AuthorTopic: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread  (Read 100136 times)

Offline Surly1

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Trump just hired a deep-state conspiracy theorist as his lawyer. Here’s what Joe diGenova has said.
by Aaron Blake March 19 at 2:55 PM Email the author

President Trump has stepped up his attacks on special counsel Robert S. Mueller III's investigation in recent days, and his lawyer even suggested that the inquiry should be shut down. And just in case the direction in which this whole thing is headed wasn't clear, Trump has now hired a lawyer who argues the president is being framed.

The SOLE reason Trump has added DiGenova is the reason you will listen in vain for on the cable TV news talking heads programs: to control the news cycle and keep his base off mouth-breathing full retards stoked and angry. His  job is to go on Trump TV every night and masturbate and thrown shit like a caged chimpanzee, and otherwise smear the Mueller probe.

As a creature of reality TV, Trump's strategy is to control the narrative and win the news cycle. period. As I stated nearly a year ago. It's about keeping his base of any and half-insane white apes in line and his approval above the Nixon tipping point.

That's it.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Online Eddie

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1216 on: March 20, 2018, 06:13:51 AM »
I think Mueller needs to lay down his cards pretty soon. Otherwise, the alternative facts media will bury him with bullshit.
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Offline RE

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🔞 Donald Trump is losing his fight against Stormy Daniels
« Reply #1217 on: March 22, 2018, 12:20:41 AM »
http://www.macleans.ca/politics/washington/donald-trump-is-losing-his-fight-against-stormy-daniels/

Donald Trump is losing his fight against Stormy Daniels

Every day more details are unzipped in the saga of the U.S. president and his liaisons with women—and it’s beginning to take a serious toll
by Allen Abel

Mar 21, 2018


Stormy Daniels appeared at a news conference on May 29, 2008, to tout the success of the Restricted to Adults (RTA) website and other efforts by the adult film industry to protect children from inappropriate material. (Photo By Tom Williams/Roll Call/Getty Images)

She’s not usually known for begging for money, but here is the torrential Stormy Daniels, née Stephanie Clifford, on the cyber-panhandling site crowdjustice.com, appealing for contributions so that, in her words, she can “speak honestly and openly to the American people about my relationship with now President Donald Trump.”

“First, this money is not going to me personally,” the actor, director, pole dancer and reputed pre-presidential lower-case playmate goes on. “Ever.”

“Second, if you donate, your donation merely appears as a donation to “Crowd Justice” on your bank or credit card statement.  There is no reference to Stormy Daniels or Stephanie Clifford.”

The pornographist’s appeal already had brought in US$268,940 at press time. But should the scales of justice eventually tip against the clever Clifford/Daniels, who avers that she enjoyed consensual friendship-with-benefits with Trump shortly after Melania gave birth to son Barron in 2006, she may need every dollar that her eleemosynary plea can implant. Threatened by Trump’s legal team with a counter-fine of $1 million per utterance, she quickly could find herself as bankrupt as a Trump casino.

STORMY DANIELS – NOT ROBERT MUELLER – MIGHT SPELL TRUMP’S DOOM, the Washington Post loudly, and possibly wishfully, prophesied this week.

HOW THE STORMY DANIELS SCANDAL COULD BRING DOWN TRUMP, bellowed Rolling Stone.

STORMY DANIELS COULD RECOGNIZE TRUMP’S GENITALS, sniggered the FDaily Mail.

In 2011, Daniels starred in a bondage scene with a lie detector and was proved to be telling the truth about the affair. This Sunday, a much-ballyhooed interview on 60 Minutes may or may not reveal more of her than has been bared previously. It has even been hinted that photographs or videos of Trump’s own unprotected goldmember may be part of the trove.

    READ MORE: Donald Trump is the Magic 8-Ball president

Despite this typhoon of attention, The Stormy, who continues to titillate the heartland’s lonely hearts on her Make America Horny Again tour of the country’s leading terpsichorean auditoria, is far from alone. Every day, it seems, more details are unzipped in the salacious saga of the 45th president and his long list of liaisons with women who were not then his wife, not yet his wife, and/or not ever going to be his wife, though with Donald J. Trump, you never know.

(“The publicity gradually dehumanizes you,” Trump complained in 1990 in a book entitled Trump: Surviving At The Top. “To many people, Donald Trump isn’t a flesh-and-blood human being anymore. Instead, I’m a symbol–of wealth, fame, egotism, greed, and probably several other not-so-nice things . . . Reality never seems to get in anyone’s way.”)

On Tuesday, for example–Barron’s 12th birthday!–former upper-case Playboy Playmate Karen McDougal sued the president in California, alleging that a payment of US$150,000 that McDougal received from the publisher of The National Enquirer in 2016 was part of “a multifaceted effort to silence” her.  An attorney for McDougal, who never has claimed that her romps with Trump were anything but consensual, stated: “We intend to invalidate the so-called contract . . . imposed on Karen so she can move forward with the private life she deserves.”

The adventurous life of Trump’s own privates made even more news that same day, when a judge in his very own Manhattan ruled that the President of the United States is not exempt from being sued for defamation just because he happens to be the President of the United States.

“No one is above the law,” Judge Jennifer Schecter of the Empire State’s supreme court wrote, echoing Spencer Tracy in Adam’s Rib (and Barack Obama on FOX News when asked about a possible prosecution of Hillary Clinton for her email irregularities). The opinion affirmed the litigious rights of an Apprentice contestant named Summer Zervos, who alleges that Trump grabbed her, kissed her, and rubbed himself against her against her will. While campaigning for the White House, Trump repeatedly called Zervos—and numerous other accusers—a liar, a word that carries substantial legal weight.

“Nothing in the Supremacy Clause of the United States Constitution even suggests that the president cannot be called to account before a state court for wrongful conduct that bears no relationship to any federal executive responsibility,” the New York judge decreed. Should Zervos prevail in court after the inevitable years or decades of appeals and delays, Trump may find himself as exposed as Stormy Daniels.

“Trump’s lawyers were trying to use executive privilege in a new way and they lost,” says Justin Vaughn, professor of political science at Boise State University in Idaho and the creator of many of those presidential rankings that usually have placed James Buchanan at the bottom of the heap, at least until The Donald came along. (Trump hit rock-bottom in the most recent poll of historians while Barack Obama, previously mired at a mediocre 18th, rocketed to number eight just by comparison.)

“Bill Clinton’s team tried to make the same case and they failed to keep him out of the federal court system,” Vaughn tells Maclean’s. “Trump argued that it’s a different matter in a state court, which is not only a terrible argument that he’s destined to lose, and not only bad for Trump in the short term, but if you take all the salaciousness out of it and just look at the institutional consequences, it makes it harder for any president to claim executive privilege in the future.”

“The Zervos case is full steam ahead and Trump will absolutely have to give a deposition,” predicts Barbara McQuade, professor-by-practice and lecturer in civil and criminal law at the University of Michigan and one of the 46 federal attorneys whom Trump dismissed when he took office. (During her 8-year tenure as U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, McQuade successfully prosecuted the city’s mayor and the “underwear bomber” who tried to set off plastic explosives in his own briefs aboard a jet airliner, among many other high-profile fraud and terrorism cases.) “It was at this stage in Bill Clinton’s case that he had to tell the truth about Monica Lewinski. Given Donald Trump’s history with the truth, this could be very significant.”

“They could also ask him about other women, which also happened to Clinton. In the context of the Zervos case, if they are trying to establish a pattern of behavior, they could ask about Stormy Daniels, about Karen McDougal, so I think that this could be a place rife with peril if he lies under oath.”

“The other thing that could be interesting for those who say ‘I don’t really care about his personal life because I always assumed the worst anyway’ is that it’s not about the sex, it’s the hush money,” Prof McQuade adds. “If there is a pattern of him concealing that behavior, could this be obstruction of justice? They could allege that when things go bad and he wants them to go away, he throws money at it and he persuades people to be quiet.”

“Politically and legally, it would be tough to punish Trump for having these affairs 10 years ago,” agrees Justin Vaughn. “Even the evangelical leaders gave him a pre-presidential mulligan. But if we learned anything from Richard Nixon, it’s that it is not the crime, it’s the cover-up. What could be more problematic is not that he had these affairs, but that they’re engaging in legal actions to keep information out of the public realm, which in the long run usually fails.”

“When you look at Stormy Daniels, what do you see?” Prof. Vaughn is asked. “I think that she and her attorney have been pretty successful in controlling the narrative so far and getting her message out through the mainstream media,” he answers.  “I don’t know if they are doing everything right or if Trump’s team is doing everything wrong.”

“Nobody elected Donald Trump because he’s a moral paragon,” Vaughn reasons. “If this was Jeb Bush, it would have ended his presidency by now. But there’s got to be a tipping point somewhere. I have a friend, a long-time Republican, who told me that she won’t allow her kids to watch the news anymore. At a certain point, even if he’s the leader of your team, if you can’t let your kids watch the news, there’s got to be a red line somewhere. I’m surprised we haven’t got to it yet, but it’s got to be coming.”

The singular absence of allegations of moral turpitude during the Obama years may have led some younger observers to view the current chief executive especially harshly. But Donald Trump is far from the only president to have dallied extra-maritally before or even during his tenure; the sordid history runs from John Kennedy’s trysts with Marilyn Monroe to Warren Gamaliel Harding, who referred to his penis as “Jerry” in torrid letters to his long-time paramour.

“Do I think I could get elected?” Trump mused in 2011 in a book entitled Time To Get Tough: Making America #1 Again. “At one time I would have said yes, probably. But now, since my marital problems have been dragged through the newspapers, I’m less sure.”

“It all comes down to whether the House flips to the Democrats,” says Barbara McQuade. “At what point does the House, even the Republicans, get tired of his act? But if it turns out that someone’s personal life doesn’t impact his presidency, then none of this matters.”

Yet there is one person—publicly silent, regally postured, gamely suffering (if she indeed is suffering)—to whom these affairs and allegations must matter. Virtually invisible in public settings since Inauguration Day, and nearly always mute at ritual functions within the White House, Melania Trump First Lady emerged tentatively this week. But even while convening with representatives of social-media companies to kick off her long-delayed campaign against cyber-bullying, the First Lady was apologetic and demure.

“I am well aware that people are skeptical of me discussing the topic,” she said. “I have been criticized for my commitment to tackling this issue and I know that will continue, but it will not stop me from doing what I know is right. I am here with one goal: helping children and our next generation.”

(Compare this to Michelle Obama, who recently kicked off her first public appearance in more than a year—presenting an award to the school counselor of the year at the Kennedy Center—by proclaiming to a whooping, cheering audience, “I’m back!”)

Meanwhile, the sordid procession continues, with Stormy Daniels in the wings at 60 Minutes and mayhem in the West Wing under the most boyish, bizarre and boisterous administration in American history.

A few days ago, a Maclean’s reporter was walking toward the White House to attend the daily press briefing.

“Another day, another scandal,” the journalist muttered to one of the law-enforcement personnel who are stationed along Pennsylvania Avenue to protect the president from external menace, though not from himself, which may be the greatest danger of all to Donald Trump.

“It’s not a scandal,” the officer replied. “You gotta have shame to have scandal.”
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Offline Palloy2

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1218 on: March 22, 2018, 05:21:37 PM »
Another one bites the dust.

https://www.rt.com/usa/422081-trump-security-adviser-mcmaster-bolton/
Trump replaces national security adviser McMaster with John Bolton
22 Mar, 2018

Former United Nations ambassador and stalwart Republican hawk John Bolton will replace Gen. HR McMaster as the national security adviser on April 9, President Trump has announced.

Announcing his decision, Trump thanked Herbert Raymond McMaster for his service, praising his “outstanding job” in his role as the National Security Advisor. McMaster “will always remain my friend,” the US president tweeted.

“After thirty-four years of service to our nation, I am requesting retirement from the US Army effective this summer after which I will leave public service. Throughout my career it has been my greatest privilege to serve alongside extraordinary servicemembers and dedicated civilians,” McMaster said in a statement.

Trump reciprocated, noting that the general “served his country with distinction” for more than three decades. “General McMaster’s leadership of the National Security Council staff has helped my administration accomplish great things to bolster America’s national security,” the president said in a statement.

The administration especially noted McMaster's crucial role in drafting the America First National Security Strategy, “smashing” Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL) terrorists and bringing North Korea "to the table.”

Bolton will become Trump’s third national security adviser in 14 months. McMaster was named Trump's national security adviser in February 2017, just days after the US President sacked his predecessor, Michael Flynn, amid a scandal over his ‘unreported’ contact with the former Russian Ambassador to the US.

The White House has emphasized that Trump’s move to relieve the general of his duties was a mutually-agreed decision. “This was not related to any one moment or incident, rather it was the result of ongoing conversations between the two,” a WH official outlined.
"The State is a body of armed men."

Offline RE

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Is the Teflon Don that slick this shit will slip off him?  ???  :icon_scratch:

RE

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/03/23/596257288/former-playboy-model-spills-alleged-affair-details-trump-tried-to-pay-her

Former Playboy Model Spills Details Of Alleged Affair: Trump Tried To Pay Her


March 23, 20182:22 AM ET

Vanessa Romo

In an interview on Anderson Cooper 360 Thursday evening, former Playboy model Karen McDougal shared details of her alleged affair with President Trump.
Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic

The former Playboy model who's suing for the right to talk about her alleged affair with President Trump is not waiting for a court or a judge to free her from a contract she says was contrived for the sole purpose of killing the story of their 10-month relationship.

In an interview with CNN's Anderson Cooper Thursday evening, Karen McDougal said Trump tried to pay her after the first time they had sexual relations.

"After we had been intimate, he tried to pay me, and I actually didn't know how to take that," she said, clasping her hands together.

She recalled how the cash offer left her shaken while Trump appeared surprised by her reaction. "The look on my face must have been so sad," she said. She wondered, "Does he think I'm in this for money? That's not me."

"I'm not that kind of girl," she said she told him.

His response: "You're really special."

McDougal recounted the specifics of the alleged affair; She first met Trump at the Playboy Mansion when he was filming an episode of Celebrity Apprentice. He said "hello" and seemed immediately smitten by the striking brunette, who bears more than a passing resemblance to his new wife at the time, Melania. He was direct in asking for her number and called "right away." Over the next few days they talked on the phone. She claimed she had many of Trump's private phone numbers, including those of his body guard and assistant.

When asked what attracted her to Trump, she ticked off a list: He's a nice looking man, he's sweet, funny, very charismatic and his personality is "wow!"

"Great posture," she added.

Their first "date," she said gesturing with air quotes, took place at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on June 12, 2006. Two days before Trump's 60th birthday. She thought they were meeting for dinner in the tony hotel restaurant but instead, Trump's bodyguard ushered her into the reality star's usual bungalow.

"I was concerned," McDougal confided to Cooper and the audience at large. "At that moment I realized maybe something else is going on."

After some conversation they had unprotected sex, she claimed.

McDougal contended the president said, "I don't like these things." It's unclear if she meant condoms or another form of contraception.

That set a precedent for their future sexual encounters, of which she said there were "many dozens." From June 2006 through April 2007 she said, "We saw each other a minimum of five times a month up to bigger numbers," and each meeting involved some type of sexual intimacy.

Throughout their relationship Trump arranged their trysts, asking her to meet him all over the country in private and in public, she said. Mostly he'd fly her out to meet him and put her up for the length of her stay, but he occasionally had her book her own travel and pay for herself, with the understanding that he'd reimburse her later.

That way there'd be "no paper trail," she said.

She told Cooper that Trump didn't seem to care if people saw them together and didn't seem conflicted about cheating on his wife. She claimed she visited him at his New Jersey home. Once, she said, he even took her to the apartment in Trump Tower that he lived in with his wife and their young son Barron.

"Aren't you afraid to bring me here?"

"They won't say anything," Trump supposedly said.

He showed her around the "very gold" apartment and pointed out Melania's room saying, "she likes to get away to read."

It was moments like this, McDougal said, that filled her with guilt and dread over the extramarital affair.

"Doing something wrong is bad enough and when you're doing something wrong and you're in the middle of somebody else's home or bed or whatever, that just puts a little stab in your heart," she said.

Even worse was actually meeting Melania and posing for a picture with her, Trump and a handful of McDougal's Playboy Playmate colleagues, she said. McDougal conceded it's possible Melania knew about the Playmate's dalliance with Trump.

Still, she said she was very happy throughout the romance. She said she loved Trump and that he loved her. He told her so "all the time" and had several pet names for her, including "baby" and "beautiful Karen."

One of her memories involves Trump favorably comparing her to his daughter, Ivanka.

"He said I was beautiful like her," she told Cooper.

Throughout the relationship, McDougal kept a journal recording her encounters with Trump. She said her sister and a handful of friends knew of their liaison. But, she told Cooper, she did not keep any texts, photos or messages of documenting their relationship.

At one point, Trump said he was remodeling an apartment as a Christmas gift for McDougal, she said. But she never saw it.
Stormy Daniels Files Suit, Claims NDA Invalid Because Trump Didn't Sign At The XXX
The Two-Way
Stormy Daniels Files Suit, Claims NDA Invalid Because Trump Didn't Sign At The XXX

McDougal claimed she was not aware that Trump allegedly had other paramours while they were involved, including adult film actress Stormy Daniels who says she also had a fling with Trump. Stormy, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford is also suing to be able to tell her story.

"I thought I was the only one," McDougal admitted, adding that "it makes sense. If he's doing it behind his wife's back why would he not do it behind my back?"

In the end, McDougal said she was overwhelmed by guilt and fear that the affair would become public. That feeling is what ultimately lead her to end it, the same way it started, over the phone, she said.

"The excitement took over for a while but I started feeling so bad about myself. ... It was tearing me apart in the long run. I knew I needed to get out," she said.

McDougal delved into the lawsuit filed in a California court earlier this week, asking to be released from a contract she signed with American Media Inc. for her life rights.

Shortly after Trump won the Republican nomination, the model turned aspiring journalist promised to keep quiet about the supposed romance with Trump in exchange for $150,000 and a deal to write articles for some of the company's magazines and appear on at least two covers.

She explained to Cooper that she was happy to take the hush money. In fact, she said she was relieved that the story of the illicit affair would be buried and also thrilled about the opportunity to re-brand herself from former Playmate to lifestyle and fitness model.

She said AMI and its owner David Pecker in particular, framed the deal as a means to "jumpstart" her career and protect her image as "wholesome and pure."

At the time, she thought, "It's a win-win for me. I get the work and my story doesn't have to come out."

Additionally, she felt a deep sense of loyalty to Trump both as a former lover but also as a Republican.

"I voted for the president. That's my party. That's my president!" she said.

But things didn't pan out the way she had anticipated. The company and Pecker, who is a long-time friend of Trump's, failed to hold up their end of the bargain, according to McDougal. And now she wants out of the contract.

"I almost feel violated. I feel taken advantage of," she told Cooper. "I feel like the contract was illegal, I was lied to and I want to share my truth."

"I want my life rights back," she demanded.

As NPR reported, AMI denies the accusations and in a statement issued Tuesday, the company said, "McDougal has been free to respond to press inquiries about her relationship with President Trump since 2016" adding that "the suggestion that AMI 'silenced' her is completely without merit."

Still, McDougal said she fears financial ruin and hopes a legal judgment in her favor will release her from the deal with AMI. She has even offered to pay back the money she took.

She also offered an apology to Melania. "I'm sorry," she said choking back tears. "I wouldn't want it done to me."

"I know it's a wrong thing to do but in those days I was a different girl. I had fun. I was in the Playboy scene," she explained.

In the years since her entanglement with Trump, she has returned to her roots and faith. "I'm going to church. I'm involved in ministry," she said.

Trump has not commented on any of McDougal's claims but the White House has denied the affair.

"I think somebody is lying but I can tell you it's not me," she said.
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Offline RE

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📺 Stormy Daniels interview on '60 Minutes' set for March 25
« Reply #1220 on: March 25, 2018, 01:12:56 AM »
Since I don't have a TV, I may be the only person in the FSoA who is NOT watching this live.  I'll wait for reports from Diners on how it went and then view the vid on Utoob when CNN puts it up.

RE

Stormy Daniels interview on '60 Minutes' set for March 25
by Brian Stelter   @brianstelter March 16, 2018: 9:57 AM ET
Stormy Daniels scandal is about money, not sex
Anderson Cooper's interview with Stephanie Clifford, the adult film star known as Stormy Daniels, is set to air on "60 Minutes" on Sunday, March 25.


The interview was taped last week. The air date has not been officially announced. But two sources involved with the story told CNN that it has always been slated for March 25.

There have been loud calls -- particularly from Trump critics -- for CBS to televise the interview sooner, given the swirling questions about her alleged relationship with Donald Trump and her acceptance of hush money shortly before Trump was elected president. Trump's lawyer and the White House have denied allegations of an affair.

The newsmagazine routinely takes weeks to edit its stories. In this case, "60 Minutes" producers wanted time to vet the allegations that Clifford leveled in the interview.

There were also some practical scheduling concerns. When Cooper landed the Daniels interview, CBS had already announced an exclusive interview with the Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Norah O'Donnell's sit-down marked the first time a U.S. TV network has interviewed a Saudi leader since 2005. The hard-to-move interview is airing this Sunday.

A CBS spokesman declined to comment on the Clifford interview. "60 Minutes" usually doesn't announce its stories until a few days before air.

But Cooper's interview with Clifford was revealed when her publicity-savvy lawyer Michael Avenatti tweeted out a picture of them together last week.

Since then, the content of the interview has been shrouded in mystery.

The interview is a scoop for both Cooper and "60 Minutes." Cooper is both a full-time anchor on CNN and a part-time correspondent for "60 Minutes." He has been a contributor to the newsmagazine for over a decade.

Avenatti said on CNN's "New Day" on Friday that he doesn't know the "definitive date" of the interview, but had read a Washington Post report that March 25 is the tentative date.

Referring to CBS, he said, "They want to make sure they get it right. They're crossing every t, they're dotting every i, they understand the importance of this."

Avenatti also said that Daniels "was physically threatened to stay silent."

He did not say who threatened her, but he indicated that the "60 Minutes" interview contains more information.

Clifford can provide "very specific details," he said. "When people tune in, I think they're going to learn what happened."
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Offline RE

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Hired & Fired in under a WEEK!
« Reply #1221 on: March 25, 2018, 11:32:22 AM »
How long can this Clown Show go on?  ::)

RE

https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/25/politics/joseph-digenova-trump-legal-team/index.html

Trump not bringing on attorney diGenova just days after his hiring was announced

CNN)President Donald Trump's attorney announced Sunday that a veteran Washington husband-and-wife legal duo will not join Trump's team handling the Russia probe.
"The President is disappointed that conflicts prevent Joe diGenova and Victoria Toensing from joining the President's Special Counsel legal team," his lawyer, Jay Sekulow, said in a statement. "However, those conflicts do not prevent them from assisting the President in other legal matters. The President looks forward to working with them."

Sekulow announced Monday that diGenova, a former US attorney for the District of Columbia, would be joining the team, and sources told CNN that he and Toensing met with Trump on Thursday. One source said the President liked the pair's message, but was not convinced they were right for the legal jobs.

Trump's lead lawyer, John Dowd, resigned from Trump's personal legal team on the same day of the meeting as his disagreements with the President intensified and the President stepped up attacks on special counsel Robert Mueller. The reversal Sunday leaves Trump's legal team with diminished resources as Mueller's probe intensifies.

DiGenova and Toensing released a statement on the announcement Sunday, saying: "We thank the President for his confidence in us and we look forward to working with him on other matters."

The announcement on Sunday came as Trump insisted on Twitter he was not having a hard time assembling a legal team for the Russia probe, and after CNN reported on Friday that diGenova and Toensing's roles in the legal team were still in question.

Two sources previously told CNN that there was concern about diGenova and Toensing's conflicts, and sources told CNN some members of the President's legal team had opposed their hiring. Two sources also noted that Toensing represents clients who are connected to the special counsel probe led by former FBI Director Robert Mueller. Toensing had gotten conflict waivers from her clients, CNN has previously reported.

When asked what other legal issues besides the Mueller probe the couple could help Trump with, a source familiar with the matter told CNN there were myriad issues, like emoluments, in which they would lend a hand.

The possibility of diGenova's hire attracted widespread attention to the legal figure's brash comments about the Russia investigation, including the assertion that Trump had been "framed" by FBI and Justice Department officials.
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1222 on: March 25, 2018, 02:08:22 PM »
Someone should tell Trump that Charles Manson died last November and will not be available for any cabinet positions.
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Online Eddie

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1223 on: March 25, 2018, 02:38:19 PM »
Imelda Marcos is still available.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

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Re: Hired & Fired in under a WEEK!
« Reply #1224 on: March 25, 2018, 03:48:49 PM »
How long can this Clown Show go on?  ::)

RE

https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/25/politics/joseph-digenova-trump-legal-team/index.html

Trump not bringing on attorney diGenova just days after his hiring was announced

How long do ya got?

I am told the reason Dump didn't close on the diGenovas is that people were laughing at them. Fat Nixon hates being an object of ridicule. Which is something his opponents should remember.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: Hired & Fired in under a WEEK!
« Reply #1225 on: March 25, 2018, 06:27:11 PM »
How long can this Clown Show go on?  ::)

RE

https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/25/politics/joseph-digenova-trump-legal-team/index.html

Trump not bringing on attorney diGenova just days after his hiring was announced

How long do ya got?

Not long.

Quote
I am told the reason Dump didn't close on the diGenovas is that people were laughing at them. Fat Nixon hates being an object of ridicule. Which is something his opponents should remember.

He must have some rough Saturday Nights then.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/kczRX0mQ_S8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/kczRX0mQ_S8</a>

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Offline RE

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Trump Does Trump, and Things Get Worse
« Reply #1226 on: March 27, 2018, 08:37:27 AM »
https://www.thedailybeast.com/trump-does-trump-and-things-get-worse?ref=scroll

Gut Punch
Trump Does Trump, and Things Get Worse
It’s one thing to run a privately held company on the fly, trusting the same ‘gut’ that drove you into multiple bankruptcies. Now the president intends to lead America that way.

Michael Tomasky
03.27.18 5:12 AM ET


Amidst the numbing chaos that is the Trump administration, these past few days are worth reflecting on because three events have moved the needle in a bad direction.

1. The hiring of John Bolton highlights Donald Trump’s instability, his total lack of any coherent worldview, and most of all—and most dangerously of all—his need to feel that no limits are being imposed on him. Here’s what I mean. When talking foreign policy, sometimes Trump sounds like Bolton, with all that overheated rhetoric he’s thrown at Kim Jong Un. But at other times, he’s an isolationist. At still other times, like when he’s agreeing to meet with Kim with no preconditions, he’s a Neville Chamberlain in the making. (By the way, is Lloyd’s of London taking odds yet on whether that summit will actually happen?)
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So if he wasn’t happy with H.R. McMaster and wanted new blood, he could have gone in any number of ways. That he chose the guy who will reinforce his worst instincts tells us, I think, that what he values most (aside from unquestioning loyalty) is someone who won’t hem him in; in other words, Trump may decide to launch a first strike against North Korea, or he may not. But if he does, by God, he doesn’t want some globalist ninny telling him not to. So the principle at work here is not hawkishness per se. It’s having someone who won’t tell him no.

Remember how Fred Flintstone, when he was thinking of stealing the vacation money to buy a new bowling ball, would have a little angel and little devil pop up on each shoulder making their respective cases? Bolton is Trump’s little devil, and clearly, Trump wanted things that way.

2. Trump’s slapstick handling of the budget shows us—again, but probably more than anything before it—just how massively in over his head he is in the job. As Michael Grunwald wrote in Politico last week, Trump just got rolled by Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi. They didn’t get their Dreamers request, but they got everything else, and Trump got very little. Thirty-three miles of border fence but no sanctuary cities defunding, no Planned Parenthood defunding, and not much else.

Yes, it was congressional Republicans who cut these deals, not Trump. But Trump couldn’t cut them, or credibly refute cutting them, because he doesn’t know enough to do one or the other. He knows nothing about the ins and outs of the budget. And that ridiculous feint last Friday morning that he was going to veto it… He relented after a few people with some actual knowledge told him how suicidal that would be, let alone on his way out to another weekend at Mar a Lago. But it was embarrassing.

3. The Stormy Daniels story was kind of non-newsy on certain levels. That Trump slept with a porn star and behaved crudely toward her is about the least shocking thing in the world. But the threats made against her are the real story here. That’s going to be the new iteration of this story, and depending on how it plays out it stands the chance of reminding the country of something that many have forgotten, or never knew: The president of the United States has mob ties.

Here’s David Cay Johnston cataloguing a few of them, like how Trump went out of his way to use Mafia-controlled companies to pour the concrete for Trump Tower. The great Wayne Barrett was the master chronicler of all this, going back to the 1990s. All you need to know for now is that back in the day, the government of Australia denied him a permit to open a casino in Sydney because the government deemed him to be too mobbed up. Trump will say of this failure that he lost interest in Australia, but Australia also lost interest in him.

We’re bound to see some more reporting about the nature of these threats that Daniels discussed on 60 Minutes Sunday night. What else do Daniels and that swashbuckling lawyer of hers have with regard to these threats? Is Robert Mueller maybe looking into who made them on Trump’s behalf? Is Mueller going to interview Michael Cohen one of these days? That might be Mueller’s best path to Trump. Depending on where this goes, Americans could learn some interesting things about the past associations of the man who now embodies our democratic republic.

And now we hear that Trump may want to be his own chief of staff. Hey, why not? A president needs a chief of staff only when he relies on staff. When he does things like read, and look at evidence. Trump doesn’t need anyone. He has his TV. If they don’t say it on Fox & Friends, how important can it be, anyway?

As we think back over these 14 months, we recall that the madness started literally on the first day, with the speech about “carnage” and the protests about his crowd size. And every week has brought jaw-dropping moments, too many to count.

But this is different. Trump has spent a year-plus feeling that he was heeding the advice of these wise people in Washington (he wasn’t really, but in his mind he was), and it hasn’t made him happy. Now he’s finished with that.

It’s one thing to run a privately held company on the fly, trusting the same “gut” that drove you into multiple bankruptcies. But to make the fate of the country, its people, and—in the case of North Korea and possibly Iran—its volunteer soldiers, hinge on your uninformed gut is criminal. I mean that figuratively, for now. But Mueller may make it literal.

Shocking as these last few days have been, there is still worse yet to come.
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Online Eddie

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1227 on: March 27, 2018, 09:16:19 AM »
I'm guessing we'll get into a more serious pissing contest with Russia in Syria. That looks like the next big mistake to me. Look for a false flag there any day.

Look, Novichok!!!
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Offline Palloy2

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1228 on: March 28, 2018, 04:59:09 PM »
Another one FIRED, another military promotion.

https://www.rt.com/usa/422631-trump-fires-veteran-affairs-shulkin/
Trump fires Veteran Affairs Secretary David Shulkin
28 Mar, 2018


FILE PHOTO: Secretary of the Department of Veteran Affairs David Shulkin talks with US President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House © Carlos Barria / Reuters

US President Donald Trump has apparently fired Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, and says he is nominating the White House physician to replace him.

On Wednesday afternoon, Trump tweeted about nominating Admiral Ronny L. Jackson, the presidential physician, as Shulkin’s replacement. He will need to be confirmed by the Senate. In the interim, the VA will be led by Robert Wilkie, currently the Undersecretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness.

    ....In the interim, Hon. Robert Wilkie of DOD will serve as Acting Secretary. I am thankful for Dr. David Shulkin’s service to our country and to our GREAT VETERANS!
    — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) March 28, 2018

“I appreciate the work of Dr. David Shulkin and the many great things we did together at Veterans Affairs, including the VA Accountability Act that he was helpful in getting passed,” Trump said in a statement, thanking Shulkin for his service at the VA.

Trump called Jackson a “highly trained and qualified” member of the military, who has a “deep appreciation” for the debt the US owes to its military veterans.

Shulkin, a holdover from the Obama administration, helped Trump reform the troubled agency in 2017. A February 2018 report by the VA inspector general, however, accused the secretary of improperly accepting Wimbledon tickets during his trip to Britain last year and other “serious derelictions.”

The IG also accused Shulkin’s chief of staff of making false statements and altering a document so the secretary’s wife could accompany him on a trip to Britain and Denmark at the cost of $4,312 to the VA. Shulkin initially denied the charges, then offered to reimburse the agency for the costs. His chief of staff retired following the report’s publication.

Admiral Jackson served as the White House physician during the presidencies of Barack Obama and George W. Bush. He was thrust into the spotlight in January, when he proclaimed Trump was in excellent mental and physical health over objections from Democrats and the media. Jackson brushed off suggestions that Trump was obese and could have heart problems by crediting his “incredibly good” genes and a lifetime of abstinence from alcohol and tobacco.

Shulkin is the second member of Trump’s cabinet to leave after having dubious travel practices made public. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price resigned in September 2017, after it emerged that he chartered private jets for more than 26 overseas trips, at the reported cost of more than $1 million to US taxpayers.
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Offline RE

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⚕️ Trump ousts Shulkin from Veterans Affairs, taps his doctor
« Reply #1229 on: March 29, 2018, 01:28:50 AM »
...and another one bites the dust... ::)

Better yet, he replaces him with his own Primary Care Physician!  lol.

RE

https://www.yahoo.com/news/trump-fires-veterans-affairs-secretary-shulkin-214223514--politics.html

Trump ousts Shulkin from Veterans Affairs, taps his doctor
[Associated Press]
Hope Yen and Zeke Miller, Associated Press
,Associated Press•March 28, 2018


WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Donald Trump fired Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin on Wednesday and nominated White House doctor Ronny Jackson to replace him in the wake of a bruising ethics scandal and a mounting rebellion within the agency.

A Navy rear admiral, Jackson is a surprise choice to succeed Shulkin, a former Obama administration official and the first non-veteran ever to head the VA. Trump had been considering replacements for Shulkin for weeks, but had not been known to be considering Jackson for the role.
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In a statement, Trump praised Jackson as "highly trained and qualified." It was a decision that signaled Trump chose to go with someone he knows and trusts, rather than the candidate with the longest resume, to run a massive agency facing huge bureaucratic challenges.

Jackson has served since 2013 as the physician to the president, one of the people in closest proximity to Trump day in and day out.

His profile rose after he conducted a sweeping press conference about the president's medical exam in January in which he impressed Trump with his camera-ready demeanor and deft navigation of reporters' questions as he delivered a rosy depiction of the president's health, according to a person familiar with the president's thinking but not authorized to discuss private conversations.

Jackson eagerly embraced the idea of moving to the VA, according to a White House official who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss personnel matters. Ironically, it was Shulkin who had recommended Jackson for an undersecretary position at the agency in fall. Jackson was vetted during that time on his policy positions and other issues, the official said.

The promotion of Jackson marks the latest Trump hire to be driven at least as much by personal familiarity with the president as by his vision for the role.

Brigadier General Dr. Richard Tubb, who trained Jackson, said in a letter read at Jackson's briefing that the doctor had been attached like "Velcro" to Trump since Inauguration Day.

"On any given day," he wrote,"the 'physician's office,' as it is known, is generally the first and last to see the President."

A White House official said Shulkin was informed of his dismissal by Chief of Staff John Kelly before the president announced the move on Twitter on Wednesday afternoon.

Trump had considered several others for the post, including conservative "Fox & Friends" contributor Pete Hegseth. The White House was hopeful Jackson will have a smoother confirmation process because he was chosen for his current position during former President Barack Obama's administration.

But a major veterans' organization expressed concern over Shulkin's dismissal and Trump's intention to nominate Jackson, whom they worried lacked experience to run the huge department.

"We are disappointed and already quite concerned about this nominee," said Joe Chenelly, the national executive director of AMVETS. "The administration needs to be ready to prove that he's qualified to run such a massive agency, a $200 billion bureaucracy."

Rep. Phil Roe, chairman of the House Veterans Affairs Committee, said he believed Shulkin did a "fantastic job" and didn't think he should have been dismissed, but "at the end of the day, cabinet secretaries serve at the pleasure of the president."

"I respect President Trump's decision, support the president's agenda and remain willing to work with anyone committed to doing the right thing on behalf of our nation's veterans," Roe said. "I am in the process of reaching out to Dr. Jackson and I look forward to building a strong relationship with him also."

Shulkin is the second Cabinet secretary to depart over controversies involving expensive travel, following former Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price's resignation last September. Trump said in a statement he is "grateful" for Shulkin's service.

Shulkin had continued to insist he had the full confidence of the White House amid continuing investigations into his travel and leadership of the department.

He had agreed to reimburse the government more than $4,000 after the VA's internal watchdog concluded last month that he had improperly accepted Wimbledon tennis tickets and that his then-chief of staff had doctored emails to justify his wife traveling to Europe with him at taxpayer expense. Shulkin also blamed internal drama at the agency on a half-dozen or so rebellious political appointees, insisting he had White House backing to fire them.

But the continuing VA infighting and a fresh raft of watchdog reports documenting leadership failures and spending waste — as well as fresh allegations that Shulkin had used a member of his security detail to run personal errands — proved too much of a distraction.

It was the latest in a series of departures of top administration officials, including Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who was fired by Trump earlier this month, and national security adviser H.R. McMaster, whose departure was announced last week.

The VA change comes as Trump is trying to expand the Veterans Choice program, fulfilling a campaign promise that major veterans' groups worry could be an unwanted step toward privatizing VA health care. His plan remains in limbo in Congress after lawmakers declined last week to include it in a spending bill.

Having pushed through legislation in Trump's first year making it easier to fire bad VA employees and speed disability appeals, Shulkin leaves behind a department in disarray. Several projects remain unfinished, including a multibillion-dollar overhaul of electronic medical records aimed at speeding up wait times for veterans seeking medical care as well as expanded mental health treatment for veterans at higher risk of suicide.

Trump selected Robert Wilkie, undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness, to serve as the acting head of the VA.

The VA is government's second-largest department, responsible for 9 million military veterans in more than 1,700 government-run health facilities. The selection of Wilkie bypasses VA Deputy Secretary Tom Bowman, who has come under criticism for being too moderate to push Trump's agenda of fixing veterans' care.

During the presidential campaign, Trump repeatedly pledged to fix the VA, which was still reeling after a 2014 scandal at its Phoenix medical center, where veterans waited months for care even as VA employees created secret waiting lists to cover up delays. Criticizing the department as "the most corrupt," Trump said he would bring accountability and expand access to private doctors, promising to triple the number of veterans "seeing the doctor of their choice."

Currently, more than 30 percent of VA appointments are made in the private sector.

___

Associated Press writers Jill Colvin and Jonathan Lemire contributed to this report.
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