. What you know you can’t explain, but you feel it. You’ve felt it your entire life, that there’s something wrong with the world.
You don’t know what it is but its there, like a splinter in your mind

Offline RE

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Re: 🤡 Manafort goes to Rikers
« Reply #1985 on: June 05, 2019, 01:16:28 PM »
Martha Stewart part deux......

He writes a book & gets a cookin' shew after detention class  :icon_mrgreen:

Pauly Wally Dootle all day long is the latest 1%'er poster child (yawn)

Martha Stewart wasn't in solitary in Rikers, nor was she 70 years old.

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🤡 Trump vows to hit Mexico with tariffs despite pushback from Republicans
« Reply #1986 on: June 06, 2019, 01:01:15 AM »
Trumpovetsky on a rampage!

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Longer Vid from Democracy Now!

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🤡 Pelosi tells Dems she wants to see Trump ‘in prison’
« Reply #1987 on: June 06, 2019, 01:09:27 AM »
I agree with Pelosi on this one.  Trumpovetsky is killing the economy.  He's going to get slaughtered in the election, barring a Super fuck-up by the Demodopes.  There's only a little more than a year until the election.  It's pointless to hold Impeachment hearings now, they would take too long to complete anyhow.

Maybe he will get a prison cell next to Manafort in Rikers!  :icon_sunny:

RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/06/05/pelosi-impeachment-1355435

Pelosi tells Dems she wants to see Trump ‘in prison’

She also clashed with Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, who pressed her to begin impeachment proceedings.


By HEATHER CAYGLE

06/05/2019 09:50 PM EDT


Speaker Nancy Pelosi told senior Democrats that she’d like to see President Donald Trump “in prison” as she clashed with House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler in a meeting on Tuesday night over whether to launch impeachment proceedings.

Pelosi met with Nadler (D-N.Y.) and several other top Democrats who are aggressively pursuing investigations against the president, according to multiple sources. Nadler and other committee leaders have been embroiled in a behind-the-scenes turf battle for weeks over ownership of the Democrats’ sprawling investigation into Trump.

Nadler pressed Pelosi to allow his committee to launch an impeachment inquiry against Trump — the second such request he’s made in recent weeks only to be rebuffed by the California Democrat and other senior leaders. Pelosi stood firm, reiterating that she isn’t open to the idea of impeaching Trump at this time.

“I don’t want to see him impeached, I want to see him in prison,” Pelosi said, according to multiple Democratic sources familiar with the meeting. Instead of impeachment, Pelosi still prefers to see Trump defeated at the ballot box and then prosecuted for his alleged crimes, according to the sources.

They said she was expressing solidarity with pro-impeachment Democrats who want to hold the president accountable while disputing the idea that it is now time to take that step. Pelosi has long argued that certain conditions must be met before Democrats begin impeachment — public support and strong bipartisan backing, neither of which have so far materialized.
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Other Democrats said Pelosi’s comment wasn’t that surprising given her previous criticisms of the president, including saying Trump “is engaged in a cover-up,” that his staff and family should stage an intervention and that the president’s actions “are villainous to the Constitution of the United States.”

Ashley Etienne, a Pelosi spokeswoman said Pelosi and the chairmen “had a productive meeting about the state of play with the Mueller report. They agreed to keep all options on the table and continue to move forward with an aggressive hearing and legislative strategy, as early as next week, to address the president’s corruption and abuses of power uncovered in the report.”

House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), Oversight Chairman Elijah Cummings (D-Md.), Ways and Means Chairman Richard Neal (D-Mass.) and Foreign Affairs Chairman Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.) were also present for the meeting. Financial Services Chairwoman Maxine Waters (D-Calif.) — a vocal impeachment supporter whose panel is probing Trump’s finances — was not in attendance.

In Tuesday’s meeting, some committee chairs expressed frustration about the appearance that rank-and-file members — rather than party leaders — were leading the caucus’ oversight strategy, including what they do on impeachment, according to one source familiar with the meeting.

But not all committee leaders were supportive of the impeachment inquiry. Both Schiff and Neal argued that if Democrats are going to open an inquiry, they should also be prepared to impeach Trump, which the caucus isn’t ready to do, they said. Cummings also sided with Pelosi, according to a source.

Neal also grumbled about Democrats who have come out in favor of impeachment, saying it puts pressure on members in bordering congressional districts to explain why they don’t feel the same way. House Rules Chairman Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) — whose district touches Neal’s — came out for impeachment last week.

The meeting is just the latest example of the impeachment debate that is roiling the Democratic Caucus. Pelosi is facing continued pressure both publicly from some rank-and-file members and privately from committee leaders like Nadler, who are unhappy with the current strategy.
Richard Burr

congress
Senate Intelligence Committee summons mysterious British security consultant

By NATASHA BERTRAND

The gulf between Nadler and Pelosi was on full display Wednesday as the New York Democrat dodged questions about whether he and Pelosi were in agreement on Democrats’ impeachment strategy.

“We are investigating all of the things we would investigate, frankly, in an impeachment inquiry,” Nadler said on CNN. He then paused for several seconds when asked if he and Pelosi were “on the same page.”

“When that decision has to be made, it will be made not by any one individual, it will be made probably by the caucus as a whole,” Nadler added. “Certainly Nancy will have the largest single voice in it.”

Pelosi, meanwhile, is trying to publicly project unity — going so far as to defiantly declare Wednesday that “there is no controversy” within the caucus over impeachment.

“Make no mistake, we know exactly what path we’re on. We know exactly what actions we need to take,” Pelosi told reporters earlier Wednesday, hitting her palm on the podium for emphasis.
poster="http://v.politico.com/images/1155968404/201906/3518/1155968404_6044119156001_6044122636001-vs.jpg?pubId=1155968404"
true

In reality, the speaker and her top lieutenants have been trying to tamp down a rebellion within the caucus, as close to 60 members have publicly declared they want to begin impeaching Trump.

Trump, meanwhile, has continued to stonewall Democrats’ every attempt to investigate his administration, personal finances and charges of obstruction of justice outlined by special counsel Robert Mueller.

Party leaders have tried to relieve some of the pressure by taking more aggressive public action against the White House’s repeated defiance, including scheduling a contempt vote on the House floor next week against Attorney General William Barr and former White House counsel Don McGahn.

And Democratic leaders continue to emphasize that their methodical, step-by-step oversight process is working, pointing to recent federal court victories Democrats have secured against Trump’s efforts to block them. Nadler is also still trying to secure Mueller’s testimony before his committee.
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https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/6/5/18653800/trump-approval-rating-by-state-2020-election-odds

Trump is really unpopular in the most important 2020 battleground states

Trump is deep underwater in New Hampshire, Wisconsin, Michigan, and other key 2020 states.
By Dylan Scott@dylanlscottdylan.scott@vox.com Jun 5, 2019, 12:30pm EDT


Donald Trump’s odds of winning reelection look grim given his approval rating in some of the most important 2020 election battleground states. Peter Summers/Getty Images

As he seeks a second term in the 2020 election, President Trump should be able to lean on his advantage in the Electoral College — in 2016, as you might remember, he lost the national popular vote but won enough states (and the right states) to secure 270 electors and take the presidency.

But new polling of his state-by-state approval ratings suggests the president is unpopular in some of the most important battleground states for 2020, an ill omen if the trends hold until Election Day 2020.

Trump has been unpopular since his first day in office. The question now is whether he’s so unpopular that it overrides his advantage as an incumbent and a pretty strong US economy. The new state polls from Morning Consult don’t bode well for him.

Here are the raw numbers for Trump in the states that are expected to be competitive in the 2020 election:

    New Hampshire: 39 percent approval, 58 percent disapproval
    Wisconsin: 42 percent approval, 55 percent disapproval
    Michigan: 42 percent approval, 54 percent disapproval
    Iowa: 42 percent approval, 54 percent disapproval
    Arizona: 45 percent approval, 51 percent disapproval
    Pennsylvania 45 percent approval, 52 percent disapproval
    Ohio: 46 percent approval, 50 percent disapproval
    North Carolina: 46 percent approval, 50 percent disapproval
    Florida: 48 percent approval, 48 percent disapproval
    Indiana: 49 percent approval, 46 percent disapproval

It’s a grim picture. Wisconsin and Michigan were critical Midwestern pieces of Trump’s Electoral College puzzle and he is now deeply unpopular in both states. Pennsylvania was maybe his most surprising win in 2016, and now he is seven points underwater. Perhaps Trump can take solace in his even job approval rating in Florida, but that is the only swing state where the president looks as strong as he did on Election Day 2016. Everywhere else, his support has deteriorated.

Maybe the most striking finding is in Iowa, where Trump beat Hillary Clinton by nearly 10 points. Iowans disapprove of his job performance by a 12-point margin now, in a farming state that’s been hit hard by Trump’s trade war. That would suggest the president’s cult of personality will not totally inoculate him from the unpopular parts of his policy agenda.

We still have a year and a half to go before the 2020 election. These approval numbers aren’t the same as a head-to-head match-up with a specific Democratic candidate (though those have not been very encouraging for Trump either). But they do indicate the unusual weakness of the president heading into his reelection campaign.
Trump’s presidential approval rating has been stubbornly low

Head-to-head polling between Trump and any prospective Democratic nominee seems nearly useless at this point. Aside from Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders, many Americans haven’t yet formed their opinions on the various Democrats seeking their party’s nomination.

But presidential approval ratings have always been strongly linked to voting behavior, and everybody knows Trump. Here is the RealClearPolitics average of the president’s approval rating, from the start of his presidency to now:
Real Clear Politics

Trump has been consistently unpopular throughout his first two years. At his best, so far, he was seven points more unpopular than popular. A recent uptick has swiftly eroded. And as Vox’s Ezra Klein wrote last summer, this has been in defiance of a relatively solid economy:

    “Trump’s poll numbers are probably 20 points below where a president would typically be with consumer sentiment as high as it is now,” says John Sides, a political scientist at George Washington University who has done work benchmarking presidential approval to economic indicators.

    So here, then, is what we can say: Judged on the economy, which is the traditional driver of presidential approval, Donald Trump’s poll numbers should be much, much higher than they are now. Far from finding a winning strategy, he seems to have found a losing one despite holding a winning hand.

Trump’s approval rating is the metric to watch as we endure all the unpredictable twists and turns that will precede the 2020 election. The new numbers from Morning Consult show it isn’t just the Democratic states that are down on Trump; the states he would need to win reelection aren’t very happy with the president, either.
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🤡 Trump plans to declare new national emergency to impose tariffs
« Reply #1989 on: June 07, 2019, 12:25:52 AM »
Another Emergency!  ::)

RE

https://thehill.com/homenews/administration/447374-trump-plans-to-declare-new-national-emergency-to-impose-tariffs

Trump plans to declare new national emergency to impose tariffs
By Rafael Bernal and Jordan Fabian - 06/06/19 05:28 PM EDT



President Trump is planning to declare a new national emergency in order to implement sweeping tariffs on Mexico over the flow of Central American migrants to the U.S., according to a draft document of the declaration reviewed by The Hill.

According to the document, the new emergency is necessary due to “the failure of the Government of Mexico to take effective action to reduce the mass migration of aliens illegally crossing into the United States through Mexico.”

The new emergency declaration would follow a February emergency declaration, which Trump used to justify sending National Guard troops to support Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officials at the southern border.

The draft document signals that the White House believes that imposing the tariffs under the February emergency declaration might not pass legal muster. But it remains unclear if a final decision has been made to invoke another emergency. The White House did not answer questions about the document.

Officials from the White House counsel’s office and the Justice Department floated the idea of a new declaration this week during a closed-door meeting with Republican senators.

The White House has said it plans to impose the tariffs under the 1977 International Emergency Economic Powers Act, which allows the president to take unilateral action to counter an “unusual and extraordinary threat” in times of national emergency.

But a new national emergency is likely to spark widespread opposition on Capitol Hill from Republicans and Democrats who say Trump is overstepping his tariff authority and also could draw fresh legal challenges.

Trump last week threatened to impose a 5 percent tariff on all Mexican goods crossing into the United States, which would increase by another 5 percent every subsequent month, capping at 25 percent in October.

The draft declaration, which delineates how tariffs would be imposed on Mexican goods, mentions nine  instances of Mexico's “failure” to control northward migration from Central America.

“The United States Government has repeatedly asked the Government of Mexico to take responsibility and help reduce this mass migration. Yet the Government of Mexico has failed to take sufficient action to alleviate this problem, has allowed this mass incursion to increase, and has failed to secure its own southern border,” reads the draft.

A Mexican delegation led by Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard has been in Washington since Saturday and is seeking to reach a deal and stave off the tariffs that have been set to take effect Monday.

But the White House, as of Thursday afternoon, said the U.S. was still planning to go through with them.

“Position has not changed, and we are still moving forward with tariffs at this time,” said White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders in an email.

Mexican markets have been unstable since the announcement as the Mexican economy is heavily dependent on exports to the United States.

Mexican manufacturing shares value chains with U.S. manufacturing, with products crossing the border as many as eight times before being assembled for sale to the final consumer.

Democrats and some key Republicans who have voiced opposition to the tariffs have said they may take legislative action in an attempt to stop them.

“If the President does declare a national emergency and attempt to put these tariffs into place, I will introduce a resolution of disapproval to stop his overreach,” said House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal (D-Mass.) in a press release Thursday.

Some Senate Republicans have said they could introduce a similar measure.

Still, Trump would likely veto any congressional action to block the declaration. It is unlikely that opponents of the tariffs will have the votes to override a potential veto.

Trump's first use of his veto power was against a congressional resolution to block his February emergency declaration at the U.S.-Mexico border.

In the draft emergency declaration, Trump writes that about 675,000 people have been apprehended or turned away at the border so far in fiscal 2019.

“More than three-fourths of the aliens illegally crossing our southern border are from El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. They often travel through Guatemala, cross Mexico’s southern border, and travel without restriction across Mexico before entering the United States," reads the document. “The Government of Mexico is well aware of this problem.”
Former National Security Adviser Gen. James Jones says Iranian resistance group should be celebrated
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🤡 Mr. Dean Goes to Washington
« Reply #1990 on: June 10, 2019, 12:24:14 AM »
The Dems relive the Glory Days...

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https://thehill.com/policy/national-security/447525-dems-needle-trump-with-watergate-witness

Democrats needle Trump with Watergate witness

© Getty Images

Democrats are ripping a page out of the Watergate playbook as they look to shine a spotlight on the unsavory details about President Trump’s conduct contained in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

The House Judiciary Committee will grill John Dean, who served as White House counsel for former President Nixon and was tied up in the Watergate controversy, during a public hearing on Monday.

Dean was intimately involved in the Watergate cover-up and delivered televised testimony before Congress following his ouster that helped contribute to Nixon’s resignation. Dean also served four months in prison for his role in the cover-up.

“Dean was an incredibly important part of the public, the congressional Watergate investigation,” said Ken Hughes, an expert on Watergate and a research specialist at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center. “He set the agenda for the rest of the congressional Watergate investigation.”

Dean has been no stranger to the public eye in recent years. He’s been a vocal critic of President Trump, arguing he engaged in obstruction based on what is described in Mueller’s report.

“This is clear obstruction,” Dean told CNN’s Jake Tapper following the release of the public report in April. “The obstruction statute is an endeavor statute as well as an actual overt action. If you endeavor to obstruct — and there is much evidence here of endeavor — you’ve violated the obstruction statute.”

Democrats describe Dean as an ideal witness who can provide historical context on obstruction of justice within the White House given his pivotal role in the Watergate scandal. Many Democrats have drawn comparisons between Nixon’s conduct in Watergate and Trump’s actions as Mueller portrays them in his 448-page report.

“Remember, he was the one who broke the back of Nixon’s obstruction of justice, who testified truthfully,” House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) told reporters Wednesday. “He knows how a White House does it, and he can testify with respect to some of the evidence in the Mueller report and how that relates to his experience with obstruction of justice.”

The hearing is the first in an expected series focused on the details of the Mueller investigation. Democrats say they want to elucidate key parts of the special counsel’s dense report without having secured testimony from Mueller himself.

Democrats say they are looking for Dean’s firsthand expertise on obstruction of justice to guide their sweeping investigation into Trump and his conduct. They’re likely to ask Dean to compare the obstruction he witnessed and participated in with the actions of Trump and his associates as described in the second volume of Mueller’s report.

“Not only can he provide some historical context; I think he is very immersed in what the actual procedures and laws are regarding issues of executive privilege, executive power versus congressional subpoenas,” said Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.), a House Judiciary Committee member. “He’s also intimately familiar with obstruction of justice as well as abuse of power.”

Democrats argue Mueller found substantial evidence that Trump obstructed justice and have taken his first public statements on May 29 as a green light to further investigate the president’s conduct.

A growing number of Democrats, including several on the House Judiciary panel, have also encouraged the committee to open an impeachment inquiry since the release of Mueller’s report; however, Nadler has not publicly backed impeachment, and House leaders remain opposed to such a move.

Trump and his allies have accused Democrats of trying to defame him ahead of the 2020 reelection, and the White House has fought the onslaught of Democrat-led investigations in the House.

Many Republicans see the hearing with Dean as little more than political theater.

They also argue it’s time to move on following Mueller’s investigation, describing his conclusions as vindicating the president.

In a letter to Nadler on Friday, Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.), the House Judiciary Committee’s top Republican, suggested Democrats were in danger of violating House rules that require members to engage in “civil debate” and that bar them from engaging in “personalities” with other members of Congress or the president.

“This appears to be part of a strategy to turn the Committee’s oversight hearings into a mock-impeachment inquiry rather than a legitimate exercise in congressional oversight,” Collins wrote. “Conducting such hearings inevitably sets this Committee on a collision course with the longstanding Rules of the House.”

“Should you choose to forego your obligation to enforce the Rules and ensure the Committee conducts itself in a dignified manner, please know those transgressions will not go unnoticed or unremarked upon by Republican Members,” Collins further wrote.

Monday’s hearing comes as committee Democrats are still trying to wrangle Mueller to deliver public testimony.

In his public remarks, Mueller made clear he does not want to answer questions from Congress publicly and emphasized that any such testimony would not go beyond the details in his report.

Nadler on Wednesday indicated the negotiations with Mueller are ongoing. He expressed confidence that Mueller would appear before the committee and noted that the panel would subpoena him if necessary.

Dean’s testimony is no substitute for Mueller and other witnesses who can provide firsthand accounts of the events laid out in the report.

One such witness is former White House counsel Don McGahn, who, according to the report, refused Trump’s direction to have Mueller removed because he feared it would trigger another “Saturday Night Massacre” — a reference to events that played out during Watergate when Nixon fired Justice Department officials who refused to fire special prosecutor Archibald Cox.

The House Judiciary Committee has subpoenaed McGahn for public testimony, but the former official has thus far refused on orders from Trump, who cited a Justice Department legal opinion arguing that McGahn is immune from compelled congressional testimony in instructing him not to evade the appearance last month.

The House plans to vote Tuesday to hold both McGahn and Attorney General William Barr in civil contempt for failing to comply with congressional subpoenas, allowing Nadler to go to court to enforce them.
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🤡 Trump teases additional non-existent deal with Mexico
« Reply #1991 on: June 10, 2019, 08:27:20 PM »
https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/10/politics/trump-secret-deal-mexico/index.html

Trump teases additional deal that Mexican Foreign Secretary suggests doesn't exist


By Jennifer Hansler, CNN

Updated 6:27 PM ET, Mon June 10, 2019
Trump defends Mexico deal as skepticism intensifies

Trump defends Mexico deal as skepticism intensifies 02:51

Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump on Monday afternoon continued to tease an unannounced agreement between the US and Mexico, despite the Mexican Foreign Minister's declaration that there was no secret or outstanding deal between the two nations.
"We have an agreement on something that they will announce very soon. It's all done. They have to get approval," Trump told reporters Monday at the White House, noting that the approval would come from Mexico's legislative body.
"They will get approval. If they don't get approval, we'll have to think in terms of tariffs," he said.
Hours earlier, the President had tweeted, "We have fully signed and documented another very important part of the Immigration and Security deal with Mexico, one that the U.S. has been asking about getting for many years."

In both cases, Trump did not offer details about what was contained in the alleged agreement.
Mexican Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard, one of the chief negotiators of the deal agreed to on Friday, suggested Monday that he was not aware of another deal.
Trump fights back against skeptics of his new Mexico deal
Trump fights back against skeptics of his new Mexico deal
"Aside from what I've explained there is no agreement of any kind, that has been made known," he told reporters in Mexico City. "Everything I've been talking about was known since Friday."
Asked about the existence of another agreement, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was ambiguous.
"As for other agreements, there were a number of commitments made. I can't go into them in detail here, but each side was committed to a set of outcomes," he told reporters Monday.
After days of negotiations in Washington, DC, the United States and Mexico on Friday reached an agreement to avert Trump's tariff threat. As part of the terms of the joint statement, Mexico will take "unprecedented steps" to increase enforcement to curb irregular migration, including the deployment of its National Guard throughout the country -- giving priority to Mexico's southern border -- and individuals caught crossing into the US from Mexico seeking asylum will be "rapidly returned" to Mexico where they will await consideration of their asylum claims. The declaration also reiterates the countries' commitment from last year, which emphasizes US support for development in Central America and southern Mexico.
However, both the US President and Secretary of State raised the prospect of tariffs again on Monday.

"We do not anticipate a problem with the vote but, if for any reason the approval is not forthcoming, Tariffs will be reinstated!" Trump tweeted about the alleged undisclosed deal. Pompeo noted that if sufficient headway is not made on the joint agreement, "there's risk that those tariffs will go back in place."
"And as we had these conversations ... my counterpart Marcelo, we both understood that. It means that we're got hard work to do over the coming days and weeks to deliver on those actual outcomes on the ground along our southern border," Pompeo said, adding that they will evaluate whether progress has been made "literally daily."

CNN's Kevin Liptak and Claudia Dominguez contributed to this report.
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🤡 Donald Trump’s Failures Make Him Even More Dangerous
« Reply #1992 on: June 11, 2019, 12:18:15 AM »
Hilarious that Trumpovetsky is another Goldfinger Wannabee like GO.

Birds of a Feather...

RE

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-06-10/mexico-tariffs-trump-s-failures-make-him-even-more-dangerous

Donald Trump’s Failures Make Him Even More Dangerous

If countries keep calling the president’s bluff, as Mexico has done, there’s a good chance he may start burning things down just to prove a point.
By Timothy L. O'Brien
June 10, 2019, 3:30 AM AKDT


Donald Trump may be channeling his favorite Bond villain Auric Goldfinger as he plays chicken with the world’s economy, but he’s not much of a mastermind. Photographer: Silver Screen Collection/Moviepix

Timothy L. O’Brien is the executive editor of Bloomberg Opinion. He has been an editor and writer for the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, HuffPost and Talk magazine. His books include “TrumpNation: The Art of Being The Donald.”

Follow @TimOBrien on Twitter
COMMENTS
LISTEN TO ARTICLE
4:52

Any remaining thoughts that President Donald Trump has been playing three-dimensional chess while everyone else around him is engaged in less sophisticated pursuits should perish with his sudden abandonment of tariff threats against Mexico.

The only thing Trump got from this stunt was yet another round of abundant attention as everyone tried to decipher the riddle of “what-is-this-unusual-and-loopy-man-up to-this-time-because-he’s-breaking-the-norms-of-generally-accepted-presidential-behavior?” For Trump personally, the opportunity to generate and then bask in that kind of media buzz is, of course, far from nothing. Self-aggrandizement and self-preservation have motivated almost all of his thinking for decades; first as an unknown outer-borough tyro, then as a closely-watched developer and carnival barker, finally during his years as TV celebrity and now president.

Trump certainly grabbed the spotlight last week. After all, by unexpectedly threatening, via Twitter, to impose onerous tariffs on Mexico if it failed to help solve the immigration and humanitarian crisis spilling over from Central America and into the U.S., Trump set the global business and political communities on edge.

And how many of us get a chance to pull off something that cool ourselves? Not just anybody can look and act the part of a Bond villain. Trump once told me, while driving together to one of his golf courses, that his favorite Bond villain was Auric Goldfinger, the chunky thug who wanted to wreck the global economy and help China and his own fortunes by tainting the U.S.’s gold supply at Fort Knox. “I thought Goldfinger was just a great character,” Trump said. “To me, he was the best of all the characters. Semi-believable.”

So over the course of a week, Trump got into character and played chicken with global trade, the economy, the southern border of the U.S., the lives of migrants and the financial security of tens of millions of people — before having to cave once the costs and peril of all of this became apparent. Trump’s enablers in Congress helped put an end to the madness because something more important (to them) than the rule of law, civility, ethics, equality, global stability, mature policymaking, and the environment was at stake: money.

By Friday evening, Trump had to close down his show, taking comfort on Twitter the following day that “reviews” of his role-playing “have been very good” — with the exception, he said, of the movie critics populating the “Fake and Corrupt News Media” at NBC, CNN, the New York Times and the Washington Post.

The truth of the matter is that Mexico, other than stepping up its own role policing the southern border in accordance with an earlier agreement, has conceded nothing — as Michael Shear and Maggie Haberman pointed out in the Times. After so much noise and distress, the author of “The Art of the Deal” was left empty-handed. “The decision marks a victory for Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, whose administration had been pressing Trump to drop the tariff threat,” noted Bloomberg News reporters Josh Wingrove, Nick Wadhams, and Shannon Pettypiece.

But let’s not kid ourselves that this is an end to the White House play-acting. This has happened before and will happen again. Trade negotiations with Japan and the European Union are coming and tortuous head-butting on trade and tariffs is already underway with China. There’s lots of room for Trump to turn incendiary in all of that. He knows little about policy but a lot about how to stoke the passions and resentments of his base. And he’s content to fabricate things to seduce his supporters into accepting the idea that he never loses and that he always has a secret card to play.

“We have been trying to get some of these Border Actions for a long time, as have other administrations, but were not able to get them, or get them in full, until our signed agreement with Mexico,” he wrote on Twitter on Sunday. “Importantly, some things not mentioned in yesterday press release, one in particular, were agreed upon. That will be announced at the appropriate time.”

Aha. There’s a “not-mentioned” that can be uncorked “at the appropriate time.” Hmmm. While nobody other than the president seems to know what that secret agreement might be, he also warned that should Mexico not play ball the way he wants in the future, there will be hell — and tariffs — to pay. In the meantime, everyone should remain off-balance. “We can always go back to our previous, and very profitable, position of Tariffs,” he concluded on Twitter. “But I don't believe that will be necessary.”

This is a man flailing, much as he did several months ago after threatening to keep the U.S. government shut down unless he got the funding to build a wall along the southern border. More experienced and deft politicians than him torpedoed that gambit and the government reopened.

Trying to govern by threat and blunt force isn’t really governing at all, and if enough bluffs get called, the players on the other side of the table tend to stiffen their spines. That’s not a good scenario for anyone involved, because a predictably unpredictable person lacking self-confidence, restraint and principled, courageous advisers may eventually try burning things down just to prove his point.

The president of the United States isn’t playing chess. But, like a kid with matches, he’s only too happy to play with fire.
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Re: 🤡 Donald Trump’s Failures Make Him Even More Dangerous
« Reply #1993 on: June 11, 2019, 02:54:22 AM »

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-06-10/mexico-tariffs-trump-s-failures-make-him-even-more-dangerous

Donald Trump’s Failures Make Him Even More Dangerous

If countries keep calling the president’s bluff, as Mexico has done, there’s a good chance he may start burning things down just to prove a point.
By Timothy L. O'Brien
June 10, 2019, 3:30 AM AKDT
//
So over the course of a week, Trump got into character and played chicken with global trade, the economy, the southern border of the U.S., the lives of migrants and the financial security of tens of millions of people — before having to cave once the costs and peril of all of this became apparent. Trump’s enablers in Congress helped put an end to the madness because something more important (to them) than the rule of law, civility, ethics, equality, global stability, mature policymaking, and the environment was at stake: money.

//

But let’s not kid ourselves that this is an end to the White House play-acting. This has happened before and will happen again. Trade negotiations with Japan and the European Union are coming and tortuous head-butting on trade and tariffs is already underway with China. There’s lots of room for Trump to turn incendiary in all of that. He knows little about policy but a lot about how to stoke the passions and resentments of his base. And he’s content to fabricate things to seduce his supporters into accepting the idea that he never loses and that he always has a secret card to play.

//
Trying to govern by threat and blunt force isn’t really governing at all, and if enough bluffs get called, the players on the other side of the table tend to stiffen their spines. That’s not a good scenario for anyone involved, because a predictably unpredictable person lacking self-confidence, restraint and principled, courageous advisers may eventually try burning things down just to prove his point.

The president of the United States isn’t playing chess. But, like a kid with matches, he’s only too happy to play with fire.

Terrific analysis. Anyone who thinks that Pud is to vicious and insane enough to plunge the planet into global war hasn't read the news. If the Ds get close to exposing his finances, I predict war with Fiji.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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🤡 John W. Dean, Then & Now
« Reply #1994 on: June 11, 2019, 03:25:12 AM »
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