AuthorTopic: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread  (Read 110530 times)

Offline K-Dog

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The modes of Trump.
« Reply #1515 on: September 14, 2018, 01:20:59 AM »
Quote
“obsessed,” “lathered,” and “freaked out”

I know the feeling, but seriously, that describes Trump in fast mode.  Fast mode Trump is different than Trump in slow mode.  “obsessed” remains the same but “lathered” becomes "lubricious" and he doesn't get “freaked out” in slow mode.  Slow mode is when Trum is “obsessed”, "lubricious" and is not "freaked out" but instead gets his "freak on" talking about a new deal.


Slow Mode Trump.


Fast Mode Trump

The author knows of no other modes of Trump excepting for Grumpy Trump where Trump sometimes lingers while transitioning from slow to fast mode.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2018, 01:25:10 AM by K-Dog »
Under ideal conditions of temperature and pressure the organism will grow without limit.

Offline RE

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🤡 🏝️ 'It's getting lonely on Trump Island'
« Reply #1516 on: September 14, 2018, 06:57:11 PM »
Even GO has stopped shilling for His President.  :icon_sunny:  How sad for The Donald.  :(

RE

https://www.businessinsider.com/paul-manafort-guilty-plea-cooperation-legal-implications-trump-2018-9

'It's getting lonely on Trump Island': Mueller just snagged his biggest victory yet in the Russia probe
Sonam Sheth


Manafort served as Trump's campaign manager in mid-2016, when he won the Republican Party's nomination. Reuters

    Paul Manafort's decision to plead guilty and flip in the Russia investigation is the single-biggest victory for the special counsel Robert Mueller, so far.
    Before agreeing to a plea deal with Manafort, prosecutors likely sat down with him or his attorney for a proffer session, during which a defendant has to answer several key questions from investigators about his own case or any criminal activity he may have witnessed.
    "This means Mueller's team feels that what Manafort has to offer is not just credible, but important," said one Justice Department veteran.
    Manafort's decision to flip against President Trump likely blindsided his legal team.

Paul Manafort was the chairman of President Donald Trump's campaign when he offered a Russian oligarch "private briefings" on Trump's bid.

He was spearheading the campaign when WikiLeaks began dumping thousands of emails from the Democratic National Committee that had been stolen by Russian operatives.

Perhaps most importantly, he was one of three top Trump campaign officials to attend a meeting with two Russian lobbyists offering kompromat on Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton at the height of the campaign.

On Friday, Manafort pleaded guilty to two counts of conspiracy and obstruction, and Andrew Weissmann, a prosecutor working for the special counsel Robert Mueller, told a federal judge that Manafort had flipped and would be cooperating "in any and all matter as to which the government deems the cooperation relevant," including "testifying fully, completely" before a grand jury.

Patrick Cotter, a former federal prosecutor who worked with Weissmann in the past, didn't mince words when he reacted to the development.

"Manafort's cooperation is the single most important advancement for the Mueller probe," he said. "He is the single most important witness thus far, because his position was such that he can shed light on the most critical question of what the president knew, and when he knew it."
'This is a huge get for Mueller's team'
Robert MuellerRobert Mueller. Alex Wong/Getty Images

Mueller is investigating Russia's interference in the 2016 election, whether members of the Trump campaign colluded with Moscow to tilt the race in his favor, and whether Trump sought to obstruct justice after the existence of the investigation became public knowledge last year.

News of Manafort's deal with Mueller came after intense speculation over whether the former Trump campaign chairman would plead guilty or go to trial.

Trump's lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, told Politico earlier this week that Manafort was in a joint defense agreement with the president, and that Trump's team was not worried about Manafort flipping.

He told BuzzFeed early Friday, less than two hours before Manafort's plea hearing, that Manafort had not withdrawn from the agreement, in what appeared to be an indication that even if Manafort entered a guilty plea, he would not be cooperating against Trump.

For that reason, Weissmann's announcement that Manafort had flipped likely "blindsided" the president's legal team, Cotter said.

But Elie Honig, a former Justice Department lawyer who prosecuted hundreds of organized crime cases, said it's common in high-profile cases for a cooperator to stay silent about their agreement with the prosecution until the last minute.

"Joint defense agreements are very common in mob cases," he said. "And when you're working to flip someone in a joint defense agreement, they'd have to keep it a secret. The last people you'd tell are the other people in the agreement because they could threaten you, try to dissuade you, or do other things to derail you."

Giuliani told Business Insider on Friday evening that Manafort had still not withdrawn from his joint defense agreement with Trump.

But Jeffrey Cramer, a longtime former federal prosecutor who spent 12 years at the Justice Department, pointed out that a joint defense agreement in this case is not the same as those in most other federal cases.

"Normal defense agreements involve people on the same indictment," he said, adding that he believed it was likely the most Manafort was getting out of his agreement with Trump was money to cover his legal expenses. "Regardless, he is talking to Mueller now, so I doubt there will be many meetings between the two sides going forward."

What Manafort knows is important for several threads of the Russia investigation, like the hack of the DNC and any communication between Trump campaign members and Russian interests. But the biggest value he brings to Mueller is the ability to shed light on the controversial June 2016 meeting between campaign officials and Russian lobbyists.

Manafort attended the meeting along with Donald Trump Jr. and Jared Kushner, and it eventually emerged that, contrary to Trump Jr.'s initial statements, the meeting was pitched as "part of Russia and its government's support" for Trump's candidacy.

It is a federal crime to accept something of value from a foreign government in connection to an American election, and legal experts have suggested that if Trump campaign officials took the meeting to get kompromat on Clinton, it could place them in serious legal jeopardy.

"Manafort has knowledge of that meeting because he was there, there's no speculation on that," Cramer said. "He knows what it was for, what happened at the meeting, and he may even know about the cover-up afterward. This is a huge get for Mueller's team."
'It's getting very lonely on Trump Island'
Donald TrumpDonald Trump. Alex Edelman/Getty Images

After Manafort's plea deal was announced, both Giuliani and the White House released statements downplaying its significance.

"Once again an investigation has concluded with a plea having nothing to do with President Trump or the Trump campaign," Giuliani said in a statement to Business Insider. "The reason: the President did nothing wrong."

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders struck a similar chord.

"This had absolutely nothing to do with the President or his victorious 2016 Presidential campaign," she said in a statement. "It is totally unrelated."

While the charges to which Manafort pleaded are unrelated to Trump, legal experts say Manafort will tell Mueller a lot more than just information about what was in the indictments against him.

"Sanders' statement is just false," Cramer said. "Some things are gray. This is really black and white. The Russia meeting was obviously during the campaign, the DNC hack was obviously during the campaign, as were many other events Manafort may know about."

"The court of public opinion is one thing; the legal system doesn't care about the spin the White House is putting on this," he added.

Honig agreed.

Manafort's cooperation, he said, is a massive victory for the special counsel, because "the way it works with federal cooperation is it's all or nothing."

"The cooperator doesn't just talk about select people or categories, with the exception of close family members at times," he said. "They have to talk about everything they've ever done, all the criminal activity they knew about, every crime they've committed."

Before striking a plea deal with a defendant, prosecutors sit down with them or their attorney for what's known as a proffer session, which involves answering any questions from investigators, including those about their own case and other possible criminal activity they may have witnessed.

Even if Mueller's team didn't have the chance to sit down for a full proffer session with Manafort, experts said he almost certainly knew the broad strokes of what the former Trump campaign chairman had to offer.

Ultimately, prosecutors only agree to a cooperation deal with a defendant if the defendant gives them information that can be confirmed by other witnesses and information investigators have gathered.

Cotter, who was part of the team that convicted the Gambino crime family boss John Gotti after flipping his right-hand man, Salvatore "Sammy the bull" Gravano, said that was the most significant takeaway for him.

"This means Mueller's team feels that what Manafort has to offer is not just credible, but important," he said. "That suggests that what Manafort knows is really critical evidence about that Trump Tower meeting, who knew about it and when, and what other contacts were there between the campaign and people around Trump."

The bottom line? Every day, Cotter said, there are one or two fewer people the president can rely on.

"It's getting very lonely on Trump Island."
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Offline RE

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🤡 From CO2 to Methane, Trump’s Hurricane of Destruction
« Reply #1517 on: September 15, 2018, 12:01:33 AM »
https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/09/14/from-co2-to-methane-trumps-hurricane-of-destruction/

September 14, 2018
From CO2 to Methane, Trump’s Hurricane of Destruction
by Joshua Frank


Photo Source Becker1999 | CC BY 2.0


While the Trump administration swirls around in a vortex of Tweets, lies and Russiagate, one thing is for certain, while we are all distracted and perplexed by the daily mayhem, Trump and his fossil fuel buddies are getting away with environmental plunder.

It’s not a surprise, really, given that Trump believes man-made climate change is a bunch of stale chow mein, as he notoriously tweeted:

Unfortunately, Trump has moved beyond his wacky conspiracy theory and sparked a full-on assault on the environmental laws, science and regulatory apparatus which act as our best hope to curb greenhouse gas emissions. In documents uncovered by the New York Times earlier this week, the paper revealed the Trump gang is going to announce a proposal that will make it far easier for oil and gas companies to release methane into the atmosphere. Trump’s gaseous rollback would allow these polluters to stop monitoring and fixing leakage that originates from their pipes.

Leaking methane is catastrophic, and by some estimates the gas accounts for one-third of all warming from greenhouse gas emissions. In the US, leaks account for approximately 32 percent of the industry’s total methane pollution. While methane doesn’t stick around as long as carbon dioxide, it has a much more immediate impact and is considered 84 times more potent than CO2 in the first twenty years after being released. Obama did not go nearly far enough in halting the fossil fuel polluters; nonetheless, Trump’s administration is dismantling every meager roadblock Obama’s EPA erected.

Trump’s latest move falls on the heels of a draft rule from earlier this year that would kill Obama’s methane waste rule, which mandated that oil and gas companies to capture any leaking methane from their operations, as well as update their existing equipment to minimize leaks. Earlier this summer the EPA moved to weaken regulations on CO2 emissions from vehicle exhaust. And just last month Trump’s EPA moved to dismantle the Obama era regulations that caps CO2 emissions from coal-fired smokestacks, admitting the change would lead to at least 1,400 premature deaths per year.

It doesn’t stop there. In July, the Trump administration released a proposal that would remove key provisions from the Endangered Species Act, putting the survival of threatened and endangered species in further peril. To top it off, the  brazen Bureau of Land Management is almost totally foregoing the public input stage that’s required before selling off our public lands to oil and gas development.

Along with gutting regulations, Trump is hellbent on exterminating the EPA as well. According to Columbia Law School’s Silencing Science Tracker, government scientists have been interfered with or censored by government agencies 116 times. Budgets have been slashed, staff has been cut and scientific research canceled. According to the tracker, only 20 of 83 federal science jobs have been filled under Trump.

On the campaign trail, Trump promised to drain the swamp and shrink government spending, and when it comes to the EPA he’s kept his promise. A Freedom of Information Act request filed by the Washington Post shows Trump has downsized the EPA workforce by 1,200. Additionally, the Post reports that “260 scientists, 185 ‘environmental protection specialists’ and 106 engineers are gone.”

During the height of the EPA in the 1990s, over 18,000 people were employed by the agency, that number has now dropped to around 13,750. The fall of EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt and his scorched-earth oversight was certainly a feel-good moment, but the appointment of Andrew Wheeler leaves much to be desired.

Wheeler, a former energy lobbyist, worked hard to put the brakes on Obama’s EPA from enacting laws that would hold oil and gas companies accountable. He also served as the vice president of the obscure Washington Coal Club that consists of lawmakers, lobbyists and coal barons who share the same agenda of keeping the dirty fuel burning for decades to come. Wheeler also worked for Oklahoma Senator Jim Inhofe, one of the most anti-environmental senators to ever hold office. Inhofe often refers to climate change as a hoax and infamously brought a snowball to the Senate floor to prove global warming was a con-job. Wheeler by every measure is as dangerous as Pruitt and will gleefully support Trump’s war on the environment.

Trump and his dismal EPA are ensuring that pesky government regulations don’t get in the way of fossil fuel profits any time soon. The impact of Trump’s disdain for science will certainly be felt, starting with the communities being clobbered by Hurricane Florence.
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More articles by:Joshua Frank

JOSHUA FRANK is managing editor of CounterPunch. His most recent book is Big Heat: Earth on the Brink, co-authored with Jeffrey St. Clair, to be published by AK Press next month. He can be reached at joshua@counterpunch.org. You can troll him on Twitter @joshua__frank.
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Offline Surly1

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With “Fear” and Trump, Bob Woodward Has a Bookend to the Nixon Story
« Reply #1518 on: September 16, 2018, 04:47:55 AM »
With “Fear” and Trump, Bob Woodward Has a Bookend to the Nixon Story
Almost half a century later, the ghost of the scandal that launched Woodward’s career haunts the Trump White House.


Bob Woodward’s “Fear” belongs on a shelf with the literature of mad kings, next to Robert Graves’s “I, Claudius,” featuring the Roman emperor Caligula, and Ryszard Kapuściński’s “The Emperor,” about the last days in the court of Ethiopia’s Haile Selassie. Those books are masterpieces of fictionalized history, while “Fear” is a remarkable feat of reporting conveyed in prose that couldn’t be called literary. But they resemble one another in their atmosphere of antic dread—the claustrophobic, gut-tightening sense that power has come utterly unmoored from reality, and no one in the palace is safe from the wild impulses of the ruler. There’s nothing comparable in American journalism, except maybe Woodward’s “The Final Days,” co-written with Carl Bernstein, about the downfall of Richard Nixon. Yet even Nixon—drunk late at night and talking to paintings in the White House residence—seems relatively sane and pitiable compared with Donald Trump. You half expect to find Woodward’s Trump ordering the execution of the entire National Security Council, declaring himself a god on Twitter, then anointing his daughter as heir to the throne.

The title of the book comes from Trump’s definition of “real power,” whether in terms of political clout or the ability to bully a woman he has victimized. But the fear around his Presidency has nothing to do with his skillful use of intimidation, and everything to do with the dangerous consequences of his erratic behavior. At Trump’s core lies a need always to look strong, which, of course, makes him look weak. In several scenes, one adviser or another struggles to find the right, flattering words that will keep the President from starting a nuclear war.

No one has any respect for Trump. In the course of the book, his chief of staff calls him “an idiot”; his Secretary of State ups it to “a fucking moron”; his Secretary of Defense compares him to an eleven-year-old; his top economic adviser and his personal lawyer consider him, respectively, “a professional liar” and “a fucking liar.” (Various denials have been issued.) Gary Cohn, the economic adviser, tells the President to his face that he’s “a fucking asshole,” while Trump calls Cohn “a fucking globalist.” When Cohn first tries to resign, Trump mocks him for being under his wife’s thumb, not to mention treasonous. There’s no end to the Cabinet members and generals whom Trump is eager to insult in front of their colleagues, or to fire by tweet. A coarse and feckless viciousness is the operating procedure of his White House, and the poison spreads to everyone. Only snakes and sycophants survive.

You might have already sensed this, but you didn’t know it with such nauseating specificity. In the absence of an Oval Office taping system like the one that destroyed Nixon during Watergate, Woodward’s interviews, conducted under the shroud of deep background, are a pretty comprehensive substitute. One of his most detailed, most revealing scenes takes place in the Tank, the secure windowless meeting room of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in the summer of 2017. Cohn and Defense Secretary James Mattis conspire to bring Trump across the river to the Pentagon in order to impress upon him the importance of the American-led international order of security partnerships and trade treaties. The presentation quickly collapses under Steve Bannon’s sophistic questioning. Trump, who cares only about scoring a profit off allies, keeps repeating, “It’s all bullshit!” He announces his intention to tear up the defense treaty with South Korea—“Pull the fucking thing out! I don’t give a shit”—and soon leaves.

South Korea—its trade surplus with the United States, the cost of American troops and defense systems there—is an obsession of Trump’s, and perhaps the closest thing in “Fear” to an organizing narrative principle. The book begins with Cohn removing a one-paragraph letter that awaits Trump’s signature on the Oval Office desk and that would end the Korean-American trade agreement. Cohn is counting on the President’s flickering consciousness to make him forget about the letter and the impulse to undermine an important ally. But Trump keeps demanding another draft, for destroying alliances is—along with hatred of the press—his genuine, unquenchable passion in politics. His stamina in pursuit of these demons is impressive. Every day in his White House has the disintegrating feel of final days, but the next day is the same, and the story never ends.

Even though Woodward rarely quotes people speaking to him directly, it isn’t hard to discern some of his main White House sources: Cohn; Trump’s first chief of staff, Reince Priebus; his staff secretary Rob Porter. In Woodward’s acquiescent style, they come across as public servants making personal sacrifices for the good of the country—in the same category as Anonymous, the author of the Times Op-Ed about the internal “resistance” to Trump. Cohn’s subterfuge with the letter becomes an act of patriotism—he’s one of the grownups who need to stay in the room. Woodward’s reporting exposes, perhaps inadvertently, what a hollow conceit this is.

Priebus, the former chairman of the Republican National Committee, sees everything in terms of political advantage, and encourages Trump’s polarizing instinct to govern as the President of his base. Cohn, the Democrat in the group, decides not to resign over Trump’s softness on white nationalism, in order to push through a hugely regressive tax bill that leaves the next generation with almost two trillion dollars of debt. Tariffs, not neo-Nazis, finally persuade him to quit. Steve Mnuchin, the Treasury Secretary, is reduced to grovelling. “I’m with you,” he assures Trump, after the meeting in the Tank. H. R. McMaster, the national-security adviser, is treated with stunning contempt. John Kelly, Priebus’s volatile replacement as chief of staff, has an attention span shorter than Trump’s. None of them has anything to say about Trump’s corrosion of American democracy. If this is the resistance, we watch it getting crushed. By the end of “Fear,” Trump has won in a rout.

Woodward has written a kind of bookend to the Nixon story, and the ghost of the scandal that launched his career haunts the Trump White House. “All the President’s Men,” Woodward’s first collaboration with Bernstein, was at its heart a detective story, and the trail of evidence led the reporters into the Oval Office. We don’t yet know the outcome of Robert Mueller’s investigation into collusion and obstruction of justice, but in a sense it doesn’t matter. The real crime is already in plain sight. ♦

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: With “Fear” and Trump, Bob Woodward Has a Bookend to the Nixon Story
« Reply #1519 on: September 16, 2018, 05:18:39 AM »
Trumpovetsky makes Nixon look like fucking Mother Theresa.

RE
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Offline Surly1

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Re: With “Fear” and Trump, Bob Woodward Has a Bookend to the Nixon Story
« Reply #1520 on: September 16, 2018, 05:23:17 AM »
Trumpovetsky makes Nixon look like fucking Mother Theresa.

RE

I recall at the time I thought he was Satan incarnated on earth. Which he was. Trump makes Nixon look like kindly Uncle Dick.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: With “Fear” and Trump, Bob Woodward Has a Bookend to the Nixon Story
« Reply #1521 on: September 16, 2018, 05:29:36 AM »
Trumpovetsky makes Nixon look like fucking Mother Theresa.

RE

I recall at the time I thought he was Satan incarnated on earth. Which he was. Trump makes Nixon look like kindly Uncle Dick.

Nixon WAS Satan.  Trumpofsky is Satan2.

RE
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Offline Surly1

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Re: With “Fear” and Trump, Bob Woodward Has a Bookend to the Nixon Story
« Reply #1522 on: September 16, 2018, 07:40:23 AM »
Trumpovetsky makes Nixon look like fucking Mother Theresa.

RE

I recall at the time I thought he was Satan incarnated on earth. Which he was. Trump makes Nixon look like kindly Uncle Dick.

Nixon WAS Satan.  Trumpofsky is Satan2.

RE

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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🤡 Trump hits China with fresh tariffs, threatens more if Beijing retaliates
« Reply #1523 on: September 18, 2018, 12:49:45 AM »
This will work out well, I am sure.  ::)

RE

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trade-china-tariffs/trump-slaps-tariffs-on-200-billion-in-chinese-goods-threatens-267-billion-more-idUSKCN1LX2M3

Business News
September 17, 2018 / 2:53 PM / Updated 22 minutes ago
Trump hits China with fresh tariffs, threatens more if Beijing retaliates
David Lawder, Kevin Yao


7 Min Read

WASHINGTON/TIANJIN (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump escalated his trade war with Beijing, imposing 10 percent tariffs on about $200 billion worth of imports in a move one senior Chinese regulator said “poisoned” the atmosphere for negotiations.

Trump also warned in a statement on Monday that if China takes retaliatory action against U.S. farmers or industries, “we will immediately pursue phase three, which is tariffs on approximately $267 billion of additional imports.”

China is reviewing plans to send a delegation to Washington for fresh talks in light of the U.S. decision, the South China Morning Post reported on Tuesday, citing a government source in Beijing, raising the risk of a prolonged trade battle between the world’s largest economies that could hit global growth.

U.S. trade actions against China will not work as China has ample fiscal and monetary policy tools to cope with the impact, a senior securities market official said.
Related Coverage

    China says has no choice but to retaliate against latest U.S. tariffs
    China says has no choice but to retaliate against latest U.S. tariffs
    U.S. gives rare earths reprieve in revised $200 billion China tariff list
    U.S. gives rare earths reprieve in revised $200 billion China tariff list
    Trade war impact on China's economy not big, but stocks, FX need to be watched - central bank adviser
    Trade war impact on China's economy not big, but stocks, FX need to be watched - central bank adviser

“President Trump is a hard-hitting businessman, and he tries to put pressure on China so he can get concessions from our negotiations. I think that kind of tactic is not going to work with China,” Fang Xinghai, vice chairman of China’s securities regulator, said at a conference in the port city of Tianjin.

Collection of tariffs on the long-anticipated list will start on Sept. 24 but the rate will increase to 25 percent by the end of 2018, allowing U.S. companies some time to adjust their supply chains to alternate countries.

So far, the United States has imposed tariffs on $50 billion worth of Chinese products to pressure Beijing to make sweeping changes to its trade, technology transfer and high-tech industrial subsidy policies. China has retaliated in kind.

Vice Premier Liu He was set to convene a meeting in Beijing on Tuesday morning to discuss the government’s response, Bloomberg News reported, citing a person briefed on the matter.

China has vowed to retaliate against new U.S. tariffs, with state-run media arguing for an aggressive “counterattack.”

Sponsored

Last month, it unveiled a proposed list of tariffs on $60 billion of U.S. goods ranging from liquefied natural gas to certain types of aircraft - should Washington activate the tariffs on its $200 billion list.

The effect of the 10 percent tariffs will gradually show up in China’s fourth-quarter data, and the full impact of the total 25 percent tariffs is expected to be felt next year, dragging down China’s gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate by 0.83 percentage point, Citi analysts wrote in a note.

Fang said that even if Trump puts tariffs on all Chinese exports to the United States, the negative impact on China’s economy will be about 0.7 percent. He did not say whether he was referring to the impact on the amount of GDP or the GDP growth.
FURTHER TALKS IN DOUBT

Trump’s latest escalation of tariffs on China comes after several meetings yielded no progress. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin last week invited top Chinese officials to a new round of talks, but thus far nothing has been scheduled.

“We have been very clear about the type of changes that need to be made, and we have given China every opportunity to treat us more fairly,” Trump said in his statement. “But, so far, China has been unwilling to change its practices.”

Fang told the Tianjin forum that he hopes the two sides can sit down and talk, but added that the latest U.S. move has “poisoned” the atmosphere.

A senior Trump administration official told reporters that the United States was open to further talks with Beijing, but offered no immediate details on when they may occur.

“This is not an effort to constrain China, but this is an effort to work with China and say, ‘It’s time you address these unfair trade practices that we’ve identified that others have identified and that have harmed the entire trading system,’” the official said.

So far, China has either imposed or proposed tariffs on $110 billion of U.S. goods, representing most of its imports of American products.
Slideshow (3 Images)

“Tensions in the global economic system have manifested themselves in the U.S.-China trade war, which is now seriously disrupting global supply chains,” the European Union Chamber of Commerce in China said in a statement on Tuesday.

China's yuan currency CNY=CFXS slipped 0.3 percent against the U.S. dollar in Asian trade on Tuesday. It has weakened by about 6.0 percent since mid-June, offsetting the 10 percent tariff rate by a considerable margin.[MKTS/GLOB]
CONSUMER TECH TRIMMED

The latest U.S. move spared smart watches from Apple (AAPL.O) and Fitbit (FIT.N) and other consumer products such as baby car seats. But if the administration enacts the additional tariffs on $267 billion in goods, it would engulf all remaining U.S. imports from China and Apple products like the iPhone and its competitors would not likely be spared.

The U.S. Trade Representative’s office eliminated 297 product categories from the proposed tariff list, along with some subsets of other categories.


But the adjustments did little to appease technology and retail groups who argued U.S. consumers would feel the pain.

“President Trump’s decision...is reckless and will create lasting harm to communities across the country,” said Dean Garfield, president of the Information Technology Industry Council, which represents major tech firms.

“Tariffs are a tax on American families, period,” said Hun Quach,” RILA’s vice president for international trade.

“Consumers – not China – will bear the brunt of these tariffs and American farmers and ranchers will see the harmful effects of retaliation worsen.”

Kenneth Jarrett, president of the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai, said three quarters of its members will be hit by the tariffs, and they will not bring jobs back to the United States.

“Most of our member companies are ‘in China, for China’ - selling goods to Chinese companies and consumers, not to Americans - and thus ultimately boosting the U.S. economy,” Jarrett said.

Reporting by Steve Holland, David Lawder, Ginger Gibson, Eric Beech and David Shepardson; Additional reporting by Kevin Yao in TIANJIN, John Ruwitch in SHANGHAI and Michael Martina and Ryan Woo in BEIJING; Editing by Clive McKeef and Kim Coghill
Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
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At U.N., U.S. accuses Russia of 'cheating' on North Korea sanctions

Business News
September 17, 2018 / 11:16 AM / Updated 11 hours ago
Trump says he will announce decision on China tariffs after market close
Steve Holland, David Lawder

3 Min Read

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump said on Monday he would announce his latest plan for China tariffs after the markets close, with expectations he would levy about $200 billion worth of Chinese imports.
U.S. President Donald Trump holds the inaugural meeting of the President's National Council for the American Worker at the White House in Washington, U.S., September 17, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Trump offered few details about his tariff announcement, which has been anticipated for several days after he directed aides to proceed with the next round of tariffs on Chinese products amid deep disagreements with Beijing over trade and intellectual property policies.

“It will be a lot of money coming into the coffers of the United States of America. A lot of money coming in,” Trump told reporters at the White House. “But you’ll be seeing what we’re doing right after close of business today - the markets’ closing.”

Trump added that he had great respect for Chinese President Xi Jinping, but the U.S. goods trade deficit with China was too large and “we can’t do that any more.”

The U.S. Trade Representative’s office had proposed tariffs of 10 percent to 25 percent on more than 6,000 Chinese products, including a wide variety of electronics products, including printed circuit boards, internet-connected devices such as routers and voice, data and image reception and transmission devices.

The $200 billion list would impose tariffs directly on consumer products for the first time, from furniture to handbags, vacuum cleaners, building products and seafood.

The U.S. Treasury last week invited Chinese officials, including Vice Premier Liu He, the top economic adviser to Chinese President Xi Jinping, for more talks to try to resolve trade differences between the world’s two largest economies. But no talks have so far been announced.

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said on Monday that the United States was ready to negotiate a trade deal with China if Beijing was ready for serious discussions.
Apple, Amazon lead Wall Street lower

“We are ready to negotiate and talk with China any time that they are ready for serious and substantive negotiations toward free trade, to reduce tariffs and nontariff barriers, to open markets and allow the most competitive economy in the world — ours — to export more and more goods and services to China,” Kudlow said.

Reporting by Steve Holland and David Lawder; Writing by David Alexander; Editing by Tim Ahmann and Jonathan Oatis
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🤡 Ivanka sez, "Cut Bait" on Kavanaugh
« Reply #1524 on: September 19, 2018, 01:58:15 AM »
https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2018/09/kavanaugh-allegations-trump-ivanka

The White House
“Cut Bait”: As the Kavanaugh Nightmare Escalates, Trump Is Gripped with Uncertainty as Ivanka Suggests Cutting the Judge Loose


The threat of losing the House and Senate has stopped Trump from going scorched-earth on Christine Blasey Ford. If Trump antagonizes women voters, it could increase the odds Republicans would lose both houses in Congress.
by

    Gabriel Sherman

September 18, 2018 6:52 pm
woman in navy dress standing next to man
Donald and Ivanka Trump tour an advanced manufacturing lab in Peosta, Iowa.
By Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images.

After days of obsessing over the anonymous New York Times op-ed and Bob Woodward’s book Fear, Donald Trump’s mood was improving markedly last week as he watched Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination sailing toward a confirmation vote. “Everyone thought Kavanaugh was a slam dunk,” an outside adviser to the White House told me. In a phone call with Sean Hannity over the weekend, Trump even boasted he’d gotten past Woodward’s book—he told people it was a dud. But his reprieve would be short-lived. On Sunday, college professor Christine Blasey Ford told The Washington Post that Kavanaugh had allegedly attempted to rape her at a party when they were teenagers, thrusting Trump and the White House into a #MeToo crisis at a moment when they can’t afford to antagonize women voters ahead of the midterms.

According to three sources, Kavanaugh’s imperiled confirmation has unsettled Trump and the White House. “Everyone knows his predisposition is to punch back, but this is a different situation than an election,” a former West Wing official briefed on the strategy discussions said. In the past, Trump responded to allegations of sexual misconduct by channeling his mentor Roy Cohn: deny everything, and go on the attack. But he’s been surprisingly measured in his defense of Kavanaugh. In a news conference today, Trump told reporters, “I feel so badly for him that he’s going through this,” but refrained from attacking Ford.

According to sources, several factors are at play. White House advisers are worried that more damaging information about Kavanaugh could come out. Two sources told me the White House has heard rumors that Ford’s account will be verified by women who say she told it to them contemporaneously. People worry, without apparent evidence, of another Ronan Farrow bomb dropping. One source says Ivanka Trump has told her father to “cut bait” and drop Kavanaugh.
Watch Now: Why Reporting on Trump is So Difficult

Another reason Trump hasn’t gone to the mat for Kavanaugh is that he’s said to be suspicious of Kavanaugh’s establishment pedigree. “‘He’s a Bush guy, why would I put myself out there defending him?’” Trump told people, according to a former White House official briefed on the conversations. Trump also has expressed frustration with White House counsel Don McGahn, who aggressively lobbied for him to choose Kavanaugh, a source said. “Trump wants this guy on the court, but Trump knows there are five other people he could put on the court if this falls apart,” a former official said.

But the threat of losing the House and Senate seems to have helped convince Trump not to go scorched-earth on Ford. If Trump antagonizes women voters, it could increase the odds Republicans would lose both houses in Congress. “Trump knows the Senate is not looking good,” an outside adviser said. “It’s all about the impeachment, he knows it’s coming.”

Even before the Kavanaugh crisis, Trump has been worried about Republicans’ declining fortunes, and he’s been finding ways to shift the blame. Trump told a friend in the Oval Office last week that it would be Mitch McConnell and Paul Ryan’s fault if Republicans lost the House and the Senate, according to a person familiar with the conversation. “This is the election about Ryan and McConnell—it’s about those guys,” Trump said. Trump referred to his 2020 campaign as “the real election.” “It’s pure Trump. He has to come up with a way he’s not responsible if Republicans lose,” a former West Wing staffer said.

The White House and the offices of Mitch McConnell and Paul Ryan did not respond to requests for comment.
Gabriel ShermanGabriel Sherman is a special correspondent for Vanity Fair. Most recently, Sherman served as national-affairs editor at New York magazine, and he is a regular contributor to NBC News and MSNBC.
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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1525 on: September 19, 2018, 04:13:53 AM »
A sensational headline, but based only on "one source says".
« Last Edit: September 19, 2018, 03:41:12 PM by Agent Graves »
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🤡 Trump feels angry, unprotected amid mounting crises
« Reply #1526 on: September 20, 2018, 12:00:20 AM »
https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/he-is-vulnerable-trump-feels-angry-unprotected-amid-mounting-crises/2018/09/19/e33ca996-bc26-11e8-b7d2-0773aa1e33da_story.html?utm_term=.d70d21a36c56

Politics
Trump feels angry, unprotected amid mounting crises


President Trump listens to Polish President Andrzej Duda speak during a joint press conference in the East Room of the White House on Sept. 18, 2018. (Calla Kessler/The Washington Post)

By Ashley Parker and
Philip Rucker
September 19 at 9:18 PM

President Trump’s declaration that “I don’t have an attorney general” was not merely the cry of an executive feeling betrayed by a subordinate.

It was also a raw expression of vulnerability and anger from a president who associates say increasingly believes he is unprotected — with the Russia investigation steamrolling ahead, anonymous administration officials seeking to undermine him and the specter of impeachment proceedings, should the Democrats retake the House on Nov. 6.

In a freewheeling and friendly interview published Wednesday, Trump savaged Attorney General Jeff Sessions, mocking the nation’s top law enforcement official for coming off as “mixed up and confused” during his Senate confirmation hearing and for his “sad” performance on the job.

Though Trump has long railed against Sessions, both publicly and privately, for recusing himself from overseeing the Justice Department’s Russia probe, the president’s comments to Hill.TV brought his criticism to a new level.
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“I don’t have an attorney general,” Trump said. “It’s very sad.”

Publicly, at least, Trump is going through the ordinary motions of being president. He met with the visiting president of Poland and on Wednesday toured the flood-ravaged Carolinas to survey damage from Hurricane Florence. He also prepared to hit the campaign trail with rallies in Nevada on Thursday and in Missouri on Friday, and next week he will host scores of foreign dignitaries at the United Nations General Assembly in Manhattan.
Close

Republicans are already judging the credibility of Christine Blasey Ford before she even speaks to the Senate Judiciary Committee. (JM Rieger/The Washington Post)

Behind the scenes, however, Trump is confronting broadsides from every direction — legal, political and personal.

The president, as well as family members and longtime loyalists, fret about whom in the administration they can trust, people close to them said, rattled by a pair of devastating, unauthorized insider accounts this month from inside the White House. A senior administration official penned an anonymous column in the New York Times describing a “resistance” within to guard against the president’s impulses, while Bob Woodward’s new book, “Fear,” offers an alarming portrait of a president seemingly unfit for the office.

“Everybody in the White House now has to look around and ask, ‘Who’s taping? Who’s leaking? And who’s on their way out the door?’ It’s becoming a game of survival,” said a Republican strategist who works in close coordination with the White House, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to speak candidly.

Some of Trump’s allies believe he has legitimate cause for worry.

“The president should feel vulnerable because he is vulnerable — to those that fight him daily on implementing his agenda,” Stephen K. Bannon, a former chief White House strategist, wrote in a text message.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at Valor Survive and Thrive Conference in Waukegan, Ill., on Sept. 19, 2018. (Kamil Krzaczynski/Reuters)

“The Woodward book is the typed up meeting notes from ‘The Committee to Save America,’ ” he added, referring dismissively to a loose alliance of advisers who saw themselves as protecting the country from Trump. “The anonymous op-ed is the declaration of an administrative coup by the Republican establishment.”

In some respects, Trump has maintained a sanguine outlook. Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort last week became the latest former member of the president’s inner circle to agree to cooperate with federal prosecutors. But Trump has been uncharacteristically calm about the plea deal for Manafort, whom he had praised only a month ago for refusing to “break” under pressure from special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

Asked if he was worried about Manafort’s cooperation agreement, Trump told reporters Wednesday: “No, I’m not. . . . I believe that he will tell the truth. And if he tells the truth, no problem.”

Trump has been similarly restrained this week as federal judge Brett M. Kavanaugh, his pick for the Supreme Court, fights to save his nomination amid an accusation of sexual assault, which Kavanaugh denies. Trump has publicly defended Kavanaugh, though he has refrained from attacking the judge’s accuser, Christine Blasey Ford.

White House officials, who began this week reeling from the assault allegation, said by midweek that they have concluded Kavanaugh would probably still win confirmation, especially given Ford’s reluctance to testify at a public Senate Judiciary Committee hearing scheduled by Republicans for Monday.

Nonetheless, Trump’s screed against Sessions underscored the president’s sense of anger and what he considers to be a betrayal by his attorney general, who, despite executing much of the president’s hard-line, law-and-order agenda, has never been able to recover from what Trump views as an unforgivable sin: his recusal from the Russia investigation for a conflict of interest, which ultimatelyled to Mueller’s appointment.

Trump told Hill.TV that he appointed Sessions out of blind loyalty, a decision he now regrets. Sessions’s aggressive and controversial immigration actions — including emphasizing “zero tolerance” for those who come to the country illegally and defending the administration policy of separating families — have been cheered by Trump allies. But the president criticized his attorney general even on this front, in a striking expression of his deep dissatisfaction.

“I’m not happy at the border, I’m not happy with numerous things, not just this,” Trump said, referring to the Russia probe.

The president’s attack on Sessions raised concern in the law enforcement community and also prompted reactions ranging from exasperation to outright dismay.

“Trump doesn’t just blur the lines, he flat out tries to eradicate those lines,” said Joyce Vance, a former U.S. attorney in Alabama nominated by President Barack Obama. “He wants a consigliere, not an attorney general. On the one hand, it’s a pitiful thing to watch, but it’s also deadly serious, because the attorney general does not protect the president. The attorney general protects the American people. And the fact that we have a president who doesn’t understand that is alarming.”

A former White House official was similarly disturbed. “It is a complete disgrace the way that Trump is acting like a schoolyard bully against Sessions,” the official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity to share a critical opinion.

In the interview, Trump belittled Sessions, whom he has previously dubbed “Mr. Magoo” and, according to Woodward’s book, dismissed as “mentally retarded.”

“He went through the nominating process and he did very poorly,” Trump said of Sessions’s Senate confirmation hearing. “He was giving very confusing answers, answers that should have been easily answered. And that was a rough time for him, and he won by one vote, I believe. You know, he won by just one vote.”

Trump went on to question Sessions’s self-recusal from the Russia investigation.

“He said, ‘I recuse myself, I recuse myself,’ ” Trump told Hill. TV. “And now it turned out he didn’t have to recuse himself. Actually, the FBI reported shortly thereafter any reason for him to recuse himself. And it’s very sad what happened.”

It was not clear what Trump meant.

Career Justice Department ethics officials had told Sessions he had to step aside from any ­campaign-related investigations because he had been a top campaign surrogate and met with the Russian ambassador.

FBI officials would not have been among those providing advice. Then-FBI Director James B. Comey said at a congressional hearing that he was aware of nonpublic information that he believed would force the attorney general to step aside before Sessions did so, though he declined to specify what those facts were.

After taking yet another public tongue-lashing from the president, Sessions gave a speech Wednesday to law enforcement officials in Waukegan, Ill., in which he effusivelypraised Trump.

“Under his strong leadership, we are respecting police again and enforcing our laws,” Sessions said, according to his prepared remarks, which a DOJ spokesman said he delivered. “Based on my experience meeting with officers like you across the country, I believe that morale has already improved under President Trump. I can feel the difference.”

Even as Sessions was dutifully showering compliments upon his boss, Trump was unwilling to throw him a lifeline.

“I’m disappointed in the attorney general for many reasons,” Trump told reporters before leaving for North Carolina. “You understand that.”

Devlin Barrett, John Wagner and Matt Zapotosky contributed to this report. 
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1527 on: September 20, 2018, 12:24:07 AM »
A sensational headline, but based only on "one source says".

What?

Quote
According to sources, several factors are at play. White House advisers are worried that more damaging information about Kavanaugh could come out. Two sources told me the White House has heard rumors that Ford’s account will be verified by women who say she told it to them contemporaneously. People worry, without apparent evidence, of another Ronan Farrow bomb dropping. One source says Ivanka Trump has told her father to “cut bait” and drop Kavanaugh.
Watch Now: Why Reporting on Trump is So Difficult

Source soup, but who cares?  Ten sources could all lie and a singe source could tell the truth.  Unless you have the logic of a flatworm the count should not matter.
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Re: 🤡 Trump hits China with fresh tariffs, threatens more if Beijing retaliates
« Reply #1528 on: September 20, 2018, 12:28:37 AM »
This will work out well, I am sure.  ::)

RE

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trade-china-tariffs/trump-slaps-tariffs-on-200-billion-in-chinese-goods-threatens-267-billion-more-idUSKCN1LX2M3

Business News
September 17, 2018 / 2:53 PM / Updated 22 minutes ago
Trump hits China with fresh tariffs, threatens more if Beijing retaliates
David Lawder, Kevin Yao


7 Min Read

WASHINGTON/TIANJIN (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump escalated his trade war with Beijing, imposing 10 percent tariffs on about $200 billion worth of imports in a move one senior Chinese regulator said “poisoned” the atmosphere for negotiations.

Trump also warned in a statement on Monday that if China takes retaliatory action against U.S. farmers or industries, “we will immediately pursue phase three, which is tariffs on approximately $267 billion of additional imports.”

China is reviewing plans to send a delegation to Washington for fresh talks in light of the U.S. decision, the South China Morning Post reported on Tuesday, citing a government source in Beijing, raising the risk of a prolonged trade battle between the world’s largest economies that could hit global growth.

U.S. trade actions against China will not work as China has ample fiscal and monetary policy tools to cope with the impact, a senior securities market official said.
Related Coverage

    China says has no choice but to retaliate against latest U.S. tariffs
    China says has no choice but to retaliate against latest U.S. tariffs
    U.S. gives rare earths reprieve in revised $200 billion China tariff list
    U.S. gives rare earths reprieve in revised $200 billion China tariff list
    Trade war impact on China's economy not big, but stocks, FX need to be watched - central bank adviser
    Trade war impact on China's economy not big, but stocks, FX need to be watched - central bank adviser

“President Trump is a hard-hitting businessman, and he tries to put pressure on China so he can get concessions from our negotiations. I think that kind of tactic is not going to work with China,” Fang Xinghai, vice chairman of China’s securities regulator, said at a conference in the port city of Tianjin.

Collection of tariffs on the long-anticipated list will start on Sept. 24 but the rate will increase to 25 percent by the end of 2018, allowing U.S. companies some time to adjust their supply chains to alternate countries.

So far, the United States has imposed tariffs on $50 billion worth of Chinese products to pressure Beijing to make sweeping changes to its trade, technology transfer and high-tech industrial subsidy policies. China has retaliated in kind.

Vice Premier Liu He was set to convene a meeting in Beijing on Tuesday morning to discuss the government’s response, Bloomberg News reported, citing a person briefed on the matter.

China has vowed to retaliate against new U.S. tariffs, with state-run media arguing for an aggressive “counterattack.”

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Last month, it unveiled a proposed list of tariffs on $60 billion of U.S. goods ranging from liquefied natural gas to certain types of aircraft - should Washington activate the tariffs on its $200 billion list.

The effect of the 10 percent tariffs will gradually show up in China’s fourth-quarter data, and the full impact of the total 25 percent tariffs is expected to be felt next year, dragging down China’s gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate by 0.83 percentage point, Citi analysts wrote in a note.

Fang said that even if Trump puts tariffs on all Chinese exports to the United States, the negative impact on China’s economy will be about 0.7 percent. He did not say whether he was referring to the impact on the amount of GDP or the GDP growth.
FURTHER TALKS IN DOUBT

Trump’s latest escalation of tariffs on China comes after several meetings yielded no progress. U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin last week invited top Chinese officials to a new round of talks, but thus far nothing has been scheduled.

“We have been very clear about the type of changes that need to be made, and we have given China every opportunity to treat us more fairly,” Trump said in his statement. “But, so far, China has been unwilling to change its practices.”

Fang told the Tianjin forum that he hopes the two sides can sit down and talk, but added that the latest U.S. move has “poisoned” the atmosphere.

A senior Trump administration official told reporters that the United States was open to further talks with Beijing, but offered no immediate details on when they may occur.

“This is not an effort to constrain China, but this is an effort to work with China and say, ‘It’s time you address these unfair trade practices that we’ve identified that others have identified and that have harmed the entire trading system,’” the official said.

So far, China has either imposed or proposed tariffs on $110 billion of U.S. goods, representing most of its imports of American products.
Slideshow (3 Images)

“Tensions in the global economic system have manifested themselves in the U.S.-China trade war, which is now seriously disrupting global supply chains,” the European Union Chamber of Commerce in China said in a statement on Tuesday.

China's yuan currency CNY=CFXS slipped 0.3 percent against the U.S. dollar in Asian trade on Tuesday. It has weakened by about 6.0 percent since mid-June, offsetting the 10 percent tariff rate by a considerable margin.[MKTS/GLOB]
CONSUMER TECH TRIMMED

The latest U.S. move spared smart watches from Apple (AAPL.O) and Fitbit (FIT.N) and other consumer products such as baby car seats. But if the administration enacts the additional tariffs on $267 billion in goods, it would engulf all remaining U.S. imports from China and Apple products like the iPhone and its competitors would not likely be spared.

The U.S. Trade Representative’s office eliminated 297 product categories from the proposed tariff list, along with some subsets of other categories.


But the adjustments did little to appease technology and retail groups who argued U.S. consumers would feel the pain.

“President Trump’s decision...is reckless and will create lasting harm to communities across the country,” said Dean Garfield, president of the Information Technology Industry Council, which represents major tech firms.

“Tariffs are a tax on American families, period,” said Hun Quach,” RILA’s vice president for international trade.

“Consumers – not China – will bear the brunt of these tariffs and American farmers and ranchers will see the harmful effects of retaliation worsen.”

Kenneth Jarrett, president of the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai, said three quarters of its members will be hit by the tariffs, and they will not bring jobs back to the United States.

“Most of our member companies are ‘in China, for China’ - selling goods to Chinese companies and consumers, not to Americans - and thus ultimately boosting the U.S. economy,” Jarrett said.

Reporting by Steve Holland, David Lawder, Ginger Gibson, Eric Beech and David Shepardson; Additional reporting by Kevin Yao in TIANJIN, John Ruwitch in SHANGHAI and Michael Martina and Ryan Woo in BEIJING; Editing by Clive McKeef and Kim Coghill
Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Top articles
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At U.N., U.S. accuses Russia of 'cheating' on North Korea sanctions

Business News
September 17, 2018 / 11:16 AM / Updated 11 hours ago
Trump says he will announce decision on China tariffs after market close
Steve Holland, David Lawder

3 Min Read

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump said on Monday he would announce his latest plan for China tariffs after the markets close, with expectations he would levy about $200 billion worth of Chinese imports.
U.S. President Donald Trump holds the inaugural meeting of the President's National Council for the American Worker at the White House in Washington, U.S., September 17, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Trump offered few details about his tariff announcement, which has been anticipated for several days after he directed aides to proceed with the next round of tariffs on Chinese products amid deep disagreements with Beijing over trade and intellectual property policies.

“It will be a lot of money coming into the coffers of the United States of America. A lot of money coming in,” Trump told reporters at the White House. “But you’ll be seeing what we’re doing right after close of business today - the markets’ closing.”

Trump added that he had great respect for Chinese President Xi Jinping, but the U.S. goods trade deficit with China was too large and “we can’t do that any more.”

The U.S. Trade Representative’s office had proposed tariffs of 10 percent to 25 percent on more than 6,000 Chinese products, including a wide variety of electronics products, including printed circuit boards, internet-connected devices such as routers and voice, data and image reception and transmission devices.

The $200 billion list would impose tariffs directly on consumer products for the first time, from furniture to handbags, vacuum cleaners, building products and seafood.

The U.S. Treasury last week invited Chinese officials, including Vice Premier Liu He, the top economic adviser to Chinese President Xi Jinping, for more talks to try to resolve trade differences between the world’s two largest economies. But no talks have so far been announced.

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said on Monday that the United States was ready to negotiate a trade deal with China if Beijing was ready for serious discussions.
Apple, Amazon lead Wall Street lower

“We are ready to negotiate and talk with China any time that they are ready for serious and substantive negotiations toward free trade, to reduce tariffs and nontariff barriers, to open markets and allow the most competitive economy in the world — ours — to export more and more goods and services to China,” Kudlow said.

Reporting by Steve Holland and David Lawder; Writing by David Alexander; Editing by Tim Ahmann and Jonathan Oatis
Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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All quotes delayed a minimum of 15 minutes. See here for a complete list of exchanges and delays.

© 2018 Reuters. All Rights Reserved.

Directly impacts cripple carts and their components, also scooters and E-bikes.  We will feel the pain.
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Offline Agent Graves

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Re: Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1529 on: September 20, 2018, 03:06:54 AM »
A sensational headline, but based only on "one source says".

What?

Quote
According to sources, several factors are at play. White House advisers are worried that more damaging information about Kavanaugh could come out. Two sources told me the White House has heard rumors that Ford’s account will be verified by women who say she told it to them contemporaneously. People worry, without apparent evidence, of another Ronan Farrow bomb dropping. One source says Ivanka Trump has told her father to “cut bait” and drop Kavanaugh.
Watch Now: Why Reporting on Trump is So Difficult

Source soup, but who cares?  Ten sources could all lie and a singe source could tell the truth.  Unless you have the logic of a flatworm the count should not matter.

Who was it that queried "the source? a horse of course" hmmm?. I suppose it doesn't matter how many horses inside the white house leak to Vanity Fair of all possible publications for politics. It makes a nice change from "sources inside the palace" for stuff that never turns out to be true. Even better are "sources close to" whichever movie star. With friends like that, who would need enemies.

« Last Edit: September 20, 2018, 03:30:54 AM by Agent Graves »
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