AuthorTopic: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread  (Read 218832 times)

Offline RE

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White House: Trump has left his businesses (NOT!)
« Reply #135 on: January 23, 2017, 04:40:59 PM »
First of all, the requisite papers have not been filed.

Second, how is handing off the Trump Empire to your two sons resigning?  He also could have a secret clause which makes the resignation valid only for so long as he is POTUS, then the control reverts back to him.  He's also going to be collecting on revenue from Trump Corps, through stock holdings in his companies.  Any legislation he pushes through which makes those stocks more valuable goes in his pocket.

Trumpty-Dumpty is once again passing out his own "Alternative Facts".  ::)

RE

http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/315699-white-house-trump-has-left-his-businesses

White House: Trump has left his businesses
By Jordan Fabian - 01/23/17 02:51 PM EST

[/img]
© Getty

The White House said Monday that President Trump has left his business empire, but the documentation has not been made public.

"He has resigned from the company, as he said he would, before he took office," press secretary Sean Spicer told reporters at his first official press briefing.

“Don and Eric are fully in charge of the company," he added, referring to the president's two adult sons.

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Spokeswoman Hope Hicks said the required separations documents are "not public at this time.”

ProPublica reported Friday that at that time, there was no record Trump had removed himself from his business empire.

To make the separation official, Trump is required to file paperwork in Florida, Delaware and New York. Officials in those states told the outlet those documents had not been received.

CNN said Monday the Trump Organization had provided the outlet a copy of a 19-page letter that reads: "I, Donald J. Trump, hereby resign from each and every office and position I hold" and then lists more than 400 entities.

The letter was signed by Trump and dated Jan. 19, one day before his inauguration.
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Offline agelbert

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #136 on: January 23, 2017, 08:14:17 PM »
First of all, the requisite papers have not been filed.

Second, how is handing off the Trump Empire to your two sons resigning?  He also could have a secret clause which makes the resignation valid only for so long as he is POTUS, then the control reverts back to him.  He's also going to be collecting on revenue from Trump Corps, through stock holdings in his companies.  Any legislation he pushes through which makes those stocks more valuable goes in his pocket.

Trumpty-Dumpty is once again passing out his own "Alternative Facts".  ::)

RE

http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/315699-white-house-trump-has-left-his-businesses

White House: Trump has left his businesses
By Jordan Fabian - 01/23/17 02:51 PM EST

[/img]
© Getty

The White House said Monday that President Trump has left his business empire, but the documentation has not been made public.

"He has resigned from the company, as he said he would, before he took office," press secretary Sean Spicer told reporters at his first official press briefing.

“Don and Eric are fully in charge of the company," he added, referring to the president's two adult sons.

ADVERTISEMENT
Spokeswoman Hope Hicks said the required separations documents are "not public at this time.”

ProPublica reported Friday that at that time, there was no record Trump had removed himself from his business empire.

To make the separation official, Trump is required to file paperwork in Florida, Delaware and New York. Officials in those states told the outlet those documents had not been received.

CNN said Monday the Trump Organization had provided the outlet a copy of a 19-page letter that reads: "I, Donald J. Trump, hereby resign from each and every office and position I hold" and then lists more than 400 entities.

The letter was signed by Trump and dated Jan. 19, one day before his inauguration.
He left one out...  ;D

"I, Donald J. Trump, hereby resign from the office of President of the United States in order to spend more time with my family businesses".


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if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline RE

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Trump kills TPP, giving China its first big win
« Reply #137 on: January 24, 2017, 01:11:08 AM »
Can't say I am sad to see TPP get shit-canned, but killing trade with tariffs and so forth is just going to accelerate the collapse.

RE

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/01/24/trump-kills-tpp-giving-china-its-first-big-win/?utm_term=.b9c9f1cee1d9

WorldViewsanalysis
Trump kills TPP, giving China its first big win
By Ishaan Tharoor January 24 at 1:00 AM


Want smart analysis of the most important news in your inbox every weekday along with other global reads, interesting ideas and opinions to know? Sign up for the Today's WorldView newsletter.

President Trump signed an executive order on Monday ending the United States' participation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a sweeping trade pact negotiated with eleven other nations. It was neither ratified by American lawmakers nor expected to pass a vote in Congress. But Trump chose to kill it anyway with an executive action, underscoring how different he is from his Republican predecessors — and some of the party's current leaders — who embraced free trade and preached the dogma of open markets.

He also handed China its clearest opening yet to tilt the geopolitical balance in Asia in its favor.

Today's WorldView

What's most important from where the world meets Washington

Trump's opposition to the TPP is one of his few consistent political positions. Throughout the campaign, he issued loud calls in defense of American workers and against the perils of globalization. The pact became politically toxic for both parties last year, with Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton turning against the TPP (she had initially supported it) and her leftist challenger Bernie Sanders joining Trump in framing the TPP as the project of secretive elites ready to stiff the American common man.
President Trump signs order to withdraw from Trans-Pacific Partnership
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On his fourth day in office, President Trump signed an executive order formally withdrawing the U.S. from the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. Crafted by the Obama administration, the trade deal failed to be ratified by Congress during Obama's two terms. (Daron Taylor/The Washington Post)

Trump spent Monday morning with executives of leading American manufacturing companies, discussing plans to give incentives to American corporations to stay at home and tax those that build factories elsewhere and then ship goods back. Whatever comes of these discussions, Trump seems to be sticking to his protectionist promises. Critics, though, argue that the economic and technological realities of our age mean that the bulk of lost American jobs, particularly in manufacturing, are never going to return.

"Economists have warned that many of Trump’s proposals — including suggestions that he would impose blanket double-digit tariffs on goods from Mexico and China — could backfire on the American economy by causing prices to rise or igniting a trade war," wrote The Post's Ylan Q. Mui. "And business groups such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce had lobbied extensively for passage of the TPP, touting the deal as an engine of job growth and an important check on China’s growing ambitions."

Ships sit under construction in a ship-building yard in Dalian, China, on Tuesday, Jan. 17. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

Those supporting the TPP backed the pact for political reasons as well as economic ones. It emerged as the cornerstone of former President Barack Obama's strategy to reassert American influence in Asia and balance against a rising China. The pact reduced tariffs, but also involved provisions that would compel countries to comply with tough international standards on labor and intellectual property rights. Longstanding U.S. allies in the Asia-Pacific, including Japan and Australia, were particularly enthusiastic supporters of the agreement.
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The return on responsibility
Businesses are increasingly making responsible growth part of their core strategy. Here’s why.

"We can't let countries like China write the rules of the global economy," Obama said last year. "We should write those rules."
Remaining countries scramble to save the Trans-Pacific Partnership
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With the Trans-Pacific Partnership in disarray after President Trump withdrew the U.S. from the deal, the 11 remaining members are left to pick up the pieces. Australia's prime minister is open to the "potential" of including China in the partnership, but it's unclear if other nations or China itself would oblige. (Reuters)

A retreat from the TPP now gives Beijing, which has been negotiating its own trade blocs, a chance to fill a void. Since Trump's election, the Philippines, Singapore and Malaysia have shifted toward China's proposed Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, which would also reduce tariffs — without many of the standards put in place by Obama's plan — and redirect Asian trade China's way. Other nations in the region are likely to follow suit.

"We don't have the choice America has. It's big enough that they can make a living selling things to themselves," said New Zealand Prime Minister Bill English on Monday. "We have to trade."

A host of foreign policy luminaries in Washington, including this former U.S. ambassador below, panned Trump's decision to gift China the upper hand:

"Trump has single-handedly given away an enormous source of leverage over China," Edward Alden, of the Council on Foreign Relations, told CNN. "The first rule of negotiating is don't give away something for nothing, and he's done that right off the bat." His boss, Richard Haass, echoed the sentiment:

But Trump doesn't care about the establishment's outrage. He doesn't care about the United States' historic role as a guarantor of stability and prosperity for a large swath of Asia. And the White House looks happy to risk escalation with China in a number of strategic hotspots, including over disputed islands in the South China Sea.

The uncertainty posed by the new administration allowed Chinese President Xi Jinping to play the grown-up at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland last week, where he gave a well-received address championing globalization and scolded those with protectionist delusions. The Chinese can now "pitch themselves as the driver of trade liberalization," Eric Altbach, a former U.S. trade official, told Bloomberg.

Trump's critics on the left say his populism is a sham aimed at securing plum deals for corporate allies while doing little to boost workers' rights at home.

Beijing's critics, meanwhile, argue that posturing as the guardian of the global order can't obscure China's own need for both political and economic reform. Instead, the world could drift into an era of confrontation and great power politics more familiar to the 19th century than the past few decades of American supremacy.

"Eventual Chinese leadership would not be akin to America assuming Britain’s former role after World War II," wrote Richard Fontaine, a former Bush administration official, in the Wall Street Journal. "Instead it would lead to a world likely less prosperous and certainly less free."
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Online K-Dog

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #138 on: January 24, 2017, 08:12:40 AM »
I wrote the Trumpster a letter about what he can do at Standing Rock to make everybody happy.  I'm serious so I am not re-publishing the letter here.  Not now anyway; and hopefully never.  If I do it will be because things have gone in the wrong direction. Then I will post it in the Standing Rock thread.

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Offline jdwheeler42

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Re: Trump kills TPP, giving China its first big win
« Reply #139 on: January 24, 2017, 09:27:59 AM »
Can't say I am sad to see TPP get shit-canned, but killing trade with tariffs and so forth is just going to accelerate the collapse.
And the problem would be....?  :icon_scratch:
Making pigs fly is easy... that is, of course, after you have built the catapult....

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Re: Trump kills TPP, giving China its first big win
« Reply #140 on: January 24, 2017, 12:41:52 PM »
Can't say I am sad to see TPP get shit-canned, but killing trade with tariffs and so forth is just going to accelerate the collapse.
And the problem would be....?  :icon_scratch:

I wonder too.  Making it harder for cheap-assed Chinese junk that does not do anything good for our domestic economy harder to sell here should not hasten collapse.  It should slow it down.

Obama is a citizen of the global world who conned his way into the presidency pretending he gave two shits about the American people.  Then he showed his true colors which turned out to be white in the worst way.  Trump is different.  Stopping the TPP is in our national interest.  Trump starts out on the other side of the fence already being white in the worst way.  Trump has the opportunity however to become white in the best way if he can escape the echo chamber that surrounds him and rise above his class.

Sadly, I don't think he has it in him to muster the necessary courage to be special.  His actions today with his executive order concerning oil pipelines may be showing us that.  One flush may be all we get.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2017, 01:05:52 PM by K-Dog »
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Offline RE

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Re: Trump kills TPP, giving China its first big win
« Reply #141 on: January 24, 2017, 01:29:22 PM »
Can't say I am sad to see TPP get shit-canned, but killing trade with tariffs and so forth is just going to accelerate the collapse.
And the problem would be....?  :icon_scratch:

I wonder too.  Making it harder for cheap-assed Chinese junk that does not do anything good for our domestic economy harder to sell here should not hasten collapse.  It should slow it down.

Dropping on tarriffs will collapse trade and the GDP of both coutries.  This will also collapse numerous banks involved in international trade.

Just cancelling TPP won't do this, but once onerous tarriffs are dropped on, it's a sure recipe for economic collapse.

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Trump advances controversial oil pipelines with executive action
« Reply #142 on: January 24, 2017, 01:48:49 PM »
Let the Pipelines Commence!

RE

http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/24/politics/trump-keystone-xl-dakota-access-pipelines-executive-actions/

Trump advances controversial oil pipelines with executive action


By Athena Jones, Jeremy Diamond and Gregory Krieg, CNN

Updated 4:27 PM ET, Tue January 24, 2017
Trump signs oil pipeline executive actions

dakota pipeline Tribe Announcement sot _00000000.jpg
Tribe chief on Dakota pipeline: 'We made it'
CANNON BALL, ND - NOVEMBER 30: Snow covers Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on November 30, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country have been gathering at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The proposed 1,172 mile long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Officials: Pipeline will be re-routed
exp Amy Goodman on standing rock_00011414.jpg
Amy Goodman describes covering Standing Rock
Pipeline protesters vow to remain
Pipeline protesters defy evacuation order
Protester: 'It will be a battle'
Police unleashed a water cannon on people protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota.
Protesters fighting pipeline are staying put
Meet Mni Wiconi, or Water is Life
Now Playing
Trump signs oil pipeline executive actions
Tires burn as armed soldiers and law enforcement officers stand in formation on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, to force Dakota Access pipeline protesters off private land where they had camped to block construction. The pipeline is to carry oil from western North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to an existing pipeline in Patoka, Ill. (Mike McCleary/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)
What's up with the Dakota Access Pipeline?
US Navy veteran John Gutekanst from Athens, Ohio, waves an American flag as an activist approaches the police barricade with his hands up on a bridge near Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 4, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country gather at the camp trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Police have their say about Standing Rock
Veterans stand in solidarity in Standing Rock
CANNON BALL, ND - DECEMBER 05: Military veterans are briefed on cold-weather safety issues and their overall role at Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 5, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Over the weekend a large group of military veterans joined native Americans and activists from around the country who have been at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Yesterday the US Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not grant an easement for the pipeline to cross under a lake on the Sioux Tribes Standing Rock reservation. The proposed 1,172-mile-long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Protesters stand strong despite blizzard
Dakota Access Pipeline fight isn't over
Victory for Native Americans in pipeline fight
A crowd celebrates at the Oceti Sakowin camp after it was announced that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers won't grant easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D., Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Drumming, chanting over Dakota pipeline halt
dakota pipeline Tribe Announcement sot _00000000.jpg
Tribe chief on Dakota pipeline: 'We made it'
CANNON BALL, ND - NOVEMBER 30: Snow covers Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on November 30, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country have been gathering at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The proposed 1,172 mile long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Officials: Pipeline will be re-routed
exp Amy Goodman on standing rock_00011414.jpg
Amy Goodman describes covering Standing Rock
Pipeline protesters vow to remain
Pipeline protesters defy evacuation order
Protester: 'It will be a battle'
Police unleashed a water cannon on people protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota.
Protesters fighting pipeline are staying put
Meet Mni Wiconi, or Water is Life
Trump signs oil pipeline executive actions
Tires burn as armed soldiers and law enforcement officers stand in formation on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, to force Dakota Access pipeline protesters off private land where they had camped to block construction. The pipeline is to carry oil from western North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to an existing pipeline in Patoka, Ill. (Mike McCleary/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)
What's up with the Dakota Access Pipeline?
US Navy veteran John Gutekanst from Athens, Ohio, waves an American flag as an activist approaches the police barricade with his hands up on a bridge near Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 4, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country gather at the camp trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Police have their say about Standing Rock
Veterans stand in solidarity in Standing Rock
CANNON BALL, ND - DECEMBER 05: Military veterans are briefed on cold-weather safety issues and their overall role at Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 5, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Over the weekend a large group of military veterans joined native Americans and activists from around the country who have been at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Yesterday the US Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not grant an easement for the pipeline to cross under a lake on the Sioux Tribes Standing Rock reservation. The proposed 1,172-mile-long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Protesters stand strong despite blizzard
Dakota Access Pipeline fight isn't over
Victory for Native Americans in pipeline fight
A crowd celebrates at the Oceti Sakowin camp after it was announced that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers won't grant easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D., Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Drumming, chanting over Dakota pipeline halt
Story highlights

    The decision to advance the pipelines would cast aside decisions by President Barack Obama's administration
    Trump during his campaign said he would streamline the approval of the Keystone XL pipeline

Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump on Tuesday signed executive actions to advance approval of the Keystone XL and Dakota Access oil pipelines.
The decision to advance the pipelines cast aside efforts by President Barack Obama's administration to block construction of the two pipelines, while making good on one of Trump's campaign promises.

As he signed the documents Tuesday in the Oval Office, Trump also vowed to "renegotiate some of the terms" of the Keystone bill and said he would then seek to "get that pipeline built."

Trump also issued executive actions declaring oil pipelines constructed in the US should be built with US materials, streamlining the regulatory process for pipeline construction and shortening the environmental review process.
Trump during his campaign said he would streamline the approval of the Keystone XL pipeline, which was stalled for years in the Obama administration until Obama denied approval for the pipeline's construction altogether in November 2015.
And Trump said for the first time in December that he supported construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which stalled last year amid protests opposing its construction on Native American lands. The Obama administration denied the company a permit it needed to complete the pipeline late last year.
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Protesters of the pipeline projects quickly condemned the decisions Tuesday.
"President Trump is legally required to honor our treaty rights and provide a fair and reasonable pipeline process," said Standing Rock Sioux Tribe chairman Dave Archambault II in a statement. "Americans know this pipeline was unfairly rerouted towards our nation and without our consent. The existing pipeline route risks infringing on our treaty rights, contaminating our water and the water of 17 million Americans downstream."
Environmental groups and activists were also quick to slam the decision, with Tom Steyer, the president of NextGen Climate, accusing the Trump administration of putting "corporate interests ahead of American interests."
"The pipelines are all risk and no reward, allowing corporate polluters to transport oil through our country to be sold on the global market, while putting our air and water at serious risk," he said in a statement.
Meanwhile, Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, a Democrat from North Dakota where the Dakota Access Pipeline is being built, welcomed the move, as did Sen. Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia.
"What this country needs is more jobs, and that is why I have always been a proponent of the Keystone XL Pipeline and was an original cosponsor of legislation approving the Keystone XL Pipeline project," Manchin, who has already supported several of Trump's nominees and initiatives, said in a statement. "With a majority of Americans in support of the Keystone XL pipeline's construction, I'm glad we are finally moving forward with this important project."
Just as Trump on Tuesday flicked to the need to "renegotiate" the Keystone XL pipeline terms, Trump during his campaign argued not just for quick approval of the pipeline, which would shuttle oil from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico, but also said he would push for a deal that would grant US taxpayers a share of the profits. Trump said that the US would approve the pipeline while also seeking a "better deal."
Trump's approval of both pipelines are early signs of how his administration will take a drastically different approach to energy and environmental issues. Beyond approving the pipelines, Trump has also vowed to slash environmental protection regulations and has nominated several skeptics of the overwhelming scientific consensus on climate change to key Cabinet posts dealing with environmental issues.
New wave of protests expected
Environmental groups and their progressive allies have already begun to mobilize against Trump's directive.
The Indigenous Environmental Network, a leading tribal organization dedicated to blocking further construction of the Dakota Access project, promised a new round of "massive mobilization and civil disobedience."
The documents signed by Trump have not yet been made public or provided to the tribes or their legal advocates. But Phillip Ellis, a spokesman for Earthjustice, a nonprofit environmental law organization that represents the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, told CNN they were prepared to act.
"Whatever the decision from the President and whatever the mechanism, we will pursue on behalf of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe all legal outlets to oppose the permitting (of pipeline construction)," he said. "We just don't know what that is yet."
A lawyer with Earthjustice, Jan Hasselman, said it was his understanding that the memorandum signed by Trump "directs the Army to review and approve the easement quickly, 'to the extent permitted by law.'"
Energy Transfer Partners, the company building the pipeline, needs an easement -- or legal permission -- from the Army Corps of Engineers to drill under Lake Oahe -- about a half-mile upstream from the Standing Rock tribe reservation border -- to complete the project.
"The Army Corps of Engineers still needs to make a decision on the easement and if they issue it without the (Environmental Impact Statement) process we will amend our complaint to challenge it legally on behalf of the tribe," he said.
The headsman council at the Oceti Sakowin camp, home to a large protest site during demonstrations last year, issued a call on Tuesday for "allies and people to stand up where they are" and engage in "mass civil disobedience as a showing of solidarity for Standing Rock."
Desiree Kane, who spent seven months at the Oceti Sakowin Camp as a media volunteer, told CNN she ready to answer the call.
"I leave tomorrow morning," she said in an email.
Organizers from 350.org, the Sierra Club, CREDO, and other groups have already planned a rally outside the White House at 5 p.m. Tuesday to protest the decision.
"The Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines would be a disaster for the land and water, the rights of Indigenous peoples, and the climate," they said in a statement. "Both pipelines ignited widespread grassroots resistance worldwide, and Trump's executive orders are renewing mass opposition to the projects."
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Offline agelbert

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #143 on: January 24, 2017, 02:35:23 PM »
Let the Pipelines Commence!

RE

http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/24/politics/trump-keystone-xl-dakota-access-pipelines-executive-actions/

Trump advances controversial oil pipelines with executive action


By Athena Jones, Jeremy Diamond and Gregory Krieg, CNN

Updated 4:27 PM ET, Tue January 24, 2017
Trump signs oil pipeline executive actions

dakota pipeline Tribe Announcement sot _00000000.jpg
Tribe chief on Dakota pipeline: 'We made it'
CANNON BALL, ND - NOVEMBER 30: Snow covers Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on November 30, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country have been gathering at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The proposed 1,172 mile long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Officials: Pipeline will be re-routed
exp Amy Goodman on standing rock_00011414.jpg
Amy Goodman describes covering Standing Rock
Pipeline protesters vow to remain
Pipeline protesters defy evacuation order
Protester: 'It will be a battle'
Police unleashed a water cannon on people protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota.
Protesters fighting pipeline are staying put
Meet Mni Wiconi, or Water is Life
Now Playing
Trump signs oil pipeline executive actions
Tires burn as armed soldiers and law enforcement officers stand in formation on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, to force Dakota Access pipeline protesters off private land where they had camped to block construction. The pipeline is to carry oil from western North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to an existing pipeline in Patoka, Ill. (Mike McCleary/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)
What's up with the Dakota Access Pipeline?
US Navy veteran John Gutekanst from Athens, Ohio, waves an American flag as an activist approaches the police barricade with his hands up on a bridge near Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 4, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country gather at the camp trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Police have their say about Standing Rock
Veterans stand in solidarity in Standing Rock
CANNON BALL, ND - DECEMBER 05: Military veterans are briefed on cold-weather safety issues and their overall role at Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 5, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Over the weekend a large group of military veterans joined native Americans and activists from around the country who have been at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Yesterday the US Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not grant an easement for the pipeline to cross under a lake on the Sioux Tribes Standing Rock reservation. The proposed 1,172-mile-long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Protesters stand strong despite blizzard
Dakota Access Pipeline fight isn't over
Victory for Native Americans in pipeline fight
A crowd celebrates at the Oceti Sakowin camp after it was announced that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers won't grant easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D., Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Drumming, chanting over Dakota pipeline halt
dakota pipeline Tribe Announcement sot _00000000.jpg
Tribe chief on Dakota pipeline: 'We made it'
CANNON BALL, ND - NOVEMBER 30: Snow covers Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on November 30, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country have been gathering at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The proposed 1,172 mile long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Officials: Pipeline will be re-routed
exp Amy Goodman on standing rock_00011414.jpg
Amy Goodman describes covering Standing Rock
Pipeline protesters vow to remain
Pipeline protesters defy evacuation order
Protester: 'It will be a battle'
Police unleashed a water cannon on people protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota.
Protesters fighting pipeline are staying put
Meet Mni Wiconi, or Water is Life
Trump signs oil pipeline executive actions
Tires burn as armed soldiers and law enforcement officers stand in formation on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, to force Dakota Access pipeline protesters off private land where they had camped to block construction. The pipeline is to carry oil from western North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to an existing pipeline in Patoka, Ill. (Mike McCleary/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)
What's up with the Dakota Access Pipeline?
US Navy veteran John Gutekanst from Athens, Ohio, waves an American flag as an activist approaches the police barricade with his hands up on a bridge near Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 4, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country gather at the camp trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Police have their say about Standing Rock
Veterans stand in solidarity in Standing Rock
CANNON BALL, ND - DECEMBER 05: Military veterans are briefed on cold-weather safety issues and their overall role at Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 5, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Over the weekend a large group of military veterans joined native Americans and activists from around the country who have been at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Yesterday the US Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not grant an easement for the pipeline to cross under a lake on the Sioux Tribes Standing Rock reservation. The proposed 1,172-mile-long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Protesters stand strong despite blizzard
Dakota Access Pipeline fight isn't over
Victory for Native Americans in pipeline fight
A crowd celebrates at the Oceti Sakowin camp after it was announced that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers won't grant easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D., Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Drumming, chanting over Dakota pipeline halt
Story highlights

    The decision to advance the pipelines would cast aside decisions by President Barack Obama's administration
    Trump during his campaign said he would streamline the approval of the Keystone XL pipeline

Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump on Tuesday signed executive actions to advance approval of the Keystone XL and Dakota Access oil pipelines.
The decision to advance the pipelines cast aside efforts by President Barack Obama's administration to block construction of the two pipelines, while making good on one of Trump's campaign promises.

As he signed the documents Tuesday in the Oval Office, Trump also vowed to "renegotiate some of the terms" of the Keystone bill and said he would then seek to "get that pipeline built."

Trump also issued executive actions declaring oil pipelines constructed in the US should be built with US materials, streamlining the regulatory process for pipeline construction and shortening the environmental review process.
Trump during his campaign said he would streamline the approval of the Keystone XL pipeline, which was stalled for years in the Obama administration until Obama denied approval for the pipeline's construction altogether in November 2015.
And Trump said for the first time in December that he supported construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which stalled last year amid protests opposing its construction on Native American lands. The Obama administration denied the company a permit it needed to complete the pipeline late last year.
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Protesters of the pipeline projects quickly condemned the decisions Tuesday.
"President Trump is legally required to honor our treaty rights and provide a fair and reasonable pipeline process," said Standing Rock Sioux Tribe chairman Dave Archambault II in a statement. "Americans know this pipeline was unfairly rerouted towards our nation and without our consent. The existing pipeline route risks infringing on our treaty rights, contaminating our water and the water of 17 million Americans downstream."
Environmental groups and activists were also quick to slam the decision, with Tom Steyer, the president of NextGen Climate, accusing the Trump administration of putting "corporate interests ahead of American interests."
"The pipelines are all risk and no reward, allowing corporate polluters to transport oil through our country to be sold on the global market, while putting our air and water at serious risk," he said in a statement.
Meanwhile, Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, a Democrat from North Dakota where the Dakota Access Pipeline is being built, welcomed the move, as did Sen. Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia.
"What this country needs is more jobs, and that is why I have always been a proponent of the Keystone XL Pipeline and was an original cosponsor of legislation approving the Keystone XL Pipeline project," Manchin, who has already supported several of Trump's nominees and initiatives, said in a statement. "With a majority of Americans in support of the Keystone XL pipeline's construction, I'm glad we are finally moving forward with this important project."
Just as Trump on Tuesday flicked to the need to "renegotiate" the Keystone XL pipeline terms, Trump during his campaign argued not just for quick approval of the pipeline, which would shuttle oil from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico, but also said he would push for a deal that would grant US taxpayers a share of the profits. Trump said that the US would approve the pipeline while also seeking a "better deal."
Trump's approval of both pipelines are early signs of how his administration will take a drastically different approach to energy and environmental issues. Beyond approving the pipelines, Trump has also vowed to slash environmental protection regulations and has nominated several skeptics of the overwhelming scientific consensus on climate change to key Cabinet posts dealing with environmental issues.
New wave of protests expected
Environmental groups and their progressive allies have already begun to mobilize against Trump's directive.
The Indigenous Environmental Network, a leading tribal organization dedicated to blocking further construction of the Dakota Access project, promised a new round of "massive mobilization and civil disobedience."
The documents signed by Trump have not yet been made public or provided to the tribes or their legal advocates. But Phillip Ellis, a spokesman for Earthjustice, a nonprofit environmental law organization that represents the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, told CNN they were prepared to act.
"Whatever the decision from the President and whatever the mechanism, we will pursue on behalf of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe all legal outlets to oppose the permitting (of pipeline construction)," he said. "We just don't know what that is yet."
A lawyer with Earthjustice, Jan Hasselman, said it was his understanding that the memorandum signed by Trump "directs the Army to review and approve the easement quickly, 'to the extent permitted by law.'"
Energy Transfer Partners, the company building the pipeline, needs an easement -- or legal permission -- from the Army Corps of Engineers to drill under Lake Oahe -- about a half-mile upstream from the Standing Rock tribe reservation border -- to complete the project.
"The Army Corps of Engineers still needs to make a decision on the easement and if they issue it without the (Environmental Impact Statement) process we will amend our complaint to challenge it legally on behalf of the tribe," he said.
The headsman council at the Oceti Sakowin camp, home to a large protest site during demonstrations last year, issued a call on Tuesday for "allies and people to stand up where they are" and engage in "mass civil disobedience as a showing of solidarity for Standing Rock."
Desiree Kane, who spent seven months at the Oceti Sakowin Camp as a media volunteer, told CNN she ready to answer the call.
"I leave tomorrow morning," she said in an email.
Organizers from 350.org, the Sierra Club, CREDO, and other groups have already planned a rally outside the White House at 5 p.m. Tuesday to protest the decision.
"The Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines would be a disaster for the land and water, the rights of Indigenous peoples, and the climate," they said in a statement. "Both pipelines ignited widespread grassroots resistance worldwide, and Trump's executive orders are renewing mass opposition to the projects."

I am surprised that ANYBODY would be surprised at the above actions of the Racist, Fascist fossil fuel industry PUPPET Trump.

Trump is perfectly in agreement with the following "Free Market Policy" (and he ALWAYS HAS BEEN!):


There are three legs to the fascism stool:


1) A melding of corporate and civil governance.

2) A foreign policy predicated on an aggressive nationalistic worldview.

3) An authoritarian government.

A political system that recognizes corporations as individual persons certainly provides one of those legs. Trump just completed the last two legs.

Have a nice day.

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Offline RE

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President Trump is planning to sign executive orders on immigration this week
« Reply #144 on: January 24, 2017, 06:57:39 PM »
Executive Orders?  Whatever happened to "Checks & Balances? ???  :icon_scratch:

RE

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/president-trump-is-planning-to-sign-executive-orders-on-immigration-this-week/2017/01/24/aba22b7a-e287-11e6-a453-19ec4b3d09ba_story.html?utm_term=.7f972828a22e


National Security
President Trump is planning to sign executive orders on immigration this week


President Donald Trump speaks at The Salute To Our Armed Services Inaugural Ball in Washington on Friday. (Alex Brandon/AP)

By Jerry Markon and Robert Costa January 24 at 8:44 PM

President Trump is planning to sign executive orders on Wednesday toughening immigration enforcement along the U.S.-Mexico border and targeting cities where local leaders refuse to hand over illegal immigrants for deportation, part of a multi-day rollout of his long-promised crackdown on illegal immigration, officials familiar with the decision said Tuesday.

The moves represent Trump’s first effort to deliver on perhaps the signature issue that drove his presidential campaign: his belief that illegal immigration is out of control and threatening the country’s safety and security.

On Wednesday, Trump plans to speak to a town hall of employees at the Department of Homeland Security’s headquarters in Washington, where he is expected to sign the orders. The effort to crack down on what are known as sanctuary cities will resonate with the Republican base, which has long criticized local officials who refuse to cooperate with federal immigration authorities. Later this week, officials said, the president plans to sign other orders restricting immigration and access to the United States for refugees and some visa holders from Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, although the exact timing was being arranged late Tuesday and was subject to change. Residents from many of these places are already rarely granted U.S. visas.

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Senior Trump advisers such as chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon and attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions were deeply involved in the extended debate about the orders, said several people familiar with the discussions. These people emphasized that the week’s actions are intended to start fulfilling Trump’s campaign promises on immigration and bring Republicans behind Trump on the issue, one day before he speaks at Thursday’s congressional GOP retreat in Philadelphia. These people spoke on the condition of anonymity because the executive orders were still being finalized.

Although Trump’s immigration efforts this week are widely seen inside the White House as a victory for the self-described populist wing of his inner circle — which includes Bannon, Sessions and top policy adviser Stephen Miller — there are ongoing discussions about just how far to go on some policies, in particular the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA. The 2012 initiative has given temporary protection from deportation to hundreds of thousands of people who arrived in the United States as children. Trump vowed during the campaign to reverse it.
How sanctuary cities work and what might happen to them under Trump View Graphic

It was not clear late Tuesday how DACA would be addressed as part of Trump’s immigration actions, if at all, according to a White House official, because of differing views among Trump’s advisers and associates about the timing, scope and political benefits of ending the program or suspending it for new entries.

But whether DACA will be the target of an executive order remained unclear late Tuesday as discussions continued at the White House over how and when to address the program.

“Many options are being worked through on DACA,” the official said.

A second person close to Trump noted that Sessions remains highly influential and said during his Senate confirmation hearing this month that ending DACA “would certainly be constitutional.” The person said Sessions and Bannon are working to make sure DACA is addressed but have not finalized a new policy with Trump.

White House aides said Trump planned to meet Wednesday with several parents of children who were killed by immigrants who are in the country illegally. These activists, who refer to themselves as “angel moms,” were frequently featured during Trump’s campaign rallies and during the Republican National Convention.

Any immigration measures announced by the president will set up a fierce battle in Trump’s first week between the White House and advocates for immigrants, who were reacting with alarm Tuesday as word spread that immigration was on the table. Immigration experts said they had been told the orders later this week would include a halt to all admissions of refugees for 120 days, including from the Syrian civil war, and a 30-day pause in the issuance of immigrant and non-immigrant visas to people from some predominantly Muslim countries.

The planned visit to DHS will be Trump’s second to a Cabinet-level agency since he took office Friday. He spoke to employees at the CIA’s headquarters in Northern Virginia on Saturday.
Who is really going to pay for Trump's border wall?
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President-elect Donald Trump has repeatedly asserted that “Mexico will pay” for his proposed southern border wall – but he's also said the U.S. will be reimbursed by Mexico after building it with taxpayer funds. (Peter Stevenson/The Washington Post)

The presidential visit to DHS also would symbolize some of the more controversial parts of Trump’s agenda. He centered his campaign to some degree on his proposal to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border to keep out illegal immigrants, a plan that has been vehemently opposed by Democrats and immigrant advocates.

Trump has also promised to beef up immigration enforcement along the border and inside the United States — including a tripling of the number of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents — in an expensive and logistically difficult operation to remove millions of people from the country.

Perhaps most in dispute were Trump’s campaign comments on Muslims. He called at one point for a ban on all Muslims entering the United States as a counterterrorism measure and said he would halt immigration from Syria and deport Syrian refugees already in the country.

It is unclear how this week’s executive actions, orchestrated from the White House, will sit with the man who would enforce them: Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly. Kelly, a retired Marine general who was confirmed Friday, struck a markedly different tone from the president during his confirmation hearing, saying the controversial southwest border wall might not “be built anytime soon.’’

Kelly noted that when he was a Marine officer in Iraq, his forces secured stability in part by reaching out to clerics and other Muslim leaders. He also vowed to promote “tolerance” and said he didn’t think it was appropriate to target any group of people solely based on religion or ethnic background, including through the development of a registry.

DHS declined to comment on Tuesday. But people familiar with the matter said Kelly, known for his blunt manner, is already under intense pressure from the White House to enforce the immigration crackdown on which Trump built his campaign.

Abigail Hauslohner, Karen DeYoung, Ashley Parker and David Nakamura contributed to this report.
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Offline RE

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Trump to direct federal resources toward building a border wall on Wednesday
« Reply #145 on: January 25, 2017, 04:33:42 AM »
Mexico will pay for the wall.  Right.

RE

http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/24/politics/donald-trump-immigration-refugees/

Trump to direct federal resources toward building a border wall on Wednesday

By Jim Acosta, Dan Merica and Kevin Liptak, CNN

Updated 4:12 AM ET, Wed January 25, 2017
trump border wall explainer animation orig nws_00003622

donald trump immigration amnesty support orig cm_00000000.jpg
Trump on amnesty for some undocumented immigrants
donald trump undocumented immigrants crime fact check origwx ty_00013807.jpg
Fact checking Trump on crimes by immigrants
Karina Suarez says she will fight President-elect's anti-deportation policies
Dreamer prepares to fight Trump
A mother and her children walk outside the refugee house they stayed in after being released from detention
Families held after border crossing
Juan, an undocumented immigrant, lives in Chicago but misses his family in Mexico.
Dollars to Mexico: A village's lifeline
trump nm new clinton emails_00004512.jpg
Trump stokes immigration fears in New Mexico
Donald Trump: We need to get out 'bad hombres'
donald trump estero rally
Trump: Open immigration makes recent terror possible
trump border wall explainer animation orig nws_00003622.jpg
What it would take to build Trump's border wall
us mexico border fence jpm orig_00004913.jpg
What the US-Mexico border really looks like
Now Playing
Immigrant husband, wife support Trump's wall
Senior adviser Kellyanne Conway discusses the US-Mexico wall
Conway: Mexico will pay for the wall
California Democrats ready to fight Trump
US President-elect Donald Trump looks on while speaking during a 'Thank You Tour 2016' rally in Orlando, Florida on December 16, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
GOP officials: Trump to have US pay for wall
immigrants fear possible deportation rosa flores pkg newday
Families prepare for possible deporation
donald trump immigration amnesty support orig cm_00000000.jpg
Trump on amnesty for some undocumented immigrants
donald trump undocumented immigrants crime fact check origwx ty_00013807.jpg
Fact checking Trump on crimes by immigrants
Karina Suarez says she will fight President-elect's anti-deportation policies
Dreamer prepares to fight Trump
A mother and her children walk outside the refugee house they stayed in after being released from detention
Families held after border crossing
Juan, an undocumented immigrant, lives in Chicago but misses his family in Mexico.
Dollars to Mexico: A village's lifeline
trump nm new clinton emails_00004512.jpg
Trump stokes immigration fears in New Mexico
Donald Trump: We need to get out 'bad hombres'
donald trump estero rally
Trump: Open immigration makes recent terror possible
trump border wall explainer animation orig nws_00003622.jpg
What it would take to build Trump's border wall
us mexico border fence jpm orig_00004913.jpg
What the US-Mexico border really looks like
Immigrant husband, wife support Trump's wall
Senior adviser Kellyanne Conway discusses the US-Mexico wall
Conway: Mexico will pay for the wall
California Democrats ready to fight Trump
US President-elect Donald Trump looks on while speaking during a 'Thank You Tour 2016' rally in Orlando, Florida on December 16, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
GOP officials: Trump to have US pay for wall
immigrants fear possible deportation rosa flores pkg newday
Families prepare for possible deporation
donald trump immigration amnesty support orig cm_00000000.jpg
Trump on amnesty for some undocumented immigrants

Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump will take executive action Wednesday directing federal resources toward building a border wall, a White House official confirmed to CNN.
The move begins a multi-day roll out of immigration actions that's also expected to include moves related to refugees and visas. Trump will make the announcement during a visit to the Department of Homeland Security at 1:25 p.m. ET.
Trump himself hinted at Wednesday's move on Twitter, writing "Big day planned on NATIONAL SECURITY tomorrow. Among many other things, we will build the wall!"

Trump plans to issue two executive orders Wednesday during his visit to the Department of Homeland Security, according to a person familiar with the President's plan.

The first will direct the agency to begin construction of the border wall, as well as take steps to repair existing areas of fencing along the frontier between the US and Mexico. The order will also include a mandate to increase staff at Customs and Border Protection by 5,000 and alleviate the flood of migrants fleeing violence in Central America.
According to the person familiar with the plans, Trump's executive order will require DHS to publicly detail what aid is currently directed to Mexico, an indication of an eventual move toward redirecting some of that money to fund the wall's construction — and giving cover for a longstanding campaign promise to have Mexico pay for the structure.
Executive orders: one thing you need to know
Executive orders: one thing you need to know

Executive orders: one thing you need to know 00:53
A second order will work to eliminate so-called "sanctuary cities," where municipal governments refuse to hand over undocumented immigrants to federal authorities. That order will triple resources for Immigration and Custom Enforcement and direct the federal government to identify criminal aliens in the US.
Officials said Trump would wait until later in the week to take action on visas and refugees, potentially as early as Thursday.
An order being prepared for Trump's signature includes the drastic measure of suspending the entire refugee program for four months in an attempt to gauge which country's migrants pose the least risk for US national security. A program for admitting Syrian refugees, who are fleeing civil war and a humanitarian crisis, would be ended indefinitely.
The measure being drafted specifies that migrants who engage in bigotry, so-called "honor killings" by males of their female relatives, and violence against women shouldn't be admitted. It caps the total number of refugees admitted in the 2017 fiscal year at 50,000. And it directs the Pentagon and US State Department to plan "safe zones" inside Syria, which the previous administration rejected as unlikely to alleviate civilian suffering.
Trump launched his campaign on a hardline immigration policy, proposing to build a "great, great wall" along the US-Mexico border and later to institute a "complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States" until the US government could properly vet people coming in.
Trump's immigration policy (or what we know about it) in 13 illuminating tweets
13 illuminating Donald Trump immigration tweets
But as time went on, Trump's rhetoric on immigration began to change and, at times, soften.
His aides eventually walked back the Muslim ban to a ban on immigration from countries with widespread terrorism issues. And while Trump promised to deport all people in the country illegal throughout the campaign, Sean Spicer, his press secretary, said Monday that repealing President Barack Obama's two immigration executive actions were not the President's prime focus.
"First and foremost, the President's been very, very clear that we need to direct agencies to focus on those who are in this country illegally and have a record -- a criminal record or poses a threat to the American people," Spicer said. "That's where the priorities going to be."
CNN Politics app
Wall
Is Donald Trump's border wall possible?

Is Donald Trump's border wall possible? 04:03
Earlier in January, Trump's transition team engaged in active discussions with the US Army Corps of Engineers and Interior Department to begin planning a wall along the Mexican border, including how specific environmental laws could get in the way, CNN reported.
A US official with knowledge of a visit last month to the Interior Department -- which oversees most federal lands and major environmental laws -- said the transition team was particularly interested in finding out "how long it would take" to build the wall given potential legal obstacles.
"It seems clear they were trying to size up the environmental laws that may be obstacles to building the wall," the source said.
Another US official told CNN the Trump transition team has also reached out to the Army Corps of Engineers' Southwest Division, that has previously built border security fencing, to determine what previous fencing cost and how it was constructed. The team also asked Interior several questions, including how much wall would be needed, in an effort to determine a solid number of miles of wall necessary to secure the southern border.
Trump's announcement comes as a high-level delegation of Mexican leaders arrive in the US for talks. Trump spoke by phone with the Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto on Saturday, and plans to meet with him later this month.
Refugees
What will Jared Kushner and Donald Trump's Middle East look like?
What will Jared Kushner and Donald Trump's Middle East look like?
The orders on immigration, a congressional aide said, are expected to include restrictions on refugees, and people with some visas from countries including Iraq, Iran, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia and Libya. Reuters first reported the details of the executive orders.
Retired Marine Corps Gen. John Kelly, Trump's pick to lead the Homeland Security department, was confirmed last week by the Senate.
In the first three days of the Trump administration, the US admitted 136 Syrian refugees (Saturday-Monday), according to is State Department Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration.
"These executive orders will not make our nation any safer, rather it will make our nation more fearful and less welcoming, and such restrictions run contrary to very founding principles of our nation," Hassan Shibly, executive director of CAIR-Florida told CNN.
Shibly said CAIR is already getting calls from US citizens, green card holders, immigrants and even visitors who are concerned about whether they will be allowed to re-enter the US if they leave the country for vacations or travel.
"Donald Trump is making good on the most shameful and discriminatory promises he made on the campaign trail. He called for a Muslim ban and is now taking the first steps to implement one. This will not stand. The American people are better than this," said National Iranian American Council in a statement.

CNN's Jeremy Diamond contributed to this report.
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Offline luciddreams

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #146 on: January 25, 2017, 06:55:24 AM »
Looks like Dump is going to do exactly what he said he was going to do.  He's going to create a bunch of temporary jobs building pipelines and building a wall.  Key here is temporary, but we all know Merikans can't think much past the next football game so nobody cares about the temporary aspect.  Long term thinking need not apply in Merka. 

Of course Dump is not doing this, the Corporatocracy/deep state/military industrial complex is doing this.  He's just following orders.  I can't believe anything other.  If he's not following orders he will be removed from office right quick.  Just like JFK was removed from office for going against the deep state plans for total war and global domination. 

Yep, Dumps doing all he said he would do, except for the whole "this is your Merka," "Merka is for you the people," "Goobermint is going to work for the Merkan people," and all of that other bullshit he diarrhead out of his mouth during his inauguration bull shit monologue.  It definitely was no speech. 

Offline agelbert

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #147 on: January 25, 2017, 11:35:07 AM »
Looks like Dump is going to do exactly what he said he was going to do.  He's going to create a bunch of temporary jobs building pipelines and building a wall.  Key here is temporary, but we all know Merikans can't think much past the next football game so nobody cares about the temporary aspect.  Long term thinking need not apply in Merka. 

Of course Dump is not doing this, the Corporatocracy/deep state/military industrial complex is doing this.  He's just following orders.  I can't believe anything other.   :emthup: :emthup: :emthup:

Yep, Dumps doing all he said he would do, except for the whole "this is your Merka," "Merka is for you the people," "Goobermint is going to work for the Merkan people," and all of that other bullshit he diarrhead out of his mouth during his inauguration bull shit monologue.  It definitely was no speech. 


Well said.  :emthup:

To Trump and his "alternative facts" true believing followers:

Agelbert NOTE: The full quote sheds even more light on who the Trumpers, many who claim to be Christians, REALLY are.

Quote
“To argue with a man who has renounced the use and authority of reason, and whose philosophy consists in holding humanity in contempt, is like administering medicine to the dead, or endeavoring to convert an atheist by scripture.” - Thomas Paine
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Online K-Dog

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #148 on: January 25, 2017, 01:29:55 PM »
While I agree with you guys basically it could be that Trump may be a tool of his tool more than a tool of the 'tool'.

Regardless of quibbling details the way the mainstream press is treating Trump is disgusting.  The clueless disrespect the clueless and a pretty sight it is not.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2017, 01:31:33 PM by K-Dog »
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Offline Eddie

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #149 on: January 25, 2017, 01:48:33 PM »
While I agree with you guys basically it could be that Trump may be a tool of his tool more than a tool of the 'tool'.

Regardless of quibbling details the way the mainstream press is treating Trump is disgusting.  The clueless disrespect the clueless and a pretty sight it is not.

Journalism was always subject to bias, but it is quite apparent there are no more objective news outlets. Everybody has an axe to grind.

On Trump and speculation about what he might or might not do....I try not to jump to conclusions, but all the evidence seems to point to a new government envisioned by somebody whose name starts with K.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

 

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