AuthorTopic: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread  (Read 145981 times)

Offline RE

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1815 on: March 11, 2019, 03:40:09 AM »
How about a wall that keeps foreign women away from American billionaires.  American women need jobs too and I'm convinced the threat is no less real.

 

Chastity Belts?



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Offline RE

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🤡 Trump's Budget Explained
« Reply #1816 on: March 12, 2019, 03:21:53 AM »
MOAR Bombs!  We need MOAR Bombs!

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/A3h5kcNHVxA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/A3h5kcNHVxA</a>
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Offline agelbert

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Re: Trump Budget 🦍 Explained
« Reply #1817 on: March 12, 2019, 06:15:04 PM »
MOAR Bombs!  We need MOAR Bombs!

RE


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/A3h5kcNHVxA" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/A3h5kcNHVxA</a>

😨 Well, that was a good explanation of the uh, budget.

Here's a pictorial metaphor explaining the message this budget sends to the American Public from TRUMP AND HIS GOP FRIENDS:

« Last Edit: March 12, 2019, 06:17:16 PM by agelbert »
Leges         Sine    Moribus      Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Offline RE

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https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/12/us/politics/trump-budget-cuts.html

Trump Lauded Farmers, Medicare and AIDS Programs. Then He Unsheathed the Budget Knife.


President Trump’s budget, unveiled Monday, envisioned cuts to many programs, including some he has publicly championed.CreditTom Brenner for The New York Times


By Katie Rogers

    March 12, 2019

WASHINGTON — On Friday, the White House announced that Karen Pence, the second lady, would lead a delegation to the United Arab Emirates in support of disabled American athletes at the Special Olympics. On Monday, the White House’s budget proposed striking $17.6 million in grants to expand the event.

What a difference a few days can make.

The Trump administration’s annual budget proposal on Monday envisioned a series of cuts that contrasted with the president’s own words of support for both programs and people — including some groups that make up his political base. To help make way for more military and border spending, it would slash programs large and small, from Medicaid and Medicare — which President Trump as a candidate promised to protect — to safety nets for farmers.

Democrats, who control the House, immediately announced the budget proposal dead on arrival, and many of its ideas stand little chance of passing Congress. But it lays down a marker that could help chart the political course ahead, albeit a course that sometimes seems at odds with Mr. Trump’s own pronouncements.

Here are a few of the more visible contradictions:
Cuts That Would Affect Farmers

On Twitter and in speeches, Mr. Trump has made much of the bright future he believes he is securing for farmers.

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“We’ve had so many good weeks and good days,” Mr. Trump said at the American Farm Bureau’s annual convention in January, “and it’s only going to get better because we’re doing trade deals that are going to get you so much business, you’re not even going to believe it.”

But America’s farmers, a key component of the president’s base and a group suffering the effects of his trade war with China, could be among those the budget would squeeze: The White House wants to ax 15 percent, or $3.6 billion, from the Agriculture Department’s budget. According to budget documents, officials plan to “efficiently use taxpayer resources” to find savings by eliminating “overly generous subsidy programs” and examining other safety nets.

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Reactions to cost-saving measures have predictably fallen along Washington’s deep party lines. Representative K. Michael Conaway of Texas, the top Republican on the House Agriculture Committee, said socialist-leaning Democrats were a bigger threat to farmers than a conservative budget proposal.

“I fully expect the president to be on board” to “keep our promise to farmers and ranchers and rural America made under the five-year farm bill,” he said in a statement.

But the top Democrat on the Senate Agriculture Committee, Senator Debbie Stabenow of Michigan, who battled with the White House over its approach to carrying out last winter’s sweeping farm bill, saw a different proposal.

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“The steep cuts to the U.S.D.A. would jeopardize the department’s ability to implement the farm bill at a time when farmers are struggling with economic instability and trade uncertainty,” she said in a statement.
Cuts to AIDS and Other Health Programs

Mr. Trump has promised that his administration will help eradicate AIDS over the next 10 years. Last week, he even sent a celebratory tweet hailing the news that a patient had been cured of the disease.

He was similarly optimistic in February during his State of the Union address.

“My budget will ask Democrats and Republicans to make the needed commitment to eliminate the H.I.V. epidemic in the United States within 10 years,” Mr. Trump said at the time. “Together, we will defeat AIDS in America and beyond.”

His pledge is one seemingly at odds with other moves the administration has made — namely, a November decision to cut costs for Medicare by reducing the number of drugs that must be made available to people with H.I.V., the virus that causes AIDS. Mr. Trump’s budget would provide $291 million to the Department of Health and Human Services to defeat the disease, but funding would shrink for global programs trying to do the same thing.

Steep cuts to the international affairs budget would include a 22 percent reduction to the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or Pepfar, according to the One Campaign, which seeks to eliminate global poverty and preventable diseases.

“Congress will forget this budget by Friday, but the signal it sends to the world’s poorest will be remembered,” Tom Hart, the North America executive director for the campaign, said in a statement. “We can’t end the AIDS crisis by cutting programs proven to fight this disease.”

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The budget also includes renewed calls to curb the growth of the Medicare and Medicaid health insurance programs, despite Mr. Trump’s pledge as a candidate that he would make “no cuts” to them.

The budget proposal would cut $818 billion from Medicare over 10 years, in part by squeezing payments to hospitals, nursing homes and home health providers. And it envisions cutting nearly $1.5 trillion from Medicaid, replacing the open-ended federal contribution with grants to states that would essentially cap payments and would not keep pace with rising health care costs.
Cuts to Domestic Programs Like the Special Olympics

Some suggested cuts, like the proposal to slash Special Olympics funding, have become a perennial target.

When the Education Department put funds for the Special Olympics on the chopping block again on Monday, it determined that the funding could be better found privately or at the state level. The department faces a 10 percent overall budget reduction, and has proposed eliminating dozens of programs it says “achieved their original purpose, duplicate other programs, are narrowly focused or are unable to demonstrate effectiveness,” according to budget documents.

The Special Olympics did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Monday, but the effort to eliminate funding for that program and others alarmed and angered Democrats, some of whom opposed it in blunt terms.

“It would be a cold day in hell before I helped pass a budget like this,” Representative Rosa DeLauro of Connecticut, the chairwoman of an appropriations subcommittee, said in a statement.

Catie Edmondson contributed reporting.
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Offline RE

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🤡 Trump says 'there should be no Mueller report'
« Reply #1819 on: March 16, 2019, 03:14:09 AM »
There's a big surprise.  ::)

RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/03/15/trump-mueller-investigation-1222895


President Donald Trump has repeatedly called special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation a "witch hunt." | Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images

White House
Trump says 'there should be no Mueller report'

By REBECCA MORIN

03/15/2019 10:33 AM EDT
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President Donald Trump on Friday insisted there should be no report from special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe, denouncing the investigation as "illegal."

"So, if there was knowingly & acknowledged to be 'zero' crime when the Special Counsel was appointed, and if the appointment was made based on the Fake Dossier (paid for by Crooked Hillary) and now disgraced Andrew McCabe (he & all stated no crime), then the Special Counsel...should never have been appointed and there should be no Mueller Report," the president tweeted Friday.

Trump has repeatedly called Mueller's probe into whether Russia colluded with the president's 2016 campaign a "witch hunt." Despite his criticisms, the president has maintained that he has cooperated fully with the investigation, which also includes whether Trump tried to obstruct justice.

Mueller's investigation is reportedly winding down, and lawmakers on both sides have called on the special counsel's report to be made public once the probe is completed.

poster="http://v.politico.com/images/1155968404/201903/3951/1155968404_6013529254001_6013519949001-vs.jpg?pubId=1155968404"
true

The House on Thursday passed a resolution 420-0 urging the Justice Department to make Mueller’s findings and full report public and available to Congress. Senate Republicans, however, blocked the bill.

The president on Friday also complained that the probe was only started as an excuse for Democrats losing the 2016 election.

"This was an illegal & conflicted investigation in search of a crime," he tweeted, adding "Russian Collusion was nothing more than an excuse by the Democrats for losing an Election that they thought they were going to win."
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Offline RE

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🤡 Trump claims media is trying to blame him for New Zealand mass shooting
« Reply #1820 on: March 19, 2019, 12:01:51 AM »
Add Paranoia to Megalomania and Narcissism.

RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/03/18/trump-new-zealand-shooting-1224867

White House
Trump claims media is trying to blame him for New Zealand mass shooting

By KATIE GALIOTO

03/18/2019 10:40 AM EDT


President Donald Trump on Monday accused “the fake news media” of attempting to blame him for the mass shooting at two mosques in New Zealand on Friday.

“The Fake News Media is working overtime to blame me for the horrible attack in New Zealand,” Trump tweeted. “They will have to work very hard to prove that one. So Ridiculous!”

A shooter opened fire at two mosques in Christchurch on Friday, killing 50 people and injuring dozens more. The suspect, 28-year-old Australian Brenton Tarrant, praised Trump as a symbol of white identity in a rambling 74-page manifesto posted online before the attack.

In the wake of the shooting, a number of Democrats — including Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and Rep. Rashida Talib (D-Mich.) — publicly criticized the president for failing to condemn white nationalists and suggested his inflammatory language contributes to the violence.

Trump mourned the shootings as a senseless loss of life and offered support to New Zealand in a tweet Friday. But later in the day, he told reporters in the Oval Office that he doesn’t believe white nationalism is a rising threat around the world.

“I think it's a small group of people that have very, very serious problems, I guess,” Trump said, adding, “It's certainly a terrible thing.”

Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney defended Trump in an interview that aired Sunday on Fox News, saying allegations that Trump’s rhetoric influenced the attack is “absurd.”

On Monday, White House counselor Kellyanne Conway called the claims “predictable and outrageous.” Conway compared the most recent mass shooting to when Rep. Steve Scalise (R-La.) was shot at a congressional baseball practice in 2017, which Conway called “the worst day” of the administration’s first year in the White House.

“We didn't run around saying, ‘Gee, the guy watches MSNBC or he’s Bernie supporter,’” Conway said. “Nobody should do that. Nobody should blame folks other than the evil, hateful shooter.”

Conway also slammed those taking shots at the president on the air or using social media.

“Folks, if you're not expert on this, stop weighing in like you are,” she said. “We don't need to hear your opinion on every single thing.” our privacy policy to find out more about the cookies we use.
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Offline RE

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🤡 GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers
« Reply #1821 on: March 19, 2019, 02:25:55 AM »
https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/434333-gop-moves-to-rein-in-presidents-emergency-powers

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/WmM_yiyNJok" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/WmM_yiyNJok</a>

GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers
By Jordain Carney - 03/18/19 06:00 AM EDT

Republicans are digging in for a long fight over reining in the president's emergency powers, setting up a potential clash with both the White House and Democrats.

President Trump on Friday vetoed Congress’s attempt to block his national emergency on the U.S.-Mexico border wall. With neither chamber expected to have the votes to override his veto, the president is poised to win round one of his fight with lawmakers.

But Republicans are already setting their sights on making it easier to terminate future emergency declarations — setting up an intriguing round two.

“It’s an institutional issue, it’s a congressional authorities issue. We have the power of the purse,” said Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio). “Under the National Emergencies Act, there was too much latitude that was given away … and we need to pull that back some and let it be used for legitimate national security purposes.”

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) added that there is “unanimity” in the GOP conference about making changes to the law in the wake of the fight over Trump’s emergency declaration to construct the U.S.-Mexico border wall.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has tapped Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) to craft legislation in the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee that could win the 60 votes needed for a bill to defeat a filibuster and ultimately pass the upper chamber.

Under the National Emergencies Act, Congress can force a vote on a resolution of disapproval if they want to try to block an emergency declaration. But a president can veto the resolution, setting up a difficult hurdle for Congress to overcome since a two-thirds majority vote in each chamber is needed to override a veto.

Even GOP senators who sided with Trump are interested in the broader issue.

“I would like to revisit the emergency powers that Congress has provided to the executive branch,” said Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.), who voted with Trump. “I do think it's going to be a healthy debate to have.”

McConnell told reporters after a closed-door conference lunch that there was “a lot of discomfort with the law” among Republicans and that they were “discussing” ways it could be altered.

“If Congress has grown uneasy with this law, as many have, then we should amend it. If the 116th Congress regrets the degree of flexibility that the 94th Congress gave the executive, the 116th Congress can do something about it,” McConnell added separately during a floor speech, announcing that he had asked Johnson to look into legislation on the issue.

Roughly a third of the Republican conference, including members of leadership, is already backing legislation from Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) that would require Congress to pass a resolution approving future national emergency declarations within 30 days. Without the approval, the resolution would be terminated.

“I don’t know of any president that likes to give up power, but clearly Congress has been asleep at the switch,” said Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas), who voted with Trump but is supporting Lee’s legislation.

Sen. John Kennedy (R-La.) added that “there is a lot of people, myself included, who believe that the National Emergencies Act ... needs to be reformed.”

A battle with Republicans would just aggravate Trump's existing problems with Democrats, who are suing him in court and plan subsequent votes to challenge his declaration for the wall.

A Democratic aide said the House would hold a vote to override Trump’s veto on March 26; meanwhile, Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Democrats would force a vote on blocking Trump’s national emergency every six months.

“We've got to be real careful and whether it's legislatively or in court, fight him every step of the way,” Schumer said.

Trump, as part of a failed eleventh-hour plea to get Republicans to vote against the resolution of disapproval, signaled that he could support making future changes to the National Emergencies Act, despite refusing to accept a deal earlier in the week.

Johnson, asked about Trump’s penchant for changing his mind on the issue, stressed that he would seek input from the White House.

“We’re going to need him because we want the administration to be taking a look at any exemptions that we might need to take a look at when we reclaim that authority,” Johnson said.

He added that he thought the “basic concept” of Lee’s bill was “correct” and could “pass constitutional muster” but that he expected others would have ideas on what the final legislation should look like.

“There’s a lot more complexity to this,” he said. “We’ll have a lot of input.”

An aide confirmed that Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) is working on legislation that could draw support from Democrats, who have been skeptical of the Lee bill.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Schumer both said their party would not back the Utah Republican’s bill.

But Schumer appeared to soften his stance slightly after Thursday’s Senate vote approving the resolution against Trump, saying he wanted to look at its details. Drew Hammill, a spokesman for Pelosi, also didn’t rule out legislation on Friday, saying, “House Committees are reviewing the President’s unlawful use of the National Emergencies Act.”

Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), the No. 2 Senate Democrat, predicted that Democrats would be “open” to changing the underlying law as long as it was separated from the fight over whether Republicans would back the resolution of disapproval.

“It doesn’t solve our current problem,” he added, “but it addresses the dilemma we face.”

Cristina Marcos contributed.
Tags Mitch McConnell Charles Schumer Nancy Pelosi John Kennedy Donald Trump Ron Johnson Rob Portman Mike Rounds John Cornyn Dick Durbin Marco Rubio Rand Paul Mike Lee Emergency declaration Border wall Immigration
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Offline Surly1

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Re: 🤡 GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers
« Reply #1822 on: March 19, 2019, 04:20:59 AM »
https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/434333-gop-moves-to-rein-in-presidents-emergency-powers

GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers

Color me dubious. GOP Senators may feel they have more latitude to act the House members, who, if they oppose Trump in almost any way, will find themselves primaries from the right. But I'd not hold my breath on this legislation going anywhere as long as Yurtle the turtle is Majority Leader.

The more important work of salting the federal judiciary with young, unqualified right wing ideologues must continue before Twitler so completely soils himself that even Senate Rs will have to agree to get the men with nets to take him away.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline knarf

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In the wake of the shooting, a number of Democrats — including Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and Rep. Rashida Talib (D-Mich.) — publicly criticized the president for failing to condemn white nationalists and suggested his inflammatory language contributes to the violence.



Democrats just shoot themselves in the foot.
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Offline K-Dog

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1824 on: March 19, 2019, 08:17:01 AM »
The wall is far from going away.  It is still useful.



The wall is so ridiculously absurd the fact that it is only manipulation really can't be ignored by a working brain.  I can comment about how Trump needs to be stopped and how serious he is about the wall because that is the shit that drips from his lips, but really it is all a game.  There will never be a wall and behinds the scenes work is rapidly building up the orange crouton's approval ratings. 

Because if media approves we approve!
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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1825 on: March 19, 2019, 08:22:27 AM »
And if immigration is a problem how are they getting jobs?  Where the fuck are they.  More rare than the mythical SJW  :cwmddd:



White buffaloes. 

I'll admit I through SJW in there to get a rise out of Eddie.
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Offline RE

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🤡 Deutsche Bank loaned more than $2 billion to Trump over two decades: NYT
« Reply #1826 on: March 20, 2019, 12:34:40 AM »
Good Luck calling in those markers.

RE

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/19/deutsche-bank-loaned-2-billion-to-donald-trump-over-two-decades-nyt.html

Politics
Deutsche Bank loaned more than $2 billion to Trump over two decades: NYT
Published Tue, Mar 19 2019 • 12:22 AM EDT | Updated 2 hours ago
Yen Nee Lee
@YenNee_Lee
   
Key Points

    Before becoming president, Donald Trump took loans totaling more than $2 billion across nearly two decades from Deutsche Bank, The New York Times reports.

    In some instances, Trump exaggerated his wealth and promised to reward bankers with a weekend at Mar-a-Lago in order to get those loans, according to the report.


Premium: Donald Trump, ribbon cutting, Trump International Hotel 161026
In the grand lobby of Trump international Hotel, (l-r), Donald Trump Jr., Eric Trump, U.S. Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump, Melania Trump, Tiffany Trump, and Ivanka Trump, cut the ribbon for their latest property, Trump International Hotel - Old Post Office, in Washington, DC on October 26, 2016.
Cheriss May | NurPhoto | Getty Images

Deutsche Bank loaned more than $2 billion to Donald Trump before he became president — despite multiple red flags surrounding his business dealings, The New York Times reported Monday.

The Times interviewed more than 20 former and current executives and board members at Deutsche Bank for the report, which outlined how Trump managed to secure financing from the German bank for nearly two decades despite his bankruptcies and being considered a risky client by other lenders.

The Times report comes after Germany’s two largest lenders, Deutsche Bank and Commerzbank, confirmed on Sunday that they were in talks about a merger. German-traded shares of both banks jumped Monday.

According to the newspaper, in some instances, Trump exaggerated his wealth and promised to reward bankers with a weekend at Mar-a-Lago — his private club in Palm Beach, Florida — in order to get loans.

Over the years, Trump used loans provided by Deutsche Bank to build skyscrapers and other high-end properties, the Times reported. For the German bank, its relationship with Trump was key in building its investment-banking business, the report said.

Deutsche Bank declined to comment on the Times report. The Trump Organization and the White House did not reply to CNBC’s request for comment.

Trump’s relationship with Deutsche Bank has come under scrutiny in the United States. The New York state attorney general’s office and the Democratic-controlled Intelligence Committee and Financial Services Committee in Congress have been looking into the president’s financial ties with the German bank.

For the full report on U.S. President Donald Trump’s relationship with Deutsche Bank, read The New York Times.
WATCH: Deutsche Bank reportedly considered restructuring Trump loans over default concerns

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🤡 Donald Trump's new, confusing closing argument against the Mueller Report
« Reply #1828 on: March 23, 2019, 12:19:37 AM »
https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/22/politics/donald-trump-robert-mueller-unelected/index.html

Donald Trump's new, confusing closing argument against the Mueller report
Chris Cillizza

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/5CBuW3d89pY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/5CBuW3d89pY</a>

Analysis by Chris Cillizza, CNN Editor-at-large

Updated 8:52 AM ET, Fri March 22, 2019
Trump: I don't mind if public sees Mueller report

WASHINGTON - SEPTEMBER 13: Robert Mueller, director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, arrives for a hearing on Capitol Hill on September 13, 2011 in Washington, DC. The hearing focused on whether, ten years after the September 11 terrorist attacks, the country is safer than it was. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
Poll: 87% say Mueller report should be made public
Trump doubles down on attacks against late Sen. McCain
Trump: I don't mind if public sees Mueller report
Late-night comics rail on Trump's shot at George Conway
US President Donald Trump speaks during a rally in El Paso, Texas on February 11, 2019. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Trump: Time for US to recognize Israel's sovereignty over Golan Heights
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - SEPTEMBER 13: A member of the Afghan Air Force 777 Special Mission Wing looks out of an Mi-17 helicopter during a training mission on September 13, 2017 outside of Kabul, Afghanistan. Currently the United States has about 11,000 troops in the deployed in Afghanistan, with a reported 4,000 more expected to arrive in the coming weeks. Last month, President Donald Trump announced his plan for Afghanistan which called for an increase in troop numbers and a new conditions-based approach to the war, getting rid of a timetable for the withdrawal of American forces in the country. (Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images)
2 US troops killed on a mission in Afghanistan
Erin Burnett 03212019
Burnett on Kushner: Only 1 reason people use WhatsApp
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 21: Rain falls on the White House March 21, 2019 in Washington, DC. The second day of spring brought showers to the United States capital region. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
White House braces for release of Mueller report
Former spa owner denies selling access to Trump
Anthony Scaramucci New Day 3-21-19
Hear Scaramucci's advice for Trump to win 2020

(CNN)As Washington waits for word -- that could come as soon as Friday -- about the status of special counsel Robert Mueller's report into Russian interference in the 2016 election, President Donald Trump is closing his PR campaign against the investigation on a new note: Who elected this guy???

THE POINT -- NOW ON YOUTUBE!

In each episode of his weekly YouTube show, Chris Cillizza will delve a little deeper into the surreal world of politics. Click to subscribe!
Here's Trump on that subject in an interview with Fox Business Network's Maria Bartiromo that was released Friday morning:
"It's always interesting to me because a deputy, that didn't get any votes, appoints a man that didn't get any votes, he's going to write a report on me. I had one of the greatest election victories in history. Would you say that's true? They came from the valleys, they came from the rivers, they came from the cities, they came from all over, they voted in one of the greatest elections in the history of our country, and now I have a man, because we have an attorney general who -- nobody can even believe he didn't tell me, but he recused himself -- so I have a man who is a deputy who I don't know, who I didn't know at all, and he appoints a man who had just left my office, I didn't give him the job at the FBI, [James] Comey's his best friend, but listen, you know it better than anybody, you've been very fair in this, but listen, I have a deputy, appoints a man to write a report on me, to make a determination on my presidency? People will not stand for it."

That diatribe from Trump is in line with the argument he made Wednesday before leaving the White House for a speech in Ohio. "It's interesting that a man gets appointed by a deputy; he writes a report. You know -- never figured that one out," he said. "I had the greatest electoral victory -- one of them -- in the history of our country. Tremendous success. Tens of millions of voters. And now somebody is going to write a report who never got a vote."
While rational argument -- especially as it relates to the Mueller probe and eventual report -- has never been Trump's strong suit, this latest (and maybe final) line of argument makes absolutely no sense. Trump is suggesting that because neither Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, the man who established the special counsel, or Mueller were elected -- and Trump was -- they have no right to stand in judgment on him.
But that's not how this works. Any of it. No one in the Justice Department serves in an elected position. There aren't any elected jobs to run for there. So to say that because Rosenstein and Mueller "didn't get any votes" they can't do their jobs deeply misunderstands the role the Justice Department plays in American life.
It's also in keeping with Trump's broader lack of knowledge -- or concern -- about the traditional separation between a president and his Justice Department. Trump has never really seemed to grasp that the department doesn't exist to simply investigate those he would like them to. The Justice Department is, ostensibly, upholding the laws of the land, not the personal piques of a president.

    CNN's Chris Cillizza cuts through the political spin and tells you what you need to know. By subscribing, you agree to our privacy policy.

There's even another level, however, on which Trump's attack on the "unelected" Justice Department officials makes no sense. Trump chose Jeff Sessions to run Justice. And Sessions chose Rosenstein as his deputy. While neither man won an election for their offices, they were picked -- by Trump!!! -- to serve in their roles. So it's hard to see how Trump can now credibly make the case that because Rosenstein wasn't elected he shouldn't be allowed to stand in judgment on a president. Rosenstein got the only vote that actually matters -- the vote of the President! (Or, at a minimum, the vote of the guy -- Sessions -- that the President had put in charge of Justice.)
None of these facts seem to matter much to Trump. His point is simple: I won. These guys didn't. So how can a winner be judged by people who have never even played the game?
For Trump, his 2016 electoral victory -- one of the most unlikely wins ever in the history of the presidency -- should insulate him from the likes of Mueller and Rosenstein. He won! Millions of people voted for him! How dare these unelected bureaucrats challenge him!

Of course, that's not how our democracy works. The president isn't a king. Winning an election doesn't make you immune from criticism or even investigation.
That's a lesson Donald Trump still hasn't learned.
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🤡 Michael Avenatti arrested on federal charges of wire fraud and extortion
« Reply #1829 on: March 26, 2019, 12:45:03 AM »
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/michael-avenatti-charged-arrested-federal-wire-bank-fraud-charges-live-updates-today-2019-03-25/

Michael Avenatti arrested on federal charges of wire fraud and extortion

By Stefan Becket

March 25, 2019 / 9:56 PM / CBS News


Michael Avenatti, the former lawyer for adult film actress Stormy Daniels' and a fierce critic of President Trump, speaks to the media after being arrested for allegedly trying to extort Nike for $15-$25 million on March 25, 2019, in New York City. Getty

Attorney Michael Avenatti, who came to national prominence as the lawyer for adult film star Stormy Daniels, was arrested on federal charges in two separate cases in California and New York, federal prosecutors announced Monday.

The U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York charged Avenatti for allegedly trying to extort Nike for nearly $20 million. Prosecutors said he and another attorney threatened to release damaging information about the company if it did not meet his demands.

The U.S. attorney in Los Angeles separately announced Avenatti faces bank and wire fraud charges for allegedly embezzling money from a client and defrauding a bank through fake tax returns.

Avenatti was arrested in New York and appeared in federal court Monday afternoon in Manhattan. He was released on a $300,000 personal recognizance bond and ordered to surrender his passport. He is also required to report any transactions of $5,000 or more to the court, and his travel is restricted. He's scheduled to appear in court in California on April 1, with preliminary hearings in New York set for April 25.

The criminal complaint in the New York case says Avenatti and an alleged co-conspirator, an attorney identified as "CC-1," requested a meeting with Nike's lawyers in New York last Tuesday, March 19. Two of the attorneys represent Nike as outside counsel at the law firm Boies Schiller Flexner, and one of the attorneys works for Nike in-house.

CBS News has learned CC-1 is Mark Geragos, the high-profile celebrity attorney whose recent clients include former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick and the actor Jussie Smollett. Geragos was not charged in the complaint released Monday. His office said he had no comment on the allegations.

During the meeting at Geragos' office, Avenatti said he represented the coach of an amateur athletic union (AAU) basketball team in California whose contract with Nike had not been renewed. He said the coach had evidence of Nike employees funneling illegal payments to top high school basketball prospects and their families.

The coach Avenatti said he represented is Gary Franklin of Los Angeles, CBS News has learned. Franklin is the cofounder and executive director of the California Supreme, a basketball program in Southern California.

Avenatti allegedly threatened to hold a press conference detailing the allegations to coincide with the beginning of the NCAA basketball tournament and Nike's quarterly earnings call. The complaint says Avenatti offered to scrap the press conference if Nike paid his client $1.5 million and hired Avenatti to conduct an internal investigation of the company.

After the meeting later that afternoon, Nike's attorneys contacted the U.S. Attorney's Office to report the alleged extortion attempt.

On March 20, the next day, two of the Nike attorneys held a phone call with Avenatti that was recorded by law enforcement. Avenatti allegedly reiterated his demands for payment for him and his client.

"I'm not f---ing around with this, and I'm not continuing to play games," Avenatti was recorded as saying. "You guys know enough now to know you've got a serious problem. And it's worth more in exposure to me to just blow the lid on this thing. A few million dollars doesn't move the needle for me. I'm just being really frank with you."

"I'll go and I'll go take $10 billion off your client's market cap. But I'm not f***ing around," he said.

On March 21 — the day of the Nike earnings call and the first day of the NCAA Tournament — the group met again in New York, with the Nike attorneys recording the meeting. They asked Avenatti and Geragos whether they could arrange to make a payment without an internal investigation.

"If [Nike] wants to have one confidential settlement and we're done, they can buy that for $22.5 million and we're done," Avenatti is quoted as saying. "Full confidentiality, we ride off into the sunset."

Avenatti set a deadline of Monday, March 25, to reach an agreement and arranged another meeting. Early Monday afternoon, Avenatti tweeted: "Tmrw at 11 am ET, we will be holding a press conference to disclose a major high school/college basketball scandal perpetrated by @Nike that we have uncovered."

He was arrested when he showed up for the meeting in New York, U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman said at a press conference.

In a statement Monday afternoon, Nike said it "will not be extorted or hide information that is relevant to a government investigation."

"Nike has been cooperating with the government's investigation into NCAA basketball for over a year. When Nike became aware of this matter, Nike immediately reported it to federal prosecutors," the company said. "Nike firmly believes in ethical and fair play, both in business and sports, and will continue to assist the prosecutors."

In the California case, prosecutors charged Avenatti with wire fraud, saying he negotiated a $1.6 million settlement for a client but used the money for personal use and to pay expenses for his coffee business.

Avenatti is also charged with bank fraud in California. According to the criminal complaint, Avenatti lied about his income to obtain more than $4 million in loans from a Mississippi bank in 2014. The complaint alleges Avenatti gave The Peoples Bank bogus tax returns showing more than $14 million in earnings for the three preceding years. In fact, the complaint alleges, Avenatti never filed returns for those years, and owed the IRS $850,000 from prior years.

Avenatti came to prominence for his representation of Daniels, the adult film star who alleged she had an affair with President Trump and was paid for her silence in the weeks before the 2016 election. On Monday, Daniels said she cut ties with Avenatti more than a month ago "after discovering that he had dealt with me extremely dishonestly."

Lex Haris contributed to this report.
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