AuthorTopic: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread  (Read 50928 times)

Online Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11327
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: Trump lawyer sends cease-and-desist letter to Bannon: report
« Reply #1035 on: January 04, 2018, 01:24:10 AM »
This is getting REALLY good!  :icon_sunny:

RE

Trump lawyer sends cease-and-desist letter to Bannon: report
By Brandon Carter and Brett Samuels - 01/03/18 10:48 PM EST

Trump lawyer sends cease-and-desist letter to Bannon: report




President Trump’s lawyers sent a cease-and-desist letter to former White House chief strategist Stephe Bannon Wednesday ordering him to refrain from making “disparaging statement” about Trump and his family, according to a new report.

ABC News reports the letter, from Trump attorney Charles Harder, accuses Bannon of breaching a non-disclosure agreement signed as part of working on Trump’s campaign.

  :icon_mrgreen: :icon_mrgreen: :icon_mrgreen:
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 10641
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Trumpty-Dumpty Conducting "entire transaction through intermediaries" = RED FLAG
« Reply #1036 on: January 04, 2018, 11:16:38 AM »
Trump is certainly NOT his own man. THe money that saved his ass OWNS him. I am certain the evidence of a quid pro quo that Trump agreed to in exchange for the laundered money is NOT recorded anywhere. So, no hard evidence will ever be forthcoming.

BUT, Bannon knows, and can prove, WHEN the money started coming in. All Mueller has to do is is link Trump Campaign actions DIRECTLY (chronology of events within a few days of receiving "loans") with the money laundering SOURCE. That is prima facie evidence, even if circumstantial, that Trump colluded with a foreign power by running for POTUS for the purpose of getting out of debt.

So, unless Mueller gets something from Bannon with TEETH in it, I do not yet believe Bannon is suddenly on the side of the angels.


Something like the sale of a Florida mansion to the Russian "Fertilizer King" for a $55 million profit on the flip?  

Photographed in 2005 (at article link), Donald Trump stands in front of 515 N. County Rd., the estate he bought at auction for about $41 million, renovated and then sold in 2008 at a recorded $95 million.

Donald Trump and the mansion that no one wanted. Then came a Russian fertilizer king
BY GLENN GARVIN

ggarvin@miamiherald.com

FEBRUARY 27, 2017 06:31 AM

UPDATED JULY 21, 2017 10:13 AM

Since the allegations about Donald Trump’s business connections to Russia started to fly last year in the middle of his presidential campaign, the fog of political war has made it difficult to tell the real from the shadow. Except for one very visible landmark: a sprawling, rococo seaside mansion in Palm Beach that Trump himself liked to boast about as an example of his real-estate acumen.

This sale of the mansion has now become part of U.S. special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into potential Trump links to Russia, according to Bloomberg.

“What do I have to do with Russia?” he replied to reporters’ questions at a press conference in Doral last summer. “You know the closest I came to Russia, I bought a house a number of years ago in Palm Beach … for $40 million, and I sold it to a Russian for $100 million.”

That was a bland, if fairly accurate, summary of a wild and goofy tale of the Palm Beach real-estate market involving tax fraud, Russian billionaires, lurid divorce-court accusations and — at least in the opinion of some Palm Beach observers — the execrably vulgar taste of the super-rich.

It’s a tale that’s now coming to a sad end: That $100 million mansion, once the most expensive home in America, has become its most expensive tear-down. Not a single trace of the compound remains, and soon even its address will disappear: The 6.3-acre estate on which it stood has been broken into three parcels, and one of them has already sold.

“It’s an odd story, but Palm Beach real estate can be kind of strange,” said Gary Pohrer, one of the island’s real-estate agents. “People decide they want something, and they’ll pay a price that doesn’t necessarily correspond to reality.”

The story begins in March 2001, when healthcare tycoon Abraham Gosman, who had moved from Massachusetts to Palm Beach a few years earlier and reinvented himself as a philanthropist, declared bankruptcy. That financial catastrophe would eventually result in tax-fraud convictions for Gosman and his wife.

One of the casualties of the bankruptcy was the 62,000-square-foot mansion Gosman had built at 515 N. County Road and dubbed Maison de l’Amitie, the House of Friendship. A showcase for his charity events just a mile north of the vaunted Breakers hotel, it included a ballroom with a capacity of hundreds, an art gallery, underground parking for scores of cars and a 100-foot swimming pool. It was nested among a slew of outbuildings, including a barn, guest houses and a tennis cottage.

The Gosmans managed to hold on to it for a couple of years, but by 2004 it had been seized by the bankruptcy court and put on the auction block. There were several bidders, hoping to scoop up a plutocratic property at a dollar-store price, but Trump — a real-estate mogul still more than a decade distant from political ambitions — pounced, grabbing the house for $41.35 million.

“He bought it strictly as an investment to flip,” said Carol Digges, the Palm Beach real-estate agent who would eventually re-sell the house for Trump. “He never intended to live there.”

And he didn’t. After doing some renovation on the house, Trump put it back on the market in 2006 at price that made even jaded Palm Beach eyeballs pop: $125 million. Gossip Extrapublisher and columnist Jose Lambiet, one of a few reporters Trump invited to tour the house in an attempt to drum up buyers, was even more astonished by the price after he looked around.

“I’d been in the house before, at one of Gosman’s charity parties, and Trump had hardly changed anything, just put on a couple of coats of paint,” Lambiet said. “Even that — well, he told us the fixtures in one of the bathrooms were gold, but as he walked away, I scratched a faucet with my fingernails and it was just gold-covered paint.”

Lambiet has visited many homes of wealthy owners with more money than taste, but he considered the Maison de l’Amitie in a class by itself. “It was just terrible-looking, really gaudy,” he said. “Nothing fit together — it was sort of haphazard inside.

“There was a room with a floor made of cobblestones, and in the corner was a real wood oven for pizzas. It looked like an old Italian pizza place. Who does that in their house? ... I thought, he’s never gonna sell this. And he didn’t, the house stayed on the market for a couple of years.


“And then the Russian came along.”

“The Russian” was Dmitry Rybolovlev , a cardiologist-turned-potash-magnate (Russian newspapers called him “the Fertilizer King”) whose net worth was estimated in the financial press to be well north of $10 billion. By 2008, when he first inquired about the mansion, Trump had already cut the price to $100 million, and Rybolovlev offered even less, $75 million.

But Rybolovlev is well known for buying homes as if he’s spending Monopoly money. His 24-year-old daughter Ekaterina bought Skorpios, the 74-acre Greek island where Aristotle Onassis married Jackie Kennedy, for a price estimated at $150 million or more. Then there’s the family’s $88 million apartment overlooking Central Park West, the $20 million home in Hawaii acquired from actor Will Smith and the $135 million residence in the Swiss resort of Gstaad. (To be perfectly fair, that one consists of two houses.)

Trump, sensing his fish had taken the hook    , hung tough on his price. 




On July 15, 2008, Rybolovlev bought the house for $95 million (Trump says credits on the closing costs brought the total package to $100 million), believed to be the biggest home sale in American history.

Although some real-estate publications made much of the fact that the mansion was on the market for nearly two years before it sold, Digges, the real-estate agent who sold it, wasn’t surprised. “When you’re sitting in that price range, there’s not 50 people in line waiting,” she said. “People with that kind of money are not readily available.”

Confidentiality agreements, she said, prevent her from discussing exactly how Rybolovlev came into the picture other than to say that “the client came to me on a referral.” Trump himself has said he never met Rybolovlev , who conducted the entire transaction through intermediaries;)

In the rough-and-tumble Russian financial world, anybody with wealth like Rybolovlev is viewed with a certain degree of suspicion, and his business career — which includes a charge of murder, of which he was acquitted — has certainly had its share of adventures. Much of it is shrouded in mystery; he almost never talks to reporters.

But South Florida never got a chance to see him up close. Rybolovlev never lived in his new mansion and is believed to have visited only once. That may have been due in part to a terrible mold problem discovered after he bought it.

Perhaps more importantly, though, not long after the sale closed, Rybolovlev became ensnarled in a divorce from his wife Elena, a toxic spill that splashed on for seven years. In court papers, she accused him of hosting lascivious orgies involving young girls on his yacht; he had her arrested for jewel theft.

The divorce case ended in an undisclosed settlement in 2015. And last year, Rybolovlev gave up on the mansion, successfully seeking permission to tear it down and divide the land under it into three parcels.

By November, the first of them had already sold, drawing $34.34 million for 2.35 acres.

“I thought the Russian was crazy to buy the place at that price, but now it looks like he’ll at least break even,” mused gossip columnist Lambiet.

Probably not, countered real-estate agent Pohrer: Although Rybolovlev may make back his purchase price, he’s been paying about $1.4 million a year in taxes since 2008, as well as the considerable upkeep on the huge house. “Overall, he’s going to wind up losing a pretty penny on this, maybe around $20 million,” Pohrer said.

“I actually thought the price was a little low,” he added. “There’s really no other vacant coastal land in Palm Beach for sale — everything else is going to come with a house on it. And this was the biggest of the three parcels, so the others will go for less.”

Who exactly purchased the land remains a mystery. Legal documents associated with the sale list only the name of a holding company. “I would have thought I’d be able to find out the name of the buyer by now,” said Pohrer. “But I haven’t been able to. That surprises me.” So, maybe there’s still a surprise ending in store.

The former Abe Gosman house at 515 N. County Rd. in Palm Beach was purchased by Donald Trump, who in 2008 sold it to entity connected to Russian billionaire Dmitri Rybolovlev.
Some have said the décor of the mansion at 515 N. County Rd. was gaudy and mismatched.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/business/article135187364.html#storylink=cpy

Conducting the "entire transaction through intermediaries" is a GIANT RED FLAG any detective looking for money laundering will immediately spot. I'm sure Mueller has already done so.   ;D
« Last Edit: January 04, 2018, 11:26:35 AM by agelbert »
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 29121
    • View Profile
Roy Moore accuser's Gadsden home burns; arson investigation underway
« Reply #1037 on: January 05, 2018, 06:08:39 PM »
http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2018/01/roy_moore_accusers_home_burns.html

Roy Moore accuser's Gadsden home burns; arson investigation underway
Updated 2:23 PM; Posted 11:15 AM


Tina Johnson's home on Lake Mary Louise Road in Gadsden burned on Jan. 2, 2018. The Etowah County Arson Task Force is investigating, and the sheriff's department has spoken with a "suspect of interest." (Submitted)
35.8k shares

By Anna Claire Vollers

avollers@al.com

Roy Moore accuser Tina Johnson lost her home Wednesday in a fire that is now under investigation by the Etowah County Arson Task Force.

Tina Johnson, who first came to public notice for accusing Senate candidate Roy Moore of grabbing her in his office in the early 1990s, said her home on Lake Mary Louise Road in Gadsden caught fire Tuesday morning.

After neighbors and some utility workers called 911 shortly after 8 a.m. Tuesday, the Lookout Mountain Fire Department responded to the scene. By the time the flames were extinguished, Johnson and her family had lost everything they owned.

"I am devastated, just devastated," said Johnson on Friday morning. "We have just the clothes on our backs."
Fire at home of Roy Moore accuser under investigation

Nobody appears to have been harmed in the blaze; Johnson and her husband were at work, and her grandson was at school.

"That fire is still under investigation by the Etowah County Arson Task Force," said Natalie Barton, public information officer with the Etowah County Sheriff's Department. "A suspect of interest is being spoken to. But there have been no charges, to my knowledge, related to the fire at this time."

Barton later released a statement, saying, "The ongoing investigation does not lead us to believe that the fire is in any way related to Roy Moore or allegations made against him. More details will be released when warrants are obtained."

According to Johnson and neighbor Kevin Tallant, other neighbors witnessed a young man who had a history of public intoxication walking around the house before and during the blaze.

"He's been trouble in the neighborhood for a while," said Tallant, who lives across the street from Johnson and her family. He got a call from another neighbor that morning who said smoke was coming from the home and that somebody might be inside.

"I threw on my coveralls and took off down the driveway," he said. His wife called 911 at 8:26 a.m. but the dispatcher said they'd already received a call about the fire. "I got up there," he said, "and (the fire) was already pretty well started. When the fire department got there, I started helping them."

Johnson said she has not yet heard from law enforcement how or why the fire started, except that it started at the back of the house.

She said a woman neighbor told her that the young man in question approached her as she was getting in her car that morning and asked if she thought Johnson's house was going to burn. The neighbor didn't know what he was talking about, she said, because flames weren't visible at the time.

Johnson and her family are currently living in a motel. On Friday morning, she was headed to Wal-Mart to purchase toiletries and other necessities. She said she is thankful for good neighbors, who have rallied around the family.

"My neighbors are just heartbroken, too," she said. "They're pulling together and helping us out."

Tallant said the Johnsons are good neighbors. He'd been over at her house recently, sharing some turnip greens.

"She's a super good neighbor," he said. "I like people like that. I hope they build back there."

Updated 1/5/2018 to include additional statements from the Etowah County Sheriff's Department.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 29121
    • View Profile
Trump lawyer calls NYT report a 'nothing burger' amid talk of obstruction
« Reply #1038 on: January 06, 2018, 12:21:34 AM »
https://www.politico.com/story/2018/01/05/trump-russia-probe-lawyer-nyt-report-327077

 Trump lawyer calls NYT report a 'nothing burger' amid talk of obstruction

Legal scholars say a New York Times story shows Trump is in deeper trouble with special counsel Robert Mueller.

By DARREN SAMUELSOHN

01/05/2018 05:56 PM EST


Donald Trump is pictured. | Getty Images

Experts say the report reveals insights into President Donald Trump’s motives and intent. | Win McNamee/Getty Images

    Most Read

    The nation’s cartoonists on the week in politics
    I’ve Studied the Trump-Fox Feedback Loop for Months. It’s Crazier Than You Think.
    EPA chief Pruitt is said to be eyeing attorney general job
    Cummings hospitalized as wife suspends campaign for governor
    Mandel drops out of Ohio Senate race vs. Sherrod Brown
    'This is further proof of President Trump’s war on California'
    DOJ clash with Trump allies lands on Ryan's doorstep
    Trump lawyer calls NYT report a 'nothing burger' amid talk of obstruction
    Internet falls for Trump-'Gorilla Channel' parody
    Wolff defends his book against White House attacks

Politico Magazine

    Avent-lede-iStock.jpg
    How Robots Will Break Politics

    By Ryan Avent
    Vinik-lede-ByChrisGash.jpg
    The Real Future of Work

    By Danny Vinik
    Scola-Lede-ByJustinMetz.jpg
    Can Washington Be Automated?

    By Nancy Scola
    Paul Manafort is pictured. | Getty Images
    Paul Manafort’s Desperate Legal Gamble

    By Norman Eisen and Conor Shaw

President Donald Trump’s associates on Friday brushed off a New York Times article detailing Trump’s attempted interventions into the Justice Department’s Russia probe as overblown, and rejected claims that it shows Trump tried to obstruct justice.

“Another NYT nothing burger,” Trump’s personal attorney, John Dowd, wrote in an email.

But legal scholars say the report, which dominated cable television since it appeared online Thursday night, reveals insights into Trump’s motives and intent — critical elements to any potential finding of obstruction of justice by special counsel Robert Mueller, who is probing Russia’s interference in the 2016 election.

“Trump’s motive will matter,” said Barbara McQuade, a former U.S. attorney from eastern Michigan.

McQuade cited the Times’ descriptions of Trump’s efforts to persuade Attorney General Jeff Sessions not to recuse himself from the Russia investigation early last year as potentially key evidence supporting a conspiracy to obstruct justice.

“If Trump wanted to keep Sessions in charge of the Russia investigation so that he could protect Trump, then trying to prevent him from complying with the DOJ recusal rules could provide a strong case for obstruction,” she said.

Other legal scholars agreed. Former Watergate prosecutor Nick Akerman said the combination of revelations in the Times story supplied a potent public addition “to what is becoming overwhelming evidence of Trump’s corrupt intent to put an end to the Russian investigation in which he and his family members are clearly subjects.”
The most reliable politics newsletter.

Sign up for POLITICO Playbook and get the latest news, every morning — in your inbox.
Email

By signing up you agree to receive email newsletters or alerts from POLITICO. You can unsubscribe at any time.

The article’s top finding — Trump instructed White House Counsel Don McGahn last March to stop Sessions from recusing himself from the Russia investigation — isn’t the only big revelation. It also alleges that an unnamed Sessions aide sought damaging information on then-FBI director James Comey that could be planted in the media — a description that a Justice Department spokeswoman denied. Trump fired Comey in May.

“Explosive evidence of obstruction — and imminent danger to Special Counsel,” Democratic Sen. Richard Blumenthal, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee wrote Friday morning on Twitter, adding: “White House Staff need to testify before grand jury.”

Despite the political fallout, experts cautioned that obstruction of justice is difficult to establish and that nothing in the Times article constitutes a smoking gun.

Many legal scholars also doubt that Trump could be in actual legal jeopardy to begin with, saying that the debate surrounding Bill Clinton’s impeachment largely settled the idea that a president cannot be charged for a crime while still in office. Although the Supreme Court hasn’t addressed the question directly, a 2000 Justice Department legal memo concluded that the indictment or criminal prosecution of a sitting president “would unconstitutionally undermine the capacity of the executive branch to perform its constitutionally assigned functions.”

Moreover there is little sign that a Republican-led Congress would act should Mueller refer to them a case for impeachment against Trump.

Still, the Times article states Mueller has gathered more evidence surrounding the obstruction questions involving the president than he has over any collusion between Trump’s campaign and Moscow.

It is also the latest evidence that the special counsel is still far from finishing his work, despite claims by Trump’s lawyers that he might wrap up his probe as early as this winter.

Several Democrats said the article warrants new congressional testimony from people in the president’s orbit, including Sessions and the president’s oldest son, Donald Trump Jr.

They also called for hearings involving McGahn and Mark Corallo, a former Trump legal spokesman whose resignation last summer was tied in a new book published Friday by author Michael Wolff to the president’s role in crafting a misleading statement to the news media about a meeting several Trump campaign officials, including Trump Jr., had with a Russian attorney who was promising dirt on 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

The Times story included a number of key details beyond Trump’s instruction to McGahn to stop Sessions from recusing himself from the Russia probe. After McGahn backed down, the newspaper said Trump “erupted in anger in front of numerous White House officials.”

“Where’s my Roy Cohn?” the president reportedly said, making a reference to his former personal lawyer and longtime political adviser who had worked in the 1950s as an aide to Sen. Joseph McCarthy during congressional investigations into communist activity.

Also revealed in the Times story: White House lawyer Uttam Dhillon purposely misled Trump about whether he could legally fire Comey; Trump wanted to call the Russia probe out as “fabricated and politically motivated” in a letter to Comey that would publicly justify his firing, though White House staff stopped that reference; and Mueller has obtained former White House chief of staff Reince Priebus’ handwritten notes that show Trump talked to Priebus about how he had called Comey to urge him to say publicly that he was not under investigation.
Twitter's logo is pictured. | Getty Images

Good news for Trump — Twitter won't block world leaders’ tweets

By ASHLEY GOLD

Rep. Jerry Nadler, the ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, cited the Times story in a call for McGahn to “be removed from his post immediately.”’

“It is not the duty of the White House counsel to be the president's Roy Cohn, as Donald Trump would have it, but to protect and defend the Constitution — which Mr. McGahn seems to be failing to do,” added Nadler, a New York Democrat.

Michael Zeldin, a former federal prosecutor who worked for Mueller at the Justice Department, said the most important new detail in the Times story centered around the fact Mueller has obtained Priebus’ notes about his conversations with the president. Those notes could corroborate Comey’s Congressional testimony last June detailing the president’s interference in the ongoing Russia investigation, Zeldin said, including Trump’s request that Comey drop an investigation into his former national security adviser, Michael Flynn.

Trump has publicly denied asking Comey to drop the case against Flynn. But Zeldin said the president still faces a potentially perilous dynamic if he ends up being placed under oath as a witness in the special counsel’s probe. A White House official told POLITICO last fall that Trump lawyers were open to that high-stakes scenario, because it could help Mueller wrap up the probe faster.

“If, and when, Trump testifies he would appear to be at increased risk of making false statements if he holds to his public statements that he did not have substantive conversations with Comey about loyalty, the scope of the investigation and, possibly, standing down on Flynn,” said Zeldin, who added that much depends on what Priebus, FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe and others have already told Mueller.

The Times story isn’t the first to break ground on the prospects of a presidential obstruction probe centered around Comey’s firing. Trump himself told NBC’s Lester Holt in mid-May that he had been thinking about “this Russia thing” when he ousted Comey. The New York Times that month also said the president had told Russian officials visiting the Oval Office that firing Comey had relieved “great pressure” due to the investigation, while The Washington Post reported that Trump had asked both Dan Coats, the director of national intelligence, and National Security Agency Director Mike Rogers, to deny evidence of collusion.

According to Comey’s testimony in June before the Senate Intelligence Committee, Trump last Valentine’s Day had also cleared the Oval Office of senior staff and urged the FBI director to “let this go” with respect to the Flynn investigation.

Several legal experts said the Times report is useful because it adds additional context to the story surrounding obstruction that was less apparent in last year’s media accounts and public testimony.

“The story adds interesting detail to a reported narrative already largely in place. It was clear that the president was enraged with Sessions for not recusing himself, and with Comey for at least a couple of reasons,” said Bob Bauer, who was White House counsel for former President Barack Obama. “Now that we know that Flynn lied to the FBI about his December 2016 conversation with the Russian ambassador, but do not know what the president knew about the lie or when, this seems another critical question in evaluating the basis for an obstruction investigation arising out of the Comey firing.”
Rick Ledgett is pictured. | AP Photo

Trump to give award to top NSA veteran

By JOSH GERSTEIN

Others cautioned against reading too much into the Times’ story.

Patrick Cotter, a former assistant U.S. attorney who has worked with Mueller prosecutor Andrew Weissmann, said the article describing the Sessions-McGahn interaction “was highly inappropriate, foolish and contributes additional supportive evidence as to Trump’s intent re: the Russia investigation.”

“But it does not seem to me to rise to the level of a crime in and of itself,” he added.

Julie Myers Wood, a former deputy on Kenneth Starr’s independent counsel investigation into Clinton, said she too saw noting afoul about a Sessions-McGahn conversation.

“It’s certainly appropriate for the WH counsel to have factual discussions with the AG regarding his role and any potential reasons for recusal,” she wrote in an email. “Lobbying on recusal issues may be unwise, but if done in good faith, does not constitute an attempt to obstruct.”

What Mueller plans to do with any obstruction evidence remains far from clear. Legal experts say that revelations like those in the Times report may matter more in influencing the court of public opinion — and voters’ decisions next November — than in any court room.

But while many legal experts are convinced Mueller will opt not to indict Trump with an obstruction charge, Cotter said he doesn’t think the debate over a president’s criminal liability has been settled. The growing body of evidence that’s being made public in stories like the one the Times published, he said, could lend itself to Mueller pushing forward on that track.

“That would be a way to get the allegations into the hands of the public and avoid any efforts by the White House/Justice Department/Congress to keep them in some sense secret,” Cotter said in an email. “It would also settle an important open legal question.”

Another option for Mueller — charging others surrounding Trump for obstruction of justice, while naming the president as an unindicted co-conspirator — could set the stage for an explosive clash because it “would serve as an excellent vehicle for Trump to then pardon all the identified co-conspirators,” he said.

“If he were a defendant, and pardoned everybody in the indictment, that would be an obscene obstruction of justice for his own personal benefit and Congress would be hard-pressed not to impeach,” Cotter said. “But if he isn’t actually named a defendant, and so is not in personal danger, it becomes at least slightly more defensible for him to pardon everyone while still saying he is not doing it for his own personal benefit.”
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 29121
    • View Profile
Trump blasts 'total loser' Wolff, hits 'Sloppy Steve' Bannon again in Tweets
« Reply #1039 on: January 06, 2018, 01:47:02 AM »
HILARIOUS!!!  :icon_mrgreen:

Michael Wolff is going to make a FORTUNE off this book!  :o

RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2018/01/05/trump-sloppy-steve-bannon-michael-wolff-326365


“Full of lies, misrepresentations and sources that don’t exist. Look at this guy’s past and watch what happens to him and Sloppy Steve!” President Donald Trump tweeted. | Evan Vucci/AP Photo

Trump blasts 'total loser' Wolff, hits 'Sloppy Steve' Bannon again in late-night tweets

By LOUIS NELSON

01/05/2018 07:05 AM EST

Updated 01/05/2018 11:52 PM EST
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter

President Donald Trump late Friday again slammed Michael Wolff over his incendiary book on the Trump administration’s turbulent first year, tweeting that the author "made up stories in order to sell this really boring and untruthful book."

"Michael Wolff is a total loser who made up stories in order to sell this really boring and untruthful book. He used Sloppy Steve Bannon, who cried when he got fired and begged for his job. Now Sloppy Steve has been dumped like a dog by almost everyone. Too bad!" the president tweeted shortly after praising a tweet from Sen. Rand Paul pledging to introduce a bill to end aid to Pakistan.

Trump's tweet contained a doctored image of the cover of Wolff's book displaying quotes criticizing Wolff's writing and calling him "liar and phony," which had been circulated earlier in the day by the GOP's official Twitter account.

Trump joined Republican congressional leaders at Camp David on Friday to plot the party's 2018 midterm agenda, as the media focused in large part on salacious tales recounted by Wolff in his book, “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,” which went on sale earlier in the day.

Trump claimed Thursday night that he had not authorized White House access for the book, warning readers to “look at this guy’s past,” an apparent dig at Wolff’s credibility, and referring to Steve Bannon, his former chief strategist, as “sloppy Steve.”

“I authorized Zero access to White House (actually turned him down many times) for author of phony book! I never spoke to him for book,” the president wrote on Twitter Thursday night. “Full of lies, misrepresentations and sources that don’t exist. Look at this guy’s past and watch what happens to him and Sloppy Steve!”

Trump’s assertion that he never spoke to Wolff for the book seems to contradict information from White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, who said the president did once speak to Wolff, albeit briefly and not in a formal interview setting.
ADVERTISING

Wolff’s book has put the Trump administration on the defensive this week, pushing back against embarrassing passages in the book that paint the president as ignorant, impulsive, narcissistic and inept and his West Wing disorganized and backbiting. Sanders has said the book is ridden with falsehoods and is “complete fantasy and just full of tabloid gossip.”

And while Wolff is a well-known writer, his new book has resurfaced old questions from some about his journalistic practices. Sanders complained Thursday that Wolff’s book contained little mistakes indicative of sloppy work, such as writing that White House communications director Hope Hicks is 26 years old when she is actually 29.
The most reliable politics newsletter.

Sign up for POLITICO Playbook and get the latest news, every morning — in your inbox.
Email

By signing up you agree to receive email newsletters or alerts from POLITICO. You can unsubscribe at any time.

In the days since excerpts of the book began to surface, the most notable consequence has been a wedge seemingly driven between Trump and Bannon over remarks attributed to the latter in the book. According to Wolff, Bannon called a summer 2016 meeting between Trump campaign leadership and a Russian attorney promising Kremlin-sourced incriminating information on Hillary Clinton as “unpatriotic” and “treasonous.” Bannon, who is also quoted making derisive and dismissive statements about the president, has not denied any of the comments.

Trump responded to Bannon’s words in the book with a scathing statement, declaring that the former chief strategist had “lost his mind” when he left the White House.

The president also tweeted later Friday morning that the "Mercer Family recently dumped the leaker known as Sloppy Steve Bannon. Smart!" a reference billionaire Robert Mercer's daughter Rebekah Mercer issuing a statement this week admonishing Bannon and praising Trump.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11327
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: Trump blasts 'total loser' Wolff, hits 'Sloppy Steve' Bannon again in Tweets
« Reply #1040 on: January 06, 2018, 08:30:57 AM »
HILARIOUS!!!  :icon_mrgreen:

Michael Wolff is going to make a FORTUNE off this book!  :o

RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2018/01/05/trump-sloppy-steve-bannon-michael-wolff-326365

No kidding.

What a brilliant White House crisis management strategy! Extending the cable news cycle through the weekend. He's not Fredo-- he's a genius. A fucking genius.
They can't even get them to try to keep them off the shelves.

Donald Trump Goes Full Fredo

But unlike the Godfather character, the president of the United States is backed by powerful people enabling him.

John Cazale as Fredo Corleone and Al Pacino as Michael Corleone in 'The Godfather: Part II'
Paramount Pictures / IMDB

“I can handle things. I’m smart! Not like everybody says, like dumb. I’m smart and I want respect!”

This morning’s presidential Twitter outburst recalls those words of Fredo Corleone’s in one of the most famous scenes from The Godfather series. Trump tweeted that his “two greatest assets have been mental stability and being, like, really smart,” and in a subsequent tweet called himself a “very stable genius.”

Trump may imagine that he’s Michael Corleone, the tough and canny rightful heir—or even Sonny Corleone, the terrifyingly violent but at least powerful heir apparent—but after today he is Fredo forever.

There’s a key difference between film and reality, though: The Corleone family had the awareness and vigilance to exclude Fredo from power. The American political system did not do so well.

Michael Wolff’s scathing new book about the Trump White House has sent President Trump spiraling into the most publicly visible meltdown of his presidency. Until now, Trump’s worst moments have occurred behind closed doors, and have become known to the public only second-hand, leaked by worried officials, aides, and advisers. Yesterday and today, we have seen a Trump temper-tantrum in real time on Twitter, extended over hours, punctuated only by stretch of fitful presidential sleep. Trump’s tweets yesterday focused largely on the blockbuster Wolff book, “Fire and Fury.”

It may not be the newsiest—arguably it is the least newsy—but the most important moment in Wolff’s book are words attributed at second or third-hand to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell at the time of Donald Trump’s election. “He will sign anything we put in front of him.”

Who and what Donald Trump is has been known to everyone and anyone who cared to know for years and decades. Before he was president, he was the country’s leading racist conspiracy theorist. Before he was the country’s leading racist conspiracy theorist, he was a celebrity gameshow host. Before he was a celebrity gameshow host, he was the multi-bankrupt least trusted name in real estate. Before he was the multi-bankrupt least trusted name in real estate, he was the protege of Roy Cohn’s repeatedly accused of ties to organized crime. From the start, Donald Trump was a man of many secrets, but no mysteries. Inscribed indelibly on the public record were the reasons for responsible people to do everything in their power to bar him from the presidency.

Instead, since he announced his candidacy in mid-2015, Donald Trump has been enabled and protected.

The enabling and protecting not only continues. It accelerates.

Before the Saturday morning tweets, what should have been the biggest story of the week was Trump’s success at mobilizing the Senate and the FBI to deploy criminal prosecution as a weapon against Trump critics. The Senate Judiciary committee—the Senate Judiciary Committee! The committee that oversees the proper enforcement of the law!—formally filed a criminal referral with the Department of Justice against Christopher Steele, the author of the infamous dossier about Trump’s Russia connections. The referral was signed by the committee’s chairman, Republican Senator Chuck Grassley, without even notice to Democrats on the committee, Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein said; a startling abuse of majority status and a sharp departure from the norms of the Senate, especially a 51-49 Senate.

The Department of Justice can ignore such a referral. It’s ominous, however, that on the very same day, the FBI obeyed Trump’s repeated demands and reopened a long-closed criminal investigation into the Clinton Foundation. The FBI has come under relentless abuse from Trump, who complains about its refusal to do his will. Is it now yielding?

We also learned this week from The New York Times that aides to the Attorney General sought damaging information on Capitol Hill about FBI director Comey, indicating close cooperation between the White House and Main Justice to exert political control over the country’s chief law enforcement agency.

Michael Wolff has drawn the most indelible picture yet of Donald Trump, the man. But the important thing about Trump is not the man; it’s the system of power surrounding the man.

In 2016, there were voters who genuinely, in good faith, believed that Donald Trump was a capable business leader, moderate on social issues, who cared about the troubles of working class white America—and would do something to help. There may well still be some people who believe this—but nowhere near enough to sustain a presidency.

What sustains Trump now is the support of people who know what he is, but back him anyway. Republican political elites who know him for what he is, but who back him because they believe they can control and use him; conservative media elites who sense what he is, but who delight in the cultural wars he provokes; rank-and-file conservatives who care more about their grievances and hatreds than the governance of the country.

After the Trump pardon of Sheriff Arpaio for obstruction of justice, a popular conservative blogger tweeted this justification of the president’s shocking attack on the rule of law: “The main reason for President Trump to pardon Sheriff Joe was fuck you, leftists. The new rules, bitches. 😎 ”

However crazy Trump may be, in one way he is indeed the “very stable genius” he claims to be: Trump understands how to mobilize hatred and resentment to his own advantage and profit. He has risen higher than Joe McCarthy or Charles Lindbergh or Theodore Bilbo—and he has lasted already nearly a full year in office, holding the approval of one-third of the country, more than sufficient to keep him there for a full term.

Michael Wolff has done a crucial service, showing more intimately than any reporter yet the true nature of the man at the center of the American system. But without the complicity of other power-holders, Trump would drop from his central position like a tooth from a rotten gum. What we need to do now is widen the camera angle beyond Fredo Trump to the hard-faced men and women over his shoulders. Those are the people who put Trump where he is, and keep him there, corrupting the institutions of American democracy and troubling the peace and security of the world.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 10641
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread - the people who put Trump where he is, and keep
« Reply #1041 on: January 06, 2018, 12:01:46 PM »
Donald Trump Goes Full Fredo
Quote
Michael Wolff has done a crucial service, showing more intimately than any reporter yet the true nature of the man at the center of the American system. But without the complicity of other power-holders, Trump would drop from his central position like a tooth from a rotten gum. What we need to do now is widen the camera angle beyond Fredo Trump to the hard-faced men and women over his shoulders. Those are the people who put Trump where he is, and keep him there, corrupting the institutions of American democracy and troubling the peace and security of the world.

That's about the size of it.



Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 29121
    • View Profile
Sessions under fire from all sides
« Reply #1042 on: January 07, 2018, 12:01:44 AM »
If Sessions gets the "You're FIRED" boot, Pot stocks will go to the MOON!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/98qw86DsdZ0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/98qw86DsdZ0</a>

RE

Sessions under fire from all sides
By Alexander Bolton - 01/06/18 09:10 PM EST
 

Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s job security is in question after taking withering fire from fellow Republicans this week, including from two prominent House conservatives who called on him to resign.

Two leaders of the House Freedom Caucus, Reps. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) and Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), called on Sessions to step aside in an op-ed Friday, charging he has lost control of the Department of Justice and the FBI.

Sessions has also come under criticism from Republicans and Democrats alike for his decision to rescind the Obama-era Cole memo, which gave states the space to legalize marijuana without fear of federal interference.

By withdrawing the memo, Sessions gave federal prosecutors more leeway to pursue cases against the legal marijuana industry, which is expanding rapidly in several states.

Sen. Cory Gardner (R), whose home state of Colorado is host to a booming legal cannabis industry, ripped Sessions on the Senate floor Thursday and accused him of breaking a personal pledge not to change the Obama-era policy.

“When you have Republicans calling for you to step down and you’re in a Republican administration just entering your second year, that’s trouble. He’s really on borrowed time,” said Brian Darling, a Republican strategist and former Senate aide.

“This is an attorney general who has been ridiculed by his own boss on Twitter,” he said, referring to President Trump. “At one point he didn’t have the confidence of his own boss and he’s losing the confidence of the Freedom Caucus and conservatives in the House and Senate.”

Trump reiterated his frustration with Sessions in a recent interview, again criticizing his decision to recuse himself from the Justice Department’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

“I thought it was certainly unnecessary, I thought it was a terrible thing,” Trump told The New York Times.

A new report this week revealed the lengths to which Trump went to keep Sessions from turning over the Russia probe to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.

The president took the unusual step of sending White House counsel Don McGahn to lobby Sessions against recusal, according to The Times. Sessions told McGahn his mind was made up, saying he had been advised to do so by other officials in the Justice Department.

The recusal has become a sore spot in the relationship between Trump and Sessions. The president reportedly blames his attorney general for the appointment of Robert Mueller as special counsel, a move that was made by Rosenstein.

“There’s a feeling on the right that Rod Rosenstein is running the Justice Department, not Jeff Sessions. He’s not doing anything. He’s recused himself to the point that he can’t do his job anymore,” Darling said.

Sessions is still taking heat from the president’s allies over the decision.

Meadows and Jordan argued in an op-ed published in the Washington Examiner on Friday that the FBI investigation into Russian collusion has run amok.

“It would appear he has no control at all of the premier law enforcement agency in the world,” they wrote.

“If Sessions can't address this issue immediately, then we have one final question needing an answer: When is it time for a new attorney general? Sadly, it seems the answer is now,” they concluded.
Sponsored Content
An Incredible $200 Intro Bonus Just For Using This Card
Sponsored By NextAdvisor

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) in an interview Friday accused Sessions of betraying Trump by giving special counsel Robert Mueller unfettered ability to investigate the president.

“He is a Cabinet-level piñata. He doesn’t seem to enjoy the confidence and trust of the president. He’s done a number of things on immigration and the most recent on marijuana that seem not to be playing well across the country,” said Ross K. Baker, a professor of political science at Rutgers University.

“I’m sure there are days that Attorney General Sessions wishes he were back in the United States Senate,” he added.

A Trump administration official, however, said Friday that there’s little chance that criticism from Meadows, Jordan or other congressional Republicans would pressure Sessions to resign.

“If the president starts to criticize him again, that’s a different story,” the source said.

Sessions offered his resignation to Trump earlier this year but the president declined to accept it.

The official said Sessions has responded to Trump’s earlier criticism that the Department of Justice hadn’t done enough to investigate his 2016 rival Hillary Clinton.

The department has reopened an investigation into Clinton’s use of a private email server while secretary of state and launched a new probe into the Clinton Foundation.

“He has started to rebut the earlier criticism,” the source said of Sessions.

Ironically, Sessions’s biggest allies may be Democrats who don’t want him to step down as attorney general. They fear a new attorney general who is not bound by a recusal could bring the Russian investigation to a swift end.

Even though he opposed his nomination to head the Justice Department last year, Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Thursday that he wants Sessions to keep his job.

“My view now is very simple: nothing, nothing should ever interfere with the Mueller investigation,” he said.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), a member of the Judiciary Committee, which would hold hearings and vote on a new attorney general, told CNN, “I don’t think the case has been made for his resigning,” referring to Sessions.

“It would be problematic in a lot of ways,” he said.

Republican strategists say Sessions will probably stay in the job because his resignation or dismissal would cause a major uproar and spark accusations of political interference in the Russia investigation.

“Because of the prominence of the Russia probe it’s very hard to see him leaving the administration even though he has gone against the wishes of the White House in recusing himself,” said Ford O’Connell, a Republican strategist. “How are you going to get a new attorney general through Congress?”

The Senate Republican majority has shrunk to 51 seats, and there are several GOP senators who have been outspokenly critical of Trump, including Sens. John McCain (Ariz.), Jeff Flake (Ariz.) and Ben Sasse (Neb.). That could make the confirmation process for a new attorney general exceedingly difficult.

“The biggest gripe against Sessions is his recusal,” O’Connell said.

“A lot of the other things that Sessions has done, particularly now that we have an investigation into the Clinton Foundation, I think that overall people are relatively happy with Sessions,” he said.

Politico reported Friday that Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt — a former attorney general of Oklahoma — has expressed interest in replacing Sessions if he resigns.

Some GOP officials believe Trump could move Pruitt or another Senate-confirmed senior administration official into the attorney’s job temporarily, but Trump would spark a firestorm if he skipped the Department of Justice’s line of succession, which would call for Rosenstein to replace Sessions.

One Senate Republican parliamentary expert said the president could not unilaterally appoint someone to fill the attorney general’s job permanently and with full power without Senate confirmation.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 29121
    • View Profile
Sunday shows preview: Michael Wolff in the spotlight
« Reply #1043 on: January 07, 2018, 04:44:53 AM »
If you have a TV and watch any of these shows, write a review for the Diner!  I wanna hear a Diner' Eye View of this!  :icon_mrgreen:

RE

http://thehill.com/homenews/sunday-talk-shows/367774-sunday-shows-preview-michael-wolff-in-the-spotlight

Sunday shows preview: Michael Wolff in the spotlight
By Julia Manchester - 01/06/18 04:18 PM EST


Sunday shows preview: Michael Wolff in the spotlight
© Getty Images
A new tell-all book detailing the early days of the Trump administration sent shock waves through Washington this week, and put the White House into full defense mode in the face of explosive claims made in the book.

Author Michael Wolff reportedly spoke to various members of the Trump administration for "Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House," which dominated the news cycle this week.

The book makes a series of bombshell claims, including that aides around the president question his mental fitness and that President Trump did not want to win the 2016 election.

Trump's former chief strategist Stephen Bannon also made a series of headline-making comments in the book, including calling Donald Trump Jr.'s meeting with a Russian lawyer at Trump Tower in 2016 "treasonous" and saying that investigators would crack the president's son like an egg on national television.

The book and Bannon's remarks caused an angry reaction from the White House, with the president dubbing Bannon as "Sloppy Steve" on Twitter and saying he had "lost his mind."

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders tore into the book, calling it "complete fantasy and full of tabloid gossip."

Trump's lawyers went as far as sending a cease-and-desist letter to the book's publishing company before it hit bookstores.

The White House and Trump both deny that Trump sat down with Wolff during his presidency.

The book is likely to dominate discussion on Washington's Sunday talk show circuit.

Here's the lineup:

NBC's "Meet the Press": Wolff will sit down on the program, along with Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.).

"Fox News Sunday": CIA Director Mike Pompeo and former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski will appear on the show.

CBS's "Face the Nation": Pompeo will join Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) and former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour (R) on the program.

CNN's "State of the Union": Rep Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) is slated to make an appearance on the cable news show.

ABC's "This Week": U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley will appear on the program with Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.).
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 29121
    • View Profile
Wikileaks Publishes Michael Wolf's Trump Book as a PDF
« Reply #1044 on: January 08, 2018, 12:49:52 AM »
Read it here for FREE!  :icon_sunny:

https://t.co/sf7vj4IYAx

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 29121
    • View Profile
Looking Ugly for Repugnants in House Midterm Elections
« Reply #1045 on: January 10, 2018, 04:30:47 PM »
https://www.politico.com/story/2018/01/10/house-republican-retirements-issa-royce-333851

 Rash of retirements dim GOP hopes of keeping the House

Democratic momentum is building as Reps. Darrell Issa and Ed Royce become the latest Republicans to hang it up.

By ELENA SCHNEIDER and JOHN BRESNAHAN

01/10/2018 06:40 PM EST


Darrell Issa is pictured. | Getty Images

California GOP Reps. Darrell Issa (above) and Ed Royce both bailed on their reelection campaigns in the past 48 hours, bringing the total of Republican-held open seats to a staggering 29 districts. | Bill Wechter/AFP PHOTO

    Most Read

    The IRS’ election-year quandary: When to boost Americans’ paychecks
    White House plans to destroy Trump election fraud commission's voter data
    Poll: Nearly half of voters say Trump exoneration is likely in 2018
    Trump's inner circle escapes televised grillings on Russia
    Democrats punch back on Russia
    Trump delivers a Senate race sweetener to Scott
    Trump lawyer Cohen sues Fusion GPS, BuzzFeed over Steele dossier
    Trump says GOP should 'finally take control' of Russia investigation
    DACA reinstatement throws lawmakers for a loop
    Trump jabs 'Sneaky Dianne Feinstein' for releasing Fusion GPS transcript

Politico Magazine

    24_donald_trump_88_gty_1160.jpg
    This Is How Trump’s Lawyers Are Probably Prepping Him for the Mueller Showdown

    By Bradley P. Moss
    18110_greenfield_getty.jpg
    Oprah Could Be Great for the Democrats. In 2018.

    By Jeff Greenfield
    President Donald Trump is pictured. | AP Photo
    We’re Psychiatrists. It’s Our Duty to Question the President’s Mental State.

    By Bandy X. Lee and Leonard L. Glass
    24_donald_trump_11_ap_1160.jpg
    Why the 25th Amendment Doesn’t Apply to Trump—No Matter What He Tweets

    By Joshua Zeitz

A flurry of Republican retirements in recent weeks has further weakened the party’s hold on the House heading into the midterms — and the exodus probably isn’t over.

California GOP Reps. Darrell Issa and Ed Royce both bailed on their reelection campaigns in the past 48 hours, bringing the total of Republican-held open seats to a staggering 29 districts, a figure that includes lawmakers seeking higher offices. The Issa and Royce retirements open up seats that Hillary Clinton carried in the 2016 presidential race and will be more difficult — and expensive — for Republicans to defend, particularly if the party is swept under a Democratic wave.

“There’s no putting lipstick on that: They’re both competitive districts,” Rep. Steve Stivers (R-Ohio), chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, said in an interview Wednesday.

Stivers, who said he believes the party will keep control of the House, still cautioned that more retirements could be coming — a statement likely to rattle Republicans’ nerves.

“We’re talking to a handful [of members],” Stivers said. “There’s not much hand-holding now because people have pretty much made their decision. Filing days are coming, so I think we’re pretty much through it.”
Darrell Issa is pictured. | Getty Images

California Republican Darrell Issa to retire

By ELENA SCHNEIDER and JOHN BRESNAHAN

Those pending filing deadlines — California’s is on March 9 — mean members who have been on the fence, or who are facing dauntingly poor poll numbers, could join Issa and Royce in heading for the exits in the coming weeks. The early indicators of a wave election are glaring: Democrats won a handful of off-year and special elections in 2017. Even where they fell short of victory, the party performed better than expected. President Donald Trump’s approval ratings are stuck around 40 percent. And Democrats have a double-digit lead on the House generic ballot in most polls.

“This is the final window, so I expect the next month or so, we’ll see the last wave of retirements,” said former Rep. Tom Davis (R-Va.), who chaired the NRCC for two cycles in the 1990s and 2000s. “This is not 2006, and it’s not 1994 yet. But I do think the atmospherics are factored into these members rationale for retiring.”
ADVERTISING

The 44 House members not seeking reelection this year — 29 in Republican-held seats and 15 in Democratic-held seats — puts 2018 in the company of past wave-year elections when control of the House changed hands.

In 1994, 49 House members retired and Republicans netted 54 seats, according to Brookings Institution's Vital Statistics on Congress. In 2006, 28 lawmakers retired and Democrats picked up 30 seats. And in 2010, 32 members retired and Republicans won 63 seats.

Not all Republican retirements carry the same weight in the battle for the House. Some committee chairmen calling it quits are prevented by internal party rules from remaining at the helm of their committees in the next Congress if Republicans hold the majority. Those include Reps. Jeb Hensarling (Texas), Lamar Smith (Texas), Bob Goodlatte (Va.), Bill Shuster (Pa.) and Gregg Harper (Miss.) — each of whom represent safe Republican seats.

But Issa and Royce — along with retiring Republican Reps. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (Fla.), Dave Reichert (Wash.), Charlie Dent (Pa.), Dave Trott (Mich.) and Frank LoBiondo (N.J.) — represent competitive districts. Clinton carried the seats currently held by Issa, Royce, Ros-Lehtinen and Reichert. A fifth GOP-held Clinton seat will likely open up later this week, with Rep. Martha McSally (R-Ariz.) expected to announce she will run for the Senate.
Sign up here for POLITICO Huddle

A daily play-by-play of congressional news in your inbox.
Email

By signing up you agree to receive email newsletters or alerts from POLITICO. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Taken together, Republicans see all the retirements and open seats as an indication that the 2018 elections are likely to follow historical patterns: The president’s party loses, on average, 23 seats in the House in the first midterm election of a new administration, going back to Franklin Roosevelt.

“It’s obviously the sign of an ugly cycle ahead,” said Adrian Gray, a Republican pollster. “Oftentimes, these ugly cycles appear early, and people see writing on the wall.”

Davis, the former NRCC chair, agreed.

“Every time another Republican retires, it makes it better for House Democrats — no denying that,” he said. “This is not what you want to see because, when we’ve seen these types of retirements in the past, as a general rule, a bad year follows.”

Democrats must also contend with a handful of open battleground seats. Nevada Rep. Jacky Rosen is running for Senate, Minnesota Rep. Tim Walz is running for governor and New Hampshire Rep. Carol Shea-Porter is retiring. All three represent districts that Trump carried in 2016.

The sheer number of GOP open seats isn’t only troubling for what it portends historically, though. The vacancies force Republicans to spend heavily in a growing number of districts without the advantages of incumbents’ built-in name recognition and fundraising network.

Republicans believe their fundraising — bolstered by strong money hauls by the Congressional Leadership Fund, the flagship House GOP super PAC — serves as a firewall against an energized liberal base and long list of open seats. Congressional Leadership Fund and its associated nonprofit, American Action Network, announced this week that they had raked in $66 million over the course of 2017.

“Any time you've got to recruit new candidates and raise money from the ground up, it’s a more expensive proposition. But Republicans are posting historic numbers, and they’ve seen this coming from a mile away,” said Chris Grant, a Republican consultant. “To that the extent there’s any storm, they’re prepared to weather it.”

That storm is easy to see building, even if the long-range forecast for November is less clear. Trump’s approval rating is just under 40 percent in the RealClearPolitics average. Democrats have an 11.5-point lead on the generic ballot, on average — a lead consistent with making up the two-dozen seats the party needs to win control later this year.

Trump’s poll numbers were warning signs for Issa and Royce in California, said Rob Stutzman, a GOP consultant there.

“There’s no denying that this is real evidence of how difficult Republican success can be in California,” said Stutzman. “But as with retirements elsewhere, for Republicans in districts that Trump lost, [Trump's] performance is a substantial factor.”

Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.), chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, said Wednesday that the retirements on Issa, a very wealthy self-funder, and Royce, who had $3.5 million in his campaign account as of Sept. 30, are signs that some Republicans are deciding money can’t save them.
The Internal Revenue Service building is pictured here. | POLITICO

How the GOP’s war on the IRS could backfire

By AARON LORENZO

“Momentum is on our side as Democrats this cycle. History is on our side. But while I see a clear path to the majority, these are all tough elections,” Luján said. “But the very nature that you see members of Congress in California [retiring] like Congressman Royce and Congressman Issa — both who have robust resources in their reelection accounts as well as personal wealth — I think sends a loud signal.”

Stivers, his GOP counterpart, acknowledged that “history is against us, and the presidential polling, too.” But he noted that Democrats failed to flip any GOP-held districts in special elections last year.

Despite the retirements, Stivers said Wednesday he thinks that Democrats are still “10 to 15 seats short” of really putting the House up for grabs.

“They’re getting more seats in play,” Stivers added. “I think at this point they need another 10 to 15 seats [to put the House] in play. They’re still not there yet. But they’re moving in the right direction, clearly.”

Heather Caygle and Steven Shepard contributed to this report.
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Online Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11327
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Trump attacks protections for immigrants from ‘shithole’ countries
« Reply #1046 on: January 11, 2018, 05:03:27 PM »
Trump attacks protections for immigrants from ‘shithole’ countries

Trump attacks protections for immigrants from ‘shithole’ countries

 

President Trump referred to African nations and Haiti as "shithole" countries on Jan. 11. Here are other nations he has insulted.(Melissa Macaya/The Washington Post)

By Josh Dawsey January 11 at 7:31 PM

President Trump grew frustrated with lawmakers Thursday in the Oval Office when they floated restoring protections for immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and African countries as part of a bipartisan immigration deal, according to several people briefed on the meeting.

“Why are we having all these people from shithole countries come here?” Trump said, according to these people, referring to countries mentioned by the lawmakers.

Trump then suggested that the United States should instead bring more people from countries like Norway, whose prime minister he met with on Wednesday. The president, according to a White House official, also suggested he would be open to more immigrants from Asian countries because they help the United States economically.

In addition, the president singled out Haiti, telling lawmakers that immigrants from that country must be left out of any deal, these people said.

“Why do we need more Haitians?” Trump said, according to people familiar with the meeting. “Take them out.” 

 

Despite criticism, a program that awards U.S. permanent residency through a lottery has been around for more than 20 years. This is how it works.(Claritza Jimenez/The Washington Post)

The comments left lawmakers taken aback, according to people familiar with their reactions. Sens. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) and Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.) had proposed cutting the visa lottery program by 50 percent and then prioritizing countries already in the system, a White House official said. 

A White House spokesman defended Trump’s position on immigration without directly addressing Trump’s remarks. White House officials did not dispute the account. 

[200,000 Salvadorans may be forced to leave the U.S. as Trump ends immigration protection]

“Certain Washington politicians choose to fight for foreign countries, but President Trump will always fight for the American people,” spokesman Raj Shah said in a statement issued after The Washington Post first reported Trump’s remarks. “ . . . Like other nations that have merit-based immigration, President Trump is fighting for permanent solutions that make our country stronger by welcoming those who can contribute to our society, grow our economy and assimilate into our great nation.”

Trump built his candidacy and presidency around hard stances on immigration, vowing to build a wall along the Mexican border and cut legal immigration by half, among other positions. Officials at the Department of Homeland Security have also increased immigration raids, including dozens earlier this week at convenience stores across the country. 

The remarks were quickly met with scorn from Democrats and some Republicans and could throw another wrench into bipartisan discussions on immigration, which had shown promise in recent days, according to legislators.

Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.) said the comments “will shake the confidence that people have” in the ongoing immigration policy talks.

 

DHS announced on Jan. 8 that it will end protected immigration status for about 200,000 migrants from El Salvador. This is what you need to know about TPS. (Melissa Macaya, Claritza Jimenez/The Washington Post)

 “Democrats and Republicans in the Senate made a proposal. The answer is this racist outburst of the president. How can you take him seriously? They [Republicans] don’t believe in immigration — it’s always been about people of color and keeping them out of this country,” Gutierrez said.

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond (D-La.), chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, said on Twitter that Trump’s remarks “are further proof that his Make America Great Again Agenda is really a Make America White Again agenda.”

Some Republicans also raised objections. Rep. Mia Love (R-Utah), whose family comes from Haiti, said in a statement that Trump’s remarks were “unkind, divisive, elitist, and fly in the face of our nation’s values. This behavior is unacceptable from the leader of our nation.”

“My grandmother used to say — digame con quien caminas y te dire quien eres — tell me who you walk with and I’ll tell you who you are,” said Rep. Adriano Espaillat (D-N.Y.), who represents most of Harlem and is an immigrant from the Dominican Republic, which shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti. “If he’s walking around with white supremacists and supporting them, this kind of talk doesn’t surprise me.”

The comments put further scrutiny on Trump’s long-standing tendency to make racially-charged comments — including attacks on protesting black athletes to his claim that there were fine people “on both sides” after neo-Nazis rioted in Charlottesville Trump also falsely claimed for years that former president Barack Obama was not born in the United States and took out advertisements calling for the death penalty for members of the Central Park Five in New York, who were later exonerated.

The New York Times also reported last year that Trump said immigrants in Haiti have AIDS, though the White House denied that account.

Democrats were quick to note that Trump employs Haitians at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida and that he praised Haitian Americans during a roundtable in Miami last September. Trump’s critics also said racially incendiary language could damage relationships with foreign allies. 

“Whether you vote for me or don’t vote for me, I really want to be your greatest champion, and I will be your champion,” Trump said at the Haitian American roundtable last year. 

Alix Desulme, a city council member in North Miami, home to thousands of Haitian Americans, said the president’s latest remarks were “disgusting.” 

 “Oh my God. Oh my God Jesus,” said Desulme. “I don’t know how worse it can get.”

 “This is very alarming. We know he’s not presidential but this a low,” he said. “It’s disheartening that someone who is the leader of the free world would use such demeaning language to talk about other folks, referring to folks of color.”

For many of Trump’s supporters, however, the comments may not prove to be particularly damaging. Trump came under fire from conservatives earlier this week for seeming to suggest he would be open to a comprehensive immigration reform deal without money for a border wall, before he quickly backtracked.

“He’s trying to win me back,” conservative author Ann Coulter, who has called for harsh limits on immigration, wrote on Twitter. 

Outlining a potential bipartisan deal, the lawmakers discussed restoring protections for countries that have been removed from the temporary protected status program while adding $1.5 billion for a border wall and making changes to the visa lottery system. Lawmakers mentioned that members of the CBC had requested that some African countries be included in the protective status program, according to a White House official who asked for anonymity to describe a private conversation.

The exchange was “salty” on all sides, this person said, with the president growing profane and animated while discussing immigrants from other countries. “It did not go well,” this person said. 

[Trump wants to remove these immigrants. An ugly bit of history tells us what it could do to the economy.]

The administration announced this week that it was removing protective status for citizens of El Salvador.

Trump had seemed amenable to a deal earlier in the day during phone calls with lawmakers, aides said, but shifted his position in the meeting and did not seem interested in the bipartisan compromise.

The scene played out hurriedly in the morning. Graham and Durbin thought they would be meeting with Trump alone and were surprised to find immigration hard-liners such as Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) and Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) at the meeting. White House and Hill aides say Stephen Miller, the president’s top immigration official, was concerned there could be a deal proposed that was too liberal and made sure other conservative lawmakers were present.

 

After the meeting, Marc Short, Trump’s legislative aide, said the White House was nowhere near a bipartisan agreement on immigration. 

“We still think we can get there,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said at the daily White House news briefing.

Ed O’Keefe, Maria Sacchetti and Erica Werner contributed to this report.

 

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Online RE

  • Administrator
  • Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
  • *****
  • Posts: 29121
    • View Profile
Re: Trump attacks protections for immigrants from ‘shithole’ countries
« Reply #1047 on: January 11, 2018, 05:20:10 PM »
A little racism with your tea, sir?

RE
SAVE AS MANY AS YOU CAN

Offline agelbert

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 10641
    • View Profile
    • Renewable Rervolution
Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1048 on: January 11, 2018, 05:38:20 PM »

Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Online Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Master Chef
  • *****
  • Posts: 11327
    • View Profile
    • Doomstead Diner
Re: Trump attacks protections for immigrants from ‘shithole’ countries
« Reply #1049 on: January 11, 2018, 05:58:22 PM »
A little racism with your tea, sir?

RE

More than a little. You should persevere with the Wolff book; it gets better worse.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
6 Replies
522 Views
Last post January 13, 2017, 04:34:48 PM
by RE
1 Replies
732 Views
Last post January 18, 2017, 12:55:29 AM
by RE
2 Replies
335 Views
Last post April 25, 2017, 08:00:13 PM
by agelbert