AuthorTopic: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread  (Read 182528 times)

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🤡 What We Learned From Trump’s Orlando Rally
« Reply #2010 on: June 19, 2019, 12:31:59 AM »
What we learned is Trumpovetsky is fighting the last war.  NEWZFLASH! Killary isn't running this time.  ::)

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/18/us/politics/trump-rally.html

What We Learned From Trump’s Orlando Rally
President Trump kicked off his 2020 re-election campaign on Tuesday in Orlando, Fla.CreditErin Schaff/The New York Times

President Trump kicked off his 2020 re-election campaign on Tuesday in Orlando, Fla.  Credit Erin Schaff/The New York Times

By Maggie Haberman and Annie Karni

    June 18, 2019

ORLANDO, Fla. — President Trump kicked off his 2020 re-election campaign on Tuesday night in Orlando. Here are eight takeways.
1. It was just a rally.

Despite weeks of hype from the president and his campaign, the official kickoff rally for a re-election campaign that he has been running since the day he took office was, in the end, just another rally. Mr. Trump had no new campaign message to unveil. He had no new theory of the case to mount against any of his potential opponents.

He instead spent much of his time relitigating his outrage against Hillary Clinton’s email server, promising that he would build a wall that was “stronger, bigger, better and cheaper” and talking about the “Russia hoax.” When Mr. Trump seemed to sense that the crowd’s energy was sagging, he quickly started polling attendees about what campaign slogan he should use.
2. Hello darkness, my old friend.

Mr. Trump’s portrait of the state of the country was bleak. Democrats, he said, are trying to undo his election and “rip” the Constitution apart. The infamous “swamp” of Washington that he promised to drain is still there, he said, seeping back into the foundations of the capital. And socialism is a threat at the gates.

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Fear is a powerful motivator in all things, but particularly politics, and the president has deployed it with abandon over the last four years. This rally was no exception as he spoke of immigrants pouring over the border, the danger of gangs and jobs under threat from competition overseas.
3. Size matters.

The Trump campaign rented buses across Florida to bring in supporters. The result was a packed 20,000-seat arena, with an overflow audience outside. The president’s aides pointed out that the numbers were a contrast with those of most Democrats in the field.

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Numbers have been Mr. Trump’s calling card throughout his career, and his rallies in 2016 put him on the map as a contender in a packed Republican primary race. He proved on Tuesday night that he can still draw a Beyoncé-size crowd in a state he won three years ago. But the crowd began to thin out before Mr. Trump was finished speaking, leaving patches of blue seats in the sea of red caps.
4. He may have fewer tricks in his bag.

Mr. Trump’s campaign is building for him a traditional apparatus when it comes to its fund-raising and digital operations. But when it comes to the message of the re-election campaign, his aides are leaving it all up to him. The question is whether he can still set the agenda the way he did in 2016, when every candidate felt compelled to respond to his outlandish remarks.

It was not clear whether he still can do that. He said little new in his remarks Tuesday night, and CNN broke away from him after shortly after he began. Mr. Trump has always thrived on an ability to shock, but he might have fewer tricks this time around.

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5. It’s about you, not me.

Mr. Trump turned to familiar turns of phrase by telling his supporters that he was fighting on their behalf, giving them a sense of ownership over his election. He described them as part of a movement that helped sweep him into office and helped “restore” power to voters in 2016.

But he was at his most specific when he described efforts to investigate him as a way to undermine his voters. “They are really going after you,” Mr. Trump said of efforts in the Democrat-led House to investigate his finances and allegations of malfeasance in his administration. In one of his most poignant moments, he said that when he walked into the White House for the first time, “I have never forgotten who sent me there.”

And he told attendees that their collective “political opponents” looked on their values “with hatred.”
6. But it’s also about me.

The president has a front-runner in former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and more than 20 other candidates in the Democratic primary race whom he could target as foils. But he made clear in the first 11 minutes of his kickoff rally that the news media would be his main target for the next 17 months. “The fake news” was a phrase that he uttered at least four times in those minutes, pointing to journalists and egging on the boos and jeers of his supporters.

The news media, in Mr. Trump’s telling, is denying him credit he is due. The news media, in Mr. Trump’s telling, is helping spread the “Russian hoax,” which is what he has called the investigation by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, into Russian interference in the election and whether the Trump campaign was involved. The overarching theme? Mr. Trump has been mistreated.
7. He had a sense of place.

Mr. Trump’s victory in Florida in November 2016 was a piece of the puzzle in beating Mrs. Clinton, and his campaign is aware of the need for a show of strength in the state. So is Mr. Trump, who in his remarks described it as his “second home” where he owns a private resort, Mar-a-Lago, and a golf club.

The state is notoriously hard to poll and elections in Florida are always close, as anyone who recalls the 2000 presidential race can confirm. Mr. Trump is mindful that he needs to be in the state early and often.

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8. He needs an opponent.

For now he’ll take Hillary. He mentioned Mrs. Clinton by name more than half a dozen times before at least one mention each of two leading Democratic contenders in this cycle, Mr. Biden and Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont.

Mr. Trump has been telling aides he wants to run against Mr. Biden because it is a race he recognizes. He views Mr. Biden as a male version of Mrs. Clinton — a centrist candidate who will allow him to run again as an outsider. But if his opponent is Mr. Sanders or Senator Elizabeth Warren, the president’s aides expect the race to play out along ideological lines, with Mr. Trump railing against socialism.

But without a clear opponent, Mr. Trump seemed content on Tuesday to hold up the specter of Mrs. Clinton. He talked about her deleted emails from the private server she used while she was the secretary of state. He suggested he would have been sent to the “electric chair” had he done the same thing. And he recalled how she denigrated his supporters as “deplorables.”
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🤡 Trump’s empty Cabinet
« Reply #2011 on: June 20, 2019, 01:33:24 AM »
"You're FIRED!"   "You QUIT!"

Goobermint as Reality TV.   ::)

RE

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/06/18/donald-trump-empty-cabinet-1369865



President Donald Trump's Cabinet has dwindled to a last-man-standing Cabinet-by-default, highlighted by the coming departure of acting Defense Secretary Pat Shanahan (right). | Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Trump’s empty Cabinet

Patrick Shanahan’s departure highlights the administration’s hollowed-out senior ranks.

By ELIANA JOHNSON and MARIANNE LEVINE

06/18/2019 06:05 PM EDT


A little more than a year ago, moments after he fired Secretary of State Rex Tillerson by tweet, President Donald Trump looked ahead optimistically to reshaping his Cabinet.

Standing on the White House driveway, the president told reporters, “I’m really at a point where we’re getting very close to having the Cabinet and other things that I want.”

It hasn’t quite worked out that way. Instead, Trump has a Cabinet by default, with many of its members simply being the last person standing after others pulled out of the running, declined the president’s offers or couldn’t get through their confirmation hearings.

In just the latest example of a Trump official going down amid the harsh glare of an invigorated Washington press corps, acting Defense Secretary Pat Shanahan withdrew from consideration for the top Pentagon job on Tuesday as news outlets published lurid details of his divorce.

Shanahan was never even formally nominated by the White House, but at least he managed to serve in his post for six months.

Others made it slightly further before being ground up by Trump’s Washington. Labor secretary nominee Andy Puzder saw his support evaporate in the Senate when POLITICO published allegations of domestic abuse from his ex-wife, and threw in the towel before he even sat for a hearing. Ronny Jackson, the White House physician Trump picked to run the Veterans Affairs, withdrew after accusations of misconduct on the job at the White House.
Mark Esper | Getty Images

Defense
New acting Pentagon chief has closer ties to Trump

By ELIANA JOHNSON, WESLEY MORGAN and CONNOR O’BRIEN

If there’s a thread running through them all, it’s a president with a penchant for choosing many top appointees based on instinct — and without regard for prior government experience — plus a White House whose vetting operation is far from thorough and a thin Republican Senate majority with little room for error. The result is that the Trump administration’s senior ranks largely include individuals who were not, in many cases, the president’s first or even second choice to fill a given post, but became the only logical choice after other options evaporated.
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They include the acting White House chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, who accepted his position after several others bowed out, including Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie; the president’s pick to be the ambassador to the United Nations, Kelly Craft, who then was tapped after the former State Department spokeswoman, Heather Nauert, quietly pulled herself out of the running; and Attorney General William Barr, who turned down the White House before finally accepting the job after other candidates he had recommended declined.

Add to these woes an administration with unusually high turnover, as well as the typical churn in Washington, and Trump is presiding over a government run in many cases by acting officials from the Cabinet level on down.

The president on Tuesday brushed aside those concerns, telling reporters before boarding Air Force One for a flight to Orlando, Fla., where he was set to kick off his 2020 reelection campaign, that he is pleased with the composition of his Cabinet.
Trump on Pat Shanahan: 'I didn't ask him to withdraw'

poster="http://v.politico.com/images/1155968404/201906/2361/1155968404_6049725467001_6049729647001-vs.jpg?pubId=1155968404"
Trump on Pat Shanahan: 'I didn't ask him to withdraw'
true

Trump on Pat Shanahan: 'I didn't ask him to withdraw'

"We have a very good vetting process. You take a look at our Cabinet and our secretary it's very good,” Trump said. “But we have a great vetting process.” And he reiterated his oft-stated preference for appointing acting Cabinet chiefs and avoiding the Senate confirmation process.

“As you know Pat was acting,” he said. “Acting gives you much greater flexibility, a lot easier to do things.”

Others, however, said the composition of Trump’s Cabinet was the logical result of the president’s haphazard management style.

“There are a lot of qualified people out there but not a lot who would want to work in this administration given the brevity of tenure that most of these folks face,” said Jeremy Bash, who served as chief of staff to former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta. “It’s always a gamble when you select people for very senior jobs who have zero experience in government.”

Shanahan, a former Boeing executive, had not previously served in government before being tapped to run the Pentagon, a sprawling and notoriously difficult agency to manage.
Trump on Pat Shanahan: 'I didn't ask him to withdraw'

Defense
'Let’s just bail out': Pentagon void reopens as Shanahan's nomination collapses

By DAVID BROWN

“Government service tends to weed out those who are unqualified and those who cannot pass vetting,” Bash added. “When you reach for people who have no government service you are taking a huge risk.”

Trump, who likewise had no government experience before assuming the most powerful job in the world, gravitates toward nontraditional hires, compounding the risks.

One Cabinet official, former Pentagon chief Jim Mattis, resigned in protest. Several — Tom Price, Scott Pruitt and Ryan Zinke — were effectively forced out amid scandal. Kirstjen Nielsen, Jeff Sessions, David Shulkin and Tillerson fell afoul of a president accustomed to getting his own way. Just two, Nikki Haley and Linda McMahon, left the administration on their own terms.

Shanahan wasn’t the president’s first choice for the Pentagon job. Trump said he would nominate him after the retired Army Gen. Jack Keane and former Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl said they were not interested in the position, POLITICO reported in January.

Shanahan has served as acting secretary of Defense since Mattis’ departure in early January. Though the president has said repeatedly that he prefers Cabinet members who are serving in an acting capacity, Trump had faced mounting pressure from lawmakers on Capitol Hill to nominate a permanent defense chief.
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Senate confirmation for the Pentagon post is considered particularly important because the secretary of Defense is a part of the chain of command and bears responsibility for deploying troops.

“Since the SecDef is supposed to assert civilian control over the military and all the generals who report to SecDef are confirmed by the Senate, he is at a disadvantage exercising authority over them when their positions have more political grounding than his,” said Paul Wolfowitz, who served as deputy secretary of Defense in the George W. Bush administration.

The calls for a nominee did not abate on Tuesday, when Trump announced that Army Secretary Mark Esper would replace Shanahan as acting secretary of Defense.

"I do think we'd be better off by far to have a secretary of defense who is actually confirmed by the Senate,” said Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said it is “appalling” not to have the position filled in a permanent capacity and that “it shows the chaos in this administration.”

Former Sen. Chuck Hagel, a Republican who served as President Barack Obama’s secretary of Defense, said it is in Esper’s interest to go through the formal Senate process.

“That really gives that position and that individual legitimacy going forward,“ he said. “When you are not confirmed you’re just kind of swinging out there in the wind."
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Gig Big Surprise on this one.  ::)

RE

http://nymag.com/intelligencer/2019/06/president-donald-trump-faces-new-rape-accusation.html

E. Jean Carroll: “Trump attacked me in the dressing room of Bergdorf Goodman.”
By Sarah Jones


Photograph by Amanda Demme for New York Magazine.

The cover story New York published today details an encounter the writer E. Jean Carroll had over two decades ago with Donald J. Trump, in which the then–real-estate mogul allegedly assaulted her in a dressing room of the Bergdorf Goodman department store in midtown Manhattan.

The episode is one of six incidents Carroll details in the article of attacks on her by men over the course of her life. Another episode involves the disgraced former CEO of CBS, Les Moonves. The cover story is an excerpt from her newest book, What Do We Need Men For? A Modest Proposal, which will be published on July 2 by St. Martin’s Press.

When Carroll meets Donald Trump in Bergdorf Goodman, the encounter starts as a friendly one. Trump recognizes her as “that advice lady”; Carroll recognizes him as “that real-estate tycoon.” Trump tells Carroll that he’s there to buy a gift for “a girl,” and though we don’t learn the identity of this mystery woman, Carroll places the ensuing incident in late 1995 or early 1996, during which time Trump was married to Marla Maples. When Trump asks Carroll to advise him on what to buy, she agrees, and the two eventually make their way to the lingerie section. Trump suggests a lace bodysuit and encourages Carroll to try it on; she, deflecting, jokingly suggests that he try it on instead. After they reach the dressing rooms, events turn violent. In Carroll’s account, Trump shoves her against a wall inside a dressing room, pulls down her tights, and, “forcing his fingers around my private area, thrusts his penis halfway — or completely, I’m not certain — inside me.”

Carroll, 75, is a venerated Elle advice columnist. At the time of the attack, she was well known in her own right. A frequent feature writer for magazines like Playboy and Esquire, she had her own television show on America’s Talking, the precursor to MSNBC. Trump had his own record. By the time of his alleged assault on Carroll, Trump’s ex-wife, Ivana, had already claimed that Trump violated her during their marriage. (Ivana recanted the claim after Trump launched his campaign for the presidency.) Further news reports, published in 2016, place at least four other alleged sexual-assault claims, made by Kristin Anderson, Jill Harth, Cathy Heller, and Temple Taggart McDowell, in the years before and during the time period of Carroll’s account.

Carroll is now at least the 16th woman to accuse Donald Trump of sexual misconduct and the 14th to accuse Moonves of similar offenses. The incidents, which date from the 1990s, are highly specific and related with dark humor. Moonves is compared by Carroll to an octopus,  and Trump, she writes, “yammers about himself like he’s Alexander the Great ready to loot Babylon.” But she is clear, sometimes clinical, about the violence she experienced. Moonves frantically kisses and gropes her in a hotel elevator moments after she finished interviewing him for an article. The Trump story is even darker.
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Carroll says that she disclosed the Trump incident to two friends at the time. One, whom Carroll describes as “a journalist, magazine writer, correspondent on the TV morning shows, author of many books, etc.,” told her to go to the police: “‘He raped you,’ she kept repeating when I called her. ‘He raped you. Go to the police! I’ll go with you. We’ll go together.’” The other, who is also a journalist, was sympathetically cautious: “‘Tell no one. Forget it! He has 200 lawyers. He’ll bury you.’” Carroll writes that the Donna Karan coat-dress she wore that day “still hangs on the back of my closet door.” She wore it for the first time since the attack for her portrait session with New York for the cover, above.

New York has verified that Carroll did disclose the attack to these friends at the time, and has confirmed that Bergdorf Goodman kept no security footage that would prove or disprove Carroll’s story. New York has also sought comment from Moonves and Trump. Through his representative, Moonves told New York that he “emphatically denies” the incident occurred. A senior White House official said in a statement, “This is a completely false and unrealistic story surfacing 25 years after allegedly taking place and was created simply to make the President look bad.”

As for why Carroll has come forward only now, she writes that she dreaded the public humiliation that awaits her. “Receiving death threats, being driven from my home, being dismissed, being dragged through the mud,” she writes, “and joining the 15 women who’ve come forward with credible stories about how the man grabbed, badgered, belittled, mauled, molested, and assaulted them, only to see the man turn it around, deny, threaten, and attack them, never sounded like much fun.”
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hahahahahahahahaha!!!!!!

That worked. NOT.

RE

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/delay-ice-deportations

Trump delays planned ICE raids to see if Congress can solve border crisis
Adam Shaw
By Adam Shaw | Fox News


Trump vows to deport 'millions' of undocumented immigrants as McConnell plans to force vote on border funding

Republicans are accusing Democrats of not wanting President Trump to get a win as the White House ramps up efforts to address the border crisis; Mike Emanuel reports.

President Trump announced Saturday that a planned mass roundup of illegal immigrants by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is being delayed for two weeks, in the hope that a bipartisan solution to the border crisis can be reached.

“At the request of Democrats, I have delayed the Illegal Immigration Removal Process (Deportation) for two weeks to see if the Democrats and Republicans can get together and work out a solution to the Asylum and Loophole problems at the Southern Border,” he tweeted.

TRUMP DOUBLES DOWN ON EXPECTED ICE RAID AMID PUSHBACK FROM LOCAL DEM POLITICIANS

“If not, Deportations start!” he added.

The Washington Post reported Friday that ICE was expected to target 2,000 families in up to 10 cities across the U.S., after Trump had announced earlier this week that ICE will “begin the process of removing millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the United States.”

DEMS TRYING TO ADD 'RADICAL' RIDERS SHIELDING ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS IN BORDER BILL: GOP SOURCES

ICE said in a statement Friday that “due to law-enforcement sensitivities and the safety and security of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement personnel, the agency will not offer specific details related to enforcement operations.”

However, it said that ICE prioritizes arresting and removing those illegal immigrants “who pose a threat to national security, public safety and border security.”

Despite fierce opposition from local Democratic politicians in targeted cities, Trump had stood by the plan earlier Saturday, saying that "everybody who came into the country illegally will be brought out of the country very legally."

He also dismissed the Democratic opposition on Saturday, saying they were mostly "high crime" cities.

"Well some cities are going to fight it. But if you notice they're generally high crime cities, if you look at Chicago they're fighting it. If you look at other cities they're fighting it. Many of those cities are high crime cities and they're sanctuary cities," he said.

It was not immediately clear what form the negotiations would take, but the postponement comes amid an escalating crisis at the border, with more than 140,000 migrants encountered or apprehended at the border in May.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Earlier this month, Trump announced that he had secured a deal with Mexico that would see the U.S. expand its policy of returning asylum applicants to Mexico while claims are processed, instead of applicants being released into the U.S.

The Senate Appropriations Committee this week approved Trump's $4.6 billion request for funding to tackle the humanitarian crisis, but only after the inclusion of a provision that blocks money from being diverted to funding for a wall on the border, and after Republicans dropped a request for more detention beds.

Fox News' Jake Gibson contributed to this report.
Adam Shaw is a reporter covering U.S. and European politics for Fox News.. He can be reached here.
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After this Actor is Fired/Quits, who's next?  The Acting-Acting Head? ???  :icon_scratch:

RE

https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/acting-head-us-customs-border-protection-tells-employees/story?id=63933601

Acting head of Customs and Border Protection resigns, acting ICE leader tappedz

By anne flaherty andsophie tatum

Jun 25, 2019, 6:15 PM ET


PHOTO: Migrants are loaded onto a bus by U.S. Border Patrol agents after being detained when they crossed into the United States from Mexico on June 01, 2019 in El Paso, Texas.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images


Immigration and Customs Enforcement's acting head, Mark Morgan, has been tapped to lead U.S. Customs and Border Protection, following John Sanders' resignation from the position, a government official told ABC News.
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The change in leadership comes as CBP faces new round of scrutiny regarding the conditions at certain Border Protection facilities where children are being held and new allegations that children are being neglected while in the agency's custody at these locations.

Sanders made his announcement in an email to CBP employees, which was obtained by ABC News on Tuesday. His departure follows allegations made by independent inspectors who claimed migrant children were being kept at border stations with deplorable conditions, including a facility that one doctor compared to "torture facilities."

CBP officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, on Tuesday, denied allegations of mistreatment at Border Patrol facilities, but said an internal investigation was underway. Two other administration officials said Sanders' resignation was not tied to the recent allegations of neglect at one facility in Clint, Texas.
PHOTO: Migrants are loaded onto a bus by U.S. Border Patrol agents after being detained when they crossed into the United States from Mexico on June 01, 2019 in El Paso, Texas. Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Migrants are loaded onto a bus by U.S. Border Patrol agents after being detained when they crossed into the United States from Mexico on June 01, 2019 in El Paso, Texas.
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ABC News previously reported that physician Dolly Lucio Sevier, who was granted access to the largest CBP detention center in the country in McAllen, Texas, described the facility as having "extreme cold temperatures, lights on 24 hours a day, no adequate access to medical care, basic sanitation, water or adequate food."

In an earlier interview with ABC News, Lucio Sevier said the facility "felt worse than jail."
(MORE: Doctor compares conditions for unaccompanied children at immigrant holding centers to 'torture facilities')

"It just felt, you know, lawless," she said. "I mean, imagine your own children there. I can't imagine my child being there and not being broken."

At a separate facility in Clint, Texas, lawyers said the conditions were just as bad.

Warren Binford is a law professor at Willamette University who interviewed children at the facility and said that there were infants and toddlers sleeping on concrete floors, as well as older children having to care for younger children -- a feat, he said, they were not equipped to do, ABC News has previously reported.

CBP officials told reporters on Tuesday that they had not seen evidence of neglect or abuse at the Clint facility and had returned 100 children to the center after being moved out.

When asked on the call if there was any concern about moving the children back to a facility that had allegations of mistreatment, one CBP official said they were "not concerned" because "a full investigation will be completed."

"And frankly, as I said earlier, I personally don't believe these allegations," the official told reporters.

But Lucio Sevier, told ABC News that she stands by her comments and that the U.S. Customs and Border Protection "cannot deny the deplorable conditions."

"I stand by what I said," she said.

That includes that the children in these holding facilities aren't getting access to soap, toothbrushes and showering only once every week to three weeks. The children were "dirty," she said. "I stand by everything."

Speaking on condition of anonymity, CBP officials told reporters that they were not short on items such as toothbrushes and that children were given snacks and juice on demand. They have refused news organizations access to the facilities, however, saying the officials there are too busy trying to process the children and find places for them at more long-term shelters.

Sanders has served as acting commissioner since April and is the chief operating officer of the agency. Sanders previously worked as the chief technology officer for the Transportation Security Administration, according to CBP, and has "more than 30 years of national security experience."
PHOTO: In this May 15, 2019 file photo, acting U.S. Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders, left, joins Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham on Capitol Hill in Washington. J. Scott Applewhite/AP, FILE
In this May 15, 2019 file photo, acting U.S. Customs and Border Protection Commissioner John Sanders, left, joins Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham on Capitol Hill in Washington.
more +

When he was tapped to serve as acting commissioner, acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan called Sanders "instrumental" to the agency.

"In addition to bringing greater focus on the agency's operational requirements, he has provided strategic direction and oversight to critical enterprise services and operations support functions across the agency. With John Sanders' leadership, CBP will continue to excel, remain ever vigilant, and accomplish the mission with steadfast resolve," McAleenan said at the time.
(MORE: Pelosi says Democrats to vote on emergency funding to help children at border detention centers)

In his message, Sanders said he told acting DHS Secretary Kevin McAleenan his resignation was effective July 5.

"In that letter, I quoted a wise man who said to me, 'each man will judge their success by their own metrics,'" he wrote to employees. "Although I will leave it to you to determine whether I was successful, I can unequivocally say that helping support the amazing men and women of CBP has been the most fulfilling and satisfying opportunity of my career."

He later added, "Don't underestimate the power of momentum as you continue to tackle some of this country's most difficult challenges."

Morgan previously served chief of Border Patrol with CBP before he began his role with ICE.

In an interview earlier this year with Fox News' Tucker Carlson, Morgan said that he had been to detention facilities "where I've walked up to these individuals that are so-called minors, 17 or under, and I've looked them, and I've looked at their eyes, Tucker, and I've said, 'That is a soon-to-be MS-13 gang member.' It's unequivocal."

ABC News' Jim Avila, Serena Marshall, Lana Zak and Jennifer Metz contributed to this story.
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🤡 Trump Lashes Out After Mueller Agrees to Testify to Congress
« Reply #2015 on: June 26, 2019, 09:58:27 AM »
Another off again, on again saga in the Trumpovetsky pantheon of clownishness.  ::)

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/26/us/politics/trump-mueller-testimony.html

Trump Lashes Out After Mueller Agrees to Testify to Congress


President Trump at the White House yesterday. “They’re gone and that is illegal,” Mr. Trump said of the texts between two former F.B.I. officials. “That’s a crime.”Credit Gabriella Demczuk for The New York Times

By Eileen Sullivan
    June 26, 2019

WASHINGTON — President Trump lashed out at the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, on Wednesday, dredging up false accusations about the conduct of investigators after House Democrats announced that Mr. Mueller would testify publicly next month.

The president offered no evidence as he repeated earlier accusations that Mr. Mueller destroyed text messages between two former F.B.I. officials, Peter Strzok and Lisa Page, who worked on the Russia investigation. “They’re gone and that is illegal,” Mr. Trump said of the texts in an interview with Fox Business Network. “That’s a crime.”

Mr. Trump was referring to a December Justice Department inspector general report that noted 19,000 text messages were lost because of technical problems, not intentionally deleted by Mr. Mueller or anyone.

Thousands of messages between Mr. Strzok and Ms. Page have been made public, many highly critical of the president. Both Mr. Strzok and Ms. Page were criticized in an inspector general report last year on the Hillary Clinton email investigation, but the inspector general also said that bias had not affected the F.B.I.’s decision-making process. Another inspector general report on aspects of the Russia inquiry is due in the coming weeks or months.
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“It never ends,” Mr. Trump said about Democratic efforts to investigate his conduct. He repeated that Mr. Mueller’s report, released in April, found no collusion with the Russians, and he again offered a false assertion that the special counsel team cleared him of obstruction of justice. After reading the report and considering 10 possible instances in which Mr. Trump may have obstructed justice, Attorney General William P. Barr decided the president had not.

Mr. Mueller emphasized that Mr. Trump has not been cleared of obstruction crimes. “If we had had confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so,” Mr. Mueller said in May in his only public remarks on the investigation.

While Mr. Mueller has resisted testifying before congressional oversight committees on the Russia inquiry, he was compelled by subpoenas to answer questions on July 17 in two back-to-back hearings before the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees.

In response to the news about Mr. Mueller’s upcoming appearances on Capitol Hill, Mr. Trump on Tuesday tweeted, “Presidential Harassment!”
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Read the Mueller Report: Searchable Document and Index

The findings from the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, are now available to the public. The redacted report details his two-year investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Rudolph W. Giuliani, one of Mr. Trump’s personal lawyers, dismissed Mr. Mueller’s planned testimony as a redundancy.

“I’ve seen this movie several times and I know the ending, and it should now end,” he wrote in a text message on Wednesday.

Though Mr. Trump and Mr. Barr have said they had no problem with Mr. Mueller providing congressional testimony, the White House has blocked other former government officials from complying with similar subpoenas.

Representative Jerrold Nadler of New York, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, told reporters Wednesday that he was confident he would get testimony from Mr. Mueller, even if the White House tried to step in.

“They can attempt to,” Mr. Nadler said. “I doubt they would succeed. Mr. Mueller is an honest man and understands that congressional subpoenas are not optional.”

Mr. Mueller has said any future comments about the investigation would not go beyond what was included in the 448-page report.

If Mr. Mueller’s testimony is not blocked, the stakes will be high for both Democrats and Republicans, as Mr. Mueller’s answers are sure to provide material for 2020 presidential campaigns.

Mr. Nadler said the president and attorney general have tried to distort the findings of the Mueller report. Even if Mr. Mueller sticks to the material in the report, Mr. Nadler said, correcting the public record on national television could have a “profound impact.”

Republicans will most likely question Mr. Mueller about the origins of the Russia inquiry, and whether federal officials spied on the Trump campaign. Mr. Barr has launched a separate review into the beginnings of the investigation, and Mr. Trump has given him wide authority to declassify intelligence secrets as part of the review.

Nicholas Fandos contributed reporting.
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Offline Surly1

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Re: 🤡 Trump Lashes Out After Mueller Agrees to Testify to Congress
« Reply #2016 on: June 26, 2019, 10:24:11 AM »
Another off again, on again saga in the Trumpovetsky pantheon of clownishness.  ::)

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/26/us/politics/trump-mueller-testimony.html
Trump Lashes Out After Mueller Agrees to Testify to Congress

Anyone else wonder what happened to, "No collusion! Complete exoneration!"
Asking for a friend.
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline Eddie

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Re: 🤡 Trump Lashes Out After Mueller Agrees to Testify to Congress
« Reply #2017 on: June 26, 2019, 10:50:58 AM »
Another off again, on again saga in the Trumpovetsky pantheon of clownishness.  ::)

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/26/us/politics/trump-mueller-testimony.html
Trump Lashes Out After Mueller Agrees to Testify to Congress

Anyone else wonder what happened to, "No collusion! Complete exoneration!"
Asking for a friend.

I'd answer but it would invoke Godwin's Law.
What makes the desert beautiful is that somewhere it hides a well.

Offline Surly1

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Re: 🤡 Trump Lashes Out After Mueller Agrees to Testify to Congress
« Reply #2018 on: June 26, 2019, 12:45:23 PM »
Another off again, on again saga in the Trumpovetsky pantheon of clownishness.  ::)

RE

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/26/us/politics/trump-mueller-testimony.html
Trump Lashes Out After Mueller Agrees to Testify to Congress

Anyone else wonder what happened to, "No collusion! Complete exoneration!"
Asking for a friend.

I'd answer but it would invoke Godwin's Law.

Now THAT's funny!
“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline RE

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She's got some corroboration!  She appears to have had rape fantasies though, so she's not a great victim.

RE

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-48790071

Two women say E Jean Carroll told them about Trump alleged sexual assault


Image copyright Reuters and Getty
Ms Carroll has accused Mr Trump of sexually assaulting her in the 1990s

Two women have publicly said columnist E. Jean Carroll confided in them after Donald Trump allegedly raped her in the 1990s.

Carol Martin and Lisa Birnbach at the time disagreed on whether Ms Carroll should call the police, the New York Times newspaper reports.

President Trump denies the allegation, saying Ms Carroll is "totally lying" and "she's not my type".

Ms Carroll, 75, is the 16th woman to accuse Mr Trump of sexual misconduct.

    Trump dismisses E. Jean Carroll rape allegation
    Trump sex harassment accusers demand inquiry
    Stormy Daniels: 'I was threatened over Trump affair'

Mr Trump, 73, has rejected all allegations against him.
What did Ms Martin and Ms Birnbach say?

Ms Martin, a TV news anchor in 1975-95, and Ms Birnbach, a writer, spoke publicly for the first time about the alleged sexual assault on the New York Times podcast The Daily.

Ms Carroll, the Elle columnist, said in the same podcast she had called Ms Birnbach straight after the alleged assault, telling her that Mr Trump had forced himself on her.

Ms Birnbach responded by saying she thought it was rape, urging Ms Carroll to call the police.

"Let's go to the police. I'll take you to the police" Ms Birnbach said, but added that her friend refused.

Ms Carroll described what had happened between her and Mr Trump as a "fight", not "a crime".

She also told the podcast she felt that she had encouraged Mr Trump's behaviour. Asked whether she felt responsibility for what happened, she said: "One hundred percent."

Ms Carroll said two or three days later she also told Ms Martin about the alleged assault.

Ms Martin advised against calling the police, saying Mr Trump was a powerful men with numerous lawyers.

"I said: Don't tell anybody. I wouldn't tell anybody this," Ms Martin is quoted as saying in the podcast.
Where did the alleged assault happen?

E. Jean Carroll said it happened at a Bergdorf Goodman store in New York's Manhattan in late 1995 or early 1996, when the pair bumped into each other while shopping.

The former Apprentice star and real estate magnate allegedly asked her for advice when buying lingerie for another woman and jokingly asked her to model it for him.

In the changing rooms, she said Mr Trump lunged at her, pinned her against a wall and forced himself on her.

Ms Carroll, whose "Ask E. Jean" advice column has appeared in Elle magazine since 1993, claims she managed to push him off after a "colossal struggle".

Ms Carroll made the allegations for the first time in the New York magazine last Friday. She said she would consider pressing charges against the president.
How did Mr Trump respond?

Speaking to The Hill on Monday, Mr Trump staunchly dismissed the allegations due to appear in Ms Carroll's forthcoming book, What Do We Need Men For? A Modest Proposal.

He denied even knowing Ms Carroll despite being pictured with her in New York magazine alongside details of her allegations.

"She is - it's just a terrible thing that people can make statements like that," he said.

It was his third denial since Ms Carroll went public, with Mr Trump previously accusing her of "trying to sell a new book" and "peddling fake news".

In 2016, Mr Trump made similar remarks about another accuser, Jessica Leeds, who alleges he groped her on an aeroplane in the 1980s.
Media captionJessica Leeds is calling on Congress to open an inquiry into President Trump

Addressing crowds at a rally, Mr Trump said "she would not be my first choice".
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Offline RE

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🤡 Trump says there will be tanks at July 4 celebration
« Reply #2020 on: July 02, 2019, 12:00:04 AM »
Psychological Prepping the Hoi Polloi for WAR!

See how big our Tanks are?

RE

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-signs-irs-bill-today-2019-07-01-live-updates/

Trump says there will be tanks at July 4 celebration

By Kathryn Watson
Updated on: July 1, 2019 / 6:05 PM / CBS News


U.S. Army tanks will be present at the July 4 "Salute to America" celebration, but care will be taken not to damage the streets of Washington with their sheer weight, President Trump told reporters Monday. He made the remarks at the White House Monday during a White House photo op for two bills on humanitarian assistance at the border and modernizing the IRS.

The president has long been enamored by the possibility of an even grander-than-typical Independence Day celebration, and he's borrowing ideas from events abroad like France's Bastille Day celebration. Mr. Trump will be speaking at this year's event in the scorching heat.

"You've got to be pretty careful with the tanks because the roads have a tendency not to like to carry heavy tanks. So we have to put them in certain areas but we have the brand new Sherman tanks and we have the brand new Abram tanks," the president told reporters. "And we have some incredible equipment, military equipment on display — brand new. And we're very proud of it. You know, we're making a lot of new tanks right now. We're building a lot of new tanks in Lima, Ohio — our great tank factory that people wanted to close down until I got elected and I stopped it from being closed down, and now it's a very productive facility and they do, nobody's — it's the greatest tank in the world."

The Washington Post reported earlier Monday that Mr. Trump's Independence Day celebration would include tanks, and come at an unknown price tag for taxpayers. Asked if he can give a speech to all Americans Thursday, the president insisted he can — and already has.

"I think so, I think so. I think I've reached most Americans," the president said.

Mr. Trump on Monday also returned to the 2020 census, saying in response to a reporter's question that he is considering delaying it but has made no decision.

"We're looking at that ... there's a big difference to me between being a citizen of the United States and being an illegal," he said during a photo op for the two bills — the $4.6 billion border funding bill for humanitarian assistance and another bill intended to modernize the IRS and allow for more efficient tax enforcement.

Last week, the Supreme Court ruled the administration's proposed citizenship question could not be added to the 2020 census because its explanation for why it should be added is insufficient.

The president also suggested that undocumented immigrant round-ups and deportations could resume soon.  "After July 4 a lot of people are going to be brought back out," he told reporters.

The Taxpayer First Act — not to be confused with the GOP tax bill passed in 2017 — is supposed to make the IRS more user-friendly. Mr. Trump is signing the bill after returning from his trip to Asia and his last-minute meeting with North Korean strongman Kim Jong Un. The bill signing was the first time Mr. Trump has appeared since his trip to Asia.

Mr. Trump became the first U.S. president to set foot onto North Korean soil over the weekend. But whether Mr. Trump accomplished anything for the U.S. is up for debate. Mr. Trump's last meeting with Kim ended abruptly and without an agreement.

Mr. Trump has little on his public schedule this week, and Congress is out of session for the July 4th holiday. Mr. Trump will be giving an address at an Independence Day celebration Thursday evening. Washington always has a July 4th celebration with fireworks, but presidents do not speak at it.

First published on July 1, 2019 / 5:17 PM
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Offline Surly1

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Re: 🤡 Trump says there will be tanks at July 4 celebration
« Reply #2021 on: July 02, 2019, 02:41:30 AM »

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-signs-irs-bill-today-2019-07-01-live-updates/

Trump says there will be tanks at July 4 celebration

“The old world is dying, and the New World struggles to be born: now is the time of monsters.”

Offline RE

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Re: 🤡 Trump says there will be tanks at July 4 celebration
« Reply #2022 on: July 02, 2019, 03:34:05 AM »

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-signs-irs-bill-today-2019-07-01-live-updates/

Trump says there will be tanks at July 4 celebration



Bring on Godwin.

RE
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🤡 House suing US treasury and IRS over Trump's tax returns
« Reply #2023 on: July 03, 2019, 12:01:27 AM »
Ugghh.  This is worse than the Brexit Bullshit.

RE

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/3QPPAh_xaug" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/3QPPAh_xaug</a>
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https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2019/07/03/fourth-of-july-donald-trump-military-display-national-mall-227263

3 Reasons Not to Worry About Trump’s Fourth of July—and 1 Big Reason to Worry

Other presidents have celebrated the Fourth. It's hard to think of one who has less sense of what it's about.


By JEFF GREENFIELD
July 03, 2019

Jeff Greenfield is a five-time Emmy-winning network television analyst and author.




Since President Donald Trump announced his proposal for a military display and presidential speech on the National Mall, Trump’s critics across the political spectrum, have reached a consensus: The president’s intrusion into Independence Day is a hijacking. New York Times columnist Michelle Cottle complains that Trump is "trampling a longstanding tradition of keeping these events nonpartisan — apolitical even — and focused on bringing the nation together.” The same sentiment came from the Washington Post’s editorial page, and from conservative Trump skeptics like radio host Charlie Sykes and former GOP Congressman David Jolly.

It's true that the president has upended many of the traditions of the celebration; the location of the fireworks have been moved; the president has demanded a heavy military presence, including tanks in the streets of Washington, and he plans to deliver a speech in front of a crowd where the choicest locations will be reserved for ticket holders, a feature somewhat at odds with Trump’s rhetorical scorn for the elites and D.C. insiders.

By one measure, the criticism is overwrought. There have been presidents who've appeared during celebrations at the Capitol, most recently Harry Truman in 1951. President Richard Nixon offered up a videotaped speech aired on the Mall in 1970; other presidents, including Calvin Coolidge and John Kennedy, traveled to Philadelphia’s Independence Hall to mark the occasion. (If you want one measure of how far we have traveled since JFK’s time, note that he devoted much of his speech to celebrating the emerging European Union: “The United States looks on this vast new enterprise with hope and admiration,” JFK said “We do not regard a strong and united Europe as a rival but as a partner.”)

As for the parade—well, if Trump wants military armored vehicles to accompany the flyover by the Navy’s Blue Angels, stealth fighters and Air Force One, maybe he’s just trying to emulate Thomas Jefferson, who watched a military parade from the White House back in 1801, rather than the celebrations of military might more common to Moscow and Pyongyang.

And if Trump takes the opportunity to play politics with the speech, something he can rarely resist, it's worth keeping in mind that political parties have been using the Fourth of July celebrations as platforms ever since our first parties, the Federalists and Democratic-Republicans, began holding separate Independence Day events in several locations back in the 1790s.

Celebrations of the Fourth do not tend to benefit both parties equally, and here, Trump may well be demonstrating his instinctive grasp of which way a big event tends to nudge the populace. In 2011, two academics who studied the political effect of Fourth of July festivities concluded that: "Fourth of July celebrations in the United States shape the nation's political landscape by forming beliefs and increasing participation, primarily in favor of the Republican Party. … The political right has been more successful in appropriating American patriotism and its symbols during the 20th century, [so] there is a political congruence between the patriotism promoted on Fourth of July and the values associated with the Republican Party.”

So, yes, there's been plenty of ground laid for the kind of thing Trump plans to do.

For all that, history also suggests there's good reason that his plan is rubbing people the wrong way. For one, it really is rare; it's far more common for presidents to vacate Washington on the Fourth of July, or to remain at the White House, than to insert themselves into the proceedings.

And on a more troubling level, what Trump is doing is wreathing himself in the most potent symbols of American history—delivering a speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, site of the 1963 March on Washington, looking across at a landscape of monuments—without any appreciation for the history that made that whole landscape possible. Perhaps uniquely among American presidents, he sees himself without any connection to the American story, any link to presidents past, other than his manifest superiority to any of them.

Someone who can say of himself that he has been treated worse than any president in history—four of whom were assassinated—has an impressively unique understanding of his own role in the American story, to say the least. He has rarely if ever reached back to his predecessors to find any kind of meaningful historical connection, especially the kind that would reach across lines of party and ideology to find common national ground on a day like the Fourth. Kennedy often reached back to the first generation of American political leaders; Ronald Reagan quoted FDR and JFK in many of his addresses.

Trump prefers to think of himself as the lone, overarching figure who can bend history to his will. “I alone can fix it,” he said in his 2016 acceptance speech. Neither that speech, nor his inaugural, invoked the name of any past leader. He appears to believe that the American economy turned 180 degrees on the day of his inauguration, rather than moving on the same upward trajectory it had been on for the better part of a decade. Nor is he bound by the restraints that have guided his predecessors in understanding when partisan politics ought to give way to more unifying themes.

This is, after all, a president who went to a CIA commemoration of its fallen agents and bragged (falsely) about the size of his inaugural audience and the number of times he appeared on the cover of Time magazine. This is the president who has repeatedly made blatantly political arguments in speeches to different branches of the military, when his long line of predecessors as commander in chief all somehow managed to observe the bright line between national leadership and partisan brawling.

There’s also a more personal dimension to the Trumpification of the Fourth. Throughout his presidency, he has taken outsize delight in over-the-top celebrations and honors given him by foreign governments, a delight that seems to translate into bizarre foreign policies. Receive the Gold Medallion from Saudi Arabia, and you brush aside the kingdom's murder and dismemberment of an American resident. Enjoy lavish banquets in China, and the brutal crackdown on a million Uighurs goes unmentioned. Get a “beautiful letter” from Kim Jong Un and maybe North Korea can keep its nukes. (And would you really be totally shocked if Kim showed up at the White House to help Trump celebrate the Fourth?)

Trump has been obsessed by the idea of a massive military parade ever since attending the Bastille Day celebration in Paris two years ago, first ordering up a Veterans Day parade for 2018 that was canceled only after the price tag proved embarrassingly high. For someone who literally cannot grasp the possibility that more people voted for his opponent than him, or that fewer people came to his inaugural than his predecessor’s, it is not much of a reach to imagine that in the president’s mind he will see the flyovers and the fireworks as a nation paying tribute to the greatness of a man, rather than the other way around.

It is true that, on some public occasions, Trump has been able to subordinate this vanity to a sense of occasion, at least in his literal words. His speech in Normandy at the 75th anniversary of D-Day was an unexceptionable tribute to the men who stormed the beaches, although a different White House might have thought better of staging an interview with Fox News’ Laura Ingraham in front of a graveyard filled with the bodies of those men. He has delivered State of the Union speeches without describing Democrats in the House chamber as treasonous, or the media in the press sections as enemies of the people.

What remains unsettling, however, is the thoroughly reasonable conviction that when the president delivers such homilies, he has no real connection to those words. At any moment, it’s plausible to expect that the id will drive the superego from the podium, and the explosion of grievance, self-pity and rage will erupt—dominating a day that has in recent times been free of political division.

To be fair, however, that would not be the worst result of a presidential Fourth. Back in 1845, President James Polk presided over a fireworks display at the White House. During the festivities, 12 rockets were accidentally fired into the crowd, and two people were killed. If the worst thing that happens tomorrow is just a speech, we can be thankful for small favors.
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