AuthorTopic: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread  (Read 233270 times)

Offline Eddie

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #2430 on: July 07, 2020, 04:46:21 PM »
Adventurer daughter is taking the MCAT next month. It's gotten a lot harder than it used to be, from what I gather.
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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #2431 on: July 07, 2020, 05:38:46 PM »
Adventurer daughter is taking the MCAT next month. It's gotten a lot harder than it used to be, from what I gather.

It was a tough test even back when I taught it.  Hard to imagine how they could have made it much harder.

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🤡 Trump commutes Roger Stone's sentence. Here's why he did it
« Reply #2432 on: July 11, 2020, 03:14:23 AM »
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https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/books/2020/07/14/mary-trump-says-donald-trump-utterly-incapable-being-president/5439601002/

Freed from gag order, Mary Trump has one word of advice for her uncle, President Trump: 'Resign'
Bill Keveney
Brian Truitt
USA TODAY


In an interview on the day her much-anticipated book excoriating President Donald Trump was released, Mary Trump had one word of advice for her uncle: "Resign."

Mary Trump, speaking about "Too Much and Never Enough" one day after a judge lifted a gag order, offered a simple message about President Trump, her uncle, in response to a question by ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos.

"He is utterly incapable of leading this country. And it’s dangerous to allow him to do so," she said during a clip broadcast Tuesday on ABC's "World News Tonight with David Muir," adding that her conclusion is based on what she's seen of Donald Trump over "my entire adult life."

In an ABC News story highlighting other parts of the interview, Trump, whose book already is on best-seller lists, offered an assessment of how dangerous behaviors cultivated before her uncle became president have flowered during his time in the White House.
The cover art for "Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man,"and author Mary Trump, the niece of President Donald Trump.

“I saw first-hand what focusing on the wrong things, elevating the wrong people, can do – the collateral damage that can be created by allowing somebody to live their lives without accountability,” Trump told Stephanopoulos. “And it is striking to see that continuing now on a much grander scale.”

Trump analysis:Mary L. Trump's new book almost turns The Donald into a sympathetic figure

The highlights released on "World News Tonight," in an ABC News clip and in the ABC News story largely reflect earlier discussion of the book, whose unflattering descriptions of the Trump family and the president have been the subject of many stories by journalists who received advance copies.

In the Stephanopoulos interview, which also will be featured Wednesday on ABC's "Good Morning America," Trump described an Oval Office encounter with her uncle just months after the start of his presidential term.

"He already seemed very strained by the pressures. He'd never been in a situation before where he wasn't entirely protected from criticism or accountability," said Trump, whose father, Fred Trump Jr., died in 1981. "And I just remember thinking, 'He seems tired. He seems like this is not what he signed up for, if he even knows what he signed up for."

She also remembers President Trump saying, "They won't get me," during that April 2017 visit. "And, so far, it looks like he's right," she added.

The author relies on her memories, first-hand observations and various documents for the book, which survived a legal effort by Robert Trump, her uncle and President Trump's younger brother, to keep it from being released.

In the interview, Trump, a psychologist, also discussed Fred Trump, Donald Trump's father and a huge influence, calling him "a sociopath.'

“He was incredibly driven in a way that turned other people, including his children (and) wife, into pawns to be used to his own ends,” Trump said. “It’s impossible to know who Donald might have been under different circumstances and with different parents. But clearly he learned the lesson.”

More:'Far beyond garden-variety narcissism.' Book by Trump's niece paints him as habitual liar, inept businessman
A photograph of President Donald Trump's father, Fred Trump, sits behind the Resolute Desk in the Oval Office.

The White House on Tuesday referred ABC News to its previous statements about the book. The White House previously said: "Mary Trump and her book’s publisher may claim to be acting in the public interest, but this book is clearly in the author’s own financial self-interest."

"President Trump has been in office for over three years working on behalf of the American people – why speak out now? The President describes the relationship he had with his father as warm and said his father was very good to him. He said his father was loving and not at all hard on him as a child," the statement continued.

As of Monday, publisher Simon & Schuster had shipped more than 600,000 copies of the book, subtitled "How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man," to bookstores across the country.
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https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/books/2020/07/14/mary-trump-says-donald-trump-utterly-incapable-being-president/5439601002/

Freed from gag order, Mary Trump has one word of advice for her uncle, President Trump: 'Resign'

The White House on Tuesday referred ABC News to its previous statements about the book. The White House previously said: "Mary Trump and her book’s publisher may claim to be acting in the public interest, but this book is clearly in the author’s own financial self-interest."


Issued without a shred of irony, apparently.
"...reprehensible lying communist..."

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🤡 Brad Parscale out as President Trump's campaign manager
« Reply #2435 on: July 16, 2020, 02:34:20 AM »
...and another one bites the dust...

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That would be a good start.

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https://www.npr.org/2020/07/22/893899254/down-in-the-polls-trump-pitches-fear-they-want-to-destroy-our-suburbs

Down In The Polls, Trump Pitches Fear: 'They Want To Destroy Our Suburbs'

July 22, 20205:00 AM ET
Tamara Keith 2016 square


President Trump is making a play for suburban voters by trying to convince them that if Democrat Joe Biden wins, then crime will be rampant.
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump has a message for suburban voters. And it's not a subtle one.

"They want to destroy our suburbs," Trump recently warned in a call with supporters.

"People have worked all their lives to get into a community, and now they're going to watch it go to hell," he said from the South Lawn of the White House.

Trump has been issuing increasingly dire and outlandish warnings about what Democrats will do to the suburbs. He warns suburbanites will face rising crime and falling home values if they elect Joe Biden.

The message: be afraid, be very afraid.

The newest ad from Trump's campaign is a very dramatic dramatization of an older white woman calling 9-1-1 when she sees an intruder. But no one is there to answer her call for help. As she is attacked, the words "You won't be safe in Joe Biden's America" flash on the screen.
Trump campaign YouTube

This is all based on the false claim that Biden wants to defund the police. Biden has specifically said he doesn't want to defund the police. His campaign says these are "smears" that aren't working.
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From July 1 to July 20, Trump's campaign spent more than $18 million on television ads hitting this theme, according to the tracking firm Ad Analytics. It's a similar argument to one Trump made ahead of the 2018 midterms, that caravans of migrants would cross the border bringing gangs and crime. Democrats won control of the House in a wave election, led by a suburban backlash to Trump.

"People are not afraid of what he's trying to make them afraid of," said Christine Matthews, a Republican pollster who has been critical of Trump.
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In 2016, voters in the suburbs made up 50% of the electorate. Trump won those voters narrowly that year. Now polls show him trailing Biden badly in the suburbs.

Trump hadn't explicitly addressed suburban voters until about a month ago, when, in a speech to young supporters gathered at a Phoenix mega church, Trump, referencing racial justice protests in Seattle, said it was bedlam.

"That's exactly what will come to every city near you, every suburb and community in America, if the radical-left Democrats are put in charge," Trump claimed.

From there, the appeals to suburban voters and his ideas about what issues matter to them have only gotten more direct. Trump has pushed for schools to reopen, threatening to pull funding if they don't, without explaining how it can be done safely while coronavirus cases spike. And he has targeted an Obama-era fair housing regulation, promising to sign an executive order halting it.

The 2015 regulation deals with racial segregation of housing and requires local municipalities to address historic patterns of it. But Trump warned last week that it would "destroy" the suburbs.

"Your home will go down in value and crime rates will rapidly rise," he said. "People have worked all their lives to get into a community, and now they're going to watch it go to hell. Not going to happen, not while I'm here."
Seeking Suburban Votes, Trump Targets Rule To Combat Racial Bias In Housing
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Seeking Suburban Votes, Trump Targets Rule To Combat Racial Bias In Housing

That kind of racial view, pitting whites in the suburbs against Blacks and Latinos who might move in, is an appeal that seems to stem from an anachronistic view of the suburbs.

"He thinks it's basically the planned development of Levittown in the 1960s as opposed to today's suburbs, which are multiracial, diverse and highly educated," Matthews said.

Many suburban voters do think liberal activists have overstepped, said Ryan Costello, a former Republican congressman from the Pennsylvania suburbs. But, he added, they don't ascribe that to Biden, and they don't think he is going to defund their local police departments.

Costello said that right now, people in the suburbs are worried about schools opening safely, with the emphasis on safely. They're worried about the coronavirus and the economy.

"This is really a referendum on how President Trump is handling the pandemic," Costello said. "That's the kind of stuff that suburban voters that don't have a deep partisan allegiance are going to look at. And that's where they're going to render their value judgments."

And so far, Americans largely disapprove of the job Trump is doing handling the coronavirus. On average, 58% now say they disapprove of it.

Costello announced his retirement from the House of Representatives in 2018 rather than face near-certain defeat in a wave led by suburban backlash to Trump. He questions the logic of the president's current political strategy.
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Poll: Trump Disapproval Hits All-Time High And He Trails Biden By 8

"If you're going to attack an opponent, there has to be something that is relatable in that attack on an opponent," Costello said. "I live in the suburbs, and I don't know how he would eliminate the suburbs. It doesn't make much sense to me."

The Trump campaign is downplaying this erosion of a key group that helped with his win in 2016.

"President Trump brought new voters into the Republican Party in 2016 and has realigned the political electorate, creating a broad coalition of support across all demographics that will carry him to victory in November," Trump campaign deputy national press secretary Samantha Zager said in an email when asked about Biden's apparent lead in the suburbs.

In 2016, Trump brought in a surge of rural white voters, who don't live in the suburbs, but may respond to his messages about urban crime and the dangers of the left.

"What does suburban really mean?" Ernest McGowen, an associate professor of political science at the University of Richmond, asked rhetorically. "What does it mean as a thing? Is it a geography, or is it an identity?
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McGowen, who has studied African Americans in the suburbs, and lives in the suburbs himself, says that suburban identity is about accomplishment, but not excess. In the suburbs, you know your kids will go to good schools with extracurricular activities. You'll need a lawnmower.

And McGowen points out, that doesn't mean you are all that close to the city anymore. The suburbs have expanded into what used to be rural areas.

"What we're calling a suburb now is going to be part of the metro in a few years," McGowen said. "And what we're calling exurbs is going to actually be the suburbs as we would know them."

The suburbs are again shaping up to be where 2020 could be won or lost.
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https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/24/politics/donald-trump-coronavirus-briefing-jacksonville/index.html

Trump's briefings were meant to show him in charge -- now they are becoming absurd


Analysis by Stephen Collinson, CNN

Updated 2:03 AM ET, Fri July 24, 2020
President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference at the White House, Thursday, July 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

trump collins split
Collins asks Trump: Why aren't medical experts at briefing?
US President Donald Trump speaks to the press during the renewed briefing of the Coronavirus Task Force in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC, on July 22, 2020. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)
Trump 'comfortable' with son, grandchildren returning to school
'Cold day in hell': Ex-DHS chief slams Trump's move
Seattle Mayor: Unsettling Trump is continuing down this path
Former Epstein partner: Trump and Maxwell knew each other well
'Have you seen your curve?' Keilar fact-checks Texas congressman
senate republicans white house proposal stimulus plan pkg mattingly nr vpx_00010916.jpg
Senate GOP push back against WH priorities in stimulus plan
Ted Yoho and Alexandria Ocasio Cortez
GOP lawmaker apologizes for heated exchange with Ocasio-Cortez
President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference at the White House, Thursday, July 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Trump explains why he is cancelling Jacksonville RNC activities
Dr. Fauci: I have 'a very good relationship' with Trump
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican from Kentucky, wears a protective mask as he arrives to deliver opening floor remarks in the U.S. Capitol on July 22, 2020.
Here's what's in the GOP stimulus proposal
Ted Yoho and Alexandria Ocasio Cortez
AOC responds to Rep. Ted Yoho's apology
US President Donald Trump speaks on the &quot;Rebuilding of Americas Infrastructure: Faster, Better, Stronger&quot; in Atlanta, Georgia, on July 15, 2020. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)
Trump boasts about cognitive test results as pandemic worsens
Michael Cohen, US President Donald Trump&#39;s former personal attorney, arrives to testify in a closed session before the House Intelligence Committee at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on March 6, 2019. - Cohen, who is to report to prison on May 6, 2019 to begin serving a three-year sentence for fraud, tax evasion, illegal campaign contributions and lying to Congress, expressed regret for his years of devoted service to Trump. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)
Cohen to be released from prison to home confinement
A screenshot of CNN Global Affairs Analyst Max Boot taken from an interview with CNN&#39;s Rosemary Church.
CNN analyst on Houston consulate closure: Trump's motives are 'highly suspect'
trump collins split
Collins asks Trump: Why aren't medical experts at briefing?
US President Donald Trump speaks to the press during the renewed briefing of the Coronavirus Task Force in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC, on July 22, 2020. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)
Trump 'comfortable' with son, grandchildren returning to school
'Cold day in hell': Ex-DHS chief slams Trump's move
Seattle Mayor: Unsettling Trump is continuing down this path
Former Epstein partner: Trump and Maxwell knew each other well
'Have you seen your curve?' Keilar fact-checks Texas congressman
senate republicans white house proposal stimulus plan pkg mattingly nr vpx_00010916.jpg
Senate GOP push back against WH priorities in stimulus plan
Ted Yoho and Alexandria Ocasio Cortez
GOP lawmaker apologizes for heated exchange with Ocasio-Cortez
President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference at the White House, Thursday, July 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Trump explains why he is cancelling Jacksonville RNC activities
Dr. Fauci: I have 'a very good relationship' with Trump
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican from Kentucky, wears a protective mask as he arrives to deliver opening floor remarks in the U.S. Capitol on July 22, 2020.
Here's what's in the GOP stimulus proposal
Ted Yoho and Alexandria Ocasio Cortez
AOC responds to Rep. Ted Yoho's apology
US President Donald Trump speaks on the &quot;Rebuilding of Americas Infrastructure: Faster, Better, Stronger&quot; in Atlanta, Georgia, on July 15, 2020. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)
Trump boasts about cognitive test results as pandemic worsens
Michael Cohen, US President Donald Trump&#39;s former personal attorney, arrives to testify in a closed session before the House Intelligence Committee at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on March 6, 2019. - Cohen, who is to report to prison on May 6, 2019 to begin serving a three-year sentence for fraud, tax evasion, illegal campaign contributions and lying to Congress, expressed regret for his years of devoted service to Trump. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)
Cohen to be released from prison to home confinement
A screenshot of CNN Global Affairs Analyst Max Boot taken from an interview with CNN&#39;s Rosemary Church.
CNN analyst on Houston consulate closure: Trump's motives are 'highly suspect'
trump collins split
Collins asks Trump: Why aren't medical experts at briefing?

(CNN)President Donald Trump says the country is doing great in a pandemic that just infected its four millionth US victim and is killing 1,000 people a day. But his claim is based on a brazen confidence trick, requiring Americans to ignore his responsibility for the spike in the southern and western states as he claims credit for the success of northeastern states that suppressed the disease after not heeding his advice to reopen before the virus was under control.
And that might not even be the most outrageous thing the President said at his third briefing in as many days.
Fact check: Trump continues to dishonestly downplay the pandemic
Fact check: Trump continues to dishonestly downplay the pandemic
The President, after months mocking mask wearing and social distancing guidelines, trawled for credit and claimed he was setting an "example" after deciding to cancel Republican convention events in Covid-battered Florida.
Though deeming the situation too dangerous to hold the quadrennial political showpiece, he nevertheless insisted that it was perfectly safe for children to go back to school full time in a few weeks.
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Face masks have become our new normal, and with these masks, you can make sure you're doing even more good than usual.

Trump used northeastern states like New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, which lowered their infection curve with strict stay-at-home orders, as part of a misleading argument that much of the US was free of the virus. What he didn't say is that those states succeeded because they ignored his calls to reopen.
View Trump and Biden head-to-head polling
"That's really very much indicating where the problems are," Trump said, referencing a map showing less virus penetration in the Northeast and central plains states, where fewer people live, than across the sunbelt.
"You see from that -- it's in great shape, lots of it," Trump said.
"The Northeast has become very clean. The country is in very good shape other than if you look south and west, some problems that'll all work out," the President said.
States that disregarded scientific advice to satisfy government benchmarks on reopening, many led by pro-Trump governors and that backed him in 2016 -- like Texas, Florida and Arizona -- are now in the middle of a Covid-19 nightmare. Florida, for example, registered 10,249 new cases and 173 additional deaths on Thursday, breaking the previous record of 156 deaths on July 16, according to the state's department of health.
Trump also complained that a dozen European countries and Taiwan and South Korea were sending their kids back to class and America wasn't, ignoring the fact that those places had competent central governments that beat back the virus properly. Trump, however, failed to provide the leadership and nationwide testing and tracing system that might make a resumption of school a viable proposition along with a full reopening of the economy. The United States currently has more infections and deaths than any other nation.
"This isn't about politics, this is about something very, very important. This is not about politics," Trump said about his return-to-school push, after months in which politics and not science appeared to be the primary driver of his response to the worst domestic crisis since World War II.
Still, if Thursday's erratic half-hour briefing did not provide medical clarity, it did offer some insight into the President's electoral thinking. His decision on his convention acceptance speech — that he had previously demanded should go ahead and had moved from North Carolina after officials said it was not safe -- made one thing clear: he finally understands that his denial and neglect of the pandemic gravely threaten his reelection.

CNN holds elected officials and candidates accountable by pointing out what's true and what's not.

Here's a look at our recent fact checks.
Trump hero worships Yankees closer on tragic day
It is also becoming obvious that Trump's return to the White House briefing room has nothing to do with a genuine new "tone" or providing solid information to the American people. (Following complaints that he was not sharing the stage with medical experts, top coronavirus task force member Dr. Deborah Birx sat to one side on Thursday, wearing a mask, but was not called upon to speak.)
Several times in an appearance that took place as deaths raced towards the 1,000 mark for another day, Trump paused to hero worship former New York Yankees pitcher Mariano Rivera, who sat in staff seats adjacent to the President and was not wearing a mask.
Trump responded to a question about whether the canceled Jacksonville event showed that he was pushing openings too fast by announcing he would throw out the opening pitch at a Yankees game in August.
"I've never seen a pitcher throw a ball where so many bats were broken as Mariano. He's got the all-time record," Trump added in remarks that showed the lack of focus and seriousness behind his leadership in the pandemic.
The briefings have turned into a theater of disinformation in which the President hypes any positive development -- like progress on vaccines -- yet ignores the terrible and rising human toll of the pandemic and offers highly misleading information about its seriousness and likely duration.
"It's going to come and go. It will. When you look at what happened in New York and what happened in New Jersey and other places. And now you're looking and it's gone. I hope it stays gone."
Trump's upbeat assessment contrasted with warnings of his own coronavirus task force members on Thursday. Dr. Anthony Fauci, using a baseball metaphor on Opening Day of the truncated Major League Baseball season, said at a briefing hosted by the TB Alliance: "We are not winning the game right now, we are not leading it."
Birx privately told a group of state and local health officials on Wednesday about a concerning rise in coronavirus cases in 12 cities -- even as Trump laid out a more scripted, optimistic message.
Trump says he canceled convention to 'protect' the American people
Democrats decided weeks ago that it was too inappropriate given the national emergency to hold a full nominating convention to anoint former Vice President Joe Biden as their candidate. Trump has long insisted that his moment would take place before a big crowd and and mocked his rival for planning a virtual convention. So his claim that his decision to cancel showed great leadership was a stretch.
"It's really something that, for me, I have to protect the American people. That's what I've always done, that's what I always will do, that's what I'm about," Trump said, claiming that his staff counseled him that the convention could go ahead easily but that he told them he was "elected to help and protect."
Trump cancels Republican convention activities in Jacksonville
Trump cancels Republican convention activities in Jacksonville
Trump's campaign is likely to react to criticism of the entire convention saga by saying that reporters who criticized him for going ahead are now slamming him over the cancellation and that the President cannot win.
But the notion that the President all along cared most about the American people is belied by the fact that for weeks he downplayed the threat posed by the virus to the United States and then pushed states to open up prematurely before it was vanquished. Until this week, when the political damage wrought by his indifference became ever more obvious, the President all but ignored the worsening crisis.
"We have to be vigilant, we have to be careful. And we also have to set an example. I think setting the example is very important," Trump said, in a deeply ironic remark given his previous attitude.
One source familiar with the situation told CNN Thursday that the President had been watching increasing numbers of Republican lawmakers announcing that they would not come to the convention speech in Jacksonville, which has turned into a coronavirus hotspot in recent weeks.
The prospect of a disappointing crowd at the televised event would have been deeply unpalatable to the President, who was embarrassed and ridiculed for the poor attendance at his comeback rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, last month.
Reopening schools 'critical'
The President also redoubled his demands for schools to open -- in a move that could help revive the economy vital to his reelection and foster a sense of normalcy he needs to argue he led the country out of the fire.
He asked Congress to provide $105 billion to help schools open in a new stimulus bill currently being negotiated on Capitol Hill.
But the President also said that school districts that don't open up should be deprived of such funding, setting up another clash with Republicans in Congress who do not agree with such steps. He said unused money would "go to the parents" to let them decide whether to send kids to private or charter schools. "We cannot indefinitely stop 50 million children from going to school," Trump said. "Reopening our schools is also critical to ensuring parents can go to work and provide for their families."
While he did allow that some schools in hotspot areas might need to stick with distance learning for a time, the President completely underplayed the fears of parents who are desperate for their children to get back into the classroom but who also worry they could bring the virus home. Schools are a vital lifeline for less well-off children, who rely on them for proper meals, and those who have family problems at home often first spotted by teachers.
Even so, multiple school districts and governors across the country have decided not to follow Trump's warnings because they cannot guarantee the safety of kids in already crowded buildings or fear that mass gatherings like a normal school day will unleash new centers of infection.
Trump spoke about how children have very strong immune systems and rightly said that the incidence of kids with complications from the virus is very low.
Government health experts like Fauci and Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have said that they do not yet know to what extent children are drivers of infection in the home.
One recent study in South Korea found that while children younger than 10 transmit the disease much less often than adults, those of middle school and high school age are as likely to spread the virus as adults.
Such data suggests that sending older children back to school could seed new centers of infection — and put teachers and ancillary staff at high risk.

But new CDC guidelines issued Thursday said that "no studies are conclusive, but the available evidence provides reason to believe that in-person schooling is in the best interest of students, particularly in the context of appropriate mitigation measures similar to those implemented at essential workplaces."
Such is the pressure that Trump has exerted on government scientists and experts off all kinds to bolster his personal goals. The recommendations will never be free of the taint of politics.
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Another magnificent success for the Clown-in-Chief!  ::)

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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8562843/Moment-Trumps-indestructible-border-wall-collapses-Tropical-Storm-Hanna-lashes-south-Texas.html

Sunday, Jul 26th 2020 9PM 44°F 12AM 41°F 5-Day Forecast
Section of Donald Trump's 'indestructible' border wall COLLAPSES as Tropical Storm Hanna lashes south Texas

    A video that went viral on Twitter on Sunday shows a section of the border wall toppling to the ground amid fierce wind and rain
    The clip became the target of widespread ridicule as critics likened the collapse to President Donald Trump's re-election campaign 
    Some users pointed out that last month Trump boasted that his wall is 'the most powerful and comprehensive border wall structure' in the world
    But others users called the validity of the footage into question, noting that its unclear when and where it was recorded
    CPB officials reportedly said the video was not recorded in the Rio Grande Valley

By Megan Sheets For Dailymail.com

Published: 22:05 EDT, 26 July 2020 | Updated: 02:10 EDT, 27 July 2020


A viral video purportedly shows section of the border wall separating the US and Mexico collapsing under strong winds and heavy rains from Tropical Storm Hanna. 

The video posted to Twitter by journalist Yadith Valdez on Sunday shows construction workers standing by and watching as fierce gusts knock the steel structure to the ground.

The clip became the target of widespread ridicule on social media as critics likened the section's collapse to the re-election campaign of President Donald Trump, who has already spent more than $11billion building the wall that is expected to cost an estimated $21.6billion to complete.

Some users pointed out that just a few weeks ago Trump boasted that his wall is 'the most powerful and comprehensive border wall structure' in the world.

But others users called the validity of the footage into question, noting that its unclear when and where it was recorded.

Scroll down for video
A viral video appears to show a section of the border wall between the US and Mexico collapsing under strong winds and heavy rains from Tropical Storm Hanna on Sunday
 7

A viral video appears to show a section of the border wall between the US and Mexico collapsing under strong winds and heavy rains from Tropical Storm Hanna on Sunday
The video posted to Twitter on Sunday shows construction workers standing by and watching as fierce gusts knock the steel structure to the ground
 7

The clip became the target of widespread ridicule on social media as critics likened the section's collapse to the re-election campaign of President Donald Trump, who has spent more than $11billion building the wall
 7

The video posted to Twitter on Sunday shows construction workers standing by and watching as fierce gusts knock the steel structure to the ground. The clip became the target of ridicule on social media as critics likened the collapse to President Trump's re-election campaign

Mexican news outlet Debate claimed in an article that the video was filmed at a section of wall dividing Texas from Ciudad Camargo in the state of Tamaulipas.

However, Washington Post reporter Nick Miroff refuted that report in a tweet, saying that Customs and Border Patrol officials told him the video was not recorded in the Rio Grande Valley.

'Unclear where it was filmed, but based on desert terrain, daytime recording and style of bollards, I'm guessing these are images of a monsoon out west, prob Arizona,' Miroff wrote.


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    Controversial U.S. Ambassador to Iceland asked to carry a...



Regardless of questions over the origin of the video, Trump critics had a field day with jokes about the collapse.

Best-selling author Rick Wilson tweeted: 'I have a Trump wall joke but it blows.'

Another man tweeted in response to Wilson: 'I have a trump wall joke but I know it will fall flat.'

'I have a Trump wall joke but it will fall apart before it's finished,' a third man wrote.

Yet another critic added: 'I hope the Trump Wall is still under warranty. I'd hate to see Mexico have to pay for it a second time.'
Washington Post reporter Nick Miroff discredited claims about the video being recorded in the Rio Grande Valley, citing information from Customs and Border Patrol officials

Washington Post reporter Nick Miroff discredited claims about the video being recorded in the Rio Grande Valley, citing information from Customs and Border Patrol officials
Regardless of questions over the origin of the video, Trump critics had a field day with jokes about the collapse

Regardless of questions over the origin of the video, Trump critics had a field day with jokes about the collapse
 7

 7

Trump has already spent more than $11billion building the wall that is expected to cost an estimated $21.6billion to complete. He is pictured at a promotional event for the wall in June
 7

Trump has already spent more than $11billion building the wall that is expected to cost an estimated $21.6billion to complete. He is pictured at a promotional event for the wall in June

DailyMail.com has reached out to CBP for clarification about the video. 

Hanna was downgraded to a tropical depression after it made landfall in south Texas along the Gulf Coast as a Category 1 hurricane on Sunday morning. 

The storm dumped more than 12 inches of rain along the US-Mexico border as it tore through the area with winds of up to 50 miles per hour. 
Hurricane Hanna dumped more than 12 inches of rain along the US-Mexico border on Sunday as it tore through the area with winds of up to 50 miles per hour
 7

Hurricane Hanna dumped more than 12 inches of rain along the US-Mexico border on Sunday as it tore through the area with winds of up to 50 miles per hour
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https://www.vox.com/2020/8/4/21354055/trump-axios-interview-jonathan-swan

“They are dying. That’s true. It is what it is.” Trump’s Axios interview was a disaster.

Jonathan Swan just put on a clinic on how to interview Trump.
By Aaron Rupar@atrupar Aug 4, 2020, 1:00pm EDT

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/zaaTZkqsaxY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/zaaTZkqsaxY</a>

President Trump sitting across from his interviewer and showing him a piece of paper.
Axios’s Jonathan Swan interviewing President Donald Trump. Axios/HBO

President Donald Trump’s interview with Jonathan Swan of Axios began with him telling a dizzying string of lies about his coronavirus response and the state of the pandemic in the country. It ended with Trump making the death of civil rights leader John Lewis about himself. It didn’t go any better in between.

For the second time in a month, Trump’s attempt to sit down for an interview with a journalist willing to challenge him ended in disaster. Over the course of 37 minutes, Swan repeatedly exposed Trump’s inability to respond to the most basic of follow-up questions.

Trump’s difficulty with push-back is often concealed when he answers questions beside a loud helicopter or in the friendly confines of Sean Hannity’s show. But the Swan interview, which came out just two weeks after Trump’s similarly disastrous performance on Chris Wallace’s show, highlighted the degree to which Trump is unable to defend his record in the face of even mildly challenging questions.
Trump’s coronavirus comments continue to be an embarrassment

Perhaps the most terrifying part of the interview came early on when Swan peppered Trump with a string of questions about why he isn’t doing more to fight the coronavirus and why the virus has hit the US so much harder than other comparable countries.

Asked how he can say the pandemic is under control when roughly 1,000 Americans are dying from Covid-19 each day, Trump said, remarkably, that “it is what it is.”

“They are dying. That’s true. It is what it is. ... It’s under control as much as you can control it.”

On the topic of America’s struggles with coronavirus testing, including long wait times for test results that render testing almost worthless, Trump resorted to making stuff up.

“There are those that say you can’t test too much. You know that?” Trump said at one point.

“Who says that?” Swan responded.

“Read the manuals. Read the books,” answered Trump.

“What books?” Swan challenged, but no answer was forthcoming. Instead, Trump said that “when I took over we didn’t even have a test” — as if the Obama administration was supposed to develop a test for a virus that didn’t exist until nearly three years after Trump’s inauguration.

A few minutes later, just as he did on Wallace’s show, Trump waved around pieces of paper with charts and graphs in an unconvincing effort to make it seem as though the US coronavirus death toll of more than 150,000 isn’t as bad as it seems.

“Right here, the United States is lowest in ... numerous categories ... ah, we’re lower than the world,” Trump stammered, which prompted Swan to respond, incredulously, “lower than the world? In what?”

“Oh, you’re doing death as a proportion of cases,” Swan continued. “I’m talking about death as a proportion of population. That’s where the US is really bad. Much worse than South Korea, Germany, etc. ... Look at South Korea: 50 million population, 300 deaths.”

Trump responded by suggesting South Korea is faking its numbers. But when Swan challenged him on that point, Trump quickly changed the topic back to his pieces of paper.

“Here’s one right here. You take the number of cases. No, look. We’re last. Meaning we’re first,” Trump said.

“I mean, 1,000 Americans die a day,” Swan responded. “If hospital rates were going down and deaths were going down, I’d say terrific, you deserve to be praised for testing. But they’re all going up!

Watch the exchange:

In the minutes that followed, Trump failed to explain the contradiction between his claims about being a voracious consumer of intelligence reports and that he was never informed about intelligence that Russia was offering bounties for US troops in Afghanistan that was reportedly in said briefs. “I read a lot. I comprehend extraordinarily well. Probably better than anybody you’ve interviewed in a long time,” the president claimed.

He also revealed total confusion about the difference between absentee and mail-in voting, struggled to explain why he recently extended his well-wishes to accused sex trafficker Ghislaine Maxwell (“Yeah, I wish her well. I’d wish you well, I’d wish a lot of people well. Good luck.”), and dismissed video footage of federal law enforcement officials using a baton to beat a Navy veteran who was protesting in Portland.

“I think that actually, antifa should be investigated, not the law enforcement,” Trump said.
Trump’s race relations remarks pour fuel on the fire

But perhaps Trump’s most tone-deaf remarks were reserved for the end when Swan asked him a string of questions about racial inequalities and his reaction to the death of John Lewis.

Presented with a statistic that succinctly illustrates systemic racism in the country — “Why do you think Black men are two and half times more likely to be killed by police than white men?” Swan asked — Trump dodged with an equivalency.

“I do know this: that police have killed many white people also,” he said.

After Trump claimed he’s done “more for the Black community than anybody with the possible exception of Abraham Lincoln, whether you like it or not,” Swan asked him: “You believe you did more than Lyndon Johnson, who passed the Civil Rights Act?”

“How has it worked out?” Trump responded. “If you take a look at what Lyndon Johnson did. How has it worked out?”

The interview closed with what should’ve been a softball — “How do you think history will remember John Lewis?” Swan asked. But instead of paying lip service to Lewis’s record as a Civil Rights icon, Trump denigrated him for the pettiest of reasons.

“I really don’t know. I don’t know. I don’t know John Lewis. He chose not to come to my inauguration,” Trump said.

“Taking your relationship with him out of it, do you find his story impressive, what he’s done for this country?” Swan followed up.

“He was a person that devoted a lot of energy and a lot of heart to civil rights. But there were many others also,” Trump demurred.

The interview was recorded last Tuesday and aired Monday evening on Axios’s HBO show. In a sign of how it went, Trump — who regularly promotes softball interviews he does with the Hannitys of the world in the hope of getting as many people as possible to tune in — didn’t mention it on Twitter or elsewhere.


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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #2440 on: August 04, 2020, 06:07:50 PM »
Regarding the Axios interview.  The true Trumptard will see what they want to see.  To them Trump did good.

If Trump could bury a vestial virgin to convince everyone he is still 'the man'.  He would.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/hnFlraLkk9M?t=107" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/hnFlraLkk9M?t=107</a>

Quintus Fabius Maximus. Donald John Trump.

They both have the politics of fear going on.

It is a damn good thing America does not have any virgins.



Greta had better stay on her side of the pond.  Being as she is not from a shit-hole country she might qualify.

Cuz Trump Says Nuclear Proliferation Is Scarier Than Climate Change.

“If we can do something with Russia in terms of nuclear proliferation, which is a very big problem, bigger problem than global warming, a much bigger problem than global warming in terms of the real world, that would be a great thing,”

A moving quote by the American president who wants to turn America into a shit-hole.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2020, 06:25:49 PM by K-Dog »
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🤡 Facebook removes Trump post over coronavirus misinformation
« Reply #2441 on: August 05, 2020, 05:00:21 PM »
https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/tech-news/facebook-removes-trump-post-over-coronavirus-information-n1235950

Facebook removes Trump post over coronavirus misinformation
"This video includes false claims that a group of people is immune from COVID-19 which is a violation of our policies around harmful COVID misinformation," a Facebook spokesperson said.

President Donald Trump wears a mask as he visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., on July 11.Alex Edelman / AFP - Getty Images file

Aug. 5, 2020, 2:02 PM AKDT / Updated Aug. 5, 2020, 3:25 PM AKDT
By Dylan Byers

Facebook removed a video post from President Donald Trump's personal page Wednesday that included a segment from a Fox News interview in which he falsely said children are "almost immune" to COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

"This video includes false claims that a group of people is immune from COVID-19 which is a violation of our policies around harmful COVID misinformation," said Andy Stone, a Facebook policy spokesperson.

In the interview, which aired Wednesday morning, Trump said children should return to school because they are "almost immune" or "virtually immune" to the disease. While they are less vulnerable, children can, in fact, transmit the disease to others, and some children have died from it.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

The action, the first time Facebook has removed a Trump post for COVID-19 misinformation, marks a rare instance in which it has been willing to censor the president. In June, Facebook removed ads that the Trump campaign posted that featured a symbol Nazis used to classify political prisoners during World War II.

A link to the post now diverts to a page that says, "This Content Isn't Available Right Now."
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The Trump campaign accused Facebook of "flagrant bias."

"The President was stating a fact that children are less susceptible to the coronavirus," Courtney Parella, the campaign's deputy national press secretary, said in an emailed statement. "Another day, another display of Silicon Valley's flagrant bias against this President, where the rules are only enforced in one direction. Social media companies are not the arbiters of truth."

Facebook has been closely scrutinized by critics on both the left and the right for its handling of Trump's posts. Its refusal to take action on posts in which the president appeared to call for violence against protestors sparked outrage among progressives and helped inspire civil rights groups to organize an advertising boycott against it.

At the same time, Trump's supporters have frequently complained — with little evidence — that Facebook and other social media companies like Twitter and YouTube harbor a liberal bias and unfairly censor conservatives. Several Republican lawmakers made such complaints to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg during a high-profile tech antitrust hearing last month.
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🤡 Facebook Finally Moves Against Trump
« Reply #2442 on: August 06, 2020, 05:12:08 AM »
Suckerbug finally does something right!   :o

RE

https://www.thedailybeast.com/facebook-finally-moves-against-trump

Facebook Finally Moves Against Trump

Mark Zuckerberg’s giant social network has aggressively fought for the president’s right to deceive its customers. But a misleading video about children and COVID-19 was too much.

Adam Rawnsley
Updated Aug. 05, 2020 9:20PM ET / Published Aug. 05, 2020 9:04PM ET
U.S. House Judiciary Committee via Reuters

Facebook has tried its hardest to avoid taking action against posts from President Trump that broke its own rules. But on Wednesday, that long-running effort finally ran aground against a rambling diatribe from the president about children and the coronavirus.

It’s a shift that could have an enormous impact on Trump’s re-election effort. While political spending is a small fraction of Facebook’s overall revenue, political ads make up a more significant chunk of campaign spending. Team Trump has made Facebook—with its uneven enforcement of its rules against disinformation—a cornerstone of its campaign, spending more than $35 million in ads on the social network in 2020.
Advertisement

Facebook’s top-trending news stories of the day are almost always from the president or his supporters, according to the social media tracking tool CrowdTangle. The Trump campaign even spent $325,000 promoting Facebook pages run by Brad Parscale, the president’s former campaign manager, according to The New York Times.

In an appearance on Fox News Wednesday morning, Trump told the hosts of Fox & Friends that children are “almost immune” from COVID-19.

“If you look at children, children are almost—and I would almost say definitely—but almost immune from this disease,” Trump said. “They’ve got much stronger immune systems than we do somehow for this. And they don’t have a problem. They just don’t have a problem.” 

After Trump posted a clip of the appearance with those comments on his Facebook page, the social media site took down the post. “This video includes false claims that a group of people is immune from COVID-19, which is a violation of our policies around harmful COVID misinformation,” Facebook said in a statement.

In response to Facebook’s takedown of the president’s video, the Trump campaign accused the social media company of “bias” and claimed that Trump’s statement proclaiming children “almost immune” from the virus that causes COVID-19 was instead a statement merely that “children are less susceptible to the coronavirus.”

“Another day, another display of Silicon Valley’s flagrant bias against this President, where the rules are only enforced in one direction,” Trump campaign spokeswoman Courtney Parella said in a statement. “Social media companies are not the arbiters of truth.”

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg told lawmakers in an appearance before the House Judiciary Committee last week that the company would take down medical misinformation about the COVID-19 pandemic, including specific false claims about the existence of a “cure” for the disease like hydroxychloroquine.

While the company’s content policies have long applied to ordinary users, Facebook has sought to avoid enforcing them against public officials, including Trump.

In 2019, the company announced that it would treat all posts by public officials as exempt from its rules under a 2016 policy that exempted otherwise infringing content in the event that the company considered it “newsworthy.”
“At this point I give them a participation trophy and not applause.”
— Lisa Kaplan, founder of the disinformation-tracking firm Alethea Group

“Would it be acceptable to society at large to have a private company in effect become a self-appointed referee for everything that politicians say?” Nick Clegg, Facebook’s vice president of global affairs and communications, said. “I don’t believe it would be. In open democracies, voters rightly believe that, as a general rule, they should be able to judge what politicians say themselves.”
Related in Tech
"Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks via video conference during a hearing of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law on \"Online Platforms and Market Power\", in the Rayburn House office Building on Capitol Hill, in Washington, U.S., July 29, 2020. Graeme Jennings/Pool via REUTERS"
Zuckerberg Promises to Yank Dodgy Hydroxychloroquine Claims
"Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg testifies during a US House Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing about Facebook on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, April 11, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)"
‘Hierarchy of Speech’: Audit Lays Bare Facebook’s Blunders
QAnon Is Just Getting Started, Despite Twitter’s Crackdown

As Trump’s social media posts have become more erratic and offensive over the past few months, Facebook’s hands-off policy towards officialdom has put greater pressure on the company to act.

“At this point I give them a participation trophy and not applause,” Lisa Kaplan, founder of the disinformation-tracking firm Alethea Group told The Daily Beast of the company’s decision to take down the Trump post. “It appears Facebook is following the lead of other tech companies by enforcing its policies. I’m heartened to see them taking action because the danger of disinformation coming from any trusted voice is that people see it, believe it, and change their behavior. Especially in the case of the coronavirus pandemic, changing your behavior could be the difference between life and death.”

In May, Twitter applied a warning label to a tweet from Trump threatening violence against protesters in the wake of the Minneapolis police’s killing of George Floyd. Twitter’s decision to label Trump’s threat that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” as “glorification of violence” which could risk “inspir[ing] similar actions” led some employees at Facebook to protest their company’s relative inaction by coordinating a virtual walkout at the company.

Twitter took things a step further against Trump’s campaign account late Wednesday, just hours after Facebook removed the president’s misleading post. The social media giant said the president’s “Team Trump” account would not be allowed to tweet again until it removed video of Trump making the same claim about children being “almost immune” to the coronavirus. A Twitter spokeswoman quoted by The Washington Post said the video “is in violation of the Twitter Rules on COVID-19 misinformation. The account owner will be required to remove the Tweet before they can Tweet again.”

—with additional reporting by Asawin Suebsaeng
READ THIS LIST
Trump’s Always Told ‘Jokes.’ Now, He’s Become One.
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Paid NYPD Informant Drove Protester to Attack
Justin Rohrlich
Why Are People So Deathly Afraid of Criticizing Beyoncé?
Cassie da Costa
Mitch McConnell, the Turtle, Is Losing the Race Now
Molly Jong-Fast
This May Be the Most Absurd, Trumpian Drama Ever
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Trump’s Always Told ‘Jokes.’ Now, He’s Becoming One.
PUNCHLINE

With Trump looking likely to go down hard, any grudging respect is evaporating. He is neither loved nor feared. Soon, he may even be pitied.
Matt Lewis

Senior Columnist
Published Aug. 05, 2020 7:57PM ET

Has Donald Trump officially become a laughingstock? I guess it depends on which channel you watch.

On Wednesday morning, Trump phoned in to “Fox & Friends,” where he talked ad nauseum, for over an hour, only occasionally stopping his ramblings to field “questions” about what a great job he’s doing and how lousy his enemies are. The phoner may have been intended as a chaser to  wash away the bad taste from his much-mocked sit-down with Jonathan Swan where, to any reasonable observer, it became clear that the president can’t hit anything other than softballs.

However, this conclusion will only be evident to those exposed to both shows. Many Trump supporters will only see the “Fox & Friends” interview. It’s not just that Trump’s America isn’t capable of discerning a bad performance from a good one (although, that’s probably true), it’s also that they self-filter their media exposure. (In fairness, Trump recently sat down with “Fox News Sunday” host Chris Wallace. Presumably, some residents of Trump’s America saw that one, and it did not go well.)
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https://www.cnbc.com/2020/08/05/coronavirus-stimulus-bill-updates-white-house-increases-unemployment-offer.html

White House threatens executive action if it fails to reach coronavirus relief deal with Democrats
Published Wed, Aug 5 20201:09 PM EDTUpdated Wed, Aug 5 20206:01 PM EDT
Jacob Pramuk   @jacobpramuk

President Donald Trump holds an article as he speaks during a news conference at the White House, Thursday, July 30, 2020, in Washington.
Evan Vucci | AP

Key Points

    Democrats and the Trump administration met again about coronavirus relief Wednesday but could not reach a deal.
    White House chief of staff Mark Meadows said that President Donald Trump will address unemployment insurance and an eviction moratorium by executive action, though it is unclear if he has the authority to do so.
    The White House has reportedly increased its offer for unemployment insurance payments, while Democrats reduced their request for Postal Service funding.
    As Republicans are divided over coronavirus aid, some GOP senators have said they are prepared to accept the agreement Democrats and the Trump administration reach.

The White House threatened to act on its own to provide coronavirus relief Wednesday after another day of talks with Democrats yielded no agreement.

Though the Trump administration apparently yielded ground in bargaining over extended unemployment insurance, a range of issues remained unresolved Wednesday after officials’ latest meeting with Democratic leaders. Leaving a roughly two-hour huddle with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows told reporters the sides had “no agreement.”

Congress and the Trump administration have struggled to strike an aid agreement after the enhanced unemployment benefits and a moratorium on evictions from federally-backed housing expired in late July. Millions of Americans still unable to find work will now see a staggering drop in income until lawmakers can pass legislation.

In a CNN interview after Wednesday’s meeting, Meadows said President Donald Trump would take executive action to extend both extra jobless benefits and the eviction moratorium if Democrats and the White House fail to strike a deal. The threat may be a negotiating tactic because it is unclear if Trump has the power to take those steps. Congress controls federal funding.

“If Congress can’t get it done, the president of the United States will,” Meadows told CNN.

After the talks, Schumer told reporters that Democrats “are not walking away” from discussions. The New York Democrat said the sides have “wide differences” as they struggle toward an agreement.

Pelosi would not give any assurances about how long it would take negotiators to strike a deal.

“I feel optimistic that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. But how long the tunnel is remains to be seen,” the California Democrat told reporters.

On Tuesday, the Trump administration team offered to extend extra federal unemployment insurance into December at $400 per week, NBC News and Politico reported. The White House had floated keeping the previous $600 a week benefit for a week while negotiators hashed out a broader deal. Senate Republicans have proposed a plan that would set the insurance at $200 per week through September, then change the benefit to 70% wage replacement.

Mnuchin and Meadows also offered to extend the eviction moratorium into December, the news outlets said. Democrats cut their request for U.S. Postal Service funding to $10 billion from $25 billion, according to the reports.

The four negotiators also met with Postmaster General Louis DeJoy on Wednesday. Schumer said they had a “heated discussion” about ensuring efficient mail delivery when millions of Americans cast their ballots by mail in November during the coronavirus pandemic.
watch now
VIDEO04:36
Sen. Mike Braun on stimulus talks: ‘Mostly what we’re seeing is posturing’

Spokespeople for the Democratic leaders and Trump administration officials did not immediately respond to requests for comment on the reported proposals. The concessions would mark some of the first progress on seemingly intractable issues since the GOP last week released its counteroffer to a House Democratic plan.

Despite the signs of movement toward a deal, Democrats and Republicans remain far apart on aid for state and local governments, funding for schools, and assistance for food, rent and mortgage payments, among other topics. Schumer also suggested Wednesday that he would not accept an agreement without an extension of the $600 per week jobless benefit.

“At the moment, however, the White House is not [supporting $600 a week], and we are not going to strike a deal unless we extend the unemployment benefits which have kept nearly 12 million Americans out of poverty,” he said on the Senate floor.

It appears likely Congress will have to approve a bill with largely Democratic votes in both the GOP-controlled Senate and Democratic-held House. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., acknowledged Tuesday that his caucus has “divisions about what to do” to extend unemployment insurance.

The top Senate Republican also said he is “prepared to support” the deal Democrats and the White House strike, even if he has “problems with certain parts of it.”
VIDEO02:50
Sen. Marco Rubio: Both sides must make concessions in Covid-19 stimulus talks

McConnell told reporters the Senate will stay in session next week and at least delay its planned August recess. The House has already pushed back its recess until Congress passes an aid bill.

Some Republican senators oppose even the $1 trillion proposal their party put forth last week. But others such as Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., have said they would accept concessions.

“We have to act. We have to do something,” he told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Wednesday. “And that will require us to vote for a bill that has things in it that I may not necessarily like.”

Rubio said “there’s a limit” to what he would accept. He said he would oppose a package resembling the $3 trillion legislation House Democrats passed in May.

A handful of Senate Republicans have come around to bigger unemployment insurance payments than their party offered last week. Three GOP senators, two of whom face difficult challenges in November’s election, introduced a bill Wednesday that stakes out a midpoint between the Senate Republican and House Democratic bills.

The plan from Sens. Mitt Romney of Utah, Susan Collins of Maine and Martha McSally of Arizona would allow states to choose whether to offer $400 or $500 per week in August. In September, they would pay $400 a week. Collins and McSally are running for election this year.

From October through December, they would offer 80% wage replacement. States could choose to get a waiver to pay out an extra $300 per week if their unemployment systems cannot handle setting a percentage of a worker’s pay.

Democrats have questioned whether states can upgrade unemployment systems quickly enough to handle replacing a percentage of wages this year.
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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #2444 on: August 06, 2020, 12:44:35 PM »
The motherfucker does have good strategy.

Give talks inside companies where 100% of the audience is employed he does.  His bullshit is smooth and 100% fascist.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/apTVcmEHzXc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/apTVcmEHzXc</a>

Now Trump is talking about change.  Seems like he has changed a lot of things.  He sez so.
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

 

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