AuthorTopic: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread  (Read 152854 times)

Offline RE

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A Cancer that's metasticizing.

RE

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/george-conway-calls-trump-a-cancer-that-needs-to-be-removed-in-blistering-op-ed

George Conway calls Trump a cancer that needs to be removed in blistering op-ed
Edmund DeMarche
By Edmund DeMarche | Fox News

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/N-NEzyVVioc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/N-NEzyVVioc</a>

Kellyanne Conway: Mueller probe was a political proctology exam and Trump emerged with a clean bill of health

George Conway, the husband of White House adviser Kellyanne Conway and a fierce critic of President Trump, penned an op-ed in The Washington Post that calls Trump a "cancer on the presidency" and urged Congress to take action to remove him from office.

After 22 months, a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia interference report was made available to the public. The report showed no evidence that Trump’s team “coordinated or conspired” with Russia, but many Democrats pointed out that Mueller identified 10 times where there was potential obstruction, and essentially left the next steps up to Congress.

Mueller wrote that Trump’s efforts to obstruct “were often carried out through one-on-one meetings in which the President sought to use his official power outside of usual channels.”

READ THE FULL REPORT

He continued, “The President's efforts to influence the investigation were mostly unsuccessful, but that is largely because the persons who surrounded the President declined to carry out orders or accede to his requests."

Trump's team late Thursday appeared to take a wait-and-see approach on how the public absorbed the findings. Rudy Giuliani, Trump's lawyer, seemed to be in no particular hurry to release a 45-page rebuttal when asked about it on CNN.  The White House claimed total victory and vindication for the president

Conway, who has clashed publicly with the president before and questioned his mental fitness, barely touches collusion in his piece but highlighted the obstruction argument.

"Mueller couldn’t say, with any “confidence,” that the president of the United States is not a criminal. He said, stunningly, that “if we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state.” Mueller did not so state," Conway wrote.

He pointed out that even if Trump did not reach the threshold of criminality, he could still be impeached based on earlier precedent. He called on Congress to act to “excise” the cancer in the White House “without delay.”

There is no love lost between Trump and Conway. Trump has called Conway a “stone cold LOSER & husband from hell.”

MUELLER REPORT THE 'BEGINNING OF THE BEGINNING': AXIOS EDTIOR

“George Conway, often referred to as Mr. Kellyanne Conway by those who know him, is VERY jealous of his wife’s success & angry that I, with her help, didn’t give him the job he so desperately wanted. I barely know him but just take a look, a stone cold LOSER & husband from hell!” Trump tweeted in March.

Andrew McCarthy, a former federal prosecutor, wrote in the New York Post that Trump could have simply shut down the investigation and assert executive privilege to “deny the special counsel access to key White House witnesses,” but he didn’t.
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He's fucking GUILTY!

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https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2019/04/18/robert-mueller-report-trump-obstruction-justice-william-barr-column/3509505002/

OPINION
Mueller report: Attorney General Barr jumped the gun in clearing Trump of obstruction
Chris Truax, Opinion contributor Published 3:51 p.m. ET April 18, 2019 | Updated 4:30 p.m. ET April 18, 2019
Contrary to Barr's conclusion, the Mueller report leaves very much open the question of whether President Trump is guilty of obstruction of justice.


Detailed analysis of the redacted Mueller report that was released Thursday will go on for weeks. But one thing is immediately clear: Attorney General William Barr jumped the gun when he declared last month and again Thursday that special counsel Robert Mueller did not find enough evidence to "establish that the President committed an obstruction-of-justice offense."

First, Barr has form here. Long before he was attorney general or knew any of the facts we know now, he had conclusively decided that it would be impossible for Trump to obstruct justice. So it’s no surprise that his opinion hasn’t changed now that the report is out.

But Mueller and his team came to a different conclusion. While recognizing that “the evidence we obtained about the President's actions and intent presents difficult issues,” they did not conclude that the evidence of obstruction was on the fence and decide to leave the final determination to Barr. Instead, they concluded that, despite the evidence they had uncovered, it would be improper to make a formal finding that the president had violated the law. They made this decision not because they concluded the president was not guilty, but because, under current Department of Justice practice, a sitting president can’t be indicted.
Attorney General William Barr, left, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein on April 18, 2019.

Attorney General William Barr, left, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein on April 18, 2019. (Photo: ERIK S. LESSER, EPA-EFE)

Read more commentary:

Mueller report redactions: How Congress will make sure we find out everything important

Russian interference, confirmed by the Mueller report, has been going on since Cold War

President Trump should declassify all information on the Russia investigation

Mueller’s team offered two reasons for declining to recommend prosecution of the president on obstruction charges. First, “a federal criminal accusation against a sitting President would place burdens on the President's capacity to govern and potentially preempt constitutional processes for addressing presidential misconduct.” Translation: If we make a formal finding that the president violated the law that might interfere with Congress’s impeachment authority.
No ringing endorsement of Trump's innocence

Second, if they did make a decision to prosecute, it would be at least two years and possibly six before the charges could be adjudicated, and that would be unfair to the president personally. “Fairness concerns counseled against potentially reaching that judgment when no charges can be brought. The ordinary means for an individual to respond to an accusation is through a speedy and public trial . . . In contrast , a prosecutor's judgment that crimes were committed, but that no charges will be brought, affords no such adversarial opportunity for public name-clearing before an impartial adjudicator.”

None of this is a ringing endorsement of Trump’s innocence. On the contrary. In Mueller’s own words, “f we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the President clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state. Based on the facts and the applicable legal standards, however, we are unable to reach that judgment.”
Impeachment is still on the table

In addition, whether Trump committed an actual federal crime does not completely answer the question we must decide. As the report points out, ultimately, it is up to Congress to sanction a sitting president and that determination is more than just a question of whether the president is an actual felon. For example, one of the reasons Barr believes the president did not commit obstruction is that the president’s efforts to interfere with the investigation were not motivated by “corrupt intent.” Rather, he said, Trump was personally upset and believed the investigation was “undermining his presidency, propelled by his political opponents, and fueled by illegal leaks.”

Assuming that is so and that interfering with an investigation for political reasons doesn’t qualify as corrupt intent — a big assumption — that still does not necessarily absolve the president. Even things that fall short of criminality can trigger a congressional investigation or even impeachment proceedings. Whether Trump crossed a line is a call for Congress to make, not Mueller or Barr.

Mueller intended both the American people and Congress to judge the results of his investigation for themselves. That’s why he produced a report that, even with redactions, runs to almost 450 pages. Contrary to the attorney general’s conclusion, the question of whether Trump is guilty of obstructing justice is still very much open.

Chris Truax, an appellate lawyer in San Diego, is on the legal advisory board of Republicans for the Rule of Law.

You can read diverse opinions from our Board of Contributors and other writers on the Opinion front page, on Twitter @usatodayopinion and in our daily Opinion newsletter. To respond to a column, submit a comment to letters@usatoday.com.
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🤡 Mueller didn't charge Trump — but his report is a brutal indictment
« Reply #1877 on: April 19, 2019, 11:43:55 AM »
https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/white-house/mueller-didn-t-charge-trump-his-report-brutal-indictment-n996191

Mueller didn't charge Trump — but his report is a brutal indictment
Analysis: The special counsel's findings reveal three years of actions by the president that critics say rattle the very foundations of the American system of governance.

President Donald Trump departs after taking part in an "Opportunity Zone" conference with state, local, tribal, and community leaders at the White House on April 17, 2019.Carlos Barria / Reuters

April 19, 2019, 12:00 AM AKDT
By Jonathan Allen

President Donald Trump has evaded criminal charges — but special counsel Robert Mueller’s report is a brutal indictment of his campaign and his presidency.

The first volume of the two-part, 448-page report details how Trump and his allies solicited, encouraged, accepted and benefited from the assistance provided by America's most storied foreign adversary as part of a multi-front assault on American democracy.

The other lays out comprehensive evidence that the president may have obstructed justice through what Mueller described as a "pattern of conduct" that included firing FBI Director Jim Comey, trying to remove Mueller, publicly praising and condemning witnesses, and seeking to limit the scope of the probe.
Trump labels Mueller conclusions a personal victory
April 18, 201901:59

Taken in sum, Mueller's findings reveal three years of actions by Trump and his subordinates that critics say rattle the very foundations of the American system of governance, from the sacrosanct nature of democratic elections to the idea that no man, not even the president, is above the law.

Download the NBC News app for full coverage of the Mueller report

The story, in even its most sympathetic telling, is one of a president who used nearly every power vested in his office and his persona — including hiring and firing, the bully pulpit, party loyalty, private intimidation, and disinformation — to cover up ties between his campaign and Russia so that he could spare himself the public humiliation of having won an election that wasn't entirely on the level.

Of the marquee reports written for Congress over the decades about presidential scandals, the Mueller report will stand out for the brazenness of the chief executive — and for the degree to which insubordination among his underlings reined him in, if only at the margins.

"If we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the president clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state,” Mueller wrote. “Based on the facts and the applicable legal standards, however, we are unable to reach that judgment."

Only an hour or so before the report was rolled out, Attorney General William Barr, who was picked for his job after writing that a president cannot obstruct justice, said that the report found "no collusion" between Trump and Russia — an expression that Mueller painstakingly explained in the report is of no legal consequence. It is, however, a favorite term of art of one Donald J. Trump.

Some of Trump's allies on Capitol Hill were satisfied, without reading the report, that Trump came out a clear winner — exonerated because he was not prosecuted.

"We know the conclusions of the #MuellerReport: No collusion, no further indictments," Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, tweeted. "It's over. We also know the spin, and we know that many people will still claim the President is guilty. I'll be reading the report in its entirety. No spin, just facts."

But Democrats saw in Mueller's report a delineation between the powers afforded the executive and legislative branches when it comes to judging the actions of a president.

Trump's own employees, including Barr and Mueller, did not move forward with a prosecution — indeed, Mueller wrote that he determined Justice Department guidance precluded him from doing so. But he also noted that Congress, which does not report to the president, has its own set of powers.
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House Judiciary Chairman Nadler subpoenas full, unredacted Mueller report

"The acts of obstruction of justice, whether they are criminal or not, are deeply alarming in the president of the United States," House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Thursday. "And it's clear that special counsel Mueller wanted the Congress to consider the repercussions and the consequences."

Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said Mueller had laid out a "roadmap" for Congress.

It's hard to fathom how a lengthy report in the public domain is better for Trump than the top-line declaration of a clean bill of health he got from Attorney General William Barr a few weeks ago. And there will be plenty more public discussion of the details of Mueller's findings. Already, the special counsel has been invited to Capitol Hill to testify about his conclusions.
Trump attempted to obstruct Mueller probe, associates refused to follow orders
April 18, 201909:06

Democrats will no doubt use their power in the House to extract as much political pain from Trump as possible and do so while making the case that they are simply standing up for small-"d" democratic values.

And while the political bar for removing Trump is likely insurmountable — it would take 20 Republicans and all 47 Senate Democrats to oust him — the behavior chronicled by Mueller towers over that of the standard set by the House for impeachment of President Bill Clinton on obstruction articles, according to experts.

Kim Wehle, a law professor at the University of Baltimore who investigated Clinton as part of Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr's team, said beyond that the Trump case is "infinitely more serious" than the one she worked on.

"Here we've got a hostile foreign power and the evidence is overwhelming that their objective was to attack our free and fair process," she said.

Frank O. Bowman III, a professor at the University of Missouri School of Law and author of the forthcoming book "High Crimes and Misdemeanors: A History of Impeachment for the Age of Trump" said the Mueller report suggests the president committed impeachable offenses.

"The issue for impeachment is not whether a criminal statute was violated but whether a president engaged in a pattern of activity inconsistent with his obligation to take care that the law be faithfully executed and instead sought to use his authority to undercut the institutions and norms of the justice system to benefit himself," he said. "The second half of the Mueller report strongly supports such a conclusion as to Trump."

Bowman said Trump's conduct tracked with that of President Richard Nixon, but that the refusal of Trump's subordinates to follow his orders — very likely with the Nixon example in mind — may end up saving the president politically.

"The fact that they refused doesn't change the constitutional impeachment calculus at all," he said. "Still, the fact that he was so often restrained will make it easy for Republicans in Congress to wave off his otherwise impeachable behavior."

If that's the case, the question of whether Mueller's findings render Trump unfit for office will rest with the jury he's always wanted: the voters. But the special counsel's report is an indelible testament to the president's weakness in seeking Russian aid and in deceiving the nation about it.
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More like "over-ripe" and past the due date.

RE

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/justice-department-dismisses-democratic-mueller-report-subpoena-as-premature-and-unnecessary

Justice Department dismisses Democratic Mueller report subpoena as 'premature and unnecessary'
by Naomi Lim
 | April 19, 2019 05:46 PM

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The Department of Justice on Friday dismissed the subpoena issued by House Democrats for a less-redacted version of the Mueller report, saying that it wasn't necessary.

"Congressman Nadler's subpoena is premature and unnecessary," Justice Department spokeswoman Kerri Kupec said in a statement, referring to the chairman of the House Judiciary panel, Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y. "The Department will continue to work with Congress to accommodate its legitimate requests consistent with the law and long-recognized executive branch interests."

Kupec noted that special counsel Robert Mueller's report was released Thursday with what she called "only minimal redactions, " and that arrangements are in place for Nadler and other select members of Congress to view a version with fewer redactions.
Chief Political Correspondent Byron York on the expanded Washington Examiner magazine
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The Justice Department's response ratchets up tensions between the department and congressional Democrats on the same day Nadler issued a subpoena for all of Mueller's findings.

Earlier Friday afternoon, congressional Democrats rejected Attorney General William Barr's invitation for viewing a fuller version of Mueller's conclusions on DOJ premises, saying that the terms were too restrictive.

House Judiciary ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga., piled on, criticized the Democrats Friday for "grandstanding."

"This is ridiculous," Collins wrote in a pair of tweets. "AG Barr gives Democrats unprecedented accommodations, and they refuse them hours after Chairman Nadler subpoenas those same answers. They’ve had 30 hours with the #MuellerReport and realize the more information they actually get, the more bitter it tastes."

The Justice Department has until May 1 to comply with Nadler's request regarding the Mueller report.
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https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/04/18/mueller-report-what-says-vice-president-mike-pence/3498440002/

What the Mueller report on the Russia investigation says about Vice President Mike Pence
Maureen Groppe, USA TODAY Published 5:21 p.m. ET April 18, 2019 | Updated 2:38 p.m. ET April 19, 2019


The redacted version of the Mueller report is now available from the attorney general. Here are the key takeaways from it. USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – The long-awaited report from special counsel Robert Mueller provides new details from former national security adviser Michael Flynn about his lies to Vice President Mike Pence.

Flynn also lied to President Donald Trump about lying to Pence.

Confronted by the president on Air Force One about whether he falsely described to Pence his conversation with Russia's ambassador, Flynn told Trump that he may have forgotten details of his calls, but he did not think he lied, according to the report.

"The President responded, 'Okay, That's fine. I got it,'" according to Flynn's testimony to special counsel Robert Mueller.

Pence was not asked by Mueller's team for an interview but provided documents, according to a White House official.

More: Donald Trump denounces 'Crazy Mueller Report,' calls statements about him 'fabricated' and 'untrue'

More: Vladimir Putin's team doesn't like Robert Mueller's report on election interference, Trump

Flynn's testimony is part of the report's expanded version of the previously known actions that led to Flynn's firing and Trump urging former FBI director James Comey not to go after Flynn.

Trump's pressure on Comey is one of the "key issues and events" that Mueller's team considered when investigating whether Trump tried to illegally thwart the investigation.

Mueller’s office did not conclude that Trump's actions were illegal, but also pointedly refused to clear him of wrongdoing, saying "if we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the facts that the president clearly did not commit obstruction of justice, we would so state.”

Trump also was not interviewed by Mueller's team. Instead, he provided written answers to submitted questions.

"After two years of investigation, conducted with the full cooperation of this administration, that involved hundreds of witness interviews and millions of pages of documents, the American people can see for themselves: no collusion, no obstruction," Pence said in a statement Thursday.

Flynn was one of a half-dozen Trump aides who were charged by Mueller’s team and pleaded guilty. Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to FBI agents on the fourth day of the administration about communicating with Russians during the transition, when the Obama administration was technically still in charge of foreign affairs.

Former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort, who also was indicted, mentioned Pence in his interview with investigators. Manafort said the campaign information he shared with Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska was public information. As an example, Manafort said he shared the reasons Trump chose Pence to be his running mate.

Timeline: Pence, Flynn and the Russia investigation: A timeline of key events
President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence, Aug. 21, 2017

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence, Aug. 21, 2017 (Photo: Carolyn Kaster, AP)

Pence has been on the periphery of the two-year investigation into Russia's involvement in the 2016 election.

His exposure was primarily through statements he'd made that were later contradicted.

Pence had publicly announced on Jan. 15, 2017 that Flynn assured him he had not discussed the sanctions that President Barack Obama had recently imposed on Russia before leaving office.

Authorities who had monitored communications involving foreign diplomats knew that was not the case and later notified the Trump White House.
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The Justice Department was concerned that Russia now had leverage over Flynn, since they could prove he had lied. The FBI also thought Flynn's conversation with Russia's ambassador could have violated a law preventing private citizens from engaging in unauthorized correspondence with foreign governments.

When White House Counsel Donald McGahn briefed Trump on the Flynn situation on Jan. 26, 2017, he was angry.

"Not again, this guy, this stuff," former chief of staff Reince Priebus recalled him saying.

Mueller report:: Trump's anger over Russia probe may have saved him from obstruction charge

Pence didn't find out about the Justice Department's warnings about Flynn until the Washington Post reported Feb. 9, 2017 that Flynn had in fact discussed sanctions with the Russians.

The vice president and others then sought access to and reviewed the government's information about Flynn's contacts with the Russian ambassador, according to the report. McGahn and Priebus recommended to Trump that he fire Flynn.

Trump confronted Flynn that weekend on the flight back to Washington from Mar-a-Lago. After Trump appeared to accept Flynn's response that he didn't think he'd lied to Pence, Priebus fired Flynn the next day.

"Priebus recalled that the President hugged Flynn, shook his hand, and said, 'We'll give you a good recommendation. You're a good guy. We'll take care of you,'"  according to the report.

In a private meeting with Comey the next day, Trump said he hoped Comey could "see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go," Comey testified.

Months later, Trump fired Comey, suggesting the reason was Comey's handling of the investigation of Hillary Clinton's private email server.

While it was previously reported that Pence participated in a May 8, 2017 Oval Office meeting at which Trump reviewed the draft of a letter laying out reasons for firing Comey, Pence's involvement is not mentioned in Mueller's report.

The next day, after Trump fired Comey, Pence repeated the initial White House explanation that Comey was dismissed based on the recommendation of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.

According to Mueller's report, Rosenstein was upset that his memo was being portrayed as the reason for the firing.

In any case, Trump later undercut that explanation, saying he was going to fire Comey regardless of the Justice Department's recommendation, and confirmed in a television interview the Russia investigation was indeed on his mind when he made the decision.

Pence is also briefly mentioned in the report for denying during the 2016 race that the Trump campaign was "in cahoots" with WikiLeaks in releasing emails from Hillary Clinton's campaign team.

“Nothing could be further from the truth,” Pence told Fox News that October.

But Mueller's report states Trump's campaign showed interest in WikiLeaks’ release of damaging documents about Clinton.

The report also appears to cast doubt on whether investigators had obtained “a complete picture” of activities during the Trump campaign, saying some campaign associates offered inadmissible information and deleted “relevant communications.” Some witnesses, the report said, communicated using phone applications that don’t retain data.

On the central question of whether the Trump campaign engaged in a conspiracy with Russia, investigators found that a number of campaign aides and advisers engaged in contacts with people linked to the Russian regime even as the Kremlin carried out a wide-ranging effort to intervene in the election.

Pence, in a January 2017 appearance on CBS’s Face the Nation, dismissed as “bizarre rumors” the question of whether anyone in the Trump campaign had contact with Russians about the election.

"Of course not," Pence said when posed a similar question by Chris Wallace of Fox News Sunday. "Why would there be any contacts between the campaign?"

Contributing: Kevin Johnson and Bart Jansen.
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https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/19/politics/trump-mueller-criminal-exposure-possibility-after-white-house/index.html

Mueller's report leaves open possibility of post-White House criminal exposure for Trump
CNN Digital Expansion 2017 Kara Scannell


Analysis by Kara Scannell, CNN

Updated 10:27 AM ET, Sat April 20, 2019
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WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 18: U.S. President Donald Trump pauses while speaking during an event recognizing the Wounded Warrior Project Soldier Ride in the East Room of the White House, April 18, 2019 in Washington, DC. Today the Department of Justice released special counsel Robert Mueller&#39;s redacted report on Russian election interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 18: U.S. President Donald Trump looks on during an event recognizing the Wounded Warrior Project Soldier Ride in the East Room of the White House, April 18, 2019 in Washington, DC. Today the Department of Justice released special counsel Robert Mueller&#39;s redacted report on Russian election interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
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WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 18: U.S. President Donald Trump pauses while speaking during an event recognizing the Wounded Warrior Project Soldier Ride in the East Room of the White House, April 18, 2019 in Washington, DC. Today the Department of Justice released special counsel Robert Mueller&#39;s redacted report on Russian election interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 18: U.S. Attorney General William Barr speaks about the release of the redacted version of the Mueller report as U.S. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein listens at the Department of Justice April 18, 2019 in Washington, DC. Members of Congress are expected to receive copies of the report later this morning with the report being released publicly soon after. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 18: U.S. President Donald Trump looks on during an event recognizing the Wounded Warrior Project Soldier Ride in the East Room of the White House, April 18, 2019 in Washington, DC. Today the Department of Justice released special counsel Robert Mueller&#39;s redacted report on Russian election interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
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Washington (CNN)Special counsel Robert Mueller abided by Justice Department guidelines that a sitting president can't be indicted, but in preparing the detailed 448-page report, the long-time law enforcement official has teed up an investigation into obstruction that could outlive President Donald Trump's time in the White House and his temporary immunity.
In declining to reach a traditional prosecution decision, Mueller wrote that he was adhering to DOJ guidelines and also considered the "burdens" an indictment would place on the President's ability to govern and respond to the allegations while in office.
Mueller added that the President "does not have immunity after he leaves office" and that his team "conducted a thorough factual investigation in order to preserve the evidence when memories were fresh and documentary materials were available."
4 times Barr twisted and cherry-picked Mueller&#39;s report
4 times Barr twisted and cherry-picked Mueller's report
The wording raises the remote specter of possible future criminal exposure for Trump when he is no longer in the White House. It isn't the only criminal inquiry looming over him.
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Extended honeymoon, anyone? See how two newlyweds hit the road in a class-C RV and never looked back.

Trump's immediate criminal exposure is protected by his status as president and also by the decision of Attorney General William Barr, whom Trump appointed, to not bring a case. Barr said "the evidence developed during the Special Counsel's investigation is not sufficient to establish that the President committed an obstruction-of-justice offense." Mueller rejected the legal defenses put forward by Trump's lawyers about his authority to investigate the president for obstruction.
Mueller did not ask Barr to weigh in. He also did not refer the investigation to Congress, but noted that Congress has a constitutional checks and balances role and can consider obstructive acts under its impeachment authority.
"We concluded that Congress has authority to prohibit a President's corrupt use of his authority in order to protect the integrity of the administration of justice," the report said.
Democrats set sights on Trump&#39;s finances as post-Mueller probes take shape
Democrats set sights on Trump's finances as post-Mueller probes take shape
House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler on Friday would not rule out pursuing civil impeachment proceedings but insisted that it isn't his focus initially, signaling instead he will explore whether Trump obstructed justice.
It is unclear whether the Democrats will pursue impeachment proceedings because of the potential political risk and if any Republicans would join their ranks. If Congress doesn't act, it doesn't mean Trump is out of the woods.
Trump's best defense
Trump is in a unique position to be identified by two prosecutor offices as possibly engaging in criminal conduct. In addition to Mueller, the US attorney's office for the Southern District of New York obliquely referred to the President as "Individual 1" in the campaign finance prosecution of Michael Cohen, Trump's former personal attorney. In that matter, Cohen said under oath that he violated the law by paying hush money payments to women who alleged past affairs with the President "in coordination with and at the direction of" Trump.
Trump has not been charged with any wrongdoing. And as long as he is in office, he won't be. Trump has denied affairs with both women and called Mueller's investigation a "witch hunt."
The statute of limitations on campaign finance and obstruction charges is five years. Most of the conduct at issue dates from 2016 to 2018, meaning Trump would have legal exposure on some elements until 2023.
Elie Honig, a CNN contributor and former federal prosecutor, said it's possible Trump would be charged with obstruction down the road.
"Mueller conspicuously went out of his way to say in the report that a president can be charged when out of office. It is very possible," Honig said. "That said, it seems really unlikely because it would be politically fraught and the conduct would be old by then."
Democrats set sights on Trump&#39;s finances as post-Mueller probes take shape
Democrats set sights on Trump's finances as post-Mueller probes take shape
Trump's best defense to his legal exposure is to win re-election in 2020, which would keep him in office until January 2025.
There's no knowing how prosecutors would evaluate the allegations and merits of bringing a case in the future.
Mueller's report states his team transferred nine cases it had not fully wrapped up to other US attorney offices to finish. Some of those cases, including the prosecution of Roger Stone, are public. Two additional cases that were transferred are ongoing. One is fully redacted and the other, through partial redaction, suggests it may have developed out of the investigation into Paul Manafort and Rick Gates' work with Ukraine.
Jerome Corsi, an associate of Stone who was investigated for being a possible intermediary between Stone and WikiLeaks, publicly refused a plea deal from Mueller's team on one count of perjury in November. After he rejected the offer, no charges were filed against him. Stone was indicted several months later. Last month, Corsi said he felt "vindicated" when Mueller's investigation concluded and Barr said there would be no further indictments. It is not clear if his conduct linked to the plea deal is still under investigation.
14 referrals by Mueller
The report also reveals that Mueller referred 14 investigations to other US attorney's offices for "evidence of potential criminal activity that was outside the scope of the Special Counsel's jurisdiction."
Twelve of the referrals are redacted with no information available. The two referrals that are not redacted are identified as the case against Cohen and the charges brought this month against Gregory Craig, a Washington, DC, lawyer who allegedly misled DOJ about work he had done for the Ukraine Ministry of Justice. Craig has pleaded not guilty. Cohen pleaded guilty to multiple charges and begins serving a three-year prison sentence on May 6.
Prosecutors have said in court filings that some defendants are helping with non-public investigations. The government has kept some information relating to Manafort under seal because it relates to a matter under investigation.
Fact check: What Trump associates told the public vs. what they told Mueller
Fact check: What Trump associates told the public vs. what they told Mueller
Gates' sentencing has been postponed several times because he is aiding multiple investigations. Sam Patten, a political consultant who pleaded guilty to not registering as a foreign lobbyist, received no jail time when he was sentenced earlier this month. Prosecutors filed a document detailing Patten's cooperation under seal stating only that he served as a valuable witness to "a number of other criminal investigations."

One of the referrals, according to sources, was made last spring when Mueller referred to the Southern District of New York office an investigation into whether Tony Podesta, a Democratic lobbyist, and Vin Weber, a former Republican congressman, had operated as unregistered foreign agents.
The same office is also looking into donations and expenditures of the Trump inaugural committee, into the Trump Organization, and into allegations Cohen made related to campaign finance and conversations about a possible presidential pardon.
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Offline RE

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🤡 Everything You Need To Know About The Mueller Report
« Reply #1881 on: April 21, 2019, 01:10:42 AM »
You only need to know one thing...

He's FUCKING GUILTY!

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/BKUIdwfGDRM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/BKUIdwfGDRM</a>
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Offline RE

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https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2019/04/schiff-mueller-report-more-significant-watergate-nixon.html

Schiff on Mueller Report: “In Every Way This Is More Significant Than Watergate”

By Daniel Politi
April 21, 20192:20 PM


Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee Adam Schiff speaks at a press conference on April 18, 2019 in Burbank, California.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Rep. Adam Schiff, the head of the House Intelligence Committee, pushed back against suggestions that the findings in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report somehow aren’t as serious as he and other Democrats had suggested. In particular, the allegations surrounding obstruction of justice that are outlined in the Mueller report are “far worse than anything that Richard Nixon did,” Schiff said.

The host of ABC’s This Week, Martha Raddatz, questioned Schiff about his previous statements comparing the actions of the Trump administration to Watergate, leaving the door open for him to take back some of those comments. But Schiff, who has become a favorite target of Republicans ever since Attorney General William Barr released his summary of the Mueller report, made clear that as far as he was concerned his previous statements on the seriousness of the president’s misdeeds continue to stand.

“The obstruction of justice in particular in this case is far worse than anything that Richard Nixon did,” Schiff said. “The break in by the Russians of the Democratic institutions, a foreign adversary far more significant than the plumbers breaking into the Democratic headquarters. So yes, I would say in every way this is more significant than Watergate.” Beyond that though, Schiff also said that the way Trump “would not only not stand up and resist Russian interference in our election but would welcome it goes well beyond anything Nixon did.” Taking Moscow’s side over those of his own intelligence agencies goes is one of the main reasons why “I think it is far more serious than Watergate.”

When asked whether Trump obstructed justice, Schiff said that as far as he’s concerned, there is no doubt about that, noting the obstruction came “in many ways.” Even though Trump’s allies say Mueller’s report exonerates the president, Schiff insists that Mueller “made it abundantly clear he felt he could not indict the president” and beyond that “I think he also felt that he could not say that the president should be indicted, because that would be effectively the same thing.” At the end of the day, Mueller “came as close to saying that the evidence of obstruction was evidence of a crime as he could within the Department of Justice regulations.”
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Offline Ashvin

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https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2019/04/schiff-mueller-report-more-significant-watergate-nixon.html

Schiff on Mueller Report: “In Every Way This Is More Significant Than Watergate”

By Daniel Politi
April 21, 20192:20 PM

Rep. Adam Schiff, the head of the House Intelligence Committee, pushed back against suggestions that the findings in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report somehow aren’t as serious as he and other Democrats had suggested. In particular, the allegations surrounding obstruction of justice that are outlined in the Mueller report are “far worse than anything that Richard Nixon did,” Schiff said.

The host of ABC’s This Week, Martha Raddatz, questioned Schiff about his previous statements comparing the actions of the Trump administration to Watergate, leaving the door open for him to take back some of those comments. But Schiff, who has become a favorite target of Republicans ever since Attorney General William Barr released his summary of the Mueller report, made clear that as far as he was concerned his previous statements on the seriousness of the president’s misdeeds continue to stand.

“The obstruction of justice in particular in this case is far worse than anything that Richard Nixon did,” Schiff said. “The break in by the Russians of the Democratic institutions, a foreign adversary far more significant than the plumbers breaking into the Democratic headquarters. So yes, I would say in every way this is more significant than Watergate.” Beyond that though, Schiff also said that the way Trump “would not only not stand up and resist Russian interference in our election but would welcome it goes well beyond anything Nixon did.” Taking Moscow’s side over those of his own intelligence agencies goes is one of the main reasons why “I think it is far more serious than Watergate.”

When asked whether Trump obstructed justice, Schiff said that as far as he’s concerned, there is no doubt about that, noting the obstruction came “in many ways.” Even though Trump’s allies say Mueller’s report exonerates the president, Schiff insists that Mueller “made it abundantly clear he felt he could not indict the president” and beyond that “I think he also felt that he could not say that the president should be indicted, because that would be effectively the same thing.” At the end of the day, Mueller “came as close to saying that the evidence of obstruction was evidence of a crime as he could within the Department of Justice regulations.”

This guy is the kind of shifting goal posts. First there was going to evidence of Trump helping the Russians rig the elections, now its just evidence he may have obstructed justice, and somehow that is "worse than Watergate". Everyone knows "obstruction of justice" is the broadly defined crime out there - you can obstruct justice by telling a police officer to go fuck himself. There isn't anything here that any prosecutor would be willing to touch with a ten foot pole. Dems need to give this up, already, and start doing something that their constituents actually want.

Offline RE

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Dems need to give this up, already, and start doing something that their constituents actually want.

What IYHO is it that Dem constituents want that could actually get done, passed by the Repugnant controlled Senate and then signed into law by the Clown-in-Chief?

RE
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Offline RE

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https://www.thedailybeast.com/team-trump-to-tell-democrats-get-lost-on-tax-returns

‘Let Them Knock Themselves Out’: Team Trump Scoffs at Tax Return Deadline, Dares Dems to Take Legal Action


According to two administration sources with knowledge of the matter, the Treasury Department is not going to comply with the April 23 deadline.
Asawin Suebsaeng

04.22.19 10:22 PM ET


Win McNamee/Getty

The Trump administration, along with the president’s personal lawyers, are preparing to formally tell Democratic lawmakers seeking years of Donald Trump’s tax returns to get lost, The Daily Beast has confirmed.

On Tuesday, the administration will hit the deadline imposed early this month by Rep. Richard Neal (D-MA), chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, who has demanded six years’ worth of President Trump’s long-hidden tax returns. Neal had also asked for returns for the president’s trust and seven entities in the Trump business empire, arguing that Congress has the authority to obtain the president’s tax returns under existing law.
Advertisement

According to two administration sources with knowledge of the matter, the U.S. Department of the Treasury is not going to comply with the deadline to hand over the returns, and officials plan to formally convey this decision to the committee in a letter. It is unclear if this letter will be transmitted on Tuesday.

    BATTLE
    Trump Hires Legal Team to Keep His Tax Returns Secret
    Asawin Suebsaeng

The decision to buck Congress is not surprising, as Trump has steadfastly refused to turn over his tax returns in the past. But it moves the two branches of government even closer to a vicious legal fight that could take months or years to resolve. Earlier this month, Trump attorney William Consovoy wrote a letter to the Treasury Department’s general counsel Brent McIntosh, arguing “why Chairman Neal cannot legally request—and the IRS cannot legally divulge—this information.” (The IRS is a bureau of Treasury, which is headed by Steve Mnuchin, who is copied on Consovoy’s original letter.)

When asked by The Daily Beast if the Treasury Department would adhere to the Democrats’ demands by the Tuesday deadline, one administration source simply laughed and said, “Hell no, are you kidding?” Mnuchin himself said his department wouldn’t meet a previous deadline set by congressional Democrats.

Democrats on the committee have said that if the Trump administration continues to fight their formal demand for Trump tax returns, they are prepared to issue subpoenas for the relevant material. When asked for comment on the likelihood that Democrat lawmakers will now resort to legal action, Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani replied: “Let them knock themselves out.”

The battle over Trump’s tax documents is hardly the only one the president’s armada of personal lawyers are busy fighting. In a filing revealed on Monday morning, the president and his outside counsel took the extraordinary step of suing Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD), chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, in an effort to thwart a congressional subpoena of separate Trump financial records. This month, Cummings subpoenaed Mazars, an accounting firm used by Trump and his business. In court documents, the lawyers for the Trump Organization argued that this kind of oversight of the president is illegitimate since it did not to advance a legislative agenda.

“We will not allow congressional presidential harassment to go unanswered,” Jay Sekulow, another one of President Trump’s personal lawyers, who defended him during Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe, said in a statement on Monday. Sekulow is overseeing Consovoy’s work for the president.

When asked by The Daily Beast if Trump is also going to sue any other Democratic lawmakers on other committees looking into his finances or taxes, Sekulow indicated such legal action would be weighed if a committee chair sent a related subpoena, noting,  “Each will be reviewed when issued.”
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Offline Eddie

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1886 on: April 23, 2019, 11:06:00 AM »
I wonder if Trump's returns ever are made public if it'll matter much. My guess is that he pays little if any tax, compared with his supposedly high income. I bet he chisels to claim every expenditure is business related. Way more than even the average billionaire does, which is saying a lot.

I doubt the Trump faithful would be fazed by that kind of revelation, though. They'd pretend to be happy he "beat the unfair IRS" or some shit along those lines. You can't fix stupid.
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Offline Eddie

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #1887 on: April 23, 2019, 11:13:55 AM »
I will now claim my props for calling the Russian collusion investigation correctly from the onset. I was always pretty sure the outcome would be fairly benign for Mr. Trump, and I said so from day one of the Mueller investigation (before then in fact).

It is interesting that the report does show Trump to be a lying scumbag and not immune to worrying when it looks like rocks are being turned over. He has plenty to hide. But nobody who matters wants to find it. Maybe because there are plenty of other similar criminals in DC.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Ashvin

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Dems need to give this up, already, and start doing something that their constituents actually want.

What IYHO is it that Dem constituents want that could actually get done, passed by the Repugnant controlled Senate and then signed into law by the Clown-in-Chief?

RE

They don't want to hear endless BS about how we are all victims of a Trump-Russia conspiracy. They want somebody to talk about bringing working class jobs and decent wages back. They want someone who understands that real solutions could be worked out if the Dem politicians stopped virtue-signaling for once and focused on incremental policy goals. These things could actually get done if they get their act together and WIN in 2020. Unfortunately I don't think this is likely at all... more likely their asses will be whopped by Trump even worse than before, because they just don't get it.

Offline RE

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Dems need to give this up, already, and start doing something that their constituents actually want.

What IYHO is it that Dem constituents want that could actually get done, passed by the Repugnant controlled Senate and then signed into law by the Clown-in-Chief?

RE

They don't want to hear endless BS about how we are all victims of a Trump-Russia conspiracy. They want somebody to talk about bringing working class jobs and decent wages back. They want someone who understands that real solutions could be worked out if the Dem politicians stopped virtue-signaling for once and focused on incremental policy goals. These things could actually get done if they get their act together and WIN in 2020. Unfortunately I don't think this is likely at all... more likely their asses will be whopped by Trump even worse than before, because they just don't get it.

They DO talk jobs.  You just don't hear it because you are so focused on the social issues and your anti-socialist dogma you spit up every time you post here.

RE

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/bernie-sanders-green-new-deal_n_5cbe7a3ce4b0f7a84a741611

POLITICS 04/22/2019 10:55 pm ET
Bernie Sanders Promises Green New Deal Jobs Will Pay At Least As Much As Fossil Fuel Work
The Vermont senator stood out in 2016 for his fossil fuel stances, and the emergence of the Green New Deal highlights his fine-tuned vision.
headshot
By Alexander C. Kaufman


Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) envisions a Green New Deal that rapidly phases out fossil fuels. But on Monday, he said that doesn’t mean coal miners, gas drillers and pipeline builders should expect to take a pay cut.

“All they are trying to do is feed their families,” Sanders said at his CNN town hall Monday night. “We have many, many billions of dollars to go into those communities to help workers get the training … they need to get jobs that will pay them as much or even more.”

Sanders stood out in the 2016 Democratic presidential primary for his opposition to hydraulic fracturing, the drilling technique known as fracking and credited with spurring the American oil and gas boom. He’s made climate change a central theme of his second White House run. In December, before announcing his candidacy, he hosted a town hall on the issue. In February, he co-sponsored the Senate resolution outlining what future Green New Deal legislation should include.

The senator is expected to release some kind of Green New Deal legislation in the coming months.
2020 Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders spoke about phasing out fossil fuels during his CNN town hall Monday nigh
ASSOCIATED PRESS
2020 Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders spoke about phasing out fossil fuels during his CNN town hall Monday night.

Providing a so-called “just transition” for fossil fuel workers is central to building the sort of political coalition that will be needed to overcome opposition to a deep-pocketed industry facing an existential threat to its business model. The powerful building trade unions oppose the Green New Deal in part because their members depend on high-wage, unionized jobs in the fossil fuel industry. Wages in the renewable energy business are significantly lower. Few jobs in solar or wind energy are unionized, and the past four decades of withering labor laws make it hard to imagine those industries easily organizing.

That’s why proponents of the Green New Deal say the policy that comes out of their movement requires systemic changes that go beyond simply lowering greenhouse gas emissions. And Sanders’ remark on Monday suggested his forthcoming legislation will include strong federal labor protections. 

“This is an issue we cannot run away from,” he said. “The United States of America, under a Sanders presidency, will lead the world in transforming our energy system, create millions of jobs and create a less polluting society.”
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