AuthorTopic: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread  (Read 174535 times)

Offline RE

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Re: Today in Trump
« Reply #2160 on: October 17, 2019, 04:18:56 AM »
...and to all those Diner's and Walkabout Diner's who told me Trumpofsky wouldn't be impeached and/or wouldn't be beat in 2020, I just have 4 words.

I TOLD YOU SO.

I've followed this guy since  my days at Columbia.  He was a Train Wreck waiting to happen.

Fucking Mickey Mouse could beat El Trumpo at the polls now.

RE
« Last Edit: October 17, 2019, 04:54:31 AM by RE »
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Offline Surly1

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Re: Today in Trump
« Reply #2161 on: October 17, 2019, 05:35:52 AM »
...and to all those Diner's and Walkabout Diner's who told me Trumpofsky wouldn't be impeached and/or wouldn't be beat in 2020, I just have 4 words.

I TOLD YOU SO.

I've followed this guy since  my days at Columbia.  He was a Train Wreck waiting to happen.

Fucking Mickey Mouse could beat El Trumpo at the polls now.

RE

Not so fast, Sparky. He ain't gone yet. Plus a wounded, cornered animal is the most dangerous.
Keep an eye on those nukes at Incirlik.
And remember that in the bunker, Hitler said,

Quote
"Everyone has lied to me, everyone has deceived me… the SS has left me in the lurch. The German people have not fought heroically. It deserves to perish… it is not I who have lost the war, but the German people."

Since Mein Kampf is one of the few books that trump has read, I might expect no less from the Trumpenfuhrer.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline Surly1

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #2162 on: October 17, 2019, 05:49:14 AM »
Big news day yesterday in full core-breach meltdowns. Chernobyl-on-the-Potomac.

A couple of articles from Bill palmer.

Donald Trump launches berserk attack against General James Mattis as everything falls apart for him

Thus far today Donald Trump has attacked Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi to her face, publicly attacked his close ally Senator Lindsey Graham, and sought to undermine an overseas mission being carried out by Vice President Mike Pence. Trump is burning bridges as fast as he can, and now it turns out he’s decided to begin attacking the most respected former member of his administration, General James Mattis.

Donald Trump hurled such juvenile insults at Nancy Pelosi during their White House meeting about Syria, she and the House leadership ended up getting up and walking out. We know this because Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, and Steny Hoyer held a press conference afterward and revealed as much. But it turns out Trump used the meeting to also attack James Mattis, his former Secretary of Defense.

When Chuck Schumer cited General Mattis’ recent criticism of Trump’s Syria pullout, Trump insisted that Mattis was “the world’s most overrated general” and that he “wasn’t tough enough,” according to MSNBC’s Sam Stein. That’s right, the guy who faked bone spurs to avoid military service is now questioning the toughness of a guy who spent forty-five years serving his country.

Donald Trump is falling apart in real time, in almost unbelievably deranged fashion. At this point he’s resentfully attacking and belittling everyone around him, no matter what side they’re on. Trump knows his presidency is over, he knows he’s going to be indicted and arrested after he’s gone, and he’s going off on everyone involved.

* * *

Donald Trump, Bill Barr, and Steve Mnuchin all implicated in criminal scandal involving Turkish bank

Yesterday the SDNY criminally charged a Turkish bank for laundering millions of dollars in violation of U.S. sanctions against Iran. Palmer Report flagged this case as being important because the SDNY press release revealed that the money laundering operation had been run by Rudy Giuliani’s former legal client Reza Zarrab. Now it turns out this story is much larger than even we were expecting.

It turns out the SDNY wanted to bring these charges against the Turkish bank earlier, but Turkish President Erdogan asked Donald Trump back in April to block it from happening. Sure enough, according to a stunning new report from Bloomberg tonight, Trump told Erdogan that he would have Attorney General Bill Barr and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin make the case go away.

Considering that the charges weren’t brought against the Turkish bank until now, it’s pretty clear that Barr and Mnuchin did make the criminal charges go away, at least for several months. This means that Trump, Barr, and Mnuchin entered into a criminal conspiracy to obstruct justice. This is a felony no matter why they did it. When you throw in the fact that the case involved a Rudy Giuliani client, and Trump’s subsequent decision to do Turkey a huge favor by pulling out of northern Syria, the whole thing gets even uglier.

What stands out here is that the coverup is surfacing. Someone with knowledge of the Trump-Barr-Mnuchin scandal with Turkey has leaked it to the media in an apparent effort at sounding the alarm. Criminal coverups only work as long as the public doesn’t learn about them. This is going to be, at the least, another article of impeachment against Trump. It also guarantees that Barr and Mnuchin are now facing very long prison sentences, unless they cut plea deals or somehow convince Trump to pardon them.

* * *

Donald Trump throws unhinged Twitter tantrum about Nancy Pelosi after she exposes his meltdown

This afternoon Donald Trump went berserk and started attacking Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi to her face during a meeting that was supposed to be about Syria. Trump got so carried away with his attacks on Pelosi, the Democratic leadership got up and walked out of the meeting, before revealing some of the uglier details during a press conference. Now Trump is taking things to a whole new deranged level.

During the closed door meeting, Donald Trump called Nancy Pelosi a “third grade politician” (which we think was a misstatement of the phrase “third rate politician”), and accused Pelosi of liking ISIS because they’re “communists.” The guy is completely off his rocker, and clearly can’t control himself as what’s left of his presidency unravels in real time.

Now Trump has tweeted an image of Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, and Steny Hoyer looking vaguely unhappy, with the caption “Do you think they like me?” What is this guy, two years old? This butthead is supposed to be the President of the United States, and yet he’s acting like this toward the Speaker of the House, the third highest ranking elected member of the United States government.

Donald Trump is either escalating his maniacal behavior in real time because he’s sick of this crap and he’s trying to get Senate Republicans to sign on to his ouster, or Trump really is fully mentally compromised and it’s not an act. Either way, it’s time for his presidency to end. Senate Republicans know they can’t sit on their hands much longer, or they’ll lose their seats when they’re up for reelection.

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: Today in Trump
« Reply #2163 on: October 17, 2019, 05:50:40 AM »


Not so fast, Sparky. He ain't gone yet. Plus a wounded, cornered animal is the most dangerous.
Keep an eye on those nukes at Incirlik.
And remember that in the bunker, Hitler said,

Nostradamus RE PREDICTS!  :icon_mrgreen:

Quote
"Everyone has lied to me, everyone has deceived me… the SS has left me in the lurch. The German people have not fought heroically. It deserves to perish… it is not I who have lost the war, but the German people."

Quote
Since Mein Kampf is one of the few books that trump has read, I might expect no less from the Trumpenfuhrer.

I prefer the Captain Queeg metaphor.

"They fought me at every turn!...

It was the Strawberries!!"


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/-95QqBXLG2I" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/-95QqBXLG2I</a>

Can't wait to see him yank the metal balls out of his pocket.  ;D

RE
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🤡 Ambassador Sondland Throws Trump Under the Bus
« Reply #2164 on: October 17, 2019, 03:42:01 PM »
And he's not even charged with anything!  Wait until they start making plea deals!  This is gonna be FUN!  :icon_mrgreen:

RE

https://www.thedailybeast.com/sondland-throws-trump-under-the-bus

Ambassador Sondland Throws Trump Under the Bus

The U.S. ambassador to the EU will tell Congress that he was effectively forced to work with Rudy Giuliani on Ukraine by the president.
Jamie Ross  Betsy Swan  Spencer Ackerman
Updated 10.17.19 2:02PM ET / Published 10.17.19 10:08AM ET
REUTERS


Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, will tell Congress that President Donald Trump told him to help his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani with his plan on Ukraine.

In his opening statement, which was obtained by The Daily Beast, Sondland wrote that any plot to encourage a foreign government to influence an American election would have been “wrong.”

“I did not understand, until much later, that Mr. Giuliani’s agenda might have also included an effort to prompt the Ukrainians to investigate Vice President Biden or his son or to involve Ukrainians, directly or indirectly, in the President’s 2020 reelection campaign,” he will say, according to the written version of his opening statement.

    CHARGE D’AFFAIRES BIDEN
    The Weird Rise of Trump’s Ukraine Hatchet Man
    Adam Rawnsley

Sondland's role in the pressure campaign on the Ukrainian president was first revealed by The Daily Beast. He and Giuliani encouraged President Volodymyr Zelensky to publicly announce an investigation into the Bidens. It has been alleged that there was a quid pro quo whereby Zelensky would be rewarded by the White House with a meeting between the presidents in return for launching an investigation into one of Trump's potential 2020 rivals.

“Please know that I would not have recommended that Mr. Giuliani or any private citizen be involved in these foreign policy matters. However, given the President’s explicit direction, as well as the importance we attached to arranging a White House meeting between Presidents Trump and Zelensky, we agreed to do as President Trump directed,” Sondland wrote.

“Based on the President’s direction, we were faced with a choice: We could abandon the goal of a White House meeting for President Zelensky, which we all believed was crucial to strengthening U.S.-Ukrainian ties and furthering long-held U.S. foreign policy goals in the region; or we could do as President Trump directed and talk to Mr. Giuliani to address the President’s concerns.”

The testimony describes how Trump's obsession with investigating his political rival put on hold Sondland's efforts to strengthen U.S. ties with Ukraine. Sondland will say he was “disappointed” that Trump wouldn't commit to a meeting with Zelensky until he spoke to Giuliani.

“It was apparent to all of us that the key to changing the President’s mind on Ukraine was Mr. Giuliani,” the statement reads. “It is my understanding that Energy Secretary Perry and Special Envoy Volker took the lead on reaching out to Mr. Giuliani, as the President had directed.”

According to the testimony, when he spoke to Giuliani it was made clear that Trump wanted a public statement from Zelensky “committing Ukraine to look into anticorruption issues.” Sondland will say: “Mr. Giuliani specifically mentioned the 2016 election (including the DNC server) and Burisma as two anticorruption investigatory topics of importance for the President.”

Burisma was the energy firm where, for five years, Hunter Biden served on the board. Trump has, with no evidence, repeatedly accused former Vice President Joe Biden of acting improperly to protect his son by urging the removal of Ukraine’s former general prosecutor, who was looking into money laundering allegations at the company at the time.

Aspects of Sondland’s opening statement raise questions about his candor. The former hotelier portrays Giuliani as the lever to moving Trump on Ukraine policy, something he describes in his statement as a priority of his ambassadorship. Yet he also claims not to “recall having met with Mr. Giuliani in person” and only communicating with him “a handful of times.”

Although Sondland describes an investigation of Burisma as important to Trump, as conveyed by Giuliani, Sondland claims not to have known about Hunter Biden’s place on the company’s board.
Related in Politics
The Weird Rise of Trump’s Ukraine Hatchet Man
Damning Trump Team Texts Detail Pressure Campaign on Ukraine
Trump Can Thank Giuliani’s War on Mueller for Ukraine Mess

Similarly, Sondland presents his now-famous instruction, revealed in text messages provided by former special envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker, to cease texting about a pressure campaign and to instead talk on the phone, as nothing more than a communications preference, rather than a belated reluctance to create a document of their conversation. “I simply prefer to talk rather than to text,” he says in his statement.

Sondland will testify that he was not on the Zelensky call and didn't see the transcript until September, when a truncated transcript was publicly released by the White House. Sondland will say that none of the summaries of the call he received before then mentioned Burisma or Biden, or suggested that Trump had made “any kind of request of President Zelensky.”

Sondland will say, “Let me state clearly: Inviting a foreign government to undertake investigations for the purpose of influencing an upcoming U.S. election would be wrong. Withholding foreign aid in order to pressure a foreign government to take such steps would be wrong.”

He'll add, “I did not and would not ever participate in such undertakings.”
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Offline RE

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🤡 Rick Perry announces plans to resign as energy secretary
« Reply #2165 on: October 17, 2019, 05:08:54 PM »
Another rat jumps ship!  ;D

RE

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🤡 The guardrails are off the Trump presidency
« Reply #2166 on: October 18, 2019, 05:47:11 AM »
https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/18/politics/donald-trump-impeachment-turkey-kurds-g7-mulvaney/index.html

The guardrails are off the Trump presidency
Stephen Collinson Profile

Analysis by Stephen Collinson, CNN

Updated 12:27 AM ET, Fri October 18, 2019

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/X19M-zA6WpI" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/X19M-zA6WpI</a>

Washington (CNN)Get over it.
That apt mission doctrine for a presidency blazing with abuses of power, conflicts of interest and unhinged behavior is the work of White House acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, whose barn burner of a briefing on a day of political train wrecks, staggering misdirection and reality bending sent a clear message.
Democrats can impeach President Donald Trump, Republicans can bemoan his betrayal of the Kurds and the media can fact-check him till the cows come home -- but nothing is going to restrain or moderate him. In fact, he's becoming ever more incorrigible.
The President's brazen willingness to do exactly what he wants -- key to his appeal to voters angry with the political establishment in 2016 -- shone through a wild few hours that briefly stole the spotlight from the Democratic impeachment inquiry.

Mulvaney brashly admits quid pro quo over Ukraine aid
Mulvaney brashly admits quid pro quo over Ukraine aid
First, Mulvaney blew away the cobwebs in the White House Briefing Room by announcing that the President would hold next year's G7 summit at his Doral resort in Florida.
Even for an administration that has redefined the concept of conflicts of interests, this is a staggering move. Mulvaney insisted with a straight face that Trump would not profit from the summit, even though millions of dollars from foreign delegations will flood into the coffers of the struggling resort and bring a worldwide branding boost.
Then Mulvaney made an even more unabashed declaration, admitting that Trump did freeze nearly $400 million in aid to coerce Ukraine into investigating his Democratic opponents.
"Get over it. There's going to be political influence in foreign policy," Mulvaney said, coining an instant classic phrase that will help historians understand the story of Trump's presidency. Trump's time in office embodies a defiant repudiation that this presidency should be subject to conventional standards of ethics and accountability.
The remark was so striking because suspicions that Trump had abused his power by pressuring Ukraine to fulfill his political wish list are at the center of the Democratic impeachment investigation of the President.
The President's blindsided lawyers may be behind a walk-back statement later issued by Mulvaney, in which he denied a quid pro quo with Ukraine, accusing the media of distorting comments he had made on live television -- where he had clearly been asked whether the administration had withheld funding for Ukraine for an investigation into the Democratic National Committee server and responded affirmatively.
The administration's approach -- including Mulvaney's denial -- seems to be rooted in a belief that conduct that would normally be viewed as corrupt or impeachable is just fine as long as it unfolds in full public view. It was much the same when Trump appeared on the South Lawn of the White House earlier this month and called on China to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son.
Such behavior is a lesson that when a politician is prepared to remove a fundamental underpinning of shame and ethics from his political personality, there's almost no limit to his destructive political behavior.
'A great day for civilization'
Pence announces Syria ceasefire that appears to give Turkey everything it wants
Pence announces Syria ceasefire that appears to give Turkey everything it wants
As Mulvaney combusted on live TV, Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo were in Turkey preparing to unveil a ceasefire deal over its incursion into northeastern Syria after talks with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.
"This is a great day for civilization," Trump proclaimed on Twitter. His victory was hollow, however, since the deal is merely aimed at tempering a military and humanitarian debacle that he had effectively greenlighted two weeks ago.
Pence, characteristically, ladled on praise for Trump in announcing a deal that appears to give Turkey everything it wants and to enshrine the betrayal of Kurdish anti-ISIS fighters, who the US has committed to escorting out of the border region.
Democratic Rep. Eliot Engel of New York, the chairman of the House Foreign Relations Committee, condemned the administration's efforts to frame a disaster as a triumph.
"The immediate cause of this crisis was President Trump's betrayal of our Kurdish partners, which set into motion a humanitarian crisis, a resurgence of ISIS, a strategic victory for Russia and Iran, and irreparable damage to America's standing in the world," Engel said in a statement.
"The President is an arsonist who later pretends to be a fireman."
An admiral's warning
Retired Navy Admiral: Our republic is under attack from President

Retired Navy Admiral: Our republic is under attack from President 05:02
Retired Adm. William McRaven, who oversaw the special forces raid that killed Osama bin Laden in 2011, has just penned a New York Times op-ed titled "Our Republic Is Under Attack From the President" and is accusing Trump of devastating American's constitutional infrastructure.
"If you want to destroy an organization, any organization, you destroy it from within. You destroy it from without. Then what you do is you convince everybody you're doing the right thing," McRaven told CNN's Jake Tapper on "The Lead" on Thursday.
McRaven accused Trump of undermining the intelligence community, law enforcement, the Department of Justice, the State Department, the press, America's Kurdish allies, its NATO friends and international treaties.
"I think Trump forgets that we are a nation of values. That we are not just transactional. He's a transactional President," he said.
Normally, it would be remarkable for an American military hero to make such a comment. But such is the tumult whipped up by Trump that his words will probably just get lost in the cacophony.
And it's not just McRaven who is concerned.
Some congressional Republicans are privately alarmed about Trump's conduct this week and what House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called a "meltdown" at the White House on Wednesday.
A source with knowledge of the meeting told CNN's Jamie Gangel that participants were "shell-shocked" and "shaken" by the President's behavior.
Thursday's turbulence took the already manic absurdity of the last few weeks up a few notches. After all, Trump ignited an international crisis by paving the way for Turkey's Syria invasion -- and in a bizarre reality-show stunt at the White House tried to bring together a British family with the wife of a US diplomat involved in a car crash that killed their son.
This week's turmoil has unfolded as the Democratic impeachment inquiry has raced ahead, acquiring damning testimony about an off-the-books foreign policy operation in Ukraine involving Rudy Giuliani that some alarmed officials feared broke the law.
In the latest blockbuster testimony, the US ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland, spent 10 hours before three House committees on Thursday.
The hotelier and Republican donor said he had been directed by Trump to work with Giuliani -- who was trying to dig up dirt on Biden -- in Ukraine.
Sondland's testimony, in an opening statement provided to CNN, shows Trump put on hold an effort to strengthen relations with Ukraine until top US officials were in contact with Giuliani.

Revelations about Trump's back-door Ukraine policy shop may have been one reason why Mulvaney decided Thursday to make such a public omission, even if he later walked it back.
But they are yet another indication of Trump's determination to subvert the conventions and guardrails that have governed the presidency for generations.
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Offline Surly1

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Trump Believes He Has a Mandate for Tyranny
« Reply #2167 on: October 18, 2019, 04:33:28 PM »
Trump Believes He Has a Mandate for Tyranny


White House acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney articulated the eternal message of Team Trump when faced by critics: “Get over it.” Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Sometimes a basic truth about politics or life, or political life, is staring you right in the face and you don’t see it, but it becomes obvious when someone points it out. That’s how I felt with a column from David Graham, who used this week’s bizarre press conference from acting White House chief of staff Mike Mulvaney to make a more general point about Team Donald Trump:

Who knows what acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney had in mind when he stepped to a lectern in the White House briefing room Thursday? (Not Trump’s legal team, apparently.) Whatever his goal, Mulvaney delivered a succinct credo for both the Trump administration and the Trump 2020 campaign.

“I have news for everybody: Get over it,” Mulvaney said …

“There’s going to be political influence in foreign policy,” Mulvaney chided reporters. “That is going to happen. Elections have consequences, and the foreign policy is going to change from the Obama administration to the Trump administration.”

As Graham notes, all the furor over the immediate impact of Mulvaney’s comments — which admitted a quid pro quo in Trump and his representatives’ communications with Ukrainian officials — may have obscured the fact that this is generally the White House’s attitude about everything strange or illegal or reckless this president does.

Mulvaney’s comments weren’t just more revealing than he intended about the specifics of the Ukraine scandal. They also distilled the guiding mantra of the Trump administration. Others have tried to coin their own phrases (one senior administration official tried to make “We’re America, bitch” happen, and failed), but the real Trump doctrine is “Get over it.”

The administration is forcing foreign governments into quid pro quos in order to assist Trump’s political prospects? Get over it.

It’s using the power of the presidency to financially benefit the president and his company? Get over it.

It obstructed justice and has announced its intention to do so again? Get over it.

It circumvented Congress’s power of the purse to begin construction of a border wall? Get over it.

It separated children from families at the border, locking them in inhumane conditions? Get over it.

The president is evading Senate confirmation by naming “acting” officials to top posts? Get over it.

Russia hacked the 2016 election? Get over it.

The prevailing message, in case you have missed it, is that having won the presidency in 2016 (by the skin of his teeth and enormous luck, of course, whether or not you believe Russia had something to do with it) everything he wants to do is mandated, and any resistance is an effort to overturn the election results — i.e., a “coup.” This would most obviously include an impeachment effort, which is designed to end Trump’s imperial reign before his full term has ended. The very unlikelihood of Trump’s initial election makes it, in his mind and that of many of his supporters, even more of a wondrous thing that should dispel all criticism of the stable genius who accomplished it — and explains all objections to his conduct as sour grapes.

That there are constitutional limits on presidential powers doesn’t enter into the equation — that’s a technical detail of interest only to his armies of lawyers who daily do battle with “activist judges” who also haven’t accepted the Historic Victory of 2016. That the Democrats who control one branch of Congress, and the media who aren’t part of his personal echo chamber, have their own constitutionally sanctioned role to play, doesn’t enter into Trumpian calculations at all. From that perspective, of courseimpeachment is “unconstitutional,” despite the clear language of the Constitution providing for it.

You get the sense that if, despite it all, Trump is reelected next year, the four ensuing years would take this administration down a long dark path of vindictive and even more reckless behavior. And why not? If the initial “mandate” from the electorate is regarded as virtually unlimited, a reconfirmation of his presidency after he has fully displayed his contempt for any curbs on his power and his corrupt cronyism must surely make him a colossus bestride a supine nation that has acknowledged his greatness. I don’t know if during the 2020 campaign Democrats can find a way to articulate this “you ain’t seen nothing yet” concern, or convince Americans that a vote for Trump is a vote for a much wilder and megalomanic president than they have previously seen. But if the 45th president survives both impeachment and 2020, and is in a position to enjoy fully the “consequences” of not one but two elections, the norms he might then break are beyond imagining. And Trump critics would simply have to “get over it.”

"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

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https://www.vox.com/2019/10/18/20920715/trump-dallas-rally-impeachment-pushback-schiff


President Trump arrives for a “Keep America Great” campaign rally at American Airlines Center in Dallas, Texas on October 17, 2019. Tom Pennington/Getty Images

Trump’s Dallas rally showed how untethered from reality his impeachment pushback is

It’s little more than lies and gaslighting.
By Aaron Rupar@atrupar Oct 18, 2019, 2:20pm EDT
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Acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney’s disastrous press briefing on Thursday was a prime example of how the White House is struggling to explain President Donald Trump’s efforts in Ukraine in a way that isn’t tantamount to a confession. But Trump’s rally a few hours later in Dallas indicated the president isn’t doing a much better job.

Thursday night, Trump didn’t try to defend his efforts to cajole the Ukrainian government to undertake politically beneficial investigations — efforts that have prompted an impeachment inquiry. Instead, he made stuff up about House Intelligence Chair Adam Schiff (D-CA), attacked a whistleblower whose core allegations have already been corroborated by the White House, and suggested his handpicked intelligence community inspector general is conspiring against him. None of these talking points can withstand the slightest bit of scrutiny.
Trump’s attacks on Schiff are at odds with reality

For weeks now, Trump has been lying about what happened during a September 26 House Intelligence Committee hearing featuring testimony from acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire.

Schiff opened that hearing by paraphrasing “the essence” of what Trump said to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky during the fateful late-July phone call in which Trump used American military aid as leverage to get the Ukrainian government to undertake politicized investigations. Schiff’s approach wasn’t just unnecessary — the White House’s own summary of the call was damning enough — it was also an unfortunate one, as it provided Trump and his defenders with an opportunity to deflect from the substance of the scandal.

Not only has Trump attacked Schiff over the incident, but he’s gone far further and absurdly characterized his paraphrasing as a criminal act that’s tantamount to treason. And on Thursday in Dallas, unloading on Schiff was one of the main talking points Trump used to frame the entire impeachment proceeding as a fraud.

“[Schiff] makes up my conversation which was perfect; he makes up my conversation,” Trump said. “He sees what I said — it doesn’t play well because it was perfect — so he made up a totally false conversations with the Ukrainian president. And we caught him cold. Everybody knew it anyway.”

“I want to get him before Congress, and I want to see what he has to say,” Trump added. “You know, they say he has immunity. Why do you have immunity for outright fraud? He’s a fraud!”

Seeing as how there’s video of the hearing in question, Trump’s talking point represents an especially egregious effort at gaslighting the public. But since his actions are so hard to defend on the merits, gaslighting appears to be all Trump has.
Trump’s attacks on the whistleblower continue to entirely miss the point

After attacking Schiff, Trump turned his fire on the intelligence community whistleblower who first sounded the alarm about Trump’s dealings and the inspector general who found his account to be credible.

“The whistleblower got it all wrong! Who’s the whistleblower? Who’s the whistleblower?” Trump said. “We have to know. Is the whistleblower a spy? And who is the IG that did this? All he had to do is look at the tape, or look at what they wrote down — the transcribed version of the phone call — compare that to the whistleblower’s account, and you see if had nothing to do with it. So why did the IG allow a thing like this to happen to our country? Why? Why?”

But as I detailed weeks ago, Trump’s attacks on the whistleblower completely miss the point because his core allegations about the July call and the White House’s efforts to cover it up have already been corroborated by the White House itself. And the impeachment-related hearings that have been held in recent days with key players in the Ukraine saga have only further corroborated the whistleblower’s account about what happened during the call and the subsequent efforts to cover it up.

The fact of the matter is the whistleblower’s complaint has both proven to be broadly accurate, and it is also not central to public understanding of the Ukraine scandal. But instead of trying to explain the pattern that has emerged from House hearings, Trump is falling back on his familiar strategy of lashing out and making dark insinuations about deep-state conspiracies.

Along those lines, Trump’s insinuation that intelligence community Inspector General Michael Atkinson conspired against him is absurd on two fronts. First, Atkinson was appointed to his position by Trump in November 2017, so if the president doesn’t know who he is by now, he has nobody to blame but himself. Secondly, the House hearings have made it abundantly clear that Atkinson made the only reasonable judgment possible in finding the whistleblower complaint to be credible.

Despite the flimsiness of his anti-impeachment talking points, Trump’s Dallas audience ate them up, chanting “drain the swamp!” and booing on cue as Trump lambasted Democrats. While that might be enough for Trump’s base, it’s unlikely Trump will find many buyers of what he’s selling among the unconverted.

Indeed, during a CNN interview on Friday, Republican Rep. Francis Rooney (FL) indicated that he doesn’t find Trump’s explanations for why he tried to get the Ukrainian government to undertake politically useful investigations to be persuasive. He thinks House Speaker Nancy Pelosi “has a point” in linking Trump’s efforts to enlist Ukraine’s help in undercutting the Russia investigation to his ongoing, broader affinity for Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Rooney is just one House Republican, but his willingness to publicly rebuke the president suggests patience is growing thin with Trump’s unpersuasive efforts to defend the indefensible, even among the GOP rank and file.
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Offline Surly1

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #2169 on: October 19, 2019, 01:53:06 AM »



The Kyiv Post did a clear overview of the shady characters involved in the Ukraine scandal that’s at the center of Donald Trump’s impeachment. However, it forgot to include the chief strategist who continues to be at the core of this faltering playbook - Paul Manafort.

As I have been warning journalists since 2018 (it took them over a year to catch up) Paul Manafort has been fully operational from prison working with Giuliani. Until July 2018, Manafort was confined in a low security prison that provided him computer access, now he communicates with Giuliani (and thereby, Trump) from prison via his lawyer, same legal team representing Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, Giuliani’s close associates who were arrested a couple weeks ago when trying to leave the country on one way tickets to Vienna to meet with Manafort’s former close associate Ukrainian oligarch Dmitri Firtash who is awaiting extradition to the US. They tried to leave the US the night before their Congressional impeachment hearings, Giuliani was scheduled to leave on a one way ticket the following day but discovered that wasn’t a good idea given the circumstances. Since then it’s been reported that Giuliani was a target of a big counter intelligence covert investigation linked to his organized crime work and the Ukraine scandal.

This Ukraine scandal is not only about orchestrating massive foreign interference in the 2020 election to help Trump but was intended to provide the optics for a pardon for Paul Manafort. Russian media made this very clear earlier this year. This has also been made clear by Giuliani himself in May when he admitted to a NYT journalist that he was coordinating the Ukraine strategy with Manafort from prison as part of his defense.

Why is this significant? Paul Manafort is Putin’s top American political influence peddler. He’s the main guy who helps Putin prop up Kremlin backed candidates in Ukraine and in the US.

Putin - Manafort - Trump. Those are the main characters in this ongoing political warfare attack on the US. Giuliani has had to pick up a lot of his work since Manafort got tied up in prison, and he’s not nearly as good despite running in Russian and Ukrainian mafia circles for decades. It now involves Mike Pence, Bill Barr, Mike Pompeo, Rick Perry, Mick Mulvaney and others. No doubt Manafort is frustrated by these turn of events going south and that he can’t be more hands on, and no doubt Putin wants his guy freed too.

The Kyiv Post remains the top news organization on anything Ukraine related. It’s editors and journalists are top notch and continue to break stories well in advance of US media as they relate to Ukraine and Russia. Kudos for this fantastic graphic, despite that it’s missing Manafort.
"It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse." -Ezra Pound

Offline RE

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #2170 on: October 19, 2019, 02:55:06 AM »
Not to mention, Pauly's only hope of getting out of the Joint is a Pardon from El Trumpo.

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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #2171 on: October 19, 2019, 04:04:46 AM »
Want to bet that Trump pardons everybody even remotely connected before he gets out (except maybe Cohen?). AND then Pence pardons him??
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Re: 🤡 Trumpty-Dumpty POTUS Thread
« Reply #2172 on: October 19, 2019, 04:40:20 AM »
Want to bet that Trump pardons everybody even remotely connected before he gets out (except maybe Cohen?). AND then Pence pardons him??
AJ

AKA, "Pulls a Nixon"?  lol.

It's possible, but Tricky Dick got away with it because he agreed to RESIGN.  He didn't get impeached.  Trumpovetsky will never agree to resign, he's too confrontational.

So, in order to pull this off, His Trumpness would have to do it BEFORE the trial in the Senate.  That action would flip enough Senate Repugnants to vote to CONVICT, there are already many of them wobbling as a matter of self-preservation.  So it's a matter of shooting himself in the foot.

After impeachment, there are many NEW charges these criminals can be charged with being revealed, so back to the pokey they go.

What I would not be surprised about is if Rudi NEVER turns up again, being fitted with Cement Galoshes by the shoemaker Vlad the Impaler.

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🤡 White House staggers after tumultuous 48 hours
« Reply #2173 on: October 20, 2019, 12:58:22 AM »
https://thehill.com/homenews/administration/466539-white-house-staggers-after-tumultuous-48-hour-hours

White House staggers after tumultuous 48 hours
By Morgan Chalfant and Brett Samuels - 10/19/19 05:42 PM EDT


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The White House is slumping into the weekend after one of the most difficult 48-hour periods in President Trump’s tumultuous term of office.

Wednesday and Thursday produced a slew of damaging headlines for an administration battling an impeachment push by Democrats and a revolt by Republicans over the president’s handling of foreign affairs.

If all that wasn’t enough, the White House also announced long-anticipated plans to hold the next Group of Seven (G-7) summit at a Trump-branded property in Miami, dismissing criticism that doing so would raise emoluments issues.

The crescendo came Thursday when the White House’s acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, in an on-camera press conference to announce the G-7 decision, said the president had held up security aid to Ukraine partly to pressure the country to investigate a conspiracy theory undermining the conclusion that Russia interfered in the 2016 election.

Mulvaney walked back the remarks hours later, blaming the media for the storm. But in one swoop, the chief of staff had given Democrats fodder and undermined weeks of administration talking points that there had been no quid pro quo on Ukraine.

“I didn't find it the least bit credible,” House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) said Friday when asked about Mulvaney’s walk-back.

Mulvaney’s remarks came as witness after witness appeared behind closed doors with Schiff and other lawmakers to talk about the administration’s actions in Ukraine, despite a White House letter to Democrats last week that pledged an end to cooperation with the probe.

Many of those testifying have served up more damaging headlines for Trump — including U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland, a donor to Trump whose testimony, it was thought, might be more helpful to the White House.

Even as it dealt with the impeachment circus, Trump’s advisers were trying to sell skeptical Republicans on a cease-fire deal with Turkey as a win.

This only churned up fresh criticism over the president’s decision to withdraw U.S. troops from northern Syria, which various Republicans and outside observers have criticized as an abandonment of Kurdish allies, a ceding of U.S. power and an act that have given new energy to ISIS.

In a rare rebuke of Trump, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) penned an op-ed in The Washington Post on Friday afternoon labeling the withdrawal of U.S. forces from Syria a “grave strategic mistake.”

“The combination of a U.S. pullback and the escalating Turkish-Kurdish hostilities is creating a strategic nightmare for our country,” McConnell wrote in the op-ed, which did not mention Trump’s name. “Even if the five-day cease-fire announced Thursday holds, events of the past week have set back the United States’ campaign against the Islamic State and other terrorists.”

There is no link between impeachment and the crisis in Syria, but it is hard not to see political connections between the two. And the Syria fight certainly does not make it easier for Republicans to defend Trump on impeachment.

Rep. Francis Rooney (R-Fla.) called Mulvaney’s reversal “shocking” and declined to rule out that Trump’s actions amounted to an impeachable offense.

“I don’t think this is as much as Richard Nixon did, but I’m very mindful of the fact that back during Watergate everybody said, ‘Oh it’s a witch hunt to get Nixon,’” Rooney said Friday on CNN. “Turns out, it wasn’t a witch hunt. It was absolutely correct.”

Former Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a frequent Trump critic, said he’d back impeaching Trump on Friday.

“Look, I fought with people on air over, ‘Is there a quid pro quo’ and ‘Does this rise to the level of impeachment.’ I now believe that it does,” Kasich said during an interview on CNN on Friday. “And I say it with great sadness. This is not something I really wanted to do.”

While Republicans in the Senate are highly unlikely to support impeaching the president, some say they may be less willing to defend him as he disregards their opinions on foreign policy.

“I don’t think it directly makes it more likely that he’ll be removed from office. I do think it makes his political standing significantly weaker in the Senate,” said GOP strategist Alex Conant, who served as communications director for Sen. Marco Rubio’s (R-Fla.) 2016 campaign.

“He wants Republican senators out there defending him on impeachment, not attacking him over the Kurds.”

The narrative could worsen for the White House in the near future.

Congress is still mulling sanctions legislation against Turkey that would force Trump’s hand even as he boasts about his agreement.

The House committees leading the impeachment inquiry are expected to interview several more administration officials next week, which could produce additional damaging testimony.

And former Trump officials appear comfortable speaking out against the president. Ex-Defense Secretary James Mattis uncharacteristically mocked the president during a gala appearance on Thursday night after Trump called the retired general “overrated.”

Energy Secretary Rick Perry told Trump on Thursday that he will resign in the coming months. But Perry, who has been a recurring figure in the Ukraine controversy, has been willing to defend the president thus far and would not commit to cooperating in the Democratic probe.

“It’s awesome,” Perry said of his relationship with Trump. “He never ceases to amaze me.”
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Offline RE

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🤡 Anderson Cooper mocks White House press secretary's Mulvaney story
« Reply #2174 on: October 20, 2019, 01:21:21 PM »
Actually, it's more Stephanie Grisham that AC mocks in this edition of The Ridiculist. Whoever titled this vid for CNN is not paying attention. lol.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/C5WoAlkmGUg" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/C5WoAlkmGUg</a>

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